Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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DIAMONDS-GIRLS BEST FRIEND
Baseball diamonds are no longer a refuge for the male athlete. The
latest in local baseball is UF's batgirl; a volunteer coed short of
skirt, but long on loyalty. Cheryl Mays (above) watches action on
home base Saturday as the Gators opened their season with a 4-0
whitewas of South Florida. See story on page 17.

Dorm Residents
To Get In Swim

See Related Stories Page 2
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Two swimming pools, one
serving the Broward-Yulee area,
and another by the
Graham-Tolbert west campus
dormitories, were approved for
construction Friday by the
Board of Regents.
Construction should begin
within 60 days, as soon as the
bids are let.
Estimated cost. of the two
pools and related facilities will
be $150,000. Funds for the
projects will come from housing
improvement accounts, of the
Division of Housing.
The pools will be the second
and third constructed on
campus. At present, the only
pool serving the campus was
built in 1928 for a student
population of 2,200. It now
serves for intercollegiate,
physical education and
recreational swimming.
The pool project is a joint
effort of UFs housing division
and Student Government. UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
presented the proposal for the

pools at the Friday regents
meeting.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor planned at the
beginning of his term of office
(SEE 'POOL' PAGE 2)

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SSOC DEMONSTRATORS STAGE SIT-IN ON SECOND FLOOR OF TIGERT HALL T M KENNEDY

AFTER YEARS SERVICE

Zinober To Leave Court

Peter W. Zinober, Chancellor of the Honor Court, said Sunday he
will resign his post if SG will appoint his replacement.
Zinober has served as Chancellor of the Honor Court since
February, 1968.
Scheduled to graduate in March, Zinober stated in a letter to
Student Body President Clyde Taylor that due to his graduation from
the College of Law he will not be eligible to complete his term as
chancellor.
He recommended that Elliott Zack, president of the Honor Court
Bar Association, be appointed chancellor for the remainder of the
term.
Presently Vice Chancellor of Honor Court, Zack has held the
offices of chief defense investigator, assistant chief defense counsel,
and chief defense counsel of Honor Court.
Zack will receive his Juris Doctor from the UF Law School this
June.
The Student Body Constitution directs the President of SG, with,
majority consent of the justices, to appoint a new chancellor.

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 99 University of Florida, Gainesville Monday, March 10, 1969

STUDY-IN PLANNED
SSOC Declares Itself
'Officially Recognized

See Related Stories Page 3
By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer
Denied recognition by the UF
administration, the Southern
Students Organizing Committee
Sunday declared itself an
officially recognized campus
organization.
In a statement released
Sunday afternoon, SSOC
spokesmen said they did not
recognize UF President Stephen
C. OConnells authority to
exercise any form of dictatorial
power.
They also said since SSOC
was supported by the
Committee on Student
Organizations, Student
Government and numerous
other student organizations,

America's Number 1 College Daily

SSOC thereby declared itself an
officially recognized student
organization.
SSOC leaders said they felt
they were officially recognized
in the sense that we are
recognized by the people that
count the students.
They claimed the right to
use University of Florida
facilities under SSOC
sponsorship.
A study-in will be held
outside OConnells office from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Wednesday.
The statement said the
study-in was to emphasize the
following five demands:
f an effective and
responsible Student Government
that would have ultimate say
over all areas of student
activities;

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PETE ZINOBER
. ...asks for replacement

no internal or external
investigations of students or
faculty because of their political
views or affiliations;
a public apology from
OConnell to Dr. Kenneth
Megill;
no city, county or state
police on the University of
Florida campus;
and campus police
disarmament.
Steve Fahrer, chairman of the
SSOC steering committee, said
OConnell should apologize to
Megill for the investigation
touched off by Sen. Tom Slades
letter of Feb. 10.
A teach-in to honor D.
Burke Kibler, chairman of the
Board of Regents, who will be
speaking on campus, has been
called for Thursday afternoon at
(SEE 'SSOC' PAGE 2)



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10, 1969

RegentsChartering Policy Under orudy

ByCAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
An early morning meeting
Friday of members of the Board
of Regents, Chancellor of
Universities Robert Mautz and
student representatives from six
state university campuses may
have punched a hole in the dike
of the State Board of Regents
policy.
The regents current
controversial policy on the
chartering of student
organizations by the university is
now being studied by a
committee composed of three
regents, student government
representatives from UF, Florida
State, West Florida, South
Florida, Florida Atlantic, and

Opinion Divided
On SSOC Flap

A random opinion poll of 30
UF students shows that they are
evenly divided in their support
of UF President Stephen C.
OConnells rejection of the
SSOC charter last week.
One student who disagreed
with OConnells decision said
since the group is a segment of
the student population it should
be recognized.
A student who agreed with
SSOC Issues
Statement
f FROM PA6E OWE
2:15 in the Plaza of the
Americas.
The SSOC statement said the
purpose of the teach-in is to
explain how Kiblers position is
utilized to maintain the unfree,
undemocratic atmosphere at the
institutions of higher learning in
this state.
Following the teach-in, SSOC
members will attend Kiblers
speech which is open to the
public. He is speaking in the
Reitz Union at the Phi Kappa
Phi initiation banquet.

Pool Construction Approved

f BOM PAGE OHt
to place primary emphasis on
on-campus recreation
improvements; rather than Lake
Wauburg. Now that the housing
division is paying for the pools,
SG funds earmarked for that
purpose will probably go for
Wauburg improvements.
The pools will not be
Olympic size, but will be heated,
greatly extending their period of
jiu> kw ctiuionte I IPe nrpcpnt

7 i
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
5 The Fiorida Aiiigator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away -copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertisin Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

BROAD COMMITTEE SET VP FRIDAY

Florida A & M Universities, and
one SSOC or SDS spokesman
from UF and FSU.
Clyde Taylor, president of the
UF student body, and Manny
James, president of Florida Blue
Key, met with Chairman of the
Board of Regents D. Burke
Kibler and Mautz in Tampa
Friday morning to discuss the
disturbances on the UF campus
after UF President Stephen C.
OConnell denied charter to the
SSOC Wednesday.
Mautz told the Alligator
Sunday that he felt the meeting
was vital in Kiblers decision to
restudy the regents present
position.
I think Kibler regrets the
disturbances youve been having
and regrets that they were

the decision said since SSOC
behaved irresponsibly on other
campuses it should not be
allowed here.
When asked if they thought
OConnells decision was free
from outside influence, a great
majority of the students said it
was not. Most students said he
was influenced directly by the
Board of Regents and at least
indirectly by the public.
A majority of students
thought that organizations not
made up totally of students
should not be allowed on
campus, but since there are
many organizations on campus
that have non-student
membership, this was not a good
enough reason to deny the SSOC
charter.
Two-thirds of the students
said the administration should
not make the Final decision on
granting charters. Many
commented that the students
should have at least equal voice
in the decision.
The students almost
unanimously approved the
protest action taken by the
SSOC and other students
because it was non-violent and
didnt cause any real trouble.

facility is not heated.
Size of the facilities will be
45x 100. The pools will be
constructed in two sections; a
45x75 swimming area, and a
45x25 diving area.
Initial facilities to be included
with the pools will be large deck
areas, rest rooms, and barbeque
pits.
According to UF Housing
Director Harold Riker, handball
and volleyball courts will follow
within the same area as soon as
funds arp. availahlr*

necessary, Mautz said.
However, he strongly backs the
presidents in their decisions.
Mautz refered to the decision
of Florida State University
President Stanley Marshall to
deny charter to the SDS at FSU
last week, as well as OConnells
decision here.
Whether the presidents
should be backed under the
current board policies and
whether these policies should be
changed are two separate
questions, Mautz said.
He denounced people who
insist it must be my way or else
they are in the threat business.
However, he feels cooler
heads will prevail when the
issue has a chance to be thought
out.

CSBP Wants New Policy

By USF Oracle
TAMPA The Board of Regents Friday said
it will study a request by the Council of Student
Body Presidents (CSBP) that the universities not
be required to recognize and approve student
organizations.
The request came at tlie end of the Regents
regular monthly meeting on the University of
South Florida campus.
The CSBP requested a policy consisting of
solely registration for campus organizations be
instituted in place of the present system of
university recognition and approval.
The request comes in the wake of student
protests at Florida State University over the
denial of campus recognition to the Students for
a Democratic Society, and over UF President
Stephen C. OConnells denial of recognition to
the Southern Students Organizing Committee.
A similar application by SDS was turned
down at USF last June.

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I think in the long run these
students will abide by the rules
and regulations of the university
and will use only legal measures
to bring their cause before the
Board of Regents, Mautz said
of the SSOC threats to
demonstrate when Kibler
appears on campus later this
week.
James agreed that the regents
may have been persuaded to see
the viewpoint of UF student
-leaders in their support of
SSOCs right to be recognized.
The main Board of Regents
hang-up was their application of
all thought to this one instance
with SSOC, James said. Once
the SSOC issue is solved I think
we can work something out with
the board.

Regents Chairman D. Burke Kibler referred
the CSBP request to a committee to be chaired
by former Regents Chairman Chester Ferguson
of Tampa. Regents Dr. Louis Murray of Orlando,
Mrs. E.D. Pearce of Pensacola, Henry Kramer of
Jacksonville and Julius Parker of Tallahassee fill
out the committee.
Kibler also invited the CSBP and one
member from each dissident group to sit in on
the committee hearings.
Kibler said we do not want to be intolerant
and said any student petition that goes through
the proper channels and is reasonably
presented would get the attention of the board.
He did not set a deadline for the committee to
report.
Student Body President Clyde Taylor said the
CSBP had worked with the Regents before and
such talks were fruitful. He expressed his
confidence that the next round would produce
good results.

James said that as long as
SSOC continues its threats of
further action, npthing will get
done by the regents.
He also said that Student
Government was not going to
continue losing any more sleep,
or wasting any more time or
money trying to work anything
out when SSOC refuses to
negotiate.
When SSOC is willing to sit
down and talk with student
leaders I think we can work out
' a policy acceptable to the
regents, James said.
James said Mautz was very
receptive to the students ideas
to take the regents out of the
chartering business. He said
Kiblers reaction was so-so.



Psuedo Red-Baiter No Riaht-Wina Radical

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
While student protestors were
confronting UF President
Stephen C. OConnell in the
corridor outside his Tigert Hall
office Thursday afternoon, a
man who has been the focus of
campus dissent in the past
himself sat relaxing and talking
in his motel room a block away.
The man was Sen. Tom Slade,
R-Jacksonville.
Slade, whose letter to
OConnell Feb. 10 calling for the
immediate dismissal of
philosophy Asst. Prof. Kenneth
Megill caused a furor of reaction,
was in town on a junket of state
mental health and correctional
institutionals.
He had just come from a
walking tour of Sunland
Training Center, a mental
rehabilitation hospital in
northeast Gainesville.
Outside the 32-year-old
senators plush, deep-pile
carpeted room it was rainy and
stormy. A squall line was passing
through north central Florida.
Air temperature was 50 degrees.
Demonstrators, seeking cover
from the chilling rain, had earlier
huddled under the Research
Library colonade while listening
to speakers denounce the
establishment.
In an age of contrasts in
society, in generations, in
thought the contrast between
Slade in a warm room calmly
smoking and slowly sipping a
mixed drink, and the protests
being raised a few steps away in
the cold by students involved in
a revolution of ideas, was
wrought with irony.
As the rain splattered on his
room window overlooking the
pine-tree landscaped UF campus,
the casually dressed legislature
reflected on the activities of the
last month since his letter
reached OConnells desk, and
earlier had been widely
publicized through the state
press.
On the UF campus his letter
has been called an ultimatum.
He has been depicted as a
i red-baiter by campus leftists.
Slade took issue with these
accusations.
I am not a right-wing
radical, he told the Alligator. I
dont see a Communist under
every bush. I have no idea if
radicals are influenced by
Communists.
My letter to President
OConnell has been
misinterpreted as an ultimatum.
There should be no legislative
interference. But, we should not
tolerate an aura of anarchy,
either.
He went on to say that since
legislators were elected to
represent state taxpayers, they
had a right to voice opposition
to campus dissent.
His complaint against
radicals, he said, was not because
he thought they are
communist-linked, but because
they advocated takeover of
campus administration.
As he spoke, members and
supports of Southern Students
Organizing Committee were
maintaining their sit-in along the
hall outside OConnells second
floor office.

\ 1 I iur; H( >l

They were protesting SSOC's
right to be recognized on
campus.
Slade looked out the window
behind him and onto the campus
in the distance. Through the
wind and sheets of rain it looked
peaceful.
He was interested in hearing
of the campus mood. When told
that radicals had a relatively
small following of 300 or 400
attending a Plaza of the
Americas rally earlier in the day,
he remained silent.
But, later he commented, It
would be extremely foolish not
to listen to student
recommendations, but they have
a responsibility to the man at
the helm OConnell.
In his dismissal letter, he took
a slap at OConnells Action

Tiqert Sit-In Lasts 3 Hours

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
, ?
A planned sit-in in the hall in
front of UF President Stephen
C. OConnells office in Tigert
Hall was called off less than
three hours after it began late
Friday afternoon.
Steve Fahrer, president of the

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KENNEDY
DEMONSTRATORS CROWD FLOORS OF TIGERT HALL
... protestors sang, talked, ate to pass the time

Hale Calls Protests Orderly

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
Vice President for Student Affairs Lester L. Hale
expressed relief Sunday that the campus protests
Thursday and Friday were orderly, and that no
action had to be taken by the authorities.
Hale said that as long as the planned SSOC vigil
outside of UF President Stephen C. OConnells
office this week did not obstruct the business of the
university no action will be taken.
If they simply exercise the freedom of
expression, they will not be disturbed, Hale said.
But if they become disorderly in any way it will be
handled in the appropriate manner.
Hale said the same would apply to the promised
SSOC demonstrations when Regents Chairman D.
Burke Kibler appears on campus Thursday:
Hale said OConnell knew his decision to deny
the SSOC university charter would be unpopular
and that there would be many who didnt
understand, but he hoped to explain the wiseness of
his decision.
I think he did this to a great extent this past

PROFILE
VViV/AVAWAVAVVIPA*.W.V.

Conference, saying its proposals
for rewording of the state
employe loyalty oath and for
unrestricted sale of student
literature on campus were not in
line with accpetable standards of
the university system.
He took a drag on his
cigarette and said, OConnell is
probably fair-minded enough to
listen to student complaints if
they act within the system. j
Slade measures education ii.
dollars and cents.
He pointed out that the state
spends SI,BOO a year per student
at each university. He repeated
his belief that students were
going to school to learn, not to
participate in demonstrations.
If they dont abide by the

Southern Students Organizing
Committee, and Dr. Kenneth
Megill urged the 50-75 students
to leave the building before the
7 p.m. closing time.
They said they expected
police to arrest everyone there
without warning.
We dont feel this is worth

150 STUDENTS DWINDLE

week, he said.
Hale said he didnt see what else OConnell could
have done in the investigation of philosophy
professor Kenneth Megill.
It was his responsibility to find out what the
facts were in the situation.
Hale said he was pleased with the student
leadership shown in the last few days.
While they disagreed with the president, they at
the same time disavowed any disruption and put
their request to the Board of Regents rather than
supporting the tactics of the SSOC, the vice
president said.
Hale denounced the inciting efforts of the
students who came from FSU to stir up the
emotions of the people here.
He referred to three SDS members arrested at
FSU last week for refusing to obey the court
injunction against using university facilities, who
spoke at SSOCs rallies Thrusday and Friday.
Hale questioned the SSOC demands that the
University Police be disarmed and said they are not
armed more than necessary.

rules, they can go somewhere
else.
If the state did not have such
a financial interest in state
education, he said that although
he may still disagree with what
dissenters say, he could not and
would not advocate legislative
interference.
UF gets 48 per cent of its
funds from the state. The rest
comes from private grants,
foundations, industry, federal
aid and student fees.
Slade is an engineer. He holds
a degree from Southern Institute
of Technology, a branch of
Georgia Tech. He owns several
Jacksonville based petroleum
products companies.
He was once active in
student politics at his alma
mater.
I was student body
president, he recalled.
However, because I had an
outside job, I could not

getting arrested over, Fahrer
said.
The group filed out and
gathered on the front steps.
The abortive sit-in began after
a rally on the Plaza of the
Americas. The rally which began
about 3 p.m. was less than an
hour old when Margaret
Hortenstine stepped to the mike

Monday, March 10,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

WMBL
SEN. TOM SLADE
... visits campus
have been president if the office
was demanding.
There are reports circulated
in state political circles that
Slade is a possible candidate for
either comptroller or treasurer in
1970.
When asked about his
political affairs, he only smiled.

and urged the 300 students
present to follow her to the
administration building.
Im tired of speeches, she
said. If we make any more I Ithink
think Ithink OConnell should hear
them. Lets to the Tigert.
Once inside they found
OConnells administrative
assistant, Mel Sharpe, standing at
the door to the presidents
office.
OConnell was in Tampa at a
meeting of the Board of
Regents, but his office was still
open.
About 150 students went
into the hall, but the group
dwindled to less than 100 soon.
When asked admittance into the
office, the students were told by
Sharpe they couldnt be
accommodated.
Sharpe closed the office at
about 4:10, 50 minutes before
the regular closing time saying
we cant get any work done
like this.
Fahrer then announced the
groups intention to remain in
the building until Thursday
when D. Burke Kibler, chairman
of the Board of Regents plans to
speak on campus.
Earlier at the rally Charles
Fulwood, minister of
informaiton for the Junta of
Military Organizations (JOMO)
told of far reaching plans to
organize a strike of university
employes, and told the basic
goals of JOMO, a Black Radical
group which attempts to
educated young blacks in their
history.
Also speaking at the rally was
student body president Clyde
Taylor, who told them he and
Manny James, Blue Key
president, had met with Kibler
and Robert Mautz, chancellor of
the state unversity system.
T ayioT s~aidr he had
recommended a new system of
recognizing student groups.
Taylor said the main problem
with the university system was
with the Board of Regents, and
not on the individual campuses.

Page 3



1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10,1969

Page 4

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MEMBERS OF THE STUDENT BODY:
At this moment political deals by the elite power groups of our campus ^^^HHRIB^BBH
are being made in an effort to put forth candidates for student body mmSEB"
president. And once again you the students will suffer. HHB||i
It is for this reason I have chosen to bring my candidacy for student body
president to you. I realize this is not traditional. But I am not a traditional
candidate. HhEM
Those few have met and are meeting in closed sessions to decide which
safe candidates can insure their vested interests.
I feel it is of utmost importance for you to have a choice.
I have been a student on this campus for six years. I have served under
four student body presidents. I have seen students constantly being used and
neglected while individuals and organizations further their own interests at
your expense.
I will not assume a position with any of the traditional candidates and
forsake your interests and trust.
I will bring an end to the political spoils system which has stifled student '**E
concern and initiative on our campus for so long. V gHo^Hf
Student Government has just recently begun to skim the surface of the EHiflP
real issues and problems facing our campus and community. Constructive EHajl
change has just begun to creep into the halls of student government. Help me
to insure its place and pace by becoming an Independent Student Seeking
United-Responsible Efforts in student government.
With your support I will continue to serve you and the University of i v
Florida. ; BBi
John Mica "fjw*
... s
Students
United Responsible Efforts
lEBr \ in Student government
U y -^4- r : -, -r PHONE 376-1970
Paid Politjcal Advertisement Paid for by 324-ISSUE MEMBERS



CLYDE TAYLOR SAYS

Forget SG Abolishment,
No Displeasure Exists

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President Clyde Taylor said
Thursday the abolishment of Student Government
need not be discussed anymore.
He claimed the results of Wednesdays SG
election showed no significant student displeasure
with the present SG.
A constitutional amendment to abolish SG was
defeated by a 2,257-826 vote Wednesday, the total
vote falling short of a required 25 per cent of the
student body needed to initiate the referendum.
He denied any rumors that the referendum to
abolish SG may appear on the April 24 presidential
election. Wednesdays election was the best chance
for the referendum, he said.
Student opinion on SSOC recognition and the
fate of the honor system at UF should be on the
next ballot.
Taylor said he would liket to see how much
student support for SSOC is at UF.
On Wednesday Taylor and other student leaders
came out in favor of chartering SSOC.
Student Body Vice President Gary Goodrich said
he was pleased with the outcome of the election.
We have heard so much from people who want

Next SG Administration Inherits
.£
Sticky Task Os Reorganization

The question of Student
Government reorganization will
be left for the next
administration to work out,
according to Mark Glick,
assistant to President Clyde
Taylor.
An invalid election, held
March 5, in which only 15 per
cent of the student body
participated, gave Student
Government a three to one vote
of confidence as to its existence.
However, 2,463 voted that
there was need to reform as
Accent Positions
Open For 1970
Applications for the positions
of chairman and vice chairman
of the Accent 1970 program
must be turned in by Thursday
at noon.
.Interested persons should turn
applications in at the Student
Activities Desk on the third
floor of the J. Wayne Reitz
Union.
A decision as to who will fill
the positions will be made by
the Public Functions Authority
on Thursday afternoon.

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opposed to only 360 who
thought the present organization
was working well.
Glick said there was no need
to hold such a referendum
election again. Anything we do
is futile, he said, until the
administration comes in. They
will have to make the decisions,
he said.
The election of a new
president, vice president and
senators will be held April 24.
The referendum vote was a
plank in Taylors campaign last


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to abolish Student Government, he said. But the
voters didnt turn out in droves to do anything
about it.
Goodrich said that because of the tricky
political games charge made by some students they
expected a bigger vote. That charge doesnt hold
much water.
He said he feels dedicated to a study of SG to
see in what areas it can be improved.
Student Senate President Jack Vaughn said the
small turnout at the elcection was disappointing.
But he thought the results of the election were
indicative of the feelings of the student body.
Vaughn said he supported the establishment of a
committee to study SG and hopes that the next SG
president will appoint members to serve on it.
Honor Court Chancellor Pete Zinober said the
826 votes to abolish SG were a protest against
politics in SG circles.
Many thought they were voting in a lost cause
election anyway so they just voted no.
A member of Honor Court, Zinober said, The
courts existence was not threatened Wednesday.
If SG had been abolished, we would have
become a branch under UF academic affairs.
He said someone has to determine the law
whether or not there is a SG.

year, when he promised to lay
Student Government on the line
at the end of his term of office.
Glick called the election more
of an opinion poll than anything
else. He said the reaction of
Student Government members
to the low turnout was
disgust.
He said it was evident that
students are apathetic to the
problem and that the issue
would be dropped now and left
until next year.

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Monday, March 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10,1969

Page 6

UC Resolution
Awaits Action
By VP Conner
The resolution to restructure
University College passed by the
Action Conference last month is
now on the desk of Vice
President for Academic Affairs
Frederick Conner.
However, Conner says he will
not act on it until he receives the
report from a committee
evaluating the college.
Conner personally favors
spreading general education
requirements over four years,
the first of four proposals in the
resolution, although he does not
know what effect it will have on
junior college transfers.
He is suspending action,
however, until the committee
headed by Dr. Hal Lewis,
chairman of the Action
Conference, submits its report.
Conner says he would be
greatly influenced by the
committees conclusions, which
he expects within a month.
Profs: No
Tests Given
This Week
The Office of Academic
Affairs is reminding all faculty
that no tests or papers are to be
given or assigned this week,
except for some laboratory
exams.
This policy stems from a
memorandum issued by former
UF President J. Wayne Reitz in
1967, which states that
widespread scheduling of final
examinations prior to the time
provided in the published
schedule of courses results in
considerable disruption of the
final week of classes and
hardship to the students
involved.
Take-home exams shall not
be due prior to the regularly
scheduled examination period.
Some lab exams are exempt
from this policy provided prior
approval has been received from
the Sub-committee on
Variations from the Published
Schedule of Courses of the
Schedule and Calendar
Committee.
Students may report
violations of this policy to their
dean, department chairman or
the Office of Academic Affairs.

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4

ON SSOC DISPUTE
JMBA Poll Seeks
Student Opinions

What UF students really feel
about the some of the issues
involved in the current Southern
Students Organizing Committee
charter dispute is the object of a
simple but incisive poll to be
taken today by the John
Marshall Bar Association
(JMBA).
Results will be made
immediately available to UF
President Stephen C. TVConnell,
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor and other
decision-makers who feel they
might benefit from knowing
how a representative cross
section of UF students feel.
The poll will run from
8:303:30 p.m. today. Copies
of the SSOC charter, their
petition for a charter, Vice
President of Student Affairs
Lester Hales recommendation
and OConnells Final opinion
will be posted around the law
school prior to the poll.
The JMBA will advocate no
stand, but is holding the poll to
offer something a little more
concrete.. and less emotional
than what heretofore has been
called the students opinion.
The three questions asked will
be:
Do you agree with the
objectives of the SSOC AS YOU
UNDERSTAND THEM? (yes or
no)
t Check one
[] I agree with President
OConnells decision to deny
SSOC a charter.
[] 1 feel President OConnell
should have approved the
charter with the understanding
that if SSOC violates university
standards, it will be treated like
any other chartered student
organization.
t Do you agree with the

following resolution?
[] Recognized organizations
would be eligible for funding by
Student Government and enjoy
the approving sanction of the
university. Clear standards must
be stated for qualifying as such
an organization.
[] Registered organizations
any student related
organizations would
automatically qualify as a
registered organization not
carrying the universitys
approval, ineligible for funding
by student government, but
eligible to use university
facilities. (yes, 1 favor this
resolution, no I favor the present
system, or no, I would prefer
some third alternative.)
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ISRAELI JETS DROP BOMBS

Egyptian Official Dead
After Suez Canal Duel

CAIRO (UPI) The Egyptian
chief of staff, Gen. Abdel
Moneim Riad was fatally
wounded Sunday during an
Arab-Israeli artillery duel across
the Suez Canal, it was officially
announced here.
Riad was second in comand of
Egypts armed forces and
Egypts top military strategist.
Egyptian and Israel artillery
dueled across the Suez Cani
Sunday for the second straight
day. Fires still raged through
Egyptian oil installations hit by
Israel gunners in Saturdays long
battle.
In Jerusalem Sunday, a hand
grenade exploded in a main
downtown street near police
headquarters, seriously injuring
three girls and two men,
authorities reported. Police said
the grenade was tossed by an
unidentified youth.
In Amman, a Jordanian
military spokeanan said two
Israeli jets flew across the Jordan
River and fired rockets and
dropped napalm bombs about
seven and one-half miles south
of the Sea of Galilee.
. 1 r- J rVr
Israeli military spokesmen in
Jerusalem said 14 soldiers were
wounded, two of them seriously
in Sundays fighting along the
canal before U.N. truce
observers arranged a cease-fire.

College Os Business
To Involve Students
The College of Business Administration will open its doors to more
student involvement in such areas as curriculum, counseling, and grade
appeals tonight in an open meeting at 7 in room 18 of Matherly Hall.
All business students are urged to attend the meeting where a
College Council, similar to the Arts and Science Council will be
discussed and possibly organized. Students will elect a committee to
represent them in talking with an already selected faculty committee.
Dr. Irving J. Goffman, chairman of the faculty committee, referred
to the meeting as a trial balloon to see how many students were
interested in having a bigger voice in their college.
In response to the Action Conference resolution urging colleges to
give students more influence in curriculum decisions, and to other
colleges who have set up councils, Dean Donald Hart appointed a
faculty committee two months ago to explore the areas where
students want more involvement.
The committee called in the presidents of all the honor societies of
the departments as an Ad Hoc committee. The open meeting was
called because the Ad Hoc committee didnt feel really representative
of the majority of the students.

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Earlier, it was announced that
one of the seven soldiers
wounded in Saturdays
fighting which Israelis said was
the worst along the waterway in
months had died of his
injuries.
The Israelis said Sundays
exchange lasted three hours and
25 minutes.
An Egyptian military
communique issued in Cairo
claimed 35 Israeli soldiers were
killed or wounded in the
five-hour artillery duel Saturday.
Egyptian casualties were
reported as one killed and 15
wounded.
Cairo radio made no mention
of casualties in reporting on the
fighting Sunday. It claimed two
Israeli helicopters had been shot
down while Egyptian artillery
knocked out numerous gun
positions on the Israeli-occupied
east bank of the canal.
The Cairo broadcasts also said
Israeli guns had set fire to oil
storage tanks in the Suez City
area, at the southern entrance to
the waterway. But it did not
make clear whether they were
fires touched off during the
fighting Sunday.
UPI correspondent Peter D.
Lych visited Suez City early
Sunday, before the guns opened
up again, and reported five fires
still burning on the Nasr and

Suez refineries on the outskirts
of the city. He said all five were
burning out of control, belching
smoke and flames high into the
skies and devouring thousands of
dollars worth of fuel in Egypts
two main refineries.
A sixth fire, started by the
Israeli shells at the Nasr refinery
was put out during the night,
Lynch reported. He added that
it was evident from a tour of the
refineries that Israeli gunners
had zeroed in on the oil tank
farms and could hit them any
time.
An Israeli spokesman claimed
Sundays exchange was touched
off by Egyptian small aims fire
on an Israeli patrol near port
Tewfic, adjacent to Suez City.
About 10 minutes later, he said,
Egyptian artillery opened up and
Israeli forces returned the fire.
The shooting began at 3:10
p.m. and stopped at 6:35 p.m.
after U.N. observers obtained a
cease-fire, the spokesman said.
Sundays battle erupted as
U.N. peace envoy Gunnar
Jarring arrived in Jerusalem on
his renewed mission to find a
political solution to the
Arab-Israeli dispute. He met
with Foreign Minister Abba
Eban but there was no
immediate report on their
conversations.
The Israeli cabinet headed a
report from the Israeli chief of
staff, Maj. Gen. Haim Bar-lev, on
the Suez Canal situation. It also
discussed Ebans scheduled visit
to the United States for talks
with Washington officials and a
possible meeting with President
Nixon.
In Cairo, the Egyptian
Foreign Ministry announced it
had instructed its permanent
representative in the United
Nations to submit an official
complaint over the Israeli
shelling Sunday. Israels
ambassador presented a letter to
the Security Council Saturday
night, charging Egyptian fire
across the canal was a serious
breach of the cease-fire.

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Mondiy, Mmk 10, IMS, The Florida AfligMw,

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10,1969

STATEMENT ISSUED
Philosophy Profs
Endorse Meaill

Expressing concern for
academic freedom at UF, 10
professors from the philosophy
department issued a statement
Thursday in support of Dr.
Kenneth Megill.
Megflls dismissal from the
university was demanded last
month by State Sen. Tom Slade
(R-Jacksonville) after the radical
professor called for the
formation of a strong teachers
union to join with students in
taking control of the university.
The professors presented their
statement to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell at a
special meeting with the
president.
We feel that legislative
interference is neither the only,
nor perhaps even the most
important issue at stake, the
statement said.
The key issue to which we
refer is the affirmation not only
of the RIGHT of Professor
Megill as a citizen and a member
of the academic community to

Kibler Here Thursday
Not Friday As Reported

Chairman of the Board of
Regents, D. Burke Kibler, arrives
on campus Thursday, not Friday
as reported in one story in the
March 7 issue of The Florida
Alligator. f
He will be the main speaker at
the initiation ceremonies of UFs
Phi Kappa Phi honor society
Friday. The public is invited to
the initiation at 4 pjn. in the
Reitz Union Auditorium.
The Southern Students
Organizing Society has promised
to be on hand and let him have
it.
Kibler has said no state
university or college will be
allowed to give SSOC, as well as
Students for a Democratic
Society, (SDS), a charter.
Kibler plans to speak on
quantitative and qualitative
requirements for high education
in Florida. He plans to discuss
the role of various junior colleges
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say what he did at the place and
in the manner in which he said
it, the statement said, but his
DUTY as a professor and a
philosopher to express his
sincere and well-considered
convictions.
They held that his ideas not
only may be expressed, but must
be expressed.
To deny this is not only to
deny academic freedom to every
faculty member and student in
the Florida university system,
but also to advocate hypocrisy.
Conservatives
Meet Tonight
The Conservative Party will
hold an organizational meeting
tonight at 7 pjn. in room 355,
Reitz Union.
The purpose of the meeting is
to adopt a constitution, elect
officers and issue position
papers.

and universities and establish the
responsibilities of these
institutions.
Phi Kappa Phi is an honor
society recognizing outstanding
and scholarship achievement in
all fields.

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1969 Leeming Division, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y.



SAIGON (UPI) U.S. forces
trying to break the back of the
new Communist offensive
battled North Vietnamese and
Viet Cong troops in heavy
fighting on two fronts near
Saigon Sunday. U.S. 852 jets
saturated the jungles around the
city with tons of bombs.
Elements of the Ist Brigade,
Ist U.S. Air Cavalry Division
fought a three-hour battle with
more than 100 North
Vietnamese regulars in an area
about 50 miles northwest of
Saigon.
U.S. spokesmen said 14
- Americans were killed and 31
wounded against Communist
losses of 34 dead in the battle
that ended about 6 a.m.
Nine members of a U.S. Ist
Infantry Division unit were
killed and at least 11 wounded
in another predawn fight 12
miles southeast of Saigon in a
marshy area east of Nha Be,
American headquarters said.

Student ACLU Condemns
Denial Os SSOC Charter

Denial of charter recognition
to SSOC was condemned by the
student chapter of the American
Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), in
a resolution stating that
members considered the denial
to be a violation of due
process, equal protection of the
laws, freedom of speech,
assembly and association.
We condemn, the
resolution - read, the illegal
actions of UF President Stephen
C. OConnell and the Board of
Regents irt the memorandum
released today prejudging SSOC
and SDS at UF and FSU.
Student ACLU recommends
legal steps be taken by SG to
recognize SSOC. The ACLU and
the Law Students Civil Rights
Research Council stand ready to
furnish legal help where needed.
We support due process, not
POLITICAL process.
The resolution was signed by
Stephen K. Johnson, chairman
of the ACLU.
OConnell received backing
from the executive board of the
Florida chapter of the Young
Americans for Freedom, which
declared in a resolution that it
supported and endorsed
OConnells decision since the
SSOC was not a student
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852 s Bomb Reds Near Saigon

FIRST AIR CAVALRY BATTLES VC

There was no report on
Communist casualties.
Far to the north, near Dong
Ha just below the Demilitarized
zone, a U.S. Marine ambush
team reported killing 20 North
Vietnamese troops in a fight that
broke out about noon Sunday.
Three Marines were listed as
wounded in the clash near the
Vandergrif combat base.
Waves of 852 Stratofortresses
early Sunday pounded areas of
war zone north and northwest of
Saigon with nearly 2 million
pounds of bombs in nine raids
before daybreak. This was
described as the heaviest
bombardment for any one-day
period since last November.
The 852 strikes were carried
out in areas of Tay Ninh
province about 61 miles
northwest of Saigon within two
to three miles of Cambodia.
Prior to the start of the
Communist offensive on Feb.

organization but is open to
persons not affiliated with the
UF.
The YAF board also
supported the decision because
of certain policies pursued by
SSOC, which call for
disruption of the normal,
functioning of the university and
possible confrontation with
university adminstration.
Mike McNerney, president of
Interhall Council, reported the
councils acceptance of a
resolution disapproving of
OConnells decision.
We are willing to sponsor
SSOC in obtaining facilities so
that they may meet on campus,
McNerney said. Interhall does
not in any way approve of SSOC
or its philosophy
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23, upwards of 12,000 North
Vietnamese troops were believed
ssed in the area.
South Vietnamese spokesmen
reported that Communist
gunners shelled two cities and
four district towns Saturday
night and early Sunday,
including the province capital of
Pleiku in the central highlands
230 miles northeast of Saigon
and Quang Ngai 318 miles
northeast of Saigon.
No casualties were reported at
Pleiku. Spokesmen said three
militiamen were wounded at
Quang Ngai when mortar shells
exploded near a schoolhouse.
Either a rocket or a martar
Saturday night struck the U.S.
Navy support activity hospital
five miles southeast of Dan
Nang, wounding six Americans.
Five of the victims were patients
and the sixth a staff member,
spokesmen said.
The shell landed between a
hospital ward and a kitchen,

We do feel that student
organizations have the right to
use university facilities and to
invite guests and speakers as long
as they stay within the
guidelines and laws of the
universities.
I am personally very sorry
that the women of this campus
havent cared more to speak
out, said Joan Schaffel,
president of the Association of
Women Students.
I am personally opposed to
OConnells decision because this
a organization has been on campus
for two years and has not
stopped the functioning of this
university yet.
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causing minor damage. None of
the wounded was badly hurt,
officials said.
About 15 rounds of 107 mm
mortar fire crunched into the
U.S. Ist Infantry Division base
camp at Lai Khe 30 miles north
of Saigon. Casualties were

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Monday, March 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

described as very light.
Two Americans were killed
Saturday when an Army OH6
Helicopter was shot down by
Communist gunners about 100
miles east of Saigon. It was the
1,105 th chopper down in South
Vietnam in the war, officials
said.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10, 1969

If Thev Wont Become Involved, Who

Winds whistle shrill,
Icy and Chill.
Little care we;
Little we fear
Weather without.
Sheltered about
The Mahogany Tree.
William M. Thackeray
Sheltered in the remote and silent corners of their own
meaningless little worlds, tucked comfortably and securely
into their own untroubled mental ruts, UF students tread
through the whirlpools of life.
From many backgrounds, from many walks of life, they
come to the mega-versity. Among the thousands of nameless
faces, they become but one more.
And they bask in the warmth of anonymity:
With but a handful of exceptions, the mass of white,
middle-class, complacent faces share one great thing in
common:
Little care we.
FORUM:-^^
( JKL ia mil Vib&wt )
hone joy the i
Sure SSOC is real speedv; it doesn't nC-c
any time at all to belt out a speec h at the
Plaza of the Americas. But when it comes to
the red tape, the dirty work, and the paper
shuffling, that's where reforms get i lone, and
that's what takes time. But don't tell SSOC
that; all spoiled children have one thing in
common they want what thee
want right now.

wfwltr y JTTJm h fliy?
iw M Iv 7
wt f
c/ I f ,/ j flv/fpjiw
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SSOC lost its charter bid last week. Few students even
bothered to read the headlines. Even fewer mustered any
intellectual indignation about the fact that the denial adde
to a growing national tendency of repressing dissi ent
opinion.
Fewer yet were willing to stand up and be counted
The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
IgagW '* tha exercise of responsibility.''
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Pui/tokl/v Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
AM
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
J\)tW\lLm Executive Editor News Editor

.* JfEjEEf : *HP jg nrjfs*
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iIIIjI t lilEitiHKfek. i

editorial

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
The SSOC issue is like a sieve it just
does not hold water.
The SSOC kiddies showed their true
colors Thursday night, when five student
leaders met with them to suggest ways out
of their recognition crisis.
The leaders asked SSOC to pick a few
delegates to work with them on a
short-range goal, setting up away of
registering organizations without involving
official recognition.
But no. that doesnt cut it. SSOC wants
everything and right now. My God,
working and negotiating with other
students and the administration would take
time, and wheres the drama in working on
committees? There wouldnt be T.V.
cameras, packs of reporters, front page
headlines or, worst of all, fixed bayonets
threatening the enslaved idealists.
So, amid cat-calls, sarcasm and cries for
freedom now, SSOC turned up its
collective nose at what just might get them
what they supposedly are after.
All of which leads one to question then thenmotives.
motives. thenmotives. SSOCs big-time patriarch, Ed
Freeman, demanded as alternatives,
taking a building, sleeping in Tigert or
staging a rally. Yes, their tnartyr-sninHa tnartyr-sninHacomplex
complex tnartyr-sninHacomplex comes to full force here. Dont
they realize that a disruption would just
make President OConnell even more firm,
even more respected in this State, and even
more justified, at least to himself?
Os course they do. Thats just the point.
They dont really want recognition, they
just want trouble. The issue of wanting

SSOC .. Just Looking

J 1
among that small number who disa I
while also disagreeing with SSOCspjjl
Student Government laid its exj
week. It asked the disenchanted to v]
if they really believed SG was wortj
those who thought SG had somethij
reform to go to the polls and voice tJ
But the masses clung tenaciously!
of indifference. The masses stayed wl
caccoons, safe, snug and unafraid J
Tree.
And its kind of sad that so dal
anything beyond the hollow solitude!
leaders of tomorrow, our nations ail
live and sleep and study on the Collegl
If they dont care about the worJ
who will? If they wont become invd
who will?
Surely they must realize that tha
worth having when apathy is the vid
progress.

recognition so they can have meeting
places on campus, is so hokey it stinks. If
they were just dying to get a place to meet,
they would have jumped at the chance to
go along with the leaders whose
organizations would sponsor them.
No, SSOC is just in desperate need of an
issue, since issues tyranny, injustice,
etc. are what they work from. And the
UF has been relatively quiet this year. As I
overheard after the Gentry trial, Damn,
what are we going to complain about
now?
Lozd, if OConnell had approved their
charter, nobody would be hearing or
talking about SSOC, much less following
its Tigert antics.
SSOC had a long string of reasons to
Tigerts A
MR. EDITOR:
There is an affliction that affects many
of our administrators and a good number
of the others who constantly stick their
hands into university affairs: congenital
alimentary canal inversion.
This is an embarrassing condition to
those who have if"siflce they must sU on
their food to eat it; it frees them, however,
from the necessary trips we others must
take to the WC each day since their
problems are relieved by speaking out on
issues, or, in the case of those who have
had corrective surgery, by writing
cojnments on them.
One would hope that this malformation



ill?
Id with the decision
;ophies.
ice on the line last
for its abolishment
s. It requested that
o offer but needed
opinion.
I their security born
Iped in their private
er their Mahogany
led few care about
themselves. For the
our worlds future,
lampus.
in which they live,
led and committed,
I can be no future
lr of the battle for
" ....
m I
I ii mm'
s aB.

For A Bayonet Point

ypass the student leaders proposals. The
rrepressible Freeman whined something
bout how SSOC has always initiated
eforms on campus, but Student
jovernment takes 1-2 years to carry them
>ut.
Sure, SSOC is real speedy; it doesnt
ake any time at all to belt out a speech at
lie Plaza of the Americas. But when it
; omes to the red tape, the dirty work, and
he paper shuffling, thats where reforms
>et done, and thats what takes time. But
lont tell SSOC that; all spoiled children
lave one thing in common they want
what they want right now.
Then, some self-righteous young lady
med about restrictions on speakers. What
f we wanted to bring Eldridge Cleaver or

Alimentary Inversion

pould save these souls from the common
fcondition called egg on the face since
their faces never see the egg. It doesnt,
however, and the egg on their faces
inevitably is egg on ours.
Apparently, moreover, this disease
remisses and only reoccurs during the late
winter and early spring. This can be proved
by historical inspection since the major
past three years that have resulted in egg
on the face have occurred during
time. (To refresh some memories, some of
those were the Levin and Cross affair and
the Cason firing of 1966. the Pamme
Brewer debacle of 1967, the Jones tenure
1 abomination and the Dow -protestors
inquisition of 1968, and now the SSOC

Remember The Humiliation?
But Now You Use Your Fists

(EDITORS NOTE: The following dialogue is ficticious in content
but, according to the authors information, is based on an incident
that actually did occur.)
By PAUL DRAPIER
. ___ __ V .)
Hello, Im Steve.
Im Johnny.
Well, how are ..
Johnny, Johnny Kolonis.
The name sounds rather familiar.
Sure, Steve, think, youll remember.
Well, it sounds so strange yet so familiar. It must have been some
time ago?
You were in Lamda Xi as a matter of fact.
Yeah, well, ah . .
I was in Pi Lamb.
Oh, then you were a student.
Yes, Steve, I was a student.
Well, its been some time hasnt it, John?
Not that long; not that we should both forget.
Well, Ive been awfully busy. You certainly understand, John,
that . .
No, Steve, you misunderstand me. Os course, I cant blame you.
Introspection never fosters ambition political ambition. Imagine
how miserable we would be if we remembered everything?
Not that I really mean to change the subject, John, but what
business are you in? \
Run a curio shop in Tarpon Springs. Ive dived for sponge the
greater part of my life.
And you graduated from here?
Was in drama. What I remember most are our inter-fraternity
football games, Steve. Remember?
Oh, sure, of course, those were great times.
Yes, Steve, I really enjoyed myself. Im sure you did too, even in
spite of well, forget it.
Im not quite sure I understand?
Never mind. Tell me, Steve, how is everything on campus?

farce which comes on the heels of similar
absurdities at FSU and outside oral
flatulations against Dr. Megill.)
Action must be taken to keep this
defect in check since its effects are
embarrassing to all. Strong, demanding
student and faculty action is the only way
to do this since this disease is also in part
an evil spirit, and any good shaman will tell
you that evil spirits are afraid of loud and
strange noises.
If in the end this proves ineffective,
though, then the only way to rid this
campus of this atrocity must be the
excommunication and banishment of the
....... 1 afflicted;
GIL KORENBLIT, 4AS

Tom Hayden to campus; You wouldnt let
us.
Notwithstanding the fact that Cleaver is
a fugitive who probably wouldnt get too
excited about showing his face in the
Florida sunshine, if the girl had checked
her facts she would have realized that the
UF has a new lecture policy which permits
any individual or group to bring a speaker
to campus, as long as he signs a statement
that he wont incite to riot.
Florida Blue Key President Manny
James gave the most appropriate reply to
SSOC Thursday night: If thats the way
you feel, I dont give one good God damn
what you do.
Take your marbles, children, and go
play in somebody elses yard.

* jjHp
jt .. **mtiMm* 'ii
JJ Intel
Til Get By" jfe

Oh, not bad. You may have heard of the Gentry business in
Tarpon Springs. But that didnt amount to much. There was some
dissidence,but you can always expect it on a large campus.
What is this in the Plaza, Steve, I mean all these people?
Oh, its over recognition of a radical organization. I vetoed its
application for chartership.
Why?
Youve heard of SDS, John. Well, its the same sort of thing. It
advocates disruption of the Universitys academic mission and future
progress. ?
Hmm. Maybe you will remember now, Steve?
What are you talking about, John?
The inter-fraternity football games, when your house was playing
mine.
Well, sure, but . .
Look, Steve! Theyre burning a dummy, an effigy. Why, Steve, I
think yoir name is written on it.
Just as I said, John. These radicals advocate violent overthrow,
anarchy. Can you imagine giving recognition to ..
Wait a minute, Steve. 1 was wrong. Your name wasnt written on
the dummy. But the only words I can make out are Ignorance and
Obstinacy.
Say that again, John; I didnt quite hear you.
Actually, your memory is slipping, Steve. Remember that day, I
mean before you were on the boxing team, one day when your house
was playing mine? You and I got into an argument. I was bigger than
you. I still am, as a matter of fact. Anyway, you started acting cocky,
so I punched you in the nose. What could you do? Id been fighting
since I was six and I was mighty damn good. But what good were
those talents? I became the best diver in Tarpon Springs. If another
boat crowded the rock bar I was working, 1 knew I could come
alongside and tell him to get off or he would have to deal with
Kolonis. But certainly you lemembcr now, Steve?
Well, as a matter of fact. .
As a matter of fact its the same damn thing here, wont you
agree? Look at the signs. They say they want to implement the
Universitys education mission and future progress. Whether thats the
case or not, I cant say. But youve learned to use your fists since we
last met. And you remember, Steve, how humiliating it was to be
slammed up against the side of the head and not be able to do
anything. We cannot forget these things even though we cant
remember.

Monday, March 10, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March IQ, 1969

Edav Russia. China Put Troops On Alert

MOSCOW (UPI) The Soviet Union
fanned public anger against Communist
China Sunday but guarded the
embattled Chinese embassy against
further attacks by crowds protesting the
Soviet-Chinese border clash a week ago.
The defense ministry newspaper
Krasnaya Zvezda Red Star called for
vigilance and increased combat
readiness in the face of what it
considered increasing Chinese
belligerency.
In Tokyo and Hong Kong, news
reports said Communist China has put 5
million troops on alert and, in some
areas near the Soviet border, was

SPACE CENTER, Houston
The Apollo 9 astronauts, sleep sleeping
ing sleeping so soundly they missed their
first wake-up call, spent a rela relatively
tively relatively leisurely seventh day in
space Sunday, taking pictures
like tourists and practicing
moon-landing navigation.
James A. McDivitt, David
Scott and Russell Schweickart
were relaxed and happy and
their work periods were
punctuated by easy banter with
ground controllers.
At one point a flight surgeon
radioed up to Scott that the
astronaut had successfully fixed
a broken sensor to monitor his
heartbeat and Scott shot back:
Dr. Scott thanks you. Ive been
looking for a new job.
Ground communicator Stuart
Roosa, also an astronaut,
plunged into the banter: The
surgeons say theyll put you to
work. I can just see the headlines
now: Scott Quitting Space
Program.
On the ground, their wives
and children attended church to
pray for safe conclusion of the
10-day earth-orbiting mission
scheduled to end Thursday with
splashdown in the Atlantic
about 800 miles east of
Bermuda.

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ASTRONAUTS TRACK LANDMARKS

Apollo 9 Cruising Easily

preparing for war in case of a Soviet
attack.
The Soviet Union placed extra police
forces as well as troops around the
Communist Chinese Embassy. Hundreds
of strollers passed the embassy Sunday,
some of them jeering and shaking their
fists, but police kept them moving and
there was no organized protest.
All Soviet newspapers heightened the
violent tone of their anti-Chinese
articles Sunday, and the labor
newspaper, Trud, declared as a national
hero the commander of the unit that
battled the Chinese at the border point
in far east Russia.
The commander, Lt. Ivan 1.

Apollo 9s most important
duty of the day was to track
four landmarks on earth as they
would when preparing to make a
lunar landing. The crews job
was made harder by the 17,500
mile an hour speed of their
Apollo command cabin in earth
orbit. This left the spacemen less
time to track each landmark
with the space-crafts 28-power
sextant and telescope but they
generally wdre successful.
The astronauts, worn out
from the first half of the hardest
space mission men have ever
flown, got an extra hour of sleep
Sunday morning. During their
first five days aloft they had
proved the. U.S. moon landing
craft ready for lunar flight.
They were so tired from these
tasks and from Saturdays engine
firing and precise photographic
prospecting for earths riches
from space that they did not at
first respond to the morning call
from Roosa shortly before 7 am
EST.
Scott reported all three fliers
got a solid nights sleep T/i
hours for himself, 8 for McDivitt
and B'/2 for Schweickart.
Under Comments, be advised
a good morning from your
smiling FIDO (flight dynamics

officer) and GUIDO (guidance
officer, Roosa told McDivitt.
Under Comments, be advised
I didnt realize Fido and Guido
smiled, McDivitt joked back in
a take-off on technical flight
plan reporting. Ask retrofire
officer if he is smiling.
Retros only comment is
that he would smile if he knew
where all that stu*'f was,
Roosa replied. The stuff he
referred to was various pieces of
equipment which must be
carefully stored before re-entry.
Scott, using the telescope and
sextant during the landmark
tracking chores, reported
difficulty with the telescope
during an attempt to track the
Corpus Christi site. But he said
he was able to track the Spanish
Sahara landmark very well.
A,
The astronauts later reported
more difficulties with being able
to track and mark the landmarks
precisely and communicate the
information to ground
controllers. These were similar
to those Apollo 7 experienced in
October.

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Stielnikov, and 30 of his men were
killed in the clash last Sunday at the
Nizhni-Mikhailovka border post near
Damansky Island in the Ussuri River.
The Soviet news agency Tass
distributed a graphic account of the
battle Sunday night. Its news reports
quoted Pvt. Vasily Vishnevsky,
described as a survivor of the battle.
The Ch inese approached our
commander in ranks, Vishnevsky told
Tass. Those in the front rank had no
weapons in their hands. When only
three meters (nine feet) separated them
from the Soviet borderguards, the first
rank scattered.
Behind them were soldiers of the

Roosa kept the crewmen all
sports enthusiasts informed on
Saturday nights basketball
action. Informed that Ohio State
beat Michigan 95-86 and Miami
of Ohio won over Notre Dame
63-60, McDivitt said: Listen, if
Michigan got beat and Miami of
Ohio won, Im in trouble when I
get home.
McDivitt is a graduate of the
University of Michigan and his
wife Pat is an Ohio girl.
Told of USCs 4644 victory
over top-ranked UCLA, McDivitt
said: Wow! Aint that
something?
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Chinese People Republic with
submachine guns at the ready. They
fired point blank into our friends.
After the battle, Vishnevsky said, the
Soviets gathered their dead and found
the bodies mutilated. He said the
Chinese had killed a number of
wounded by shooting or stabbing them
with bayonets.
Red Star charged the Communist
Chinese with timing the attack to
coincide with the West German
presidential elections last week in West
Berlin, which the Soviets protested, as
well as the increased fighting in South
Vietnam. To earn the favors of the
West.

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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

j| FOR SALE ji
14 Ft. wooden runabout, 35 HP,
trailor access $460. 372-7305.
(A-3t-98-P)
Hand-crafted Spanish classical guitar
and hard case call Martha
378-9972 after 8 p.m. any night for
information. Guitar is light weight,
good tone. (A-2t-98-P)
ROBERTS 770 X recorder, perfect
condition, usual features, almost a
year old, $250 or best offer.
378-0734. (A-2t-98-P)
GUNS GUNS GUNS lnve lnventory
ntory lnventory over 450 buy sell trade
repair. Reloading supplies, custom,
reloading Harry Beckwith, Gun
Dealer, Micanopy 466-3340.
(A-ts-69-P)
Rare, white AKC German Shepherd
puppies. Gentle temperment, good
with children. SIOO. Phone
378-0844. (A-st-96-P)
Gibson guitar, steel strings, hollow
.dark brown wood, in groovy
condition must sell so best offer will
do. Call 392-9772 after 3:30 p.m.
(A-st-96-P)
Unusually well furnished 10x55
mobile home. A/C and with separate
storage shed with workshop. 5
minutes from Univ. $3250. Call
378-3684 Eves. (A-4t-97=P)
Muntz M6O 8 & 4 track car stereo.
Still under warranty & in new
condition. Must sell. Call Chris Pool
at 3 78-885 1 during week.
(A-3t=97-P)
.i.vpper, 57 Harley, 1200 cc flh,just
rebuilt engine,springer forks,bobbed
fenders,need to sell quickly,s6so,see
J .Ahearn,392-8895,Reid Hall.
(A-st-99-P)
I RENT |
Must sublet 1 bedroom furnished
University Gardens Apartment, car carpeted,
peted, carpeted, AC, pool, slls per month.
Call Lee 372-5921. (B-st-99-P)
Luxurious-l-bdrm-apt-to-sublease
f urn ished-carpeted-central-heat-air
dish w.ash er-d is posal-pool-landmark
phase-2-available-March-20-3787618.
(B-3t-99-P)
Must sublease 3 bedrm 2bath fur furnished
nished furnished apt. at Williamsburg, large
living rm. dining rm. dishwasher cen central
tral central air heat pool $260. Call
37 30756. (B-st-99-P)
3rd quarter one bedroom apt. Colo Colonial
nial Colonial Manor carpeted & pool V 2 block
from campus call Now 378-8470.
(B-98-2t-P)
WANT TO live in Sin City? Sublet
beautiful 2-bedroom atp. in luxurious
Landmark. Call 378-6494.
(B-st-96-P)
1 Bedroom, AC, apt. 1533 NW sth
Ave. Walking distance to campus,
$95 per month. Call 378-8058.
(B-st-95-P)
Best location in town. 1 block from
Tigert Hall. 1 br., AC apts. Rents
sllO-$l2O. 372-7111. 1216 SW 2nd
Ave. Apt 1, Colonial Manor Apts. 9-6
p.m. daily, 2-5 Sunday. (B-6t-98-P)
SUBLET 2 br apt. at Landmark
Phase II or 2 roommates wanted to
share same. Pool, health club, etc.
Reasonable rent. Call 378-8982 after
6. Apt. 113. (B-st-98-P)
VILLAGE 34 Sublet spacious 1
bdrm. apt. private patio, quiet
surroundings. Call Lynn 372-6077.
(B-st-98-P)
2 Bedroom apt. in triplex. Central air
& heat, kitchen equipped. 3533 SW
24 Av 6. Ph. 372-5400, $95 mo.
wmsm
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where will the
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10:25
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To sef
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| FOR RENT p
One bedroom apt. for sublease. 8
Tanglewood Manor. Beautifully
furnished, central AC, head, cut-rate,
$l3O. Available Mar. 26. Call
378-0990. (B-st-96 P)
Room in private home for mature
male student. Central beat, AC,
Linen and maid service. Separate
entrance. Phone 376-5360.
(B-2t-93-P)
l^sssr^
MALE roommate needed in spacious
Gatortown apt. 3 bed, 2 bath, $52.50
mo. Call after 4. Open March and
Spring quarter. 378-6873. (C-4t-96-P)
Landmark Female roommate for
spring quarter apt. 173, $45 a
month. Call after 5:00 378-1007.
(C-st-97-P)
COED ROOMMATE wanted, large,
air-conditioned, two-bedroom, 16th
Ave. apt. on pool, $37 mo. Village
Park No. 97, Call 372-4751.
(C-st-95-P)
One female roommate needed spring
quarter Landmark Apts. 174 two
bedroom $45 mo. Call 378-0846.
(C-st-94-P)
3rd coed roommate to share house
SW 13th St. own bedroom
$33/month plus utilities. 10 min
walk from campus, roomy. Contact
Sue or Jo 378-0762. (C-3t-97-P)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-10t-94-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share Col. Manor Apt. 39 spring
quarter sllO/2 air cond. pool. Call
Julie 378-4785, 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
(C-st-95-P)
Female to share small house behind
NRM starting spring qtr $45 mo call
3785275 now, through finals and the
break late at night preferable.
(C-st-99-P)
Need 2 coeds for spacious, poolside
Camelot apartment. 2 bedrooms, 2
baths. s6l month. 378-8458.
(C-4t-99-P)
Quiet studious male for 2br apt.
Available 3rd qtr. $41.25 and share
apt with 3 additional roommates.
Call 376-6672 after 6 pm. (C-st-99-P)
Female roommates needed for Land Landmark
mark Landmark apt. or will sublet. 2 bdrm,
dishwasher, on pool. Call 378-5585.
(C-3t-99-P)
Law or Grad student wanted to share
nicely furnished 3-bedroom house
3rd quarter. Utilies pd. Call Bill early
evening 378-3862. (3t-C-99-P)
Need 1 roommate for Frederick Gar Gardens
dens Gardens 2 bedroom apartment spring
quarter. AC, pool. March rent paid.
No deposit needed. Call 378-1978.
(C-st-99-P)
MALE roommate to share two bdrm
apt two blocks from campus AC own
bedroom 60 per month call
372-9611. (C-3t-99-P)
1 or 2 female roommates for spring
quarter. Roomy, 2 bedr. duplex AC.
Call 378-8790, 1912 NW Ist Ave.
(C-st-97-P>
LIVE OFF CA MPUS C.L.O.
$60.00/M. Room & board. Frosh &
sophs, may break. Contracts total
indepen. Call 376-9420. Come by
117 NW 15 St. (C-7t-97-P)
Coolest pad in town. Need male
roommate. Pool, fine furnishings,
bar, fireplace and much more.
SSO/mo. Call before signing
elsewhere 378-4877. (C-st-97-P)
2 female roomates for spring and/or
;ummer quarters. Rent only $40.25.
3all 378-4565 or come by Apt. 69
French Quarter after 5. (C-st-98-P)
One female roommate for Landmark
sllO for Spring quarterover
pool. Willing to make a deal! Call
378-9604 or 376-7129 TODAY!
(C-st-98-P)

m m W.c. FIELDS
T R STRIKES
u W AGAIN
Tonite's Reel-ie TRTVSTT
Circus Slickers i"!
9P.11.

Monday, March 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

:SiSSi¥

]| WANTET" aSW^|
** -rm-n n r n n r ~ n r 1 n n nrn n n n n r r 1 r n n nnn n i;i innn rp!
Two roommates: one guy, one girl.
Starlight Apts., 2 blks to campus,
slOl per qtr. AC & heat. Guys call
Ron 378-3241. Girls call Fran
378-5532 Anytime. (C-2t-98-P)
Roommate wanted to share fantastic
2 bedroom brick house, wood
paneled walls, luxury stereo, T.V.
own room, share $125 mo. plus V*
utilities, Call Barry 378-6776 after
9:00 p.m. (C-3t-98-P)
Roommate for V Pk. No. 10. Avail: 3
qt. Share rent with 3 great girls. Call
376-4121 ask for Tita. Will be
moving out end of March. (C-st-97-P)
Male model, adventurer, writer, 20
Looking for INTERESTING place to
live. All offers considered. Call John
after 6 p.m. 376-7854. (C-3t-97-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Spacious apartment one block from
Norman. Have own bedroom.
Available March 17. 378-7638, 1028
SW 7th Ave. $45/month. (C-st-97-P)
Williamsburg Apt. need 1 roommate
spring quarter, pool airconditioned,
dishwasher, 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Call
376-9719. (C-SX-97-P)
f HmELTwANTro^J
Experienced cashiers, full and part
time. Apply at Florida Book Store,
1614 West University Avenue.
(E-st-98-P)
GENERAL OFFICE girls who type
well or handle bookkeeping know
office machines. Great future. Call
ALLIED PERSONNEL of Gainesville
1800 N. Main, 376-4611. (E-st-98-P)
EXCITING CAREER secretary to
executive. Plush office nice associates
and excellent pay. Call ALLIED
PERSONNEL of Gainesville 1800 N.
Main, 376-4611. (E-st-98-P)
Opportunity for college men to work
as part time life insurance salesmen
while in college as campus agents for
Pacific Mutual Life. 378-6390.
(E-st-99-P)
THIRSTY GATOR needs
bartender sandwich man. Good
pay pretty customers. No phone.
See Jim between 2 & 3 p.m., 633 NW
13th Street. (E-3t-97-P)
THIRSTY GATOR needs waitress
evenings. Good pay . handsome
customers. No phone. See Jim
between 2 & 3 p.m., 633 NW 13th
Street. (E-3t-97-P)
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Part-time or full-time Will train.
Must be 21. Dub's Steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nations 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person, Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
INHALATION THERAPY
TECHNICIAN TRAINEE On the job
training for mature person. Hospital
experience and some mechanical
aptitude helpful. Salary
commensurate with experience and
education. Paid vacation, holidays,
sick leave, and other benefits. Inquire
personnel director, Alachua General
Hospital, 372-4321. (E-6t-98-P)
I
CMS HHmmmm mnme

Page 13

1 AUTOS I
s 3
1959 PORSCHE coupe, good cond.
AM-FM radio new Pirellis, new
interior, inspected. Best offer.
378-3742. (G-3t-97-P)
6B Barracuda sport coupe VB, Facair
radio delux interior, metallic
midnight blue, vinyl top, wide oval
tires, ~sac warranty, low price.
376-3424. (G-st-97-P)
1960 Ford hardtop, 352 cu.- in.,
automatic, radio, heater, very good
condition. New starter, generator,
tune-up*. Best offer over S3OO.
378-5848 after 5 p.m. (G-st-96-P)
C PERSONAL^I
Its no dream!! PERSONAL CHEF
is here!! (J-2t-99-P)
Happy Birthday
How Sam?
Play right over it .. 40-11
Aint that a kick? r(J-lt-99-P)
; ; x.!W.M**wvjwy.w.w.ww:w*yw. l '(
I LOST & FOUND f
y. v
v-v-v.v.v.ss*:*iu;vx : Xs*'
FOUND: German shepherd puppy on
campus. Call 378-0937. (L-3t-NC-99)
LOST: Phi Delta Theta pin. If found,
call 376-1701. $lO reward. Ask for
Bruce. (L-st-99-P)
Lost license plate with name Jimmy
and *AEPi. Fell off car somewhere in
G'ville. -Please call 378-5825 for
$2.00 reward. Thanx! (L-lt-99-P)
FOUND: 1. pr glasses outside
Matherly. Call 378-8061 5:00 to
7:00. (L-3t-98-NC)
Lost metal frame prescription sun
glasses in gray case. Please call Bruce
Webbon 372-1013 or 392-0764.
(L-3t-98-P)
FOUND: 1 pr. glasses outside
Matherly. Call 378-8061 5:00 to
7:00. (L-3t-97-NC)
I
EXPERT SHOCKER! |
NY DAILY NEWS j
1 WILLIAM
? met
I mm
HMf 'IHRU,

If \ SPEQALS ||
I Lunch and Dinner ss§B
Monday Special
S BAKED MACARONI &j|
8 MEAT SAUCE ||
M ALL YOU CARE TO EAT |J
W& Tuesday Special
|| FRIED CHICKEN ||
m ALL YOU CARE TO EAT ||
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS |
W&. GAINESVILLE MALL J||

ix-ww.iw, gwmoooowwvivvvwmma;
SERVICES I
INCOME TAX $4.00 up. Expert
service in two locations to serve you:
1227 W. Unlv. Ave. (across from
Ramada Inn) & 107 N. Main St.
378-9666. (M-ts-95-P)
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(st-99-M-P)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-P)
I ~
Experienced typist reasonable rates
prompt service. 376-0406.
(M-st-98-P)
I will do ironing in my home. Call
372-5269. (M-4t-90-P)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-95-P)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)
Mdj IwjRRYi
| LAST 2 DAVSI
100 COIjOR by Oelue
ptliv United Artists
pMgrJTnE pi cture i
WITHGENERAL
AUDIENCE APPEAL I
RECOMMENDED FOR
ALL AGES I
tw
tecmncolmt mmmm
not* WtUMIHC coeowiwii
2:05 4:00 5:55



Page 14

\. Ttm Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10, 1960

Campus Crier
\ f % SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COURSE REVIEW SERVICE
Th following moons are open to students with problems in the comprehensive courses of the University College:

CPS
Physical Science tutorial help is available Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday during 3rd and 9th
periods. Call 392-1571 and the room in which the
reviews are held will be given.
CBS
Special problem-solving sessions are scheduled for
CBS 262 in room 105-B AFA on March 10 and 12 at
7:00 P.M. A graduate student in the Dept, will be
present to answer all questions.
t a ** # *n
CEH
A special problem solving session is also scheduled for
CEH 132 on March 13 at 7:00 P.M. in 105-B AFA.
Professor John Morefield will conduct the review for
questions on specific problems.

-mSp .S'
,-l 1 9 ?
I iIU
§1
I 1 u m;. Jp 1
University of Florida Gymnasium
SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 1969 8:15 pm
/I Student Government Production

These sessions are designed to help students who have problems with specific areas of the courses. All items discussed must
be brought by students, THE REVIEWS WILL ONLY ANSWER QUESTIONS. THEY ARE NOT CRAM SESSIONS. This
service will be continued next quarter if it is supported by the students. It will be on a weekly basis. All department
chairmen realize the fact that some students need more help than others and are willing to aid SG in providing this service
on the weekly basis. SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT, TO SERVE THE STUDENTS. FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION CONTACT RUSTY SKINNER, SECRETARY OF STUDENT AFFAIRS. 305 J.W.R. Union; 392-1665.

CMS
There is a mathematics lab every day of the week
from 12:30 P.M. til 4:30 P.M. in room 305 Walker
Hall. This is sponsored through the Mathematics
Department.
CSS
Another special session is planned for CSS 122. It will
be held on March 11 at 7:00 PJVI. in 105-B AFA.
*
CHN
HUMANITIES MUSIC REVIEWS WILL BE HELD
IN THE RATHSKELLER ON MARCH 12, 13, 17,
and 19. THEY WILL BE PLAYED AT THE
FOLLOWING TIMES: 3P.M.; 4 P.M.; 5 P.M.

I &at!)£Sfeeller
S m
I ERICA EROS
I & YOUNG
I "SOUNDS UNLIMITED
I All this week March 10-15
I Dont forget the "RAT on
I Friday. Celebrate the end of
I classes from 2 6 on Friday.
I HAPPY HOURS. l
I BUSH on tap 20< y\
I also reduced prices on JaUSy )
I Lowenbrau, Michelob, J
Schlitz, and Bud. , E
I u f F. Faculty Club, Inc. I I
I Rathskeller



By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
John enters through the front
door, hangs his hat on the rack
and sits down in his easy chair.
Hello, darling, says Mary,
his wife.
Hi, dear, replies John,
opening the evening paper and
glancing through its pages.
We got our phone bill in the
mail today.
Oh? How much is it?
Only $3,000. And that
included two long distance calls
to Mother.
Thats not too bad. I
wonder if they made an error in
our favor.
Could be.
John turns the pages of his
paper.
I see here where they
arrested 200 policemen in
California for interfering with
student riots.
Is that right? It serves them
right for interfering with the
artistic expression of todays
American youth.
John JX urns the pages and
kicks off his shoes.
Says here that the President
plans to keep that 200 per cent
surcharge until at least next
year.
Well, 1 think its the least we
can do to support our fighting
men in Vietnam, Cambodia,
China, Japan, Italy, England,
France, Russia, South America
and Greece.
Yes, indeed. Patriotism is
needed now. Yes, indeed.
Mary continues to knit. She
adjusts her glasses and blows her
nose. John continues to turn
pages.
Heres an interesting item.
Says that Israel just dropped 20
more hydrogen bombs on the
Arabs. It was in retaliation for
an Arab attack which killed an
approximate four million Jews.
Land sakes! I just dont
know what those little countries
are coming to. I wish wed
intervene and stop those border
disputes.
John pauses to light his pipe.
He turns pages. Mary rocks and
knits.
Heres something. Says that
Cuba just captured 25 of our spy
ships. They claim that we were

I ROBBIES I
The Beet In
Meal.&Jjf QBSandwichei
[COLOR TV fi BILLIARDS!
11718 W. University Ave.
I *On The Gold Coast* I

mpssaans

invading her territorial waters.
Oh? How close were we?
Key West.
John chuckles to himself.
Mary pauses in her work and
looks questioningly at John.
Whats so funny, dear?
This item in the paper. Says
that enemy casualties this week
were 800,000. Says that allied
casualties were 25. I just dont
know how the government could
think the people are so stupid as
to believe ridiculous figures like
that.
It is funny. Everybody
knows were killing at least
120,000 of THEM a week, and
theyre lucky if they kill as
many as 10 of US.
John pauses, puts down the
paper and cleans his glasses on a
dirty handkerchief. Resumes
reading.
You might want to go down
to the store this weekend, dear.
Big sale.
Really? Like what?
Well, pork chops are going
for $8 a pound. And theyre
giving milk away its only $4 a
gallon. Bacons a steal at $5 a
pound. And while youre down
there you better get some
bread sl a loaf.
I just dont know how they
manage to stay open at those
prices.
Doorbell rings. John answers
it. Obscure conversation. Door
closes. John returns.
Who was that, dear?
Just the police. Wanted to
congratulate me for turning in
Smith next door for owning a
pistol. They said he was
executed today.
Well good, dear. Maybe
NEW
Hawaiian IKT
Village |||
Now leasing for Sept.
3461 S.W. Second Ave.
PHONE 378-5905
Next to Westgate
Shopping Center
Townhouse & Flats
Swimming Pool
Recreation Hall
Wall to Wall Carpet
Air Conditioned
Dishwashers & Disposals
Private Patios
Master TV Antenna
Laundry Facilities
1 & 2 BR., 1, Viz, 2 Baths
MODELS OPEN DAILY 10-5
Hotpoint Appliances

theyll mention you in the
paper.
By the way, wheres the
kids?
Oh, Mike went to an LSD
party and Carol is getting an
abortion.
You know, Mary, I certainly
am glad the kids are being raised
in this day and age. when
everything is right in the world.
Yes, darling. Its the perfect
time in a perfect world.
l
Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
NORTH OF XK
THE MALL Nfl
37 6-4552 Aut^Zed
DEALER


Wash, wet, soak, hunt, pi / } // Just the bottom of every bottle. Soak Soaksquint,
squint, Soaksquint, wash, soak, wet, cry a little. Ml / j // a drop or ing your contacts in Lensine be-
Contact lenses were de- { twoofLen- tween wearing periods assures
signed to be'a convenience. And /r\ sine before you of proper lens hygiene,
they are up to a point. They're (I V vyy | you insert Improper storage between
convenient enough to wear, // your lens pre- wearings permits the growth of
once you get used to them, but, pares it for bacteria on your lenses. This is a
s- until recently, you had to use your eye. Lensine maxes your sure cause of eye irritation and,
two or more different lens solu- contacts, which ore made of in some cases, it can endanger
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needed selfneeded two or three differ- p sine is an "isotonic so- sanitizing, and antiseptic,
ent bottles, lens cases, and yv lution. That means its Let your contacts be the con conyou
you conyou went through more than (f I U made to blend with the venience they were designed to
enough daily rituals to make eyes natural fluids. So be. The name of the game is
even the most steadfast indi- a simple drop or two ("~| Lensine. Lensine, made by
viduals consider dropping out. coats the lens, forming a I L.I the Murine Company, Inc.
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Lensine is the one lens solution bacteria and foreign de dedesigned
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lens durlens care . preparing, cleans- ing the course of the day.
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handy contact canister on ([ jjfl ||y3j
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11 1 11 ' 1 i

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APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
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war
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Monday, March 10. 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10,1909

*? I
o W - I
Engineering and Science at IBM
The interdisciplinary
environment keeps you
technologically hot!
Working in data processing today pretty much BSiBBF
means you work in a broad spectrum of tech- II3HF
nologies, says Nick Donofrio. |p : 1
An Associate Engineer at IBM, Nick is a
1967 graduate in Electrical Engineering. |
Hes using his technical background '||| '*
to design circuits for computer # |
memory systems. -lIA |j|j 111'
Circuit design used to be a narrow \iJr f J I
job, he says. Today it can take you y : ; : : % "jjlfaMi HM : /
into the front yard of half a dozen \ : lMjjM|| y JP § |j
different fields. In my job, for example, £ ! tJt Jy
I work with systems design engineers, A Jjpjf |Bp | J|
chemists, physicists, metallurgists, V-: m. Jjfjp .. I ifplf -.jjy -.jjyand
and -.jjyand programmers. = V J||p
Nick describes a hypothetical case /: ; AfPyllli|^Bl- : :: -jPBf
history: A memory systems man : / ..jw : y||||||||k J||f
comes to me with memory circuit :§|l
requirements. Before I can start I
designing the circuit, I go to see a ''
physicist. He helps me select an Bb|l||P- -i^llljlll
appropriate technology for the HK s : yj
monolithic circuit. ..^|:;||||:; s :> HHr' *iflll ;-r
As the design develops, I work with a M^lnnHp
test group and also check back with the ":
systems and semiconductor people to make \
sure Im on the right track. M&jk&t. '"V
Keeping up lis:jara A
The interdisciplinary environment at IBM helps
you keep up to date technologically. As Nick /J# ; : >. .J
puts it, Youre constantly exposed to whats J
happening in other fields.
IBM needs technical graduates to work in
research, design and development, manufactur manufacturing,
ing, manufacturing, product test, field engineering, and space
defense projects. We also
people in programming and marketing.
your
youre engineering and
science at IBM, ask your placement office
for more
An Employer
IBM, TB^
;-J ; . . ' . ;.v- .. V
\ ;
__ <'
7 ' ..; /



NIT-Picked Gators Cleanse Tide

Southeastern Conference
action came to a close Saturday
night with UF, Kentucky, LSU,
Vanderbilt and Auburn winning
their games.
UF NIT-bound with an 18-8
record, finished its season third
in the SEC, winding up the
campaign with a 73-60 victory
over Alabama behind the 27
points of Neal Walk.
The Crimson Tide lost its last
15 games and was the SECs
only 20 game loser, finishing
4-20. *
SEC Standings
W L W L
Kentucky 16 2 22 4
Tennessee 13 5 18 6
Florida 12 6 18 8
Auburn 10 8 15 10
Georgia 9 9 13 12
Vanderbilt 9 9 15 11
Mississippi 7 11 10 14
Louisiana St. 7 11 13 13
Mississippi St. 6 13 8 17
Alabama 1 17 4 20
Owls Meet
UF In NIT
(EDITORS NOTE: This story
by -a UF student appeared in
Sundays Gainesville Sun.)
By DAVE LARIMER
UFs first opponent in the
National Invitational
Tournament, Temple, will look
like an old Gator
nemesis Tennessee.
Temples Owls play the same
deliberate offensive game that
helped Tennessee finish second
in the Southeastern Conference.
Temple plays a controlled
offense, waiting for a break,
said a writer for the Philadelphia
Bulletin, home base of Temple.
Gators meet Temple in the
first round of the. NIT Thursday
night in New York Citys
Madison Square Garden.
The Gators will also face a
zone defense . .something
Tennessee used to become the
second best defensive outfit in
the country.
The Owls use a 3-2 or 2-3
zone depending on the situation
and rarely employe a
man-to-man defense.
The combination of offense
and defense has earned the Owls
an 18-8 record and a 2-2 mark in
the five-team Philadelphia City
Conference.
In The tough city league,
Temple finished third, losing to
strong LaSalle and Villanova.
Also in the league are St.
Josephs and Pennsylvania.
The Owls rely on the scoring
of senior John Baum. The 6-5
forward is averaging 19 points a
contest and has grasped 13
rebounds a game. Next comes
Joe Cromer, a 6-5 senior who
carries a 14-point and
10-rebound average.
Biggest starter on the team is
senior Ed Mast. The 6-9 senior is
averaging seven points and eight
rebounds an outing.
Tony Brocchi, a 5-10 senior,
and Bill Strunk, a 6-2
sophomore, are the two starting
guards. Brocchi, who became a
starter after Temple lost its
regular earlier in the season, is
theplaymaker.
Best reserve is Jim Snook, a
6-5 senior who is a transfer from
the Naval Academy.

Kentucky, bound for another
NCAA tournament with its 24th
SEC championship in hand,
belted conference runner-up and
NIT-bound Tennessee 84-69 in
Lexington, to prove again, once
and for all, that Adolph Rupps
Wildcats were deservedly the
champs.
Pistol Pete Maravich,
meanwhile, put on his usual one
man gang performance, scoring
58 points for Louisiana State, as
the Bengal Tigers squeaked by
Georgia, 90-80 in double
overtime.
Maravichs point total pushed
his 1968-69 season figures to
1,148 points in 26 games, an
average of 44.2 per game -a
figure that snapped the previous
highest average in NCAA
history, set by Maravich in his
sophomore year, at 43.8.
Maravich, who needed 49
points in his last game to snap
his previous scoring record,
threw in 21 field goals and 16
free throws to lead LSU from a
15-point second half deficit into
a regulation game tie, scoring the
final 17 Bengal points.
Still tied 78-78 after one
overtime period, the remarkable
Maravich scored 11 of 12 LSU
points giving LSU the victory.
In a fitting finish, the skinny
<- s \ > >V% v
" |||'
H' i||
' < .w:
cggSg&ijgS?? sxgs >
* -1
W*' m f } ff £ ,
/ § § / / i t'*
TIPOFF
... Neal leaps high for the tip
CHARGE
... Boyd goes under for a layup

SEC ROUNDUP

junior threw in a 30-foot
fallaway hook shot at the final
gun, then grew a large smile.
Vanderbilt, which slumped
badly and unexpectedly in
mid-season, took all its
frustrations out on helpless
Mississippi. State, trouncing the
Bulldogs, 120-83.
Senior guard Tom Hagan
capped a brilliant career with 44
points to lead the route.
Auburn, with a final game
80-70 victory over Mississippi,

The Florida Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

i
New Era
At UF
By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UFs invitation to the
National Invitational
Tournament marks a new era for
basketball in Gator country,
according to Head Coach
Tommy Bartlett.
Weve been fighting for three
years for this, Bartlett said.
We are no longer the same old
Gators.
The invitation the Gators
received was the 100th given by
the NIT in its 31 year history. It
was made possible by the recent
ruling by the Southeastern
Conference that more than one
team can participate in
post-season contests. In the past
only the conference champ
could compete and that was in
the NCAA tournament.
The NIT this year took two
SEC reams, Tennessee and UF
were invited.
This berth we got means
something new and big for
future athletes to think about,
Bartlett said.
Bartlett extended thanks to
Athletic Director Ray Graves,
Sports Information Director
Norm Carlson and Florida Gov.
Claude Kirk for working to keep
UF in the picture and helping
the Gators get the bid.
We also owe a great deal to
our fans the students, Gator
Tipoff Club and alumni,
Bartlett said. They cheered us
through the season, even when
things looked bad.
wBB opn^j||j
V;
vfff CjJJI
nil
GEE ME?
... Mike gives his fans am autograph

finished with a flourish to take
fourth place in the SEC.
John Mengelt, the all-SEC
sophomore, led the victory with
21 points.
Alabama-60
Suits 5-9 0-0 3 4 0 10
Elliott 6-14 2-2 2 4 1 14
Deppe 1-3 0-3 11 7 2 2
White o-2 0-0 0 0 0 0
Adkins 6-13 0-0 3 3 312
Holt 1-2 11 0 0 13
Hoover O-l 2-3 10 0-2
Hogue 2-1 1 0-0 3 0 3 4
Harrison 6-10 1-1 2 1 413
Totals 27-66 6-10 25 19 14 60

I
PH
fW HP .'
\S Fjy| !/lH|P%!*
YEAH TONY
... you can come along with us

Kansas, Army Invited

NEW YORK (UPI) Army
and Kansas were chosen Sunday
to play in the 32nd annual
National Invitational
Tournament beginning
Thursday.
The selection of the Cadets
and the Jayhawks left the NIT
Baby Gators Win
UFs Baby Gators capped off
their season with a 7469
victory over the Alabama
freshmen to run their final
season record to 158 here
Saturday night.
Clifford Cox pumped in 28
points for the Baby Gators on
13 fielders in 20 shots and sank
two of four from the foul line.
Two other Gators were in
double figures. Gary Waddell
tallied 15 points and Dan Boe
added 11.
Alabama69
Holland 6-12 0-0 3 3 3 12
Lynch 2-11 3-3 5 7 0 7
Gamble 5-9 0-0 4 1 3 10
Wilkie 3-9 0-0 4 1 3 10
House 9-16 7-8 11 0 2 25
Nesmith 2-4 0-0 2 0 0 4.
Williams 2-8 1-3 3 0 2 6
TOTALS 29-73 11-14 32 14 12 69
FLORIDA
Waddell 5-12 5-5 10 3 3 15
Boe 5-11 1-3 6 3 3 11
Ceravolo 3-10 0-0 2 4 1 6
Kelley 3-8 0-0 6 3 0 6
Cox r 13-20 2-4 7 4 3 28
Houston 4-6 0-0 4 3 0 8
TOTALS 33-67 8-12 35 20 10 74
Halftime score: Florida 45, Alabama
40.
I Officials: Huff and Harman

Monday, March 10, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

with only one berth to fill to
round out its 16-team Held.
That spot will go to the loser
of Monday nights playoff game
between Louisville and Drake
for the Missouri Valley
conference title.
The winner goes to the
National Collegiate Athletic
Association tournament.
Army, the nations leading
defensive team, allowing only 53
points per game, carries a 168
record into its sixth NIT
appearance.
Coached by Bob Knight and
featuring a deliberate style
offense, Army is paced by
6-foot-l Jim Oxley, averaging 13
points a game.
Kansas, making its second
straight NIT appearance, won 20
and lost six, finishing second to
Colorado in the Big Eight
conference.
The Jayhawks, who finished
second to Dayton in last years
NIT, return with virtually the thesame
same thesame squad as last season.
-"Thursday nights Hist of four
opening round doubleheaders
pits Temple against UF and St.
Peters against either Louisville
or Drake.
Also chosen for the tourney
> were Boston College, Tennessee,
Wyoming, West Texas State,
| Ohio University,
Southern a,
Fordham and

UF-73
Vasquez 1-1 0-0 0 1 12
Leatherwood 1-7 0-0 4 4 0 2
Feazel 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 0
Fotiou 0-1 0-02110
McGinnis 2-5 1-2 2 3 1 5
Lukco 3-10 0-0 4 1 0 6
Welsch 8-19 0-1 5 5 016
Walk 8-13 11-11 15 1 527
Agee 1-1 0-0 10 0 2
Owens 6-10 1-1 71 113
Totals 30-67 13-16 40 17 9 73
Halftime score: UF 43,
Alabama 34.
Officials: Waldo and Scobey.
Fouled out: UF, Walk.
Dick Dclmw
f Jeweler#
1 CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY I
I REPAIRS I
1 TROPHIES ENGRAVING |
I 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
| V 2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Page 17



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10,1969

Page 18

Glovemen Shutout Brahmas On 3 Hitter

By Alligator Services
UF posted its second win of
the season over the University of
South Florida Saturday behind
the three-hit pitching of three
pitchers.
The pitchers, Larry Sheffield,
Mike Jacobs and Glen Pickeren
each gave up one hit as UF
evened its baseball record at 2-2

omm w
||S|^^V:.-- .. y,
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TOM KENNEDY
PLAY AT THIRD
... Hannan slides safely into third
mmsm v r.
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pgi ja
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jmj7 v'--;>Bf H
TOM KENNEDY
THE BATGIRLS
... from left Stephanie Clayton, Gracie Spinale, Livi Johnson and
Liz Anderson, Cheryl Mays, Pamme Miller
Nancy Brand, Susie McGinnis,
mg|
|T p y b|
wr v.
B
* * I 4 .. .'
-. 1?^
- .- -.:
BBBBBMBPRL y
bppbi^;.
ill y
NICK ARROYO
NICE VIEW
... those aren't the same old bats^-

with a 4-0 victory.
Coach Dave Fullers Gators
collected a total of 10 hits,
including doubles by Will
Harmon and Rod Wright and a
triple by Leon Bloodworth.
UF scored all the runs needed
in a three-run second inning.
After one was out, Skip
Lujack walked, Rod Gruber
singled him to third. Bloodworth

BATGIRLS STEAL SHOW

hit mto a force play at the plate
and Tom Eason bounced once at
South Florida third baseman
Dan Burch, who erred twice on
the play.
He fumbled the ground ball,
then threw wild to first as both
runners scored and Eason ended
up on second base.
The UF Batgirls stole the
show with their miniskirts as
they made their first appearance.
The Gators next home game
will be Monday afternoon, at 3
pjn., when they host St. Leo
College.
AHEM!
Gotham City Cave
SPORTS EDITOR:
I know nothing of Batgirls,
but if you need a Batman let me
know.
Sincerely,
Robin
& J|||
jf
f jB m
, / Bk
B Bi M I
\VS THAT TIME
... a familiar figure at Perry Field

Still Ends 15-Year Famine

ORLANDO (UPI) Veteran Ken Still earned his
first tournament victory in 15 years as a golf pro
Sunday by battling out of trouble on the final hole
to win the $115,000 Citrus Open as his closest
contenders fell victim to a 25-mile-per hour wind.
The 34-year-old Still, from Tacoma, Wash.,
started the day two strokes off the pace, but thanks
to the inability of the leaders to hold their pace, his
10-under-par 278 which he got with Sundays
2-under-par 70 was good enough for the $23,000
TirSt prize -11 nearly 1U times as much as he had won
previously this year.
Steady Miller Barber, who came in a half hour
| earlier with a 70-279 grabbed second place money
of $13,100 and Johnny Pott, who skied to a 74, and
Orville Moody, who had a 4-under-par 68 for the
final rounds best score, tied for third at 280.
Gay Brewer, who hasnt won a tournament since

VETERAN GOLFER SACKS CITRUS OPEN

South Florida
Galize 2b 4 0 3
Huff cf 3 0 0
McGary 3 0 2
Buzzella s* 3 0 0
Stuckie If 3 0 0
Brimm rs 3 0 0
Burch 3b 3 0 0
McCarthy 1b 3 0 0
Diaz p 28 0 2
Totals 28 0 2
Florida-4
Hannon, 1f 4 0 3
Williams ss 3 0 0
Picano 2b 0 0 0
Dobies cf 4 0 0
Turlington rs 4 0 1
Lujack 1b 2 0 1

W& m&hM talWi me ZM Bi
'rsS& X s ?
9H Hp |p % i|r -jr~->
RICK ARROYO
EYES FRONT
... the old batboy takes a glance at the new
All-Star High School Classic Set
The most outstanding prep football player in the state, quarterback
Eddie McAshan of Gainesville, heads a list of 33 names to the North
all-star team for the annual high school grid classic this summer.
McAshan, regarded as one of the greatest quarterback prospects in
Florida prep history, will have an outstanding offensive team to work
with, topped by runners like Jacksonville Wolfsons Bill Thompson
and Jeff Rouzie, pass receivers such as Wayne Wheeler of Orlando
Boone and an offensice line of size and speed.
The strong North team will be coached by Jim Niblack of
Gainesville High School. His assistants at GHS, Wesley Dicks and Gene
Roberts, will aide him in the game which is set for Florida Field,
August 2.

capturing the Masters in 1967, had a two-stroke lead
at 11-under with only seven holes left to play.
But he suffered a double bogey and two single
bogeys to lose four strokes over the next four holes
and wound up at 281 after shooting a 72.
Another stroke back at 282 were U.S. Open
Champion Lee Trevino who closed with a 70, Lee
Elder who had a 74, Dave Stockton with a 74 and
Tommy Weiskopf with a 72.
Still, whose best previous showings wptp
place finishes in the 1961 Cjyun Classic and the
1967 Phoenix Open, moved ahead with a birdie on
the 510-yard par-5 15th hole and then held his pace
by parring the rest of the way in.
But he almost forced himself into a Monday
playoff with Barber at No. 18 when he iofkd his
approach shot through the crowd surrounding the
green and behind the spectator stand.

Bloodworth 2b 2 11
McTheny as 2 2 0 0
Eason e 4 10
Sheffield p 10 1
Jacobs p 0 0 10
Pikren p 10 1
Totals 31 410
South Florida 000 000 000-0
Florida 030 010 OOx4
Diaz (L) 8 104 1 4 3
Sheffield (W) 3 10 0 13
Jacobs 3 1 0 0 4 3
Pickren 3 1 0 0 0 5
E-Burch 2. RBI Harmon,
Sheffield. LOB Florida 7, South
Florida 6. WP Sheffield.
2-B-McGary, Harmon,
3b-Bloodworth. T-2:00.



Alligator Services
TAMPA- UF set three
records on its way to the Jesuit
Invitational Track meet here
Saturday.
Gators scored 94 points,
Florida State claimed 67 points

Golfers Slice Past
FSU, Jax At Home

The Dolphins posted a 468. iSk m
Each team played eight
players and the low six scores v
figured in the total. i' Is --
Behind Melnyk came Mike
Estridge with a 70, Ronnie i t 'fFw *. I j
Mahood and John Darr 735, f.
Rick Spears, Andy North and
John Sale 74s and David Barnes T- v vs
75.
Mike Cheek and Ron Philo : w #
were low for the Seminoles with mci mvit
73s while Rick Stephens, former M EVE MELNYK
P.K. Yonge player, had a 74 as '' SKUnder -P ar
did Mit Layton while Jim Keebe
had a 75, Keebe also aced No. The crowd was a factor >
14 with a seven-iron. too, Bisho P & id We had a
Jacksonvilles low scores were good turnout and we played
Mitch Fields with a72 and Lee eight threesomes. There were
Smith 75. spectators following each
Gators next match will be match.
here against Georgia Tech on
Monday, March 24. When the Gators lost to FSU
Gator golf coach Buster at Tallahassee, the match was
Bishop said he was pleased with played over a match play route,
the play of Melnyk in fashioning The home team sets the method
his 66 and that of Estridge and of scoring, Bishop said. Medal
Mahood who continue to show play is the prevailing scoring
improvement. method used in most matches.

Gators Sign NJ All-Stater

Gary Ecker, a widely-sought
all-state linebacker from Clifton,
N.J., has signed a football
scholarship with, the UF, Gator
Director of Athletics Ray Graves
announced today.
Ecker, 6-0 and 205 pounds, is
the 33rd signee by UF. He plays
for the largest high school in the
State of New Jersey and is

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
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ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager,
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N Main St Phone 376-7 581

Gators Post Jesuit Track Win

FANNIN OUTSTANDING COLLEGE PERFORMER

and Florida A & M followed
with 14. Florida State won three
events. A&M finished no better
than second.
Jerry Fannin was voted the
outstanding college performer
after he set a meet record of
47.8 seconds in the 440 yard

described by Graves as an
exceptional and rugged athlete
who could play many
positions.

PERSONAL
CHEF
IS COMING

dash. Ron Jourdan raised the
high jump mark to 7 feet,
one-quarter inch, and Clint
Fowlkes leaped the 440 hurdles
in 52.0 seconds.
Ken Misner ran the two-mile
in 9:09.4 to give FSU its only
record.
In high school events, Tampa
Robinson won AA honors and
Tampa Catholic took the Class A
championship.
UF won most of the events
and Jack Bacheler, competing in
the open mile, took that in
4:11.1.
UF results:
Mile, 1, John Parker, 4:15.8;
. shot put, 1, John Morton,
3, Mike Gorhham; 440,
1, Jerry Fannin, :47.8; 100, 1,
Florida Boys
Top Signees
A study of the latest list of
football signees by Southeastern
Conference schools and the
major area independents indicate
the state of Florida is still
producing the largest number of
prep prospects.
There are 96 high school boys
from Florida already signed by
the 10 SEC schools plus
independents Georgia Tech,
FSU, Miami and Tulane. Next
most productive state, in terms
of numbers signed, is Mississippi v
with 73. There have been 69
boys signed from Alabama, 65
from Georgia, 54 from
Tennessee, 53 from Louisiana
and 12 from Kentucky.
Florida boys rank first among
signees by UF (29), FSU (26)
and Miami (3), while being
second with Alabama (6),
Georgia Tech (19), Auburn (3),
Vanderbilt (6), and Tennessee
(3 tied with number signed
from Georgia.
DELICIOUS I
fecU FINE FOOD I
I MOOSE'* at
student prices ||
Breakfast served I
I 1614 N. W. 13th ST. I

Roger Carson, :I0.0; high
hurdles, 2, Joe Schller; javelin,
1, Mike BozeDe 215-5,3, Warren
King; long jump, 1, Bozefle,
22-3; 2, Mike Burton; discus, 1,
Morton, 163-1; 2, Bob Romer;
3, John Courtney; 880 1, Bob
Lang, 1:53.7; 2, Eamonn
O'Keeffe; high jump, 1, Ron
Jourdan, 744; 440 hurdles, 1,
Clint Fowlkes, :52.0; 3, Tim

WANTED?
w
d
RAY BROWN
can b found at
SPORTSMANS BARBER
SHOP
University Plaza
1620 W. University Ave. 372-9129
. S - ,' - -- -
I THE BLAZER 9 I
I NOW
S| r
S ... is the blazer then, as far as we are con* 1
I cerned. Classics like this change little, please I
I always. Now, we add a ring scarf, possibly, I
8 or suggest you blaze away in fresh colors.. But I
1 our classic once more proves it is one. 1
8 Blazers from $50.00 8
Silk Scarves $4.00 S
I Stag n Drajj I
I 13 W. UNIV. GAINESVILLE MALL |

Monday, March 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Oakes; triple jump, 3, Grover;
two-mfle, 2, Parker; pole vftilt,
1, Hurley, 144); 3, Kent Heu9er;
mile relay, Florida.
I SH ? NS |
| "mm |
7th St. ft DAY 372-1379
mJjw^^^^lGHm794oo9|

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 10,1969

Netters Tie UM
In Pouring Rain
By JEFF FRANK
Alligator Tennis Correspondent
UF and Miami played to a 3-3 tennis deadlock Saturday on courts
slowed down by the rain.
It appeared the Gators might be on their way to a victory over the
strong Hurricanes, as they were leading in the doubles events when it
was called by UM Coach Dale Lewis because of darkness.
Lewis expressed disappointment at the tie, but UF Coach Bill
Potter said it was the first time in 18 years he hasnt lost in Miami.
The rivals had split the six singles matches but the Gators were
leading in two of the three doubles events.
UFs No. 1 player, Armi Neely, bowed to Miamis Pat Cramer 6-4,
6-4 and Steve Beeland, playing No. 2 Saturday lost to Luis Garcia 6-1,
10-8. Miamis other singles victory came when Stan Shambron topped
Paul Lunetta 6-8,6-1,6-2.
UFs wins came from Charlie Owens over Peyton Watson 6-4, 6-1;
Jamie Pressly against Steve Segal 6-2, 6-3; and Greg Hilley over Sven
Ginman 6-3,64.

Vols Win SEC
Depth Charge UF

UFs dominance of
Southeastern Conference
swimming for 13 years came to
an end Saturday. Tennessees
Volunteers won the SEC swim
meet.
In dethroning the Gators the
Vols showed excellent team
depth.
Scoring in all events on the
final night, Tennessee
overpowered the Gators 506 to
457, while Alabama was a
distant third with 335.
Host Vanderbilt with 203,
Georgia with 146 Vi, Kentucky
125& and Louisiana State with
72 rounded out the scoring.
This was the first year the
Bengals of LSU have sent a team
to the SEC Championships.
Tennessees Mike Naber gave
an indication of what was to
come Saturday night when he
clipped 20 seconds off the
1,650-yard freestyle mark to
open the evenings events.
Nabers time was 17:18.6.
Gator 400-yard freestyle relay
team established the only other
record on the final night by
turning the distance in 3:12.5.
With the two records set
Saturday night, a total of eight
new marks went into the SEC
swimming book over the
three-day meet.
1,650-yard Freestyle: 1. Mike
Naber, Tennessee, 17:18.6 (SEC
record, old mark 17:38.6), 2. Lee
French, Alabama, 3. Jim Labontagne,
Alabama, 4. Ed Struss, Kentucky, 5.
Ed Westlake, Tennessee, 6. Gary
McGhee, Tennessee, 7. Eric Wiley,
Vanderbilt, 8. Bobby Yann,
Alabama, 9. Bruce Page, Florida, 10.
John Martin, Georgia, 11. Bob
Couch, Alabama, 12. Jim Russo,
Louisiana State.
100-yard Freestyle:. 1. Andy
McPherson, Florida, 48.1, 2. Ed
Struss, Kentucky, 3. John Chapman,

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Tennessee, 4. John Conner,
Tennessee, 5. Jim Stokes, Georgia, 6.
Jeff Wade, Alabama, 7. Steve
Hairston. Florida, 8. Tom Ralph,
Tennessee, 9. Henry Hough, Florida,
10. Howie Kirk, Georgia, 11. Bill
Folk, Kentucky, 12. Skip Voves,
Florida.
200-yard Breaststroke: 1. Denis
Pursley, Alabama 2:16.5, 2. Jim
Baer, Tennessee, 3. Mark McKee,
Florida, 4. Dirk Van Hoesen,
Vanderbilt, 5. Jim Perkins, Florida,
6. Pete Schuller, Vanderbilt, 7. Dave
Demski, Alabama, 8. Art Watson,
Tennessee, 9. Gary Mauks, Kentucky,
10. Roy Stang, Georgia, 11, Bruce
Hackett, Vanderbilt, 12. Marci
Hunphries, Georgia.
200-yard Backstroke: 1. Frank
Lorge, Vanderbilt 2:03.1, 2. Bill
Strate, Florida, 3. Scot Palmer,
Tennessee, 4. Ralph Wright,
Alabama, 5. Steve Gilliam,
Tennessee, 6. Sam Sowell,
Vanderbilt, 7. Bruce Hirten,
Alabama, 8. Bob Bridges, Florida, 9.
Jim Powell, Kentucky, 10. Ken
Calender, Georgia, 11. Ron Young,
Vanderbilt, 12. Frank Hubbell,
Tennessee.
100-yard Butterfly: 1. (Tie) Bruce
Williams, Florida, Mike McDermott,
Tenness, :53.5, 3. Steve Gilliam,
Tennessee, 4. James Murphy, Florida,
5. John Champman, Tennessee, 6.
Craig McConnell, Tennessee, 7. Barry
Russo, Florida, 8. Jim Percy,
Tennessee, 9. Skip Voves, Florida,
10. Percy Ryland, LSU, 11. Norm
Frauenheim, Vanderbilt, 12. Jack
Hazen, Georgia.
3-Meter Diving: 1. Bob Link,
Florida 409.45, 2. Ray Smith,
Florida, 399.45, 3. Bill Ferry,
Tennessee, 396.45, 4. Tim Foulks,
Tennessee, 370.35, 5. Charles
Noonan, Alabama, 368.20, 6. Glen
Hoffman, Florida, 359.20, 7. Bruce
Ruoff, Tennessee, 338.30, 8. Dave
Wolfson, Georgia, 326.50, 9. Ed
Collins, Tennessee, 320.20 10.
George Brantly, Alabama, 317.10,
11. Steve Blume, Kentucky, 290.90,
12. Jim Burns, Alabama, 283.1 Q
400-yard Freestyle Relay: 1.
Florida (Andy McPherson, Steve
Hairston, Mark McKee, Bruce
Williams), 3:12.5 (SEC record, old
mark 3:13.8), 2. Alabama, 3.
Tennessee, 4. Georgia, 5. Vanderbilt,
6. Kentucky, 7. Louisiana State.

U Two Convenient Locations
These Prices Good Through Tuesday, March 11
SUPER RIGHT HARD CORN FED WESTERN
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ARGO ITALIAN cut TABLE SALT o for 23c
GREEN BEANS 16 can 2 for 25 $ 9
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WYLERS MARSHMELLOWS 10$
LEMONADE MIX 3 JOA SUNNY FIELD
our own -kg CORNFLAKES 12 27$
TEABAGS 125 BAGS 99$ ozBOX
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