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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 98

O'Connell Urges Non-Violence

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell in a face-to-face
meeting with more than 150
SSOC members and
sympathizers Thursday said he
would uphold his decision to
deny the group a charter, and
pleaded with the group to take
no violent action.
Its (violent action) not
going to help you, he said. Its
not going to help the
institution.
The confrontation came
outside OConnells office on the
second floor of Tigert Hall, after
the group held a rally on the
Plaza of the Americas.
OConnell was grilled by
many of the students, who
questioned his denial of
recommendation by the
student-faculty Student
Organizations Committee which
said the group should be granted
a charter and recognized by the
university. The presidents
answer was simple.
I disagreed with it, he said.
Another student asked why,
after going through all the
technical channels of requesting
a charter, SSOC was not granted
one.
The mere going through
channels doesnt always mean
that youll get what you want,
he said.
One of the presidents reasons
for not recognizing the group
was that outside people may

jH H ; B fl -/".-
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1 O'CONNELL IN CONFRONTATION WITH SSOC
... crowd of 150 in Tigert Hall

The
Florida Alligator

VOWS TO UPHOLD SSOC DECISION

O'CONNELL: "THE MERE GOING THROUGH CHANNELS DOESN'T ALWAYS MEAN THAT YOU'LL GET WHAT YOU WANT."
... disagrees with recommendation by the Student Organizations Committee to recognize SSOC

take part in the groups
meetings.
Steve McGuire, a member of
the Young Democrats, said his
group often included
non-students, as did many other
campus groups.
OConnell then said there
may be a need to look into
other groups charters if it is
shown there are non-students
participating.
OConnell refused to argue
the merits of his decision, but
said there is probably a need for
some guidelines as deciding
which groups will use the
facilities of the union.
One SSOC member, Ray
Olesky, summed up the general
feeling of the gathering with a

University of Florida, Gainesville

final statement.
You are one who has
over-ruled the wishes of a
majority; that is not a
democracy, he said.
The rally, prior to the Tigert
sit-in, had been interrupted by
rain, and thfe group of more than
400 had moved under the
colonade in front of the
graduate library.
Three Florida State
University students who were
among the 59 arrested Tuesday
night were at the rally, and one
of them, Mike Kirsch, told the
group of his experiences in the
arrest.
He said the students arrested
were placed in small cells and
were not allowed to see or talk
to a lawyer until they were
arraigned before the Leon
County judge.
Dr. Robert R. Renner,
member of the American
Federation of Teachers (AFT),

OF REGISTERING organizations

Mautz Says Colleges
Should Change System

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
State University Chancellor
Robert Mautz suggested a
system of simply registering
student organizations, Thursday,
as a solution to the current
problems of university
presidents in recognizing or not
recognizing student groups.
I dont like the present
policy of the Board of Regents
concerning approval or
non-approval of student
r>rpani7atinns he said
There is a question as to the
wisdom of this policy but it will
stand effective until the regents
see fit to change it, Mautz said.
I would assume the
might raise the
question and I might also, he
said.
The day of approval or

said there was no reason for
OConnells decision, and said
the AFT felt SSOC should have
been granted a charter.
President OConnells
decision was unfortunate, he
said.
Renner said SSOC should
have been given a chance to
prove they would operate within
the law.
Let them be unlawful, he
said, and then deny their
charter.
Ed Freeman, SSOC member,
and past spokesman, told a story
of a young boy who after trying
for days to catch a squirrel
finally captured one and said he
was greatly aided by having a
dumb squirrel.
And thats what the
administration is, Freeman
said, a bunch of dumb
squirrels.
And the dumbest squirrel is
the Vice President of Student

non-approval is really a day of
the past, he said.
Mautz said the decisions of
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and acting Florida
State University President
Stanley Marshall in denying
recognition of SSOC and SDS
chapters were made by the
presidents prior to the boards
action and without official
pressure.
Mautz did not have any
comments on the Thursday rally
by the Southern Students
Organizing Committee but he
did say the day to day"
administration of the campus
has to be the responsibility of
the president.
If I make decisions for this,
then I become the president and
I am not him and would not
want to be him, he said.
Mautz said he had not lost

Friday, March 1, 1969

Affairs, our own Lester Hale,
he said.
Dr. David Kurtzman told the
group that a man keeps a
position of authority only as
long as he responsibly exercises
it.
He said OConnell had not
responsibly exercised his
authority.
Dr. Kenneth Megill, himself
the center of the recent Slade
letter controversy, said he
expected some good to come
from the student reaction to the
charter denial.
The UF within the next
week will make a step toward
becoming a liberal institution,
he said.
He said the problems at FSU
were not student-caused.
The violence at FSU did not
come from the students, did not
come from faculty, did not
come from the administration, it
came from the police, he said.

any faith in the students of the
universities.
I guess I am an incurable
optimist about human beings
and therefore I have faith in the
students, he said.
ROBERT MAUTZ
... suggests plan

America's
Number I
Collage
Daily



Page 2

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 7, 1969

Student, Faculty Humor Punctuates Protest

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TOM KENNEDY
"I WOULDNT BE A VERY GOOD ONE
... to lead a takeover"
Regents Chief Here Friday
D. Burke Kibler, chairman of the Board of Regents, will be
the main speaker at the initiation ceremonies of UFs Phi Kappa
Phi honor society Friday.
Kibler will speak on quantitative and qualitative
requirements for higher education in Florida. He will discuss the
roles of various junior colleges and universities and establish the
responsibilities of these institutions.
Phi Kappa Phi is an honor society recognizing outstanding
scholarship achievement in all fields.
The initiation will be at 4 p.m. in the Reitz Union
auditorium. The public is invited.

Most Student Leaders Convinced
Outside Influence Led OConnell

Student leader reaction to the denial of a charter
for SSOC by UF President Stephen C. OConnell is
strong and in disagreement with the president.
All are still in agreement that there was no
acceptable reason for the charter incident, and most
feel that there were outside pressures that played
heavily in OConnells decision.
Typical of these is Student Senate majority
leader, Charles Harris who, while in complete
disagreement with the phflosophies of SSOC is also
in complete disagreement with the present policy of
OConnell.
OConnell denied recognition to SSOC because
of political feelings in the state rather than the
excuses he gave students yesterday: tiis
justifications for denying should apply to all
organizations that have outside members such as
Veterans Club, American Civil Liberties Union and
numerous other organizations, said Harris.
Student Senate President Jack Vaughn disagreed
with OConnell for another reason:
SSOC has a right to espouse their goals but
OConnell feels that by granting the charter he is
endorsing the organizations philosophy, which he

definitely isnt. If SSOC should start a disruption
then OConnell could just dump the charter without
giving the leaders their present issue to raise.
IFC President Steve Zack has adopted a wait
and see attitude until OConnell clarifies his
reasons. I am still unalterably opposed to the
action but whatever action is taken must be
examined well before it is implemented.
Pete Zinober, Honor Court Chancellor, had this
to say: I also alienate myself from the SSOC
viewpoint. I feel there was a great deal of outside
pressure on OConnell but I object most strongly
with his arbitrariness. He set up an advisory board
and various channels of communication in this
university and how
those he asked. He thwarted these channels and
made them meaningless and himself a dictator.
Student Body Treasurer Phil Burnett chose to
take a middle view of the situation. He felt SSOC
should not be granted a charter but should be
allowed to use the university facilities. If we
charter them however we leave ourselves open for
funding requests and I think there are areas where
student money can be used more wisely.

There were bits and pieces of humor amid
Thursdays student protest. Some came from
faculty, some from administrators, some from
students.
Interfraternity Council past president, James
Devaney, addressed the assembly outside the
graduate research library. Devaney was a member of
the committee on student organizations which had
recommended by a 5-4 vote that the SSOC be
recognized.
The crew cut graduate student related his
research to the audience.
In the history of the school, said Devaney,
only three groups have been denied a charter.
Besides SSOC, charters were denied to a sky-diving
club and a scuba-diving club.
A spokesman for the Young Democrats told UF
President Stephen C. OConnell that his group also
permitted non-student participation. It was for that
reason OConnell denied the charter of the radical
SSOC Wednesday.
OConnell began to say that maybe their charter

WONT CHANGE DECISION

Decision Was Mine,
O'Connell Tells SG

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell Thursday night stood
firm on his decision to deny
SSOC a university charter.
OConnell, reiterating himself
on numerous occasions, puffed
his cigar and again and again told
student leaders and members of
Student Senate, Interhall
Council and Florida Blue Key
that the decision he made was
his own and that he would
continue to stand his ground
against attacks on his policy
decision.
His main argument for
denying the charter was the fact
that non-students are allowed
membership in SSOC.
Student Rights Committee
Chairman Clyde Ellis said many
organizations on campus, such as
the Veterans Club, Symphony
Band, and the American Civil
Liberties Union also have
non-student members and
questioned the validity of
OConnells argument.
I agree Clyde. We are not
consistent in what we do and
this is something we have to
recognize. But these charters did
not come to me for approval.
There is nothing I can do about
them. Student Government
approved them, OConnell said.

OConnell also brought out
the fact that if student
organizations were chartered
under student government then
SG has a responsibility to review
these organizations and require
regular examination of their
purposes and membership.
Students questioned
OConnell at the special senate
meeting in the Rathskeller as to
additional evidence he may have
used in making his decisions.
OConnell denied any outside
influence in the persons of
legislators or Board of Regents
members restating the decision
was his own.
However he did say he had a
great fear of people who will use
this university for purposes
where they have nothing to lose.
We have infiltrators already on
this campus and they have
demonstrated they can and will
use the university for purposes
not in accordance with the
university.
A hypothetical question was
raised to the President: If
SSOC changed its charter to

Taylor Urges Solidarity
In the second face-to-face confrontation of the day, more than 250
members of SSOC were advised by student leaders to accept a
long-term solution to the present charter problem.
They were told by Student Body President Clyde Taylor that
although there was an apparent student backing for their cause on
campus, they were still a minority.
I do not think a majority of students on campus would agree with
you, Taylor said. I would propose your leaders meet with us as
opposed to organizing some sort of demonstration.
Taylor suggested two solutions. The first was two methods of
recognition of campus groups.
The first method was official recognition and the second was a
method of registration for student-oriented groups.
The second solution would be the acceptance of clear-cut criteria
for official recognition.
Other student leaders then spoke and answered questions
concerning further action.
At one point an obviously perturbed Manny James, Florida Blue
Key president, told them to do anything they wanted to but not
expect student support.
JamJslaid^ 6 Uni n Tigert Hall, take hby y urself
~~ questions^ erS vith behind to answefmo're~
UF Students See Mautz, Kibler
of the State uXrshy^te^' 16 B MaU Z Chancel,or
controversy and*seek some diSCUSS

should be revoked but then restated his reply.
Maybe we should look into other charters for the
same reason.
OConnell is one of the most influential
Democrats in the state.
A sign on the wall of the student union said:
SSOC it toem.
State senate minority leader, Bill Young of St.
Pete, was visiting with OConnell when the 150
students descended upon his office.
1 really didnt know what was going on, said
Ycrung. I was just here for a friendly visit with my
old friend and I was leaving his office when I saw all
these students coming down the hall. I decided to
stay and look around.
Controversial philosophy professor, Dr. Kenneth
Megill, quipped about what he meant by takeover
of the university.
I dont know how they would ever expect me
to take over Tigert Hall. I went over to OConnells
office this week for the first time. I couldnt even
find it and got lost. I wouldnt be a very good one
to lead a takeover.

allow only student members
would OConnell then approve
it?
This question was already
raised this afternoon. But Ed
Freeman said he would not
change any part of the charter,
OConnell said.
Students reminded OConnell
that the majority of the students
were against his decision and felt
the SSOC should be granted the
charter.
I was told this decision
would be contrary to a great
deal of the students. In fact
Lester Hale (Vice President of
Student Affairs) told me I must
be concerned with their views. I
am concerned with their views
but I cant let their views control
mine like I hope you wont let
mine control yours.
I cant accept the view that
students should run this
university. If the day ever came
that students should have
complete control then they
would have to find their own
facilities to use and this would
be difficult to do.



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'LET SSOC MEET ON CAMPUS'
Senate Opposes Facility Ban

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
Board of Regents Chainfian D. Burke Kibler said
Thursday the Regents statement on SSOC and SDS
came after UF President Stephen C. OConnells
recognition decision to prevent any charges of
interference into the administration of any
individual university.
The Regents statement declared that two
radical-oriented organizations, SSOC and SDS,
cannot be recognized by any university for which
this board has responsibility.
Kibler said todays statement was not a new
policy but an interpretation of a policy made last

IN SSOC CHARTER CONTROVERSY

Regents Deny Interference

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
In a compromise move
Thursday night, the Student
Senate passed with two
dissenting votes a resolution
strongly opposing the denial of
direct use of UF facilities to
SSOC.
We further add our support
through all means at our
disposal, to provide facilities for
this group, in lieu of the fact
that several organizations, not
consisting entirely of UF
students, are presently utilizing
these facilities, the resolution
added.
The bill, which was originally
introduced by Sen. Clyde Ellis
and Majority Floor Leader

OKLAHOMA MAKES PROTEST SCENE

By United Press International
A student was seriously injured as a result of a bombing at
San Francisco State College as 17 students were arrested during
a protest demonstration Thursday at Oklahoma Christian
in continuing nationwide campus turmoil.
Black militants threatened to close down New Jerseys
Rutgers University unless their demands were met.
Sit-ins ended at Massachusetts Brandeis University and
Holyoke Community College but 74 Brandeis students faced
disciplinary action. An overnight sit-in at the state university of
New Yorks Geneseo campus ended when officials agreed to a
discussion.
A sit-in continued in protest of a tuition hike at fashionable
Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, N.Y.
Warrants charging burglary and criminal damage to property
were issued for two persons allegedly involved in the invasion by
black students of Northwestern Universitys Triangle fraternity
house.
Three students were suspended at the University of
which brought the National Guard to the Madison campus.
Twenty-nine Stanford University students said they would
refuse to pay $ 1,900 in university imposed fines for disrupting a
Jan. 14 trustees meeting. The university said the fines must be
paid before the 29 are allowed to register for the next term.
Students for a Democratic Society announced, it had
organized the disorder which drove Dr. S.l. Hayakawa, president
of San Francisco State College, from a University of Colorado

Ed Freeman Talks To Crowd Os 400 Students At SSOC Rally Thursday

Charles Harris had called for the
censure of UF President
Stephen C. OConnell for
denying SSOC the use of campus
facilities.
Harris later said the use of the
word censure had been Elliss
idea and that he had always
intended to amend it and
remove this word.
The compromise amendment
was introduced by Minority
Floor Leader Scott Holloway
with the approval of Harris.
There had previously been
opposition by members to
mention disapproval of
OConnells action.
An amendment to delete the
entire last paragraph by Sen.
Stewart Hershey leaving only
statements supporting the
general rights of students had

fall prohibiting campus recognition of any
organization advocating the use of violence.
He called SDS and SSOC evil influences and
said they are the most insolent of all people when
it comes to the rights of others.
The board is determined that freedom not
become a license for those who are bent upon
destroying the environment which must surround
the academic community in order that it may
function, the statement said.
On the subject of approval of campus
organizations by university administrations, Kibler
said, There may not be any point to recognizing or
not recognizing any student groups. We are going to
re-examine our policy.

speakers platform early this week.
Student leaders at nearby Denver University issued a
statement condemning the Boulder, Colo., disruption, saying
unreasoned violence and obscene action does not constitute
rational disagreement.
The bomb-injured San Francisco State student was identified
as Timothy Peebles, 19, East Palo Alto, Calif., who was blinded
and had both hands shattered.
Peebles was found on the floor of a locker room in the
creative arts building Wednesday night after the bomb exploded
while classes were being held in the building. Peebles was
charged with arson and carrying explosives. Another Negro
youth was sought. It was the third bombing since the start of a
student strike Nov. 6.
The 17 arrests at Oklahoma Christian College, Oklahoma
City, resulted when students attempted a sit-in Tuesday at the
administration building to protest disciplining 14 students for
attending an all-night party. The protesters were charged with
trespassing.
Other scenes of campus protest included:
____ Wisconsin-Beloit College officials announced,that a fire in the
kitchen of the college infirmary Wednesday was caused by
molotov cocktails thrown through a window. A number of
students boycotted classes Wednesday in support of demands
from black students.
Michigan-A rumor control center was established Thursday
to ease tension at troubled Ferris State College, where black and
white students battled with fists and clubs a week ago. Police
arrested 263 students involved in a lock-in this week.

previously been defeated.
Hershey later unsuccessfully
sought to have the resolution
referred to committee and
action deferred.
SG Vice President Gary
Goodrich made a strong plea in
favor of the original resolution.
He called the issue of
non-student membership of
SSOC an idea dug up to
support the administrations
denial of the charter.
Floor Leader Harris made a
strong plea for the senate to take
some stand on the matter before
adjourning.
I have definite reservations
about recognition of SSOC but I
do believe that the SSOC has the
right to hold meetings in the
union in their own name,
Harris said.

P
GARY GOODRICH
... "stronger bill"
%
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HHHHHHhiHH
CHARLIE HARRIS
... introduces bill

Friday, March 7, 1969, The Florida AHigator,

FSU Strike
Flounders;
All Quiet
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
student strike foundered in
indifference and a day4ong rain
Thursday after the state board
of regents upheld acting Florida
State University President
Stanley Marshalls denial of
official recognition to Students
for a Democratic Society.
Little impact on class
attendance was noticeable
because of the strike and student
protesters who went to a lightly
attended noon rally admitted it
was a feeble attempt. One girl
said it was obvious that there is
not a great deal of interest in a
strike.
But the group of about 60
students many of whom were
arrested Tuesday night for
violating an injunction against
holding a meeting on campus
decided to continue the two-day
boycott of classes Friday and
push for an open day of
discussion Monday.
SSOC Rally
SSOC leaders decided late
Thursday night to hold a rally
on the Plaza of the Americas at
2:30 p.m. today. Steve Fahrer,
spokesman for the group, said
the meeting would be to tell
the students they have no
power, and to decide on
further action.

Box Score
Teams Points
S.F. STATE 17
OKLA. CHRISTIAN 17
BRANDEIS 74
NORTHWESTERN 2
WISCONSIN 3
STANFORD 29
FERRIS STATE 263

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 7, 1989

NEW SELF-HELP POUCY

Drug Council Being Formed

As a part of a new self-help
policy aimed at students, the
Inter fraternity Council will
sponsor a newly-organized drugs
council, to be divorced entirely
from UF administration.
We are setting this up not
only for fraternity members,
said IFC President Steve Zack,
but for any student who desires
help in kicking the drug habit.
Right now, the only course of
referral is through the infirmary,
which means putting yourself on
record with the administration
as a drug user, he said. That
can ruin a students career.
There should be a better way.

Gatorade: Court Bound?

Ownership of the rights to
Gatorade will be the topic of a
Board of Regents subcommittee
meeting next week a meeting
at which more than likely a
recommendation will be made to
take the question to court.
At the meeting, said Julius F.
Parker, chairman of the
Tallahassee Regents
subcommittee investigating the
ownership rights and members
of the Gatorade Trust made up
of Gatorade inventor Robert
Cade and several associates, will
be asked to make a suitable offer
of settlement.
If the offer is acceptable to
the subcommittee, it will
recommend to the full Board of
Regents meeting in April that
the settlement be accepted,
Parker said. If not, the Regents
would be asked to take the case
to court.
I am not hopeful that it can
be settled out of court, Parker
said.

Trial For Accused
Flag-Burner Reset
The trial of accused flag-burner John Claxton, after repeated delays
and changes, has been rescheduled for March 17. Judge John A. H.
Murphree will hear the case beginning at 9:30 a.m. in the Alachua
County Courthouse.
Claxton wiii be tried under the state statute governing violations of
defacing an American flag. This charge is a felony and carries a
penalty for conviction of imprisonment in a state penitentiary and a
fine.
He is charged with burning a small American flag at an SDS
apolitical raDy held the night of the national election returns.
Gainesville police arrested Claxton as he left a meeting of
SDS-SSOC in the Reitz Union a week later.
Claxton was originally going to be tried under a city ordinance and
he was scheduled for trial first on Nov. 17 and then on Dec. 3,1968.
The city ordinance conviction carries a fine of S4OO and/or 60 days in
jail.
In December city charges were dropped against Claxton and the
state took up the case. Flag burning is also a federal offense and is
punishable by SI,OOO fine and/or one year in jail.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 in 1 nr or 53.50 per quarter.
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertiserent involving tv pographk'al errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to thy \dvertisin Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. 1 he Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduledto run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion. J -- --

The IFC and the Fraternity
Advisers Assn, in a Jan. 28
statement pledged the
leadership and resources of the
IFC to the establishment of a
permanent drug counselling
committee ... for aD students.
The IFC is undertaking the
project because it needs to be
done, and no one else had taken
any measures toward helping,
Zack said.
The problem has been with
us for years, he said, and no
student organization would step
in. The IFC saw a need, and set
about fulfilling it. Any other
group which would like to pitch
in is welcome.

Under a settlement
agreement, Stokely-Van Camp
would pay a portion of the
rights to the trust and the rest to
the university. Stokely presently
gives all royalty rights to the
trust organization.
This is assuming that HEW
(Health, Education and Welfare)
is willing to give up the rights it
claims, Parker said. HEW
claims it has these rights because
Cade developed Gatorade under
an HEW grant. It hasnt
indicated it will give up its
claims in this case, although it
has done so for other
universities.
At the Thursday meeting,
representatives of the Gatorade
trust, which sold the rights to
Stokely-Van Camp Corp;
Stokely-Van Camp, presently
producing Gatorade;
representatives of the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare; and the

Zack sees the council as a
referral agency, made up of
professionals who can direct the
student to help without using
university channels.
We are presently looking for
physicians who would like to
help with the committee, he
said.
Bob Zeigler, Administrative
Vice President of the IFC, will
take applications until the
council is complete.
In addition to the drug
council, IFC will make available
films on drug treatment and
prevention to dorm or
off-campus groups. All expenses
will be borne by IFC.

Board of Regents will be
present.
Gatorade will not be a topic
of discussion for the Regents
when they meet today for their
monthly meeting.

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SURGE 1 Paid
Student Lobby
By LYNNE FIRKINS
Alligator Correspondent
UF student leaders are setting up a professional lobby in
Tallahassee.
Called Project SURGE its purpose is to present the feelings
of the states university students to the governing bodies of the
State of Florida.
Such organizations shall include the governor, the
Legislature, the Board of Regents, and the Cabinet.
SURGE stands for Students for Responsible Government.
SURGE will establish a permanent paid lobby in Tallahassee
for the express purpose of presenting student problems and
views on all legislation which is related to higher education or
student interests.
The bill forming SURGE was introduced in the UF Student
Senate by Majority Leader Charles Harris.
The lobby will try to show legislators that there are
responsible students on campus, the 22-year-old Harris said.
Our universities currently suffer under inadequate budgets
and tuition continues to rise, he said.
The lobby will be a united front. Students presently dont
have any way of representing themselves, Harris said.
Applications for all positions for Project SURGE are now
being accepted in room 331 of the Reitz Union. No previous SG
experience is necessary.

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So no matter what size car you're
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FOR UNION BOARD

Fate Os Charters:
Chopping Block

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Two Union Board charters
are now on the chopping block
at the discretion of UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
The Union Board of Managers
passed a revised charter retaining
a two-board managing program
consisting of a program council
and the Board of Managers. The
two boards would be
independent of each other.
The Student Senate Tuesday
night passed a one-board plan
charter combining the program
board and the board of
managers.
Jack Vaughn, student senate
president, has been in
attendence at all union managers
board meetings concerning the
revised charter. He is the author
of the student senate charter.
He feels that the aims of the
union can best be accomplished
under the one-board plan
because programs are the most
essential part of the union
operations. By disassociating
program plans from other
divisions, such as budget
planning, some of the
effectiveness of the union is
lost.
Vice chairman of the board
of managers, John Englehart,
explained the boards objections
to the one-board plan.
With a two system operation
the board is too spread out to
function effectively.
Vaughn said that the
one-board plan would definitely
enhance the effectiveness of the
union for this very reason since
the programs would be in direct
working correlation with each
other rather than operating
independently of each other.
The union has not been
meeting the needs of the
students. This charter gives the
students a chance to relate with
the union, said Administrative
Assistant Mark Glick.
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich said, This new
charter eliminates the present
Romper Room approach to
union management. It puts the
elected president of the union in
his chairmanship capacity of the
Board of Managers where he
needs to be to represent the
students who elected him.
Also on the agenda was the
Physical Education resolution.
At the first presentation it
recommended that P.E. be
required for six quarters.
Senators objected and deleted
this from the resolution.

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The approved resolution asks
that P.E. be given one credit per
quarter, graded on a
satisfactory-unsatisfactory basis,
and will begin September 1969.
This is a change from the
present no-credit system with A
through E grades.
The original proposal to the
P.E. department asked for
voluntary P.E. The committee
assigned to investigate the
proposal changed the beginning
philosophy to mandatory P.E.
The chairman of the
committee, Joyce Miller, said
the reason for the change was
due to research the committee
had done on the subject of
voluntary versus mandatory
physical education.
Senators objected to the
change in plans by the six man
committee and had the
mandatory section cut for future
study with a possible new
resolution concerning the
voluntary-mandatory point.
The Honor Court requested a
change in the constitution to
have the Honor Court
Chancellor elected in the spring
general election, giving him the
authority to appoint the clerk,
attorney general, chief defense
counsel and a bailiff.
The move was made to
facilitate the heavy case load
presently before the honor
court.
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Friday. March 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 7, 1969

Campus Life
Invites Students
The College Life Meeting
Sunday night at the Pi Kappa
Alpha fraternity house has been
opened to all interested students
and faculty.
Sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ International,
College Life meets on Sundays
at 9:15 p.m.

FOR ARTS & SCIENCES

New Advisor SystemOked

UFs College of Arts and
Sciences has taken the first steps
in a move to give students
greater participation and
responsibility in the affairs of
the college.
A new advisor system will
allow each student to have a
specific advisor instead of being
assigned a different one each
time he requests help.
Dr. Harry H. Sisler, dean of
the college, explained that this
hopefully will eliminate the
student complaints that they

FEA Taps Top Teachers

Florida teachers were
awarded the Distinguished
Service Award last week at the
annual meeting of the John
Dewey Society.
The award, given to the
teachers through the Florida
Education Association, was in
recognition of the highly
courageous and effective actions
of the teachers of Florida during
1968 on behalf of better
learning conditions for children
and youth.
The teachers were
commended for the leadership
shown and service rendered by
so many Florida teachers at the
risk of and, in many instances, at
the cost of serious personal
hardship.
Many teachers in the state
went on strike last spring in
protest of insufficient funds
allocated for the school system.
The Distinguished Service to
Education Award was given to
the state teachers for giving
tangible support to innovation
and experimentation in
developing new and successful
programs, taking a heavy
share of responsibility for
meeting the needs of the large
community it serves, and

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feel like a number.
Each student will have a
computer-programmed status
report to clarify credit and hours
received. This, in combination
with the advisor plan, will give
the student great latitude in
course selection, said Sisler.
The requirements for
graduation have been simplified
to allow a greater range of
courses a student may take.
Ninety hours are now needed for
graduation instead of 96, and
half the students credits must
be outside his major. The

demonstrating a capacity to
change with the changing
conditions and needs of the
time.
Presenting the award was Dr.
Glen Hass, president of the John
Dewey Society and professor of
education at UF.
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pass-fail system will permit
students to take one course each
quarter without credit.
A new Advisement Council,
comprised of six faculty
members and three students, will
review regulations and
advisement procedures and
recommend changes where
necessary.
A 2 5-member Student
Council has been elected and
meets regularly with Sisler.
Currently the council is studying
teacher recognition and course
evaluation methods.

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Student 'Defense Loans Sliced 15 Per Cent

Approximately 1,400 UF students were
informed Wednesday their National Defense
Education Act (NDEA) loans will be cut by 15
per cent next quarter.
Director of Financial Aid I. Douglas Turner
said Wednesday he was told last August the UF
would be getting about $28,000 less than was
originally awarded.
The financial aid office had to decide then
whether to cut loans 20 per cent right away or
wait and see how many students dropped out of
the loan program, he said.
Because we waited and so many students
dropped the program, he said, we were able to

Rusty Plays It Cool,
Passes Spacesuit Test

SPACE CENTER, Houston (UPI) Feeling
fine, astronaut Russell L. Rusty Schweickart
casually strolled through space Thursday in a
flawless test of the moonsuit with the water-cooled
underwear that the first lunar explorers will wear.
Boy, oh boy, what a view, radioed the rookie
spaceman as he stepped onto the moon landing
machines front porch that the first American will
walk down to set foot on the moon. Theres the
moon right over there.
Later, when Apollo 9 put on its second television
transmission from space, commander James A.
McDivitt aimed the camera out a window of the
lunar lander and showed home viewers with
spectacular clarity what Schweickart had been
talking about.
The cone-shaped end of the spacecraft was
clearly visible in the foreground, with the Southern
United States, veiled in clouds, unrolling in the
background far away.
Handrails and the hatch of the command ship
stood out in sharp detail, and astronaut David

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get by with just cutting the loans about 15 per
cent.
Turner said he plays a guessing game
because he must notify students how much has
been awarded them before he gets the final word
on how much the UF has been awarded.
For the last two years. Turner said the
financial aid office has oeen playing it tight
awarding as much money as they dare.
By doing this, we were able to increase the
number of students receiving NDEA loans last
year by 600. he said.
Three years ago 1,136 students received
NDEA loans, while last year 1,700 students
received funds. Turner estimated that 1,400
students are now on the loan program.

Scotts face and waving hand were clearly visible in
one window.
Flight controllers ordered Schweickart to forego
the spacewalk after he vomited twice Wednesday
morning, but he reported feeling fine at the start
of the fourth day of the 10-day Apollo 9 mission
and was allowed a shortened version of it, walking
around the outside of the lunar lander.
/ The 33-year-old civilian scientist was outside for
3714 minutes and exposed to deadly airless space for
a total of 48 minutes from the time he first opened
the lunar landers hatch until he locked it shut
again.
While he stood in the open hatch, clambered
around trying out handrails and took pictures from
the front porch, McDivitt stayed inside the lunar
lander and Scott stood up in the open hatch of the
Apollo command craft.
During the walk, Scott in the command ship was
known, in their radio lingo, as Gumdrop, McDivitt
in the lander was Spider, and Schweickart, in
effect a separate orbiting spacecraft himself, was
called Red Rover.

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Friday, March 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Last year the UF loaned SI million, but
Turner said only about 5900.000 would be
loaned out this year.
This is partly due to the increasing number
of junior colleges and new four-year colleges, he
said. As the number increases, the slices in the
financial pie get smaller.
Ninety cents out of each dollar loaned is
supplied by the Federal Government, while the
remaining 10 cents is supplied by UF through the
National Defense Loan Matching Fund.
Turner said if students whose loans have been
cut need more money, there are funds available
in either the UF long-term or short-term loan
funds.

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 7, 1969

Page 8

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
** th< **erci*e of responsibility-"
Harold Aldrich
7 Editor-In-Chief
PiC t/ktkjth Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor

EDITORIAL
Stop Talking
Theres been a lot of talk lately.
SSOC was denied a campus charter by President Stephen
OConnell and everything from upholding free speech to
abolishing free speech has been bantered around by
hundreds of students all over campus.
SSOC members are talking, other radicals are talking,
student leaders are talking, non-active students are talking.
The game today is talking.
Fine. But if were going to talk about the issue facing this
university today, lets talk in specifics rather than in vague,
emotional generalities.
The issue is whether the University of Florida should or
should not be in the business of recognizing
student-related organizations.
The answer is no.
OConnell has repeatedly asserted that this question is
not now up for debate. Right or wrong, he contends, the
university is in the business of approving and/or
disapproving the opportunity for student groups to meet
with sanction on the campus.
OConnell is also correct when he cites chapter and verse
from Board of Regents policies which instruct the university
administration to make these decisions.
It is also highly likely that even if OConnell had ruled in
SSOCs favor, the regents would have overturned the
decision.
So, despite the fact that OConnell made an apparently
unpopular and, in our opinion, unwise decision, the blame
for his having the responsibility and the power to make the
decision at all is not his.
The blame must rest clearly with the Board of Regents.
Because the board, not OConnell, has through its own
policies created an atmosphere on Florida campuses
conducive to the exercise of arbitrary whim by
administrators.
All the demonstrations, protests, speeches, or building
takeovers being executed or planned during this crisis are
not going to change the fact that the Board of Regents,
established under the laws of the people of Florida, calls the
shots.
The place to focus discontent with the decision not to
allow SSOC on campus is not in the hallway in front of
OConnells office.
It is at the Board of Regents office in Tallahassee.
It must be recognized as a fact of life, though, that
violence or the threat of violence will not change the policy.
The policy must be changed legally.
And if the regents are not willing to provide a climate of
freedom, political and academic, on Floridas campuses,
then the question should be taken to the courts of our land.
The ACLU said in a resolution passed Thursday night
that they stand ready to furnish legal help where needed.
They should coordinate other campus groups in seeking
revision of the regents policy and then, if the regents
chicken out, file suit.
If the Supreme Court disagrees, then SSOC can say with
truth that they have fought through all the channels and
failed.
But until then, lets stop talking and start acting.
The Florida All igator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial Business. Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392 1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the Univeratv of Florida."
S-- --

The most amazing thing
about UF Campus Radicals is
the way they arrange their
priorities.
Its not as if OConnells
decision to refuse recognition to
SSOC caught any one of them
by surprise. On the contrary,
many of them would likely have
been disappointed if he had not.
But the uproar that has
surrounded this most recent
campus controversy makes it all
seem like the repeal of the Bill
of Rights.
One wonders what would
happen with SSOC if a real issue
ever came up.
Student Government may be
a corrupt and underhanded
group of aspiring politicians. But
meanwhile, they sponsor
constructive projects such as
SAMSON and Concern.
SSOC may stand and cheer
Black militants like JOMO on to
victory as they drill and salute in
the best tradition of the White
American Dream. But
somewhere in another ghetto,
other Black children suffer an
emptiness that mock guns,
uniforms and firebombs cannot
fill. An inadequate standard of
education. Not enough food.
Activists rail against Tigerts
unfairness while, across town,
White students who live next to
Black high schools are being
bussed miles to GHS where they
can brush elbows with nice clean
White kids.
Radicals, young, healthy, and
involved with life, shout
themselves hoarse for
understanding while somewhere
a man who was too sensitive to
digest the coarse elements of
life is throwing up behind a bar.
While SSOC parades its own
personal disgruntlement with
affairs here at the university,
thousands of quietly desperate
people huddle in poverty and
near-despair, hoping, not for
violent revolution, not for
ego-inflating concessions, not for
publicity or the opportunity to
inspire fear, but merely for the
kind of concrete improvements
that make life more livable.
Their enemy is not the
establishment but rather
established ignorance,
established injustice. They hope
not to hurt but to bring an end
to hurting.
There are injustices in this
world, even on this campus.
Compared with most of them,
OConnells refusal to recognize
SSOC amounts to a trifle.
There exists loneliness, anger,
fear, hatred in this world that
makes the SSOC situation look
like a middie-ciasS heaven.
Just now a message came over
the phone saying the SSOC
walked out on SG. Said SG was
against them, that SG sold out.
Who are the real sellouts?

The American Dream

Sold Out

It Went Beautifully, DeGaulle Even Saw Me To The Airport
. . MY BILLFOLD!
Speaking Out
Youre Right, Harold
:
By John Hoag
The Florida Alligator is a very good student newspaper. Some
members of the staff are very smug about this fact. Too smug.
Journalism 301 students are generally considered the chaff of the
crop by the Alligator staff members. The 301 students who really
write well are staff members anyway, according to the self-loving
staff.
Os course all of the staff members arent hung up with thoughts of
their own importance, superiority and ability. But some do feel a
surge of power:
Harold, I think I can walk on water.
Os course you can, youre an Alligator staffer.
Youre right, Harold.
Harold, do you realize some, pardon the expression (she blushes),
JM 301 students actually think they can write?
Harold chuckles with grave ferocity.
Whats so funny, Harold?
Nothing, I was just thinking we should do an expose on the average
I.Q. of the average JM 301 student.
It would be repressed, Harold.
No it wouldn t, there wouldnt be anything to repress.
Harold, do you think any 301 students actually do know how to
write?
Any 301 students who can write are already writing with us,
walking on water, and eating banana pudding with a fork.
Eating banana pudding with a fork?
You do it my way or you dont do it at all.
Harold, do you know what one of those ungodly JM 301 students
did today? I mean one who isnt on the staff, a stupid one.
No, but Ill believe anything.
This kid came into the office, he even looked like a 301 student,
his shoes were on backward, and complained because we did him a
favor.
We lifted a few quotes from a story he didiojia-class assignmenE assignmenEand
and assignmenEand he got UpseT ~
What did we lift from his story?
Just the lead, the second, sixth, seventh, and eighth paragraphs
and the idea of the story.
Is that all?
Yea and he got mad. Ill bet he writes us a nastv letter or
something.
He probably will, his kind always do.

By Uncle Javerneck



Charter Decision Comes As No Surprise

OPEN FORUM:^^
( AJuiu mi /)
hnpo /X tlj r

f Due Process Position:
A Means For Oppression

MR. EDITOR:
President OConnells failure in coming out
immediately with strong, unequivocal support for
Ken Megill and academic freedom here at the
University tells one many things. OConnells limp
averment, for example, that due process would be
followed can be understood to mean: 1) that Megill
has done something for which he will be tried or at
least investigated, 2) that Megill cannot decently
be fired instantly but will be in due time via the
Marshall Jones route.
The due process position has another dual
purpose: it tells Sen. Slade that this is OConnells
plantation and no outsider has any business 'telling
him how to handle his hired hands; on the other
side, the due process position and ensuing silence
suggest to the hired hands and lackeys that they had
better watch their step, for, though it may be Megill
today, it may be one of them tomorrow.
If OConnell has been reminded who his bossman
is, the natives, too, have been reminded who theirs
is. And what can a native do but obey, with loyalty
oaths on one side, resolutions against campus
demonstrations on the other, and due process in
the middle?
In the meantime we have all been assured that
the system remains healthy, adequate, and
thoroughly democratic. Campus organizations and
groups, school officials up and down the
hierarchical ladder, and even some legislators and
other reactionaries have reaffirmed the availability
of proper channels.
Many have passed resolutions essentially
endorsing OConnells stand while rejecting Slades

Campus Doesnt Need Radicals

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to break with the
silent majority and voice
gratitude and support for
President OConnell and Dean
Hale in denying recognition to
ssoc.
For some time I have
attended radical speak-ins, and I
have yet to hear a valid
argument competently
presented. Across the nation
these cells have violated the
rights of the majority, and have
done much toward destroying
higher education. This weeks
New York Times chronicles
Berkelys loss of its better
faculty members because of the
radical activities there. I
respectfully suggest that we

Nothing Left For ABM To Save

Is 30 billion dollars too high a price? To save
American cities from destruction not by a long
shot.
But in ten years, the largest, most sophisticated
ABM System imaginable Tvcmri save American cities
from destruction.
Because there will be no American cities, as we
now know them, in existence.
This country is at war to the death with itself.
The first minor skirmishes have already occurred:
in Watts, in Detroit, in Newark, in Memphis, in
Cleveland, in Tampa, in Rochester wherever
oppressed men are fighting for their freedom.

cannot afford to be so
extravagant here.
In view of the record of
radical authoritarianism, it is
most disappointing to find that
our student leaders are
supporting recognition of such
destructive forces.
The insolent threats daily
emanating from .the Alligators
one-sided columns are indicative
of the emotionalism and
shallowness which masquerades
on this campus in the guise of
legitimate intellectualism and
journalism.
So, the campus doesnt need
drummed up radicals hopping all
over the place. It needs a better
student body. And the student

The next time someone says
that the problem at this university
is a lack of communication, he
should remember how the SSOC
case and many others have been
handled.

demand, though a number secretly others not so
secretly agree with Slade and expect that Megill
should eventually be eliminated democratically.
This would make things come out right: Slade
would have gotten his publicity and future political
support; OConnell would have held his own under
fire and kept himself in contention as an eventual
gubernatorial candidate; and, of course, the god of
Florida politics would have been propitiated with its
1969 University of Florida sacrifice, Ken Megill.
The natives on campus, it will be observed, being
the thumbsuckers that they are, are easily distracted
from perceiving that hundreds of complaints are
received by UF personnel every year, few of which
are hardly considered, let along investigated.
Neither have most of them detected that due
process is being used as an instrument of
oppression, in this case of political persecution.
They are, however, very likely to have gotten the
message that academic freedom is to be taken
seriously at ones own risk. They have also been
reminded that he who is without power is politically
impotent and professionally vulnerable.
The good citizens of Florida need not worry
about their good university being taken over by
those who should be running it, its faculty and
students, for their reaction to the latest setback to a
free and democratic university has not been with a
bang but a whimper. Since there is, alas, no radical
movement in existence at the University of Florida,
everyone now can go back in peace to his
thumbsucking.
a
ROBERT CANNEY

And they have allies: at Berkeley, at Columbia,
at Madison; wherever men are thinking of their
brothers.
And everywhere there are those opposed to
freedom. And the champions of suppression are
gaining ground. And no longer is self defense an
inalienable right.
But in ten, in fifteen years, when the flames have
died, when the dead are buried, when the past is
forgotten, when the constitution is destroyed, when
the books are burned, when the colleges are closed
for good ...
It will be 1984.

body needs more responsible
student leaders; leaders who can
think on their feet as well as
they apparently sleep on their
feet. Even with Joe Torchia off
into the foothills of Turkey, no
hope remains for the Alligator.
MIKE COLLINS 4JM
Final Answer
Idealists die of frustration;
Realists die of dissension;
Radicals die of suppression;
Conformists die of
submission.
Isnt it nice we agree on
something death.
BILLSYMS lUC

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This letter was written prior to President
Stephen C. O'Connell's final decision to refuse recognition to SSOC.
The content, however, still seems relevant to the situation.)
MR. EDITOR:
The decision by Vice-President Hale recommending that SSOC not
be allowed on the campus, shows how the administration suppresses
any challenge, no matter how mild, to its authority. The procedures in
this case should surprise no one, for they are typical:
1) Delay. The application went in nearly six months ago. When a
student organization applies for recognition they are told that a
decision is required within one month of application, but the
upholders of law and order have already delayed six months.
2) Refer to a carefully selected committee. The committee which
considered SSOC, like other university committees, has no power and
exists to make decisions the administration would rather not make.
The surprising fact is that even this committee could not deny the
request by a student organization to use university facilities.
3) Decide the way you want to. Hale's decision was necessary only
because the channels failed to take care of the problem for him. He
has served to protect the president from making a distasteful decision,
and has demonstrated once again that he is in no way responsible to
the students or the faculty, which should surprise no one.
Hales principle argument seems to be that SSOC stated that they
are responsible to no one individual nor to a repressive authoritarian
institution, but to our concepts of freedom, equality and democracy,
both on and off campus. It does seem odd that not being responsible
to repressive institutions and being in favor of democracy is not
allowed at the university.
One might conclude that the ideal student organization, according
to the Hale formula, is one which is responsible to one individual or to C
a repressive, authoritarian institution.
Hale also finds it disturbing that SSOC is actively working to
create a new and effective re-organization of the power structure of
. UF. 1 can see why this might upset Hale, since he can only lose
power in the process, but he is a member of the Action Conference
which is supposedly doing the same thing.
Two recommendations (the right to distribute literature and the
principle that the student government should decide which student
organizations are recognized) of that conference were passed in almost
the exact form in which they were written by SSOC members. Hale
was not at the committee meeting where these recommendations were
formulated and apparently is not aware that SSOC played this
constructive role in the Action Conference.
The next time someone says that the problem at this university is a
lack of communication, he should remember how the SSOC case and
many others have been handled. Until the Office of Student Affairs is
brought under student control, it appears that no group which is
responsible to concepts of freedom, equality, and democracy will
have the right to be on this campus. Hale stated that They should go
through the existing democratic process. Where, one might ask, can
it be found?
KENNETH A. MEGILL
Assistant Professor
Department of Philosophy
Am v
Dont blame me. . all I did was agree with him.

Friday, March 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,
' .*

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Friday. March 7, 1969

Orange

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

NURSING SCHOLAR
SHIPS: The 1969 Scholarship
examination will be Oct. 14,
1969. Scholarship loans are
awarded by the Florida State
Board of Education to
applicants making the highest
scores. Applicants must have at
least one high school unit in
each of the biological and
physical sciences. Basic
collegiate nursing scholarship
loans are S6OO a year for four
years or S2OO a quarter for 12
quarters. One-half of the
scholarships are available to
students interested in attending
basic collegiate schools of
nursing and who agree to render
nursing service in a state agency
or institution for at least the
minimum time specified for the
type of scholarship they receive.
Information and application
forms may be obtained from the
County Superintendent of Public
Instruction in each county.
Application forms also are
available in Room H-101,
College of Nursing, J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.
STATE TEACHERS:
General Loan Scholarship
money has arrived. You may
receive it in the Student
Depository from Mrs. Robinson
or Miss Nabers.
STUDENT JOBS: UF
students available to start work
now are wanted by the Student
Employment. Jobs are available
for typists, library clerks, key
punch operators and draftsmen.
Please contact Student
Employment, Room 23, Tigert
Hall, for further details.

NEXT CAR LOAN...
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERALCREDIT UNION
through Friday

WORK-STUDY PROGRAM
JOBS: UF students qualified for
the College Work-Study program
are needed. If your parents'
income is less than $7,000 a year
you may apply. Many jobs are
available on campus. Please
contact Student Employment,
Room 23, Tigert Hall.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the Exit Interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.
NOTICE TO STUDENTS:
The Student Accounts sections
is now accepting Short-term
Loan applications for payment
of Spring Quarter Registration
Fees.
ft
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Councii
Thursday, March 13, at 1:30
p.m. in 235 Tigert Hall.

BLUB BULLETIN

FACULTY: There will be a
Dutch treat, German style buffet
Facluty Club get acquainted
dinner, March 11, in the west
side of the cafeteria. $2 a
person.
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
of credit, or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
J
NATIONAL DEFENSE
LOAN BORROWERS: If you
have been approved for a release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan Program for the
Spring Quarter, and have
pre-registered for that quarter,
your fee payment can be
deducted from your loan. As
soon as you have finished
pre-registering come to the
Student Accounts Office.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION: Monday,
March 10, is the deadline for
paying examination fee to
University of Florida Cashier
(HUB) for the ETS foreign
language examinations (in
French, German, Russian and
Spanish) of April 12, and for
presenting receipt of payment of
fee to the Graduate School
Office, 235 Tigert Hall, where
ticket of admission to the
examinations will be given.

and

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Friday, March 7
Movie, "LA BOHEME", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movie,
"Behold a Pale Horse", 7:00
& 9:30 p.m. & "The Fly",
12:00 midnight, South Hall
Movie Room
Murphree Area Council, "Guns
of Navarone", 7:00 & 9:45
p.m.
Dept, of German & Russian,
Illustrated Lecture, Prof.
Reinhold Grimm, Lecturer,
Bless Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Florida Players, T.S. Eliot's
"Murder in the Cathedral,
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 8
Phi Kappa Tau Banquet,
Arredondo Room Union,
5:00 p.m.
Movie, "LA BOHEME, Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movie,
"Behold a Pale Horse", 7:00
& 9:30 p.m. & 'The Fly",
12:00 midnight, South Hall
Movie Room.
Murphree Area Council Movie,
"Guns of Navarone", 7:00 &
9:45 p.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Alabama, Florida Gym, 7:45
p.m.
Florida Players: T.S. Eliot's
"Murder in the Cathedral"
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, March 9
Movie, "LA BOHEME", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Gargoyle Honor Society
Meeting, 4 C, AFA, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Players: "Murder in the
Cathedral", Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Florida String
Quartet, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
College Life Meeting, Campus
Crusade for Christ, Phi Kappa
Alpha House, 9:13 p.m.

Monday, March 10
'' English i n Action,"
Conversational English
between one American
volunteer and one
International, Baptist Student
Center, 4:00-8:00 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 254 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Florida Cicerones Meeting, 123
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Baha'i Association Meeting, 357
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 11
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 2:45 p.m.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m. v
University Films Committee
Meeting, 150 B Union, 7:00
p.m.
Mixed Media Presentation by
Students of RN 365, Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Sigma Theta Tau Initiation, 118
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Education Dames Meeting, 3320
N.W. 28th Avenue, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Music for Bassons,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE- Tickets
are now on sale for: Audubon
Film Series, General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $1.25; Univ.
of Fla. Students, $.75;
Children, $.50. University
Film Series, 10 films, General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$5.00; Univ of Fla. Students,
$2.50; Univ. of Fla. Students,
5 films, $1.50. Florida
Players: T.S. Eliot's "Murder
in the Cathedral", Faculty,
Staff & General Public,
$1.50; Univ. of Fla. Students,
$.25; High School Students,
$.75. SGP: "VAN
CLIBURN", General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $3.00, $2.25
6 $1.50; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $2.50, $1.75 &
SI.OO.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
14 Ft. wooden runabout, 35 HP,
trailor access $460. 372-7305.
(A 3t-98-P)
Hand-crafted Spanish classical guitar
and hard case call Martha
378-9972 after 8 p.m. any night for
information. Guitar is light weight,
good tone. (A-2t-98-P)
ROBERTS 770 X, recorder, perfect
condition, usual features, almost a
year old, $250 pr best offer.
378-0734. (A-2t-98-P)
GUNS GUNS GUNS lnve lnventory
ntory lnventory over 450 buy selltrade
repair. Reloading supplies, custom,
reloading Harry Beckwith, Gun
Dealer, Micanopy 466-3340.
(A-ts-69-P)
Rare, white AKC German Shepherd
puppies. Gentle temperment, good
with children. SIOO. Phone
378-0844. (A-st-96-P)
Want to buy a motorcycle??? I can
save you sss. Call 392-8775
evenings. (A-3t-96-P)
TELEVISION RCA, 23 in, all
channels, great condition, SSO or best
offer. Call 378-7805 ask for Karen or
Martee. (A-3t-96-P)
BABY FLYING SQUIRREL, cute
easy to feed and tame $5 or $9/pair.
327 NW 16th St. (5-7 p.m.) or call
376-0968. (A-3t-95-P)
Gibson guitar, steel strings, hollow
dark brown' wood, in groovy
condition must sell so best offer will
do. Call 392-9772 after 3:30 p.m.
(A-st-96-P)
Ovation electric guitar 4 mo. old
Fender amp, Harmony Sovereign
Acoustic Guitar, good cond. $350
call 378-7612. (A-st-94-P)
25% off to students: 2 drawer metal
storage or file cabinets. Refinished
gray, green or tan. J.R. Office
Furniture Co., 620*/2 S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (6t-93-A-P)
Unusually well furnished 10x55
mobile home. A/C and with separate
storage shed with workshop. 5
minutes from Univ. $3250. Call
378-3684 Eves. (A-4t-97=P)
Muntz M6O 8 & 4 track car stereo.
Still under warranty & in new
condition. Must sell. Call Chris Pool
at 378-88 5 1 during week.
(A-3t=97-P)
' r A
FOR RENT
;
WANT TO live in Sin City? Sublet
beautiful 2-bedroom atp. in luxurious
Landmark. Call 3 7 8- 6494.
(B-st-96-P)
1 Bedroom, AC, apt. 1533 NW sth
Ave. Walking distance to campus,
$95 per month. Call 378-8058.
(B-st-95-P)
2 Bedroom apt. in triplex. Central air
& heat, kitchen equipped. 3533 SW
24 Ave. Ph. 372-5400, $95 mo.
(B-st-96-P)
One bedroom apt. for sublease. 8
Tanglewood Manor. Beautifully
furnished, central AC, head, cut-rate,
$l3O. Available Mar. 26. Call
378-0990. (B-st-96 P)
Ranch style living. One bedroom apt.
Large closets and bath. Fully paneled
and air cond. Use of pool and
bar-b-que house. Walking distance of
new golf course to be opened this
spring. Water, extermination and
garbage collection included. SIOO.OO
a month 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-6t-93-P)
1 bdrm apt to sublease 3 blks from
campus air-conditioning, washing
machine. 1824 NW 3 PI no. 23 Call
372-5567. (B-st-94-P)
Extra furniture free: will sublet or
rent individually 2 br
apt dishwasher, disposal, pool,
central AC 3 qtr and/or
summer Landmark 378-5815.
(B-4t-97-P)
Corner room, 4 windows, 2 closets,
semi-private bath, phone, kitchen
use, 2 blocks campus. Week or
month. 378-4645 Ample parking.
(B-lt-98-P)
Best location in town. 1 block from
Tigert Hall. 1 br., AC apts. Rents
sllO-$l2O. 372-7111. 1216 SW 2nd
Ave. Apt 1, Colonial Manor Apts. 9-6
p.m. daily, 2-5 Sunday. (B-6t-98-P)
SUBLET 2 br apt. at Landmark
Phase II or 2 roommcites wanted to
share same. Pool, health club, etc.
Reasonable rent. Call 378-8982 after after-6.
6. after-6. Apt. 113. (B-st-98-P)
VILLAGE 34 Sublet spacious 1
bdrm. apt. private patio, quiet
surroundings. Call Lynn 372-6077.
(B-st-98-P)

Friday, March 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
** *"
t a g'
Subletting for spring quarter, two
bedrooms near campus. $405 per
quarter. Starlite Apts. Call 378-7683
(B-2t-97-P)
Room in private home for mature''
male student. Central heat, AC,
Linen and maid service. Separate
entrance. Phone 376-5360.
(B-2t-93-P)
3rd quarter one bedroom apt.
Colonial Manar, carpeted & pool. l h
block from campus. Call NOW 1
(B-3t-P)
WANTED
3 girls need roommate for spring
and/or summer term. Dishwasher,
pool, gym and sauna. Landmark Apt.
21. Ph. 378-8467 ask for Elaine $45.
(C-3t-96-P)
MALE roommate needed in spacious
Gatortown apt. 3 bed, 2 bath, $52.50
mo. Call after 4. Open March and
Spring quarter. 378-6873. (C-4t-96-P)
Coed roommate needed. 1 bedrm
apt. 4023 S.W. 34 St. Call 376-3763
or write Sally Bowers, Drawer 1030,
Apopka, Fla. $45 per mo. (C-st-24-P)
Coed to sublet private room Spring
and Summer quarters. Share kitchen
and washer/dryer. AC. Call 372-1973
or come by. 1616 NW 3rd Ave.
(C-st-94-P)

THRU SATURDAY 3-57-9
SMJLAOLORPHEUSj
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| Eli is iatarwit m the human mind, whatever innocence may doak it..."
1 IfflDOF
! **
| FROM THE SHOCKING BEST-SELLING NOVEL BY WILLIAM GOLOIN6 .. .... j
I7ZTVT7HH blWa\ B x OUkm Opens
I 630
J, JwrjiML Show Starts 730
Exclusive Firet Run
I NLW. 13th ST. 372-9523 wnerewni the bodies
turn up next?
tm £ a car seat?
u/tU, t&ZADriiHeP peter cushhg sue lloyd
lA.OC ks 00NA10 and KRK FORD Profccsd and Plwioyipfied
wtfffl IfJ IU:ZJ If PfTIR NEWBROOK -Oncisd by ROBERT HARTFORO DAVIS
W r ww ffw B A PEIFR NFVWWKX mi ROBERT HARFFOMIOAVIS fWuon
jcopo*s* THE BATTLE FOR VICTORY I
IS ENDED...BUT THE
WAR FOR REVENGE
GOES ON! I
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I 8:50 ONLY itg ffgQQCI
1 with ENIO GIROLAMI LOUISE BARRETT piero vida participation ot GUY MADISONS
Directed by E. G. ROWLAND A CIRCUS FILM-FONO ROMA Production -TECHNICOLOR* TECHWSCOPP

Page 11

NWilil i i i tiilu ..^a.v:www
I WANTED J
Landmark Female roommate for
spring quarterapt. 173, $45 a
month. Call after 5:00 378-1007.
(C-st-97-P)
One female roommate needed spring
quarter Landmark Apts. 174 two
bedroom $45 mo. Call 378-0846.
(C-st-94-P)
COED ROOMMATE wanted, large,
air-conditioned, two-bedroom, 16th
Ave. apt. on pool, $37 mo. Village
Park No. 97, Call 372-4751.
(C-st-95-P)
NEED one roommate for spring or
spring and summer. Great apt. for
less. March rent paid. Landmark Apt.
98 or call 372-9609. (C-2t-97-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share Col. Manor Apt. 39 spring
quarter sllO/2 air cond. pool. Call
Julie 378-4785, 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
(C-st-95-P)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-10t-94-P)
3rd coed roommate to share house
SW 13th St. own bedroom
$33/month plus utilities. 10 min
walk from campus, roomy. Contact
Sue or Jo 378-0762. (C-3t-97-P)
The single University crowd over
21 For the Friday Afternoon
Club will meet this and every
Friday from 5-7:30 at the
Lamplighter. Private rooms, pleasant
atmosphere. Drinks $.45. Come early
and bring your friends. (C-6t-96-P)

bBTI u/nu/i < s this i
TTvVf; FORREAU ||
THEY rIdMIInSs"
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8 co-starring
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Telephone 378-2434 IJ | WCCK!
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED |
Ny.r.sr-.s-i-x-x-xx^r-.vx.r.NS-W'X^'r'X-x-v-ss^
Coolest pad in town. Need male
roommate. Pool, fine furnishings,
bar, fireplace and much more.
SSO/mo. Call before signing
elsewhere 378-4877. (C-st-97-P)
LIVE OFF CAMPUS C.L.O.
$60.00/M. Room & board. Frosh &
sophs, may break. Contracts total
indepen. Call 376-9420. Come by
117 NW 15 St. (C-7t-97-P)
1 or 2 female roommates for spring
quarter. Roomy, 2 bedr. duplex AC.
Call 378-8790, 1912 NW Ist Ave.
(C-st-97-P)
One female roommate for Landmark
sllO -for Spring quarterover
pool. Willing to make a deal! Call
378-9604 or 376-7129 TODAY!
(C-st-98-P)
2 female roomates for spring and/or
summer quarters. Rent only $40.25.
Call 378-4565 or come by Apt. 69
French Quarter after 5. (C-st-98-P)
Coed roommate for own room in
large modern beautiful 2 bdrm.
Starlight apt. near campus. Call
372-6066. (C-lt-98-P)
Roommate wanted to share fantastic
2 bedroom brick house, wood
paneled walls, luxury stereo, T.V.
own room, share $125 mo. plus
utilities, Call Barry 378-6776 after
9:00 p.m. (C-3t-98-P)
Two roommates: one guy, one girl.
Starlight Apts., 2 blks to campus,
slOl per qtr. AC & heat. Guys call
Ron 378-3241. Girls call Fran
378-5532 Anytime. (C-2t-98-P)
Two roommates wanted for Fall
quarter 1969 who are good friends.
Please contact 392-9404. (C-lt-98-P)
Male model, adventurer, writer, 20.
Looking for INTERESTING place to
live. All offers considered. Call John
after 6 p.m. 376-7854. (C-3t-97-P)
Williamsburg Apt. need 1 roommate
spring quarter, pool airconditioned,
dishwasher, 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Call
376-9719. (C-st-97-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Spacious apartment one block from
Norman. Have own bedroom.
Available March 17. 378-7638, 1028
SW 7th Ave. $45/month. (C-st-97-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATES needed for
SW 16th Ave. 3 bedroom apt. $42.00
a month plus utilities. Call 376-9596.
(C-2t-97-P)
Roommate for V Pk. No. 10. Avail. 3
qt. Share rent with 3 great girls. Call
376-4121 ask for Tita. Will be
moving out end of March. (C-st-97-P)
Female roommates wanted. Fredrick
Garden Apartments SIOO per
quarter. Spring Quarter Only. Call
Barb at 376-1045. (C-6t-93-P)
McDonalds
Hamburgers
The way you like em best!
...100% BEEF
...GROUND FRESH
... PREPARED WITH CARE
...HOT OFF THE GRILL
...ON TOASTED BUN
... UM-M-M-M GOOD!
Come in any time.
The service is fast
our prices are right!
McDonalds*
is vour kind of place.
; S Corp 1966
201N.W. T3th Street

J, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 7, 1969

Page 12

| HELP WANTED j
THIRSTY GATOR needs waitress
evenings. Good pay handsome
customers. No phone. See Jim
between 2 & 3 p.m., 633 NW 13th
Street. (E-3t-97-P)
THIRSTY GATOR needs
bartender sandwich man. Good
pay pretty customers. No phone.
See Jim between 2 & 3 p.m., 633 NW
13th Street. (E-3t-97-P)
Are you interested in working at a
summer camp? Red Raider, Ohio,
coed, general counselling, horseback
riding, swimming, handcrafts, tennis.
Interview; March 10, 1:30-2:30,
Room 118, Union. (E-3t-96-P)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nations 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person. Room 330, jwu.
(E-tf-39-nc)

SHRIMP
SPECIAL
6 jumbo shrimp
H AA
cole slaw J ,|| y
hush puppies
flojvufA
PORE-BOY
1029 W. UNIV. AVE DIAL
ACROSS FROM

REITZ UNION THEATRE 7ST
- I
ike 'Unusm (2*****&, Coyn^joCCtt
f&ueciniM. gX
is
V -, w t ^amMr>*"' j ' s?
*3f' t *****>&
v \\ mmSSteM
r 7hun&dUu{ iMokckfa 1 CX^icCox^^.
cAUov(A9- £ :00 0:3 o, OOpm.

HELP WANTED
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Part-tim3 or full-time Will train.
Must be 21. Duos Steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)
PHOTOGRAPHERS: The Florida
Alligator needs photographers who
can meet the -itiigh standards
demanded by the nations number
oney college daily. Apply to Dave
Doucett, Managing Editor 3:30 to
5:30 today. (E-lt-98-P)
Experienced cashiers, full and part
time. Apply at Florida Book Store,
16 14 West University Avenue.
(E-st-98-P)
GENERAL OFFICE girls who type
well or handle bookkeeping know
office machines. Great future. Call
ALLIED PERSONNEL of Gainesville
1800 N. Main, 376-4611. (E-st-98-P)
EXCITING CAREER secretary to
executive. Plush office nice associates
and excellent pay. Call ALLIED
PERSONNEL of Gainesville 1800 N.
Main, 376-4611. (E-st-98-P)

ALLIED PERSONNEL OF GAINESVILLE
This area s largest & most progressive
Personnel Placement Service
Is pleased to announce
Another
SALES and ADMINISTRATIVE
Employment Seminar
Friday and Saturday, March 28th & 29th.
TWENTY-FIVE NAT'L COMPANIES PARTICIPATING!
Near grads and recent grads desired
No Obligations! No Registration Fees!
Fee Paid Openings Only!
Seminar Registration Starts Friday, March 7th.
Running through Wednesday, March 26th at
1800 North Main St. 376-4611

If \o' \ SPECIAL ||
||i FRIDAY ||
fmSd 1
SHRIMP I
§§ WITH FRENCH FRIES, S
8 SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES |g
I $1.09 I
| MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS I
MALL M



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

f- HELP WANTED |
in'hal ation therapy
TECHNICIAN TRAINEE On the job
training for mature person. Hospital
experience and some mechanical
aptitude helpful. Salary
commensurate with experience and
education. Paid vacation, holidays,
sick leave, and other benefits. Inquire
personnel director, Alachua General
Hospital, 372-4321. (E-6t-98-P)
AUTOS
,v
1960 Ford hardtop, 352 cu. in.,
automatic, radio, heater, very good
condition. New starter, qenerato:,
tune-up. Best offer over S3OO.
378-5848 after 5 p.m. (G-st-96-P)
v/olvo 1225, good condition, one
owner, S9OO or best offer. Call
378-5184. (G-3t-96-P)
1959 3/4 ton Ford pickup, execlient
condition. Motor rebuilt, new tires,
inspection sticker. Asking S6OO Call
378-4943 after 5:30. (G-3t-96-P)
1 956 inspected Olds. Good
transportation SIOO. Call 376-0320
evenings. (G-4t-95-P)
'6B Barracuda sport coupe VB, Facair
radio delux interior, metallic
midnight blue, vinyl top, wide oval
tires, sac warranty, low price.
376-3424. (G-st-97-P)
1968 Roadrunner, red delux interior,
white seats. Positraction, radio,
4- tinted windows, 12,000 mi.
Call 372-8392. (G-3t-96-P)
1959 PORSCHE coupe, good cond.
AM-FM radio new Pirellis, new
interior, inspected. Best offer.
378-3742. (G-3t-97-P)
PERSONAL |
FATHER GANNANwiII be guest
speaker at the Episcopal Student
Center this Sunday at 11:00.
(J-3t-96-P)
YOGA LESSONS: 3:30 5:00
weekdays, $3.00, 103 NE 3rd St.
Also by appointment. Mike Geison.
(J-st-94-P)
NEED your term paper typed? Ill
type anything. $.50 a page. Broward
Hall. Call 392-9761. (J-2t-97-P)
The Friday AFternoon Clubfor
the university crowd over 21will
meet this and every Friday from
5- at the Lamplighter. Private
rooms, pleasant atmosphere. Drinks
$.45. Come early and bring your
friends. (J-6t-96-P)
John Happy 21st Whatever turns
you on! Oh yeh! Love, Sexy Sadie.
(J-lt-97-P)
To my Sailor: Only 101 lonely days
till 30 beautiful days, then a million
more full of happiness. I love you
with all my heart. 8.J.8.J. (J-lt-98-P)
Have you ever dreamed of having
;your own personal chef? (J-lt-98-P)
l! LOST & FOUND 1
ft
FOUND: one pair of womens
glasses. Found in Walker Auditorium
Thursday, Feb. 27, 1969. Claim in
lost and found office. (L-3t-96-NC)
FOUND: 1 pr. glasses outside
Matherly. Call 378-8061 5:00 to
7:00. (L-3t-97-NC)
FOUND: 1 pr glasses outside
Matherly. Call 378-8061 5:00 to
7:00. (L-3t-98-NC)
Lost metal frame prescription sun
glasses in gray case. Please call Bruce
Webbon 372-1013 or 392-0764.
(L-3t-98-P)
I I
"STEVE McQUEBi
COLOR AT HIS BEST!" AT
wiimmnia 7.50 |
RICHIRO CRERRI ~1
CIHMWiHI
t BULUTf IS NEXT__J

SERVICES
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-95-P)
Experienced typist reasonable rates
prompt service. 376-0406.
(M-st-98-P)
I will do ironing in my home. Cal!
372-5269. (M-4t-90-P)

HILLEL FOUNDATION
HAYRIDE & BARBECUE
Saturday, March 8
Everyone Welcome!
SI.OO per person
PHONE 372-2900 FOR DETAILS
I BREAKFAST SPECIAL I
I 6AM-11 AM MON. FRI. I
I 2 EXTRA LARGE EGGS I
GRITS TOAST j|||i I
I JELLY COFFEE i§V 9 I
I 3 HOT CAKES I
I COFFEE
I 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I
, 1
MAR. 7-9 T s Eliots B:PM
"MURDER IN T i CKETS
Florida Players TICKETS
& TUF f ATL|Ef)P Al" 392-1653
Modern Dance Group I tIC
I Recklee Chair /fwlesb
j starts frl march 14
UNCLE
SB IKS
L-js, MI
HARRIET BEECHER STOWE'S SOUTH
immortal story comet to life in
color on our giant wide tcreen. /7 )
Je > -V> )< 11 f
j 1

Friday, March 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

SERVICES |
INCOME TAX $4.00 up. Expe.t
service in two locations to serve you:
1227 W. Univ. Ave, (across from
Ramada Inn) & 107 N. Main St.
378-9666. (M-ts-95-P)
A LTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)

Page 13

tnn nor.muF t.hfat vai I jfk"
[ Downtown Gainesville 1
I 233 W. University Ave.
PICTURES pmm J |M I I p "* m. \l¥
AMcnui #
Rianco : :
z s?* > iu Romeo
* Hi
* # love story....
f Recking Chair /TwT^H

Hols h. w. mi! 7H
HELD JT JOANNA'
OVER! rs IS STARTLING!...
l# rfc ri m musical beds with every boy who
jn q
yl I||||||^mM
ITS OSCAR PICKING
TIME AGAIN! .
See These top rated nominees so you, too. can join
the International Academy Award Came on ABC.
April thf
BEST PICTURE BEST |m|
Ojoanne rachel,
woodward rachel W
, PRODUCED and DIRECTED BY PAUL NEWMAN/
' s TECHNICOLOR"
f NOMINATED BEST &CTOR ~' N \
fHeart is a c Lonelu hunter r|q
\By CARSON McCULLER TtCHNtCOtOR J ||j |

Use our handy
mail in order
form.



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 7, 1969

KAPPA ALPHA THETA Theta sisters and
pledges atained sixth place in the scholastic
standings among the 14 sororities and captured
third place overall in the Gator Olympics last
Saturday.
The girls held their annual scholarship banquet
recently, featuring Father Gannon of the Catholic
Student Center as guest speaker. Awards went to
Gail Penland, Barbara Greenawault, Karen Decker,
and Kay Duman for attaining 4.0 averages, and
Cindy Miller was honored as the most improved in
scholarship.
Congratulations go to new Little Sisters in the
house Kathie Baxter, Sigma Phi Epsilon, and
Valerie Dodd, Delta Tau Delta and to Lesley Lott
and Pam Karl as new intiates in Alpha Lambda
Delta. Connie Black was elected vice president of
thv' Kappa Sigma Little Sisters and Bonnie Phippen
is their new secretary.
The Theta pledges will be holding a car wash
Saturday at Cosbys Gulf station, 913 University
Avenue, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tickets will be one
dollar. f
This terms pledge officers are Lesley Lott,
president; Pat Booth, secretary;Pam Karl, treasurer;
Timmy Linning, parliamentarian; and Lynn
Thompson, activities. Their pledge of the week is
Lynn Thompson.
PI KAPPA PHI Mrs. Marie Mom Weatherill is
Pi Kappa Phis new housemother. Mom is from
Boston, Mass., and was formerly a housemother at
the University of Miami.
The Pi Kapp little sisters last Sunday lost to the
Beta Little Sisters in a football game, 6-0.
Brother Jim Antista received the IFCs William L.
Fleming Scholarship at Winter Frolics.
ZETA TAU ALPHA Zetas elected new officers
last week: Barbara Sivils, president; Kay Sturmer,

UF Student
Arrested
James Lee Resce, lUC was
arrested in Hume Hall Monday
afternoon by University Police
and charged with contributing to
the delinquency of a minor.
Resces charge resulted from
an incident Feb. 5 in which he
had been reported taking nude
photographs of a 16-year-old
Gainesville High School girl,
police records said.
Bond was set at SSOO.
r
STUDY IN
CUERNAVACA
Learn to speak SPANISH
Intensive courses, with drills,
supervised labs, and theory
taught by experienced Mexican
teachers.
$I 35 per month.
Study in the INSTITUTE FOR
CONTEMPORARY LATIN
AMERICAN STUDIES.
Ex amine themes such as "Protest
and its Creative Expression in
Latin America" and "The Role
of Ed ucation in Social Change
in 10 to 30 new courses each
month.
Access to excellent library.
S3O per credit.
Live in CUERNAVACA
Near Mexico City, at 4 500 fe.pt
eTevatlon with Mexican fa'" ; d
or in oo r m.s or bung'lf
Approx. SBO per mo--'
Request c r*-:\czj from
Registrar Cidoc W.
Godot do. 4'* 9,
Cuernovr .a, Me co

The Greek Way
By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writer

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C/ FALLS
v£ I 100%EUROPEAN TEXTURED I STYLING NOW AVAILABLE I \ JgP*
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.-,, ... lacr-oss- f-romRamaria Lmr) v
\ 1 GAINESVILLE f
8 Other Showrooms
* . ' DAYTONA REAP 14. ' ~??~
* COCOA BEACH
JACKSONVILLE
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vice president; Martha Stark, pledge trainer: Linda
James, recording secretary; Margie Singler.
corresponding secretary; Jan Hatcher, treasurer:
Benni Stamm, historian; Celia Craig, rituals; Kathy
Kerns, house manager.
Fifteen new initiates were welcomed into Zeta
sisterhood. The White Violet banquet was held at
General Gaines in their honor.
Kathy Dumont has been chosen a new Delta
Upsilon Darling. Donna Walter and Betsy Kintz have
been tapped for membership in Sigma Theta Tau
nursing honorary.
DELTA SIGMA PHI Elections brought a new
slate of officers to Delta Sigma Phi. New officers are
Tom Barb, president; Bob Fort, vice president; Matt
Glover, secretary; Brad Feldser, treasurer; and
Duane Mertz, sgt.-at-arms. These men will govern
the fraternity for the 69-70 year.
This weekend features the pledge-brother
football game. Last Sunday saw the brothers play
their annual brother-little sister volleyball game. The
brothers won all three games 21-0.
PHI KAPPA TAU The Blue League Presidents
Cup may still go to the Phi Taus. After beating
every team in basketball competition, the Phi Tau
Five Manny Careno, Ken Fowle, Jay Heckler,
Paul Register and Dick Kinzer took the
championship from the Chi Phis.
The Phi Taus placed 2nd in the Heart Fund
Drive.
Brother Jack Shuler was recently named to the
Board of Student Publications.
Founders Day Celebration is Saturday in the
Reitz Union. Gutherie Babcock, prominant Miami
banker, Broward Williams, state treasurer and
Richard Irvin, Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice
will be among the returning brothers.
Little Sister Barbara Sivils was elected ZTA
President.

si:* sis* SPEND *sss]
ONE MOMENT
* On Gator Advertisments $ $ $]
| And Save DOLLARS
Ray Brown fias joined the staff
of barbers over in the Univ. Plaza
Sportsmans Barber Shop Ray was ts
formerly on Univ. Ave. barbering for 6 Vi
years. We are proud to have him with us. L_J
Sportsmans Barber Shop Univ. Plaza.
- ~~ 372-9129

FPA FAIR
Tues. March 11
Union Ballroom
8 9 P.M.
Everyone is Welcome!



ggg|§K /
|j?'
** *' i* **r*/
' i 'WsS ;s i m
:Ba ~||| 1 4 :
Mr <9 i
.'Bp BS&fc*. __ NI, BB
THE FOUR TEMPSTERS
... offer Thomas a Becket a new course of action.
I Imagination, innovation, and a willingness to experiment have
combined to produce a first at the Constans Theatre this week. For
the first time in their histories two campus organizations, The Modern
Dance Group and the Florida Players, have combined to produce a
dance-drama version of T.S. Eliots celebrated poetic drama Murder
in the Cathedral. 3
Eliots Murder in the Cathedral was an effort by the famed
English poet, and the best of a group of plays, which attempted to
restore the verse drama form to the English stage.
Since its original New York production in 1936 the play has often
been revived in educational theatres across the country. But this is the
first time this compelling story of Thomas-a-Beckets martyrdom has
been told by both the dance and the drama.
The Modern Dance Groups directory-choreographer Beth Lessard
has woven sixteen dance interpretations of scenes from Eliots drama
into and around the action of the play staged by L.L. Zimmerman,
director of the Florida Players.
Set to an original score by Helen Davies of Santa Fe Junior College,
the story of Beckets preparation for his eventual martyrdom is
recounted sometimes alternately, sometimes simultaneously by the
dancers and actors in an imaginative blend of the two art forms.
Tonight marks the opening of this bold experiment in the retelling
of the now-classic struggel between church and state in the persons of
Thomas-a-Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Henry 11, king of
England.
The Modem Dance Group and Florida Players dance-drama will be
presented tonight, Saturday and Sunday at 8 in Constans Theatre.
Admission for University students is 25 cents, for others, $ 1.50.
Reservations may be made at the Union Box Office.

Photo Lecture Sunday

The University Gallery will
present a lecture by Mr. Peter
Bunnell entitled Photography
as Printmaking Sunday at 3.
Bunnell is the Associate
Curator of the Department of
Photography of the Museum of
Modern Art. He joined the
Museum staff in 1966 on a
temporary assignment to review
and catalogue the Museums
collection of more than 10,000
photographs and has since begun
work on an extensive catalogue
of the collection.
He has also organized a
number of exhibitions including,
The Beginnings of Modern
Photography, Harry
Callahan, Master Photographs
from the Museum Collection,
Paul Caponigro and
Photography as Printmaking.
Corvair IMeeci Repair
Stop by Elrods
Gainesville s only
Corvair Specialist
10% discount to Students
1031 South Main 376-7771

Recent articles by Mr.
Bunnell include reviews and
commentary for Aperture,
Creative Camera and U.S.
Camera & Travel, and a piece
on collecting original
photographs, published in Art
in America.
Bunnell received his M.A.
degree in art history from Yale
University where he was also an
Associate in the Alfred Stieglitz
Archives. He is a candidate for
the doctorate degree at Yale
with special emphasis on the
history of photography.

IsTAK*sHftK i
| Student Special
(With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88t Steakburger I
luncheon And Any 15v Drink i
| $1.03 Value Only 85c plus tax
| Steak n Shake |
1 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville l
p

WITH CLOSEUP ENDING

35 Greta Garbo Flick
Telescopes Social Issues

Anna Karenia with Greta Garbo will be
playing in the Reitz Union Auditorium Sunday at 7
and 9 p.m.
This Garbo classic was released in 1935. The film
was directed by Clarence Brown. Fredric March,
Freddie Bartholomew, Maureen OSullivan, May
Robson and Basil Rathbone round out the cast.
A more mature treatment of Tolstoys novel than
its silent predecessor Love, this film is still the
telescoping of a great book down to the love story
within it even though attempts are made to include

Theatre
Presents
"Absence
The Gainesville Little Theatre
will again present Ira Wallachs
comedy, The Absence of a
Cello, tonight and Saturday.
Directed by Tom Godey, the
cast includes Ralph Thompson
as a professor embarking upon a
business career, Kathy Dantzler
as his apprehensive wife, Bill
Stensgaard as the corporate
interviewer, Marie Therese Welch
as the girl who changes the
course of history, and Ellen Lau
as a cleptomanial grandma.
Janice Tesh is a cuddly coed
and Steve Lerman her
not-so-suave suitor.
Reservations are advisable
and should be made by
telephone as much beforehand
as possible. Curtain time is 8:30
p.m.
Tickets are $1.75 for the
general public and $1.25 for
students.
The little theatre is located at
4039 NW 16th Blvd.
XEROX!
| OFFSET FACIUTES |
Specializing in $
3: Thesis and Dissertations s
Reductions and l
Enlargements J
Open Til 11 P.M.
§ Highest Quality
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University Piezo
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! 378-1001

Q MR STYLING
SHAMPOOING RAZOR CUTTING
LONG HAIR STYLING |||
APPOINTMENTS 378-2015 I
'.y| ; SIMS BARBER SHOP
mam B/wf/im
GAINESVILLE MALL
i '
- in,
. silil
Ha
CONCORD RADIOCORDER
an FM/AM radio and a cassette tape
recorder all in one portable unitl
compare at 130.00
SALE! 99.50
model FlO3
If you hear something on the radio you
hear again just flip the
switch you can record it to play
back anytime! In one easy to carry
portable you can enjoy a drift-free FM,
powerful AM radio plus a cassette
load tape recorder. Uses home current
or it can be operated on batteries.
0
Maas Cameras
s*

Friday, March 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

the novels social issues.
Garbo, however, brings glamour and romance to
the plight of a woman caught in an archaic social
situation. Most effective is her suicide scene in
which her expression is a statement of desperation
and inevitable doom as she stares at the wheels of
the moving train before letting go.
A scene focusing on Annas photograph in the
hands of her grieving husband follows the suicide to
allow the movie a typical Garbo close-up ending.
Admission is 50 cents at the door.

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 7, 1969

Gator Batgirls Premier
At Home Baseball Opener

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
For the UF baseball team, things are shaping up.
More than 50 coeds turned out for the
organizational meeting of the Gator Batgirls, a
group of female batboys that will help Coach
Dave Fullers squad through the long season.
Captain Mike Ovca told the coeds that they
would have a job to do.
You will generally just have to stack the bats
and chase foul balls around and pick up helmets and
look pretty, said Ovca.
The Gators open their home season Saturday
here against South Florida. Game time: 2 p.m.
The coeds were grouped into six squads with
eight members each. They will be rotated from
game to game.
The Gators go into the game with two losses in
their first two games, both at the hands of Miami.
Miami inaugurated the batgirl idea with the games
against the Gators, explained Ovca, and it may have
had something to do with why we lost.
The girls decided on their uniforms: blue
miniskirts and orange shell tops.
The Gators will play the same South Florida
team in Tampa Friday before travelling home.
Fuller is expected to rotate his pitchers in the
weekend games as he did earlier until they break
their arms in for heavier duty.
Batgirl squad No. 1 that will be handling the

Dragster May Never Race Again
Wishes He Had Been Killed

ATLANTA (UPI) Houston
Platt, a veteran Atlanta racer
whose car killed 11 persons
Sunday when it careened into a
crowd of spectators at
Covington, Ga., said Wednesday
he wished he had been killed in
the crash.
Platt was not injured in the

UF Mermen Dive Into SEC

NASHVILLE Southeastern
Conference swimming records
are expected to be smashed at
the three-day conference meet
which began Thursday.
Eleven marks were set in the
16 swimming events at the last
years tournament in Knoxville
and all of those record setting
swimmers will be back.
The Gators are favored to go
home with their 14th
consecutive title when the meet
ends Saturday. But, Tennessee
and Alabama have had top teams
in the water this season and are
expected to put the pressure on
the Gators.
The Gators are sending four
defending champions to the
meet. Tennessee has two, while
Vanderbilt and Alabama each
have one.
In addition to the UFs four
defending champions, the Gators
boast a freshman, Steve Hairston

I THIS SUNDAY I
SEB THE SENSATIONAL
** SUPER STOCKS ** GASSERS
MODIFIED PRODUCTIONS**SPQR7SCARS
. ROUND ROBIN STYLE
.** PLUS FULL EJ. CLASS PROGRAM
GEN. AD. $2.30, CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE WITH ADULT
IMF 3/j miles N.

crash at Yellow River Drag Strip,
but about 50 men, women and
children were injured when his
1969 modified Camaro raked
across the top of a crowd
protected only by a chain link
fence.
I may never race again,
Platt said in a television

from Fort Lauderdale, who is
one of the nations best freestyle
sprinters.
The record holders, out to
better their own marks will be:
The UFs Bruce Williams, a
nationally ranked middle
distance swimmer who holds
individual SEC records in the
200- and 500-yard freestyle and
participated in record setting
Florida relay teams which took
the 400-medley and 400 and
800-yard freestyle competition
last year.
UFs Barry Russo who holds
the 200-yard butterfly record
and who was on last years
800-freestyle relay team with
Williams.
UFs Mark McKee who holds
the 200 and 400-yard medley
records set last year and who
rounded out the 800-freestyle
relay squad.

Pi ip- &m mm pi ,<*. .Jil
y J % -IP 1
iB wKwNf?-- jH§
V*
WAYNE ROGERS
... warming-up for the weekend game
chores in the first game will consist of Misses Cheryl
Mays, Pat Fox, Gracie Spinale, Leslie Jones, Julie
Miller, Joan Spiegal, Joan Pasteras and Randie
Tolar.

interview Wednesday. He was
still in shock from the disaster.
He said he lost everything he
had in the demolished dragster,
and said he wished he rather
than anyone else had been killed
in the crash.
His orange colored car broke
in half and its fiberglass body
splintered as it slammed into the
people at a speed of nearly 180
mph,
I SHANNONS 1
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|v^JnW^^^NlGhJ^7^oo9|
DELICIOUS I
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tN - J student prices p
Breakfast served 1
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UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend
10% discount
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
pj:[: Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N. Main St. Phone 376-7581 '4

SALES-SERVICE-RENT ALS
m "Authorized
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Office Equipment
PLASMA DONORS NEEDED
Earn $45- $250 per month I
Inter-Coastal Biological, Inc.
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Baby Gators Get McCachren For Bama

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
UFs basketball Baby Gators
will be ending their season
Saturday at 5:45 seeking revenge
for an early season 10790 loss
to the Alabama frosh in
Tuscaloosa.
Leading the Baby Gators,
:y s s
DAN BOE
... UF frosh up for layup
Gator Hopes
For NIT Bid
Up To ACC
(EDITORS NOTE:
Speculation on a UF bid to the
National Invitational
Tournament centers around
action in the Atlantic Coast
Conference. The ACC champ
will receive an invitation to the
NCAA tournament and the
runner-up will go to the NIT. If
North or South Carolina win in
the ACC then UF will probably
get an NIT berth. But if Duke,
the dark horse, should take the
title, then both North and South
Carolina will most likely go to
the NIT and the Gators will not
get a bid.)
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI)
South Carolinas super-sophs
blitzed Maryland 9271
Thursday to set a school record ~
for the most basketball victories
in one season, and Duke beat
Virginia 99-86 in the opening
round of the Atlantic Coast
Conference Tournament.
Third-ranked North Carolina,
the tournament favorite, met
Clemson, and Wake Forest
played North Carolina State
Thursday.
South Carolina, 16th ranked,
and Duke met in Friday nights
semifinals.
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148 on the season, is 6-foot-10
Gary Waddel, UFs steal from
Lexington, Ky. Waddel leads the
frosh in scoring with a 22.2
average, in best field goal and
free throw accuracy with .530
and .810 averages respectively.
Waddels 9.4 rebounding
average is second to 6-8 Dan
Boes 9.8 average. Cliff Cox, 6-6
forward, is tied with Waddels
9.4 rebounding average.
Head Basketball Coach
Tommy Bartlett likes the aspect
of having big players like
Waddel, Boe and Cox coming up
to the varsity to take up the
coming void when All-American
and senior Neal Walk, plays out
his eligibility this year.
Were gonna need big men
for sure, Bartlett said. Waddel,
Boe and Cox might be able to
help us but all the frosh will
have a chance when we start
competing for jobs.
Waddel has got to work on
his speed and quickness if he is
going to make it on the varsity
next year, said Head Freshmen
Coach Jim McCachren. Gary
has good moves but its quickness
that a coach is looking for in a
basketball player.
Kentucky Coach Adolph
Rupps Cats continue to win so
many games because he recruits
quick fast ballplayers, according
to McCachren. All-American
Dan Issel at 6-8 is one of the
Wildcats tallest players ever.
Rupps teams usually arent
very tall. Most of his squads
feature quick fast 64 men that
can really jump and move well.
Cox is a good jumper and
has a good eye for the basket,
said McCachren. He has a lot to
learn, but he likes to play and
thinks basketball.
Interest and tremendous

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desire are the keys to
improvement, said McCachren.
Boe doesnt shoot as much
as we would like him to shoot,
McCachren said. Rebounding is
his strong point right now, but
he will need to work on other
GARY WADDELL
... Baby Gators top scorer

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phases of his game to make it on
the varsity.
The amount of summer
work these boys do on their own
will be a big factor in whether
they can develop their games to
the point that they can work
their way into a starting position
with the varsity next year,
McCachren said.
The summer work Neal
Walk did between his sophomore
and junior years was the big
difference in his individual
performance which eventually
led to All-American status for
him, McCachren said.
Coach McCachren says of 6-2
starting frosh guard Harold
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Kelley, he needs a lot of
summer work on / his ball
handling to be good. If he can
improve this part of his game it
will improve his chances to make
it on the varsity at guard.
We will have only one senior
and five juniors on next years
squad, said McCachren. Most
of our team will be sophomore
and a few of them have an
excellent chance to start next
year.
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Page 17



I, The Florida Alligatoi, Friday, March 7, 1969

Page 18

Gators Face World
On UMs Hard Courts

By JEFF FRANK
Alligator Tennis Correspondent
The UF tennis team will experience a feeling
somewhat akin to entering a lions den Saturday.
Coach Bill Potters netters, described as the
greatest tennis team to ever play for the UF and
picked as favorites to repeat as SEC champions, will
meet their First serious challenge in Coral Gables in
the form of the Miami Hurricanes.
The UF takes a 2-0 record into the match, with
wins over Rollins and Jacksonville University. For
Miami, tomorrows match with the Gators will be
the season opener.
Although officially untested yet this year,
enough is known about Miamis team to cause great
respect on the part of the players, and great concern
on the part of the coaches.
UF beat Miami up here 72 early last season.
Then late in the season, Miami beat the UF down
there by the identical score. Miami, although losing
their number 1 player via graduation, is improved
over last year.
Playing number one for them this year is Pat
Cramer, who handed Gator netter Jamie Pressly his
only two losses last year. Cramer recently was
tabbed as one of the two best young players in the
country along with Californian Stan Smith by
veteran tennis champion Gardner Mulloy.
UFs Armi Neely may try to re-write that
opinion this Saturday .*
In addition to Peyton Watson, Sven Ginman, and
Stan Shanbron who return from last years squad,
Miami coach Dale Lewis has added Mexican Davis
cupper Luis Garcia, and junior college star Steve
Segal. This makes Miami stronger at the top, and
gives them better depth than last years squad. The
Miami team finished fourth in the nation, one notch
ahead @fThe Gators.

Aussie Seeks Rugby Mates

The newly-formed UF Rugby
Club will show films today at
12:30 to introduce new
members to the unique sport.
The meeting will be held in
Room C-4 of the Reitz Union.
Organizer Tony Barker, an
Australian who has played on
state teams there for five years,
is arranging matches with several
northern colleges but he needs
recruits to join the club.
Anybody who is fairly keen
in American football, says
Barker, can be extremely good
Assists Trilogy
Wally Tinker of Auburn made
seven basket-scoring assists
against Vanderbilt, then six
against Georgia Tech over the
weekend to climb up with Bill
Hann of Tennessee and Pete
Maravich of Louisiana State is an
exclusive trilogy of SEC players
averaging Five per game. Hann
continues to pace the league
with 6.2 of the vital passes per
game. Maravich is second on 5.1
and Tinker third at 5.0.

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in rugby.
Barker describes the sport as
a game in which there is no
blocking and in which only the
ball carriers can be tackled.
It is played with a ball that
is larger than an American
football and not as
aerodynamically easy to throw.
Barker, a graduate student,

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If this paints a grim outlook for the Gator
chances tomorrow, things seem even darker when
one considers Miamis two other advantages, that of
the home court and the court surface.
Miamis home court advantage is the product of
the noise and moral support that a thousand or so
screaming fans can give their team, and Miami is
famous for their tennis support.
Even more critical for the Gators is the different
court surface they will face. The UF, as you know,
has hard courts.
Basically the ball comes off the surface low and
extremely fast. Miamis courts are green
composition. The bounce from these is much slower
and the ball comes off much higher. This was the
surface that gave the Gators so much trouble at
Rollins, and prompted team captain Neely to
remark the Gators were still off form and notin the
groove.
When asked to comment on tomorrows match
Coach Bill Potter jokingly said, Its a bunch of
little Alabama and Florida boys against the world.
He was obviously referring to the fact that four of
Miamis top seven players are from foreign
countries, notably Mexico, South Africa, and
Sweden.
Where does this leave the Gators for tomorrow?
Neely is starting to reach peak form. Steve
Beeland may be playing the best tennis on the team
currently. Charlie Owens hasnt been extended in a
match yet and the coaches really dont know just
how good he is. Pressly is playing well and would
like to be playing higher up. Greg Hilley and Paul
Lunetta give the team great depth and could well be
the deciding factors in the match.
The Gators have what can best be described as a
fighting chance tomorrow and to win may well
take all the skill and determination they can muster.

says he has but five players
already lined up for playing but
that he needs more than a dozen
to make a full team plus
reserves.
The films will be narrated by
Barker who will explain to
newcomers the facets of the
unfamiliar game.

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21



ATO Cages Championship Title 38-32

By Alligator Intramural Services
ATO worked over TEP
Wednesday night winning the
Orange League basketball title,
38-32.
The TEPs took an early 6-5
lead on the strength of Craig
Savages driving layups. Ken
Ratcliff, Tom Willis and Steve
Sykes promptly changed the
tone of the game as they hit on
key buckets in the second period
to outscore the TEPs 14- 7 and
take a six point lead into the
half.
In the third period a
Sykes-led ATO team upped their
margin to nine points.
The TEPs started pressing and
forcing ATO mistakes and cut
the margin down to three points
with more than two minutes
left. Savage accounted for most
of these last quarter heroics. But
the TEP surge sputtered.
Willis and David Thomas
opened up the lead toward the
end with accurate free throw
shooting.
As in past games, the TEPs
continually got only one shot at
the basket on offense as the
ATOs were vastly superior in
height and muscle. TEPs Larry
Newman and Rick Perillo were
off in their shooting and this was
a factor.

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REBOUND ACTION
... ATO, TEP go for ball
ATO handled the ball
extremely well and made up for
some bad first quarter shooting
with hot second and third
periods.
ATO scoring was spread
evenly as Sykes led the team
with nine points. Willis and
Hartsaw both scored eight.
Savage was the only TEP to find

TEP LEADS ORANGE LEAGUE

- A.J
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the range with 18 points. His last
two came on a half court jump
shot at the final whistle.
ATO has now moved into
third place in the league, 115
points behind the TEPs.
The TEPs, with 60 points in
basketball, have opened a 75
point lead on second place Beta.
Earlier in the day the TEPs won
their initial handball match
against Phi Delt. The TEPs may
eventually have to face the
ATOs in the finals but will first
have to cope with Sigma Nu.
ATO, after an easy first
round win will eventually have
to face a rougher than ever Pi
Lam team if they expect to play
the TEPs. If TEP should get
knocked off in handball,
however, the league might then
tighten up and ATO could take
the title.
Following handball will be
golf, tennis, track and softball,
all next quarter. The SAEs are
favored to take golf with the Pi
Lams favored to win tennis. The
Pi Lams boast several campus
tournament champions. Softball
is generally up for grabs and
ATO is favored to be an easy
winner by a big margin in track.
The championship could be
won for somebody on three
special days; the days of the

draws. That is the time when it
is determined who will play who
in each sport. Should the first
place fraternity lose in the first
round of any of these sports, the
league race would be placed up
for grabs.

I UF S REPRESENTATIVES 1
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Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 7, 1969

"You dont know what the I
gkmjk FLORIDA QUARTERLY IS ?
today? Said the I
ol the
I Neal Walk l/ check Our L*
After Georgia and Florida met in basketball a few For YoUr NGQCIs
weeks ago in Athens Bulldog coach Ken Rosemond
Disclaimed his big man. Bob Leinhard, was better than I TEXTBOOKS
Florida's Neal Walk. These two 6-11 giants met again aieia# AKm nccn
Saturday night and the results have made Walk this NEW AND USED
week's Alligator Player of the Week. A ID AI
Walk paced the Gators to an early 96-78 victory. In Ml\V*ni I Cvl vKAL
the first half, when Florida blew the Bulldogs out of the EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
game, Walk scored 18 points and had a dozen rebounds
while Leinhard had one point, four rebounds. ART SUPPLIES
When Coach Tommy Bartlett cleared his bench to
save Georgia further humiliation his Gators led, 83-48. STUDY LAMPS
Walk, when he left the game, had 34 points and 25
rebounds, Leinhard eight points and five rebounds. kA sniiteitc
Georgia coach Rosemond didn't have much to say wilVi vJUIrIIO
after the game. CWF ATQUIDTQ
Walk was hard-pressed for his honor by fellow wif EMI wrllM J
basketball players Andy Owens and Boyd Welsch, both | Ef*E DETC
of whom played well in wins over Georgia and W'est LULLtwt rEIS
Virginia, and swimmers Bruce Williams, Jamie Murphy r*f\l I ceai
and Mark McKee, who guided the Gators to-a COLLEOE SEAL
convincing win over Tennessee. ai ACrAT ctatiamcdv
Also, Florida's golf team won its second tournament MASCOT STATIONERY
of the season and was paced by all-American Steve
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[3 yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole,
BRANCH stores-medical center, BROWARD,
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