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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PwtHwirtr
AU-Amariam

Vol. 61. No. 97

SSOC Charter Nixed, Backing Grows

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell Wednesday nixed the
SSOC bid for recognition on the UF
campus.
OConnells action came over the
protests of about 15 student leaders
called to meet with the president in
his office Wednesday afternoon.
The students met after their
session with OConnell to decide
possible courses of united action
against what they termed
OConnells arbitrary and
irresponsible decision.
These student groups have called
for emergency meetings of their
organizations at 7 p.m. tonight.
In denying the request, OConnell
backed up a recommendation made
last week by Lester Hale, vice

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The reign of reason is dead.
One and a half years ago, Stephen OConnell
shed his supreme court robes and joined the ranks
of the scholars.
They called him leader.
And for good cause. He brought calm and
relative quiet to a troubled campus. The academy
had been rocked by Cason, Brewer, Dow, the names
of strife and discontent.
But Hi-Im-Steve-OConnell brought the peace of
reason, the solemnity of objectivity. He cooled
inflamed passions.
And they called him leader.
He went to work insuring judicial fairness. He
promised due process. He opened the channels of
communication, power and decision-making. He
created the Action Conference. He made progress.
And they called him leader.
But the veneer has cracked, the facade has
TTTnnirreu. This man 4s -only part Jeader. For when
his followers asked the most of him, when they
requested he drag the university, kicking and

Invalid Election Supports SG By 3-1
' See Page 2

The
Florida Alligator

EDITORIAL

president for student affairs.
Hales recommendation had
opposed the majority opinion of the
student-faculty Committee of
Student Organizations, which voted
54 to allow SSOC on campus.
OConnell said that if the group
used this decision as an excuse to
demonstrate they would only be
proving the wiseness of the denial.
This decision denies SSOC the
privilege of: using University
facilities available; inviting speakers
to campus; seeking and receiving an
award of that part of registration
fees entrusted to Student
Government for student activities,
and; representing to the students on
this campus and to the public
generally that it and its purposes and
objectives are properly related to and
enjoy the approval of this
institution.
The decision does not deny an

screaming if necessary, into the Twentieth Century
by granting campus freedom to SSOC, he bowed
out, ungraciously and foolishly.
For 17 months, while ferment brewed on
Anericas campuses, the University of Florida held
its breath and prayed. Slowly, painfully, hesitantly
it began again to find faith.
Only to have its newly-found hope cruelly,
thoughtlessly shattered on the rocks of blind
prejudice and sightless stupidity.
The University of Florida is likely now to witness
the concepts of judicial decency and meaningful
education devastated by one mans irresponsible
decision, his wrong choice.
The university community will know that Mark
Anthony spoke the truth:
The evil that men do lives after them, the good
is oft interred with their bones.
And the university certainly cannot be
comforted by the knowledge that John Champion
and Stanley well m ligerF~
Hall.

University of Florida, Gainesville

organization existence, prevent
students from joining it, nor prevent
its members from exercising any
rights of expression or assembly
protected by Constitution or law,
OConnell said.
OConnell said his decision was
based on the fact that SSOC is not
a student organization.
However, SSOC said Monday
their list of membership submitted
along with the bid for charter last
fall consisted only of students.
But the president held that since
meetings of the organization were
open to non-students and the name
of SDS was on the original
application, and the SSOC group
shared some of the basic agreements
of the radical JOMO and SDS
groups, they should not be
recognized.
Neither of these groups would,
(SEE 'CHARTER', PAGE 2)

SSOC Holds Plaza Rally
SSOC will hold a rally in the Plaza of the Americas at 2 p.m. today
to protest the denial of charter by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
Florida State University leaders of SDS and Dr. Kenneth Megill will
speak.
Student Groups To Meet
The following groups will meet in special session tonight at the
places listed to discuss UF President Stephen C.OComieHs decision
to deny official recognition and student group privileges to the
Gainesville chapter of Southern Student Organizing Committee.
All meetings are scheduled for 7 p.m.

Student Government
Student Senate
Florida Blue Key
Omicron Delta Kappa
Inter-fraternity Council (and Presidents)
Interhall Council
ACLU (campus and city)
Law Students Civil Rights Research Council
Association of Women Students
John Marshall Bar Association
Alligator (staff and editors)

The presidents, or their representatives, of all interested
organizations will meet in the Student Activities Center, third floor of
Reitz Union, at 9 p.m. to plan and organize a definite course of
action, if any.

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Thursday, March 6. 1969

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STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... now must face the flak

SG Cabinet office
Student Activities Center
Pi Kappa Phi house
ODK office
Alpha Epsilon Pi house
Interhall office
Friends Meeting House
1 Friends Meeting House
AWS office
JMBA Office
Alligator office



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 6, 1969

Invalid Election Supports SG By 3-1

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
One of the scantiest voter
turnouts in UF election history
Wednesday gave the nod to the
continued operation of Student
Government, but since so few
voted, the outcome is
inconclusive.
Returns showed nearly a 3 to
1 margin of votes favoring the
retention of Student
Government, with 2,257 voting
to retain and 826 to abolish.
However, the referendum can
hardly be considered a mandate
for Student Government, since
only 3174 students voted out of

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BALLOTING CHECKED ON COMPUTER
... by Jay Hingson (left) and Bela Demeter

Slade Arrives In Town
To Look Things Over

State Senator Tom Slade,
R-Jacksonville, will be in
Gainesville this afternoon on a
tour of state mental and
correctional institutions.
Slade, who created a
state-wide controversy last
month by demanding the firing
of UF Prof. Kenneth Megill for
his avocation of a strong
If you're
disabled,
learn
to make
the most
ofit.
Get the help you need
to lead a fuller life.
Write: Help, Box 1200,
Washington, D.C. 20013.
AJ*ublic Service
Advertisment
Courtesy Os
The Florida Alligator

nearly 20,000 enrolled at the
UF.
Since only about 15 per cent
of the student electorate turned
out, the election is considered
invalid and not binding.
For a choice to be decisive,
25 per cent of the student body
has to vote. This means that
4,500 students have to vote
before Student Government can
be abolished via a constitutional
amendment.
The referendum was a plank
in Student Body President Clyde
Taylors campaign last year,
when he promised to lay SG on
the line at the end of his term of
office. Though this election
decided nothing, officially, the

teachers union here to join with
students and take control of the
university, will stay in
Gainesville until Friday.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said Wednesday he
will meet with Slade at a public
J reception to be held Thursday
evening for Slade and his touring
group.
OConnell said he will discuss
anything Slade wants to
discuss at the reception but has
no plans for a private meeting
with him at this time.
Slade said he was unaware of
OConnells decision to deny the
SSOC charter but added that he
was naturally very pleased.
He said he would be very
surprised if there was any
reaction to his visit to the
university city.
Slade said also he did not
know that he would be meeting
with OConnell but would be
extremely pleased to meet
with him and discuss the
problems.
The president refused to

SG Again To Sponsor Miss UF

StiadenTxfOVtnTiTnent wil l "again spoisor the Miss
University of Florida contest this year.
Winner of the contest will enter the Miss Florida
Pageant which selects the state queen, who will
compete for the crown of Miss America at Atlantic
City in September.
The event this year will be the 19th annual

issue possibly will be placed
before the voters again, perhaps
as part of the Student
Government elections in April.
Included on the ballot were
two public opinion questions
about possible reforms for
Student Government. The first
one was, Is there a need for a
study to see about possible
reforms in the area of Student
Government and student
representation?
An overwhelming majority
voted in the affirmative; 2,463
voted yes, while only 360 voted
no.
The second question followed
from the first and read as
follows: If yes, should the new
Student Body President establish
a special student task force (20
to 25 people) to research the
question of restructuring
Student Government?
A total of 1,968 voters
answered in the affirmative,
while 495 voted no.
If the election was
inconclusive, it at least gave an
indication that something,
apathy perhaps, is keeping
students from voting to abolish
Student Government.
It proved that the students
will not abolish Student
Government, said Charles
Harris, majority floor leader of
the Student Senate. But at the
same time it proved by the fact
that so few voted, that students
arent satisfied or even interested
in the current set-up of Student
Government.
Marc Glick, Taylors
administrative assistant, said the
election was more of an opinion
poll which did show favorable
sentiment for Student
Government.

comment about the rumored
SSOC demonstrations planned at
Slades motel, the Ramada Inn,
during his visit to the city.
Slade will tour Sunland
Training Center this afternoon,
on a final stop on his tour
throughout the state this week.
BBSs
amt
SEN. SLADE
... on campus today

pageant. Numerous scholarships and prizes will be
awarded to the winner.
This is a campus wide election 'and all
organizations may enter a contestant in the pageant.
Applications will be available within the week and
may be picked up at the Activities desk on the third
floor ofjhe Reitz Union. Deadline for applications
is Match 13. at 4 p.m.

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BALLOT BOX IS TACKED WITH PRIDE'
... by Donna Betts, one of few who voted

Individual precinct returns
were as follows:
RETAIN SG ABOLISH SG
TOWERS ~ 149 38
NORMAN HALL 209 62
WALKER AUD. 321 g 3
TOLBERT 121 18

Debators To Host
Gator Invitational
More than 40 college debate teams will be on the UF campus this
weekend to compete in the second annual Gator Invitational Debate
Tournament.
Hosted by the UF Debate Society, the tournament will be the
largest forensics event to be held on the UF campus. Competing teams
will represent colleges and universities as far north as New York and as
far west as lowa. About 14 states will be represented.
The debate topic for the tournament is Resolved: That Executive
Control of United States Foreign Policy Should Be Significantly
Curtailed.
Some of the schools that will participate in this years Gator
Invitational Tournament are: Auburn University, Fordham University,
the University of Miami, the University of Georgia, George
Washington University, the U.S. Naval Academy and Vanderbilt
University.
John Wittig, UF debate coach, said the quality of competition in
the tournament will make it an important event for intercollegiate
debate and a special honor to the UF.
UF debaters competing in the event are: Gregg Mathews, Ralph
Glatfelter, Steve Rosin, Dave Rouse, Dee Scarr, Bess Roberts and
Gloria Mikula.
The first-place team in the tournament is awarded the Gator
Traveling Trophy, awarded each year to the championship team. The
trophy, designed by Coach Wittig, has been dubbed The Worlds
Ugliest Trophy by the UF debaters.

No Charter ForSSOC

f FROM PA6E ONE
in my opinion, be entitled to
recognition themselves,
0 Connell said in support of his
decision.

MED CENTER 68 43
HUME HALL 11
REITZ UNION 271 109
GRADUATE LIBRARY 259 178
MURPHREE 173 75
HUB 116 69
BROWARD 224 18
LAW CENTER 159 110

He felt the organization was
not consistent with the
educational purpose of this
institution.
No student, no group, is
entitled to approval of every
request or demand made, he
said.
request for recognition has been
given fair and deliberate
consideration, OConnell said.
Again, in my opinion, it has
been found not consistent with
the best interests of this
institution, its educational
mission, and its continued
operation and progress.



SSOC Organizes Rally
In Protest Os OConnell

By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell was accused of
making a stupid mistake
Wednesday by SSOC spokesman
Steve Fahrer.
Fahrer, chairman of the
steering coimittee of the
Southern Students Organizing
Committee, said OConnell erred
in calling attention to the
universitys obvious, blatant,
oppressive acts. Fahrer said he

AC Terminates 'Not With
A Bang But A Whimper
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
As its final act, Action Conference thanked UF President Stephen
C. OConnell for his support of the group and called his attention to
the 41 proposals that have been made by the conference in the past
10 months.
The conference started with 75 members last May, 15 showed up
for start of Wednesdays meeting. The president and vice president of
Student Government were conspicuously absent as was its creator
OConnell.
They were in attendance at the presidents conference discussing

MANNING DAUER
...skeptical

He pointed out that the present Little Theatre has a seating
capacity of 450. A seating capacity of 2,000 to 3,000 is needed for
the performing arts, he said.
In another proposal, the conference recommended that the seminar
program for graduate students at UF by expanded to include all levels
of university 'students.
Also, the conference passed a proposal recommending that
students be included in the curriculum decision making process as
active voting members.
Student elections were recommended as part of the proposal to
obtain the students viewpoint on courses offered.

FSU Senate Urges Dropping SDS Charges

By FSU FLAMBEAU
The FSU Faculty Senate, meeting in
special session Wednesday afternoon,
passed a resoltuion urging the university to
have charges dropped against 58 students
arrested while assembling peacefully in
the Union State Room Tuesday night.
The students were arrested for defying a
circuit court injunction prohibiting
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)
from using university facilities to present
national SDS secretary Fred Gordon.
"The; resol-u-rien calletf upon rfre~
administration to make formal and
informal efforts to have the charges
dropped.
Also included in the resolution was the
recommendation that the university adopt
a policy of niether approving nor
disapproving student organizations.
These two points were added as
amendments to an original resolution
prepared by the Faculty Senate steering

was referring to OConnells
denial of a charter for SSOC.
Fahrers remarks were made
during an interview Wednesday
night at which he announced
SSOCs plans for a rally to be
held today at 2:30 in the Plaza
of the Americas.
Fahrer said the rally was in
support of 1) the 56 Florida
State University students
arrested at bayonet point
Tuesday night, 2) Dr. Kenneth
Megills struggle for academic

the SSOC charter denial.
Conference proposals have
included an all-student conduct
committee for SG,
reapportionment of the
University Senate, yearly teacher
evaluations and voluntary class
attendance.
At Wednesdays meeting,
Political Science Department
Chairman Manning Dauer,
introduced a proposal to include
in the planned activities complex
a performing arts facility. The
proposal passed unanimously.
Dauer said he was skeptical of
the all-purpose building idea that
has been associated with the new
facility.
The last one I heard of was
the present gymnasium on
campus, he said. They called
it the auditorium, assembly hall
and gymnasium. It lodes like a
gym to me.

committee.
The original resolution contained four
points:
the faculty senate deplores the
universitys handling of student meetings.
The Florida State University campus
was not and would not have been in a
condition of crisis and that intrusion of
police with rifles and fixed bayonets to
prevent a peaceful assembly of students is
beyond the pale of academic propriety.
The Faculty Senate deplores the
division among faculty, students and
admifitsif a t-iofi -mat-has-been-er eatw by-the by-theserving
serving by-theserving of the injunction and subsequent
armed arrest of students.
The Faculty Senate charges the
administration with having precipitated an
unnecessary and unwarranted crisis.
In other action, the senate tabled a
resolution recommending that the Board of
Regents go outside the university
community in -naming a permanent
president.

freedom against bureaucratic
harassment.
Fahrer said the rally was also
to protest President
OConnells futile attempts to
suppress dissenting elements of
the academic community.
Fred Gordon, national
secretary of the Students for a
Democratic Society (SDS) from
Chicago, had been invited to
speak at the rally in behalf of
the FSU students but was unable
to come, according to Fahrer.
Gordon was arrested Tuesday
night along with 50 or more
FSU students.
Four leaders of SDS from
FSU will be coming to
Gainesville to speak at the rally,
Fahrer said. He did not know
the names of the SDS leaders
who were planning to speak.
Fahrer said philosophy
professor Kenneth Megill had
also been invited to speak.
Megill said Wednesday mght
he would speak at the rally on
the current situation here and
at FSU.
Fahrer said that anyone who
wanted to speak would be
allowed to speak.
He said he would not let
OConnell speak because he has
already spoken and did not tell
us we could speak in reply.
Also scheduled to speak are
SSOC spokesman Ed Freeman
and Fahrer.

SSOC: Once Tied To SDS
And 'Proud To Be Radical

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
After four years of unofficial
existence, Gainesvilles Southern
Student Organizing Committee
(SSOC) has been denied
recognition by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
In 1965, SSOC began as an
off-campus organization,
affiliated with Students for a
Democratic Society (SDS). Ed
Freeman was one of the
organizers of the group and its
major spokesman until
November 1968 when he
announced he would no longer
be an active member for
personal reasons.

Earlier in the day, an SDS member
called for a student strike to shut the
place down. There was no indication how
much support the strike call would get.
Fifty-eight persons were released from
jail Wednesday morning, most on their own
recognizance, on charges of contempt of
court, disorderly conduct and interfering
with a law enforcement officer.
Marshall said he obtained a circuit court
injunction to block the SDS meeting
because SDS had sought a confrontation
with the university administration and had
gotten it.
He told the faculty senate the decision
to use bayonets was made by Leon County
Sheriff Raumond Hamlin. Im sorry they
displayed the weapons so prominently, but
that wasnt my decision to make, Marshall
said.
t ~ ; r : V -i
Marshall also reaffirmed his denial of
recognition to SDS but said he hoped the
day would come when no campus
organizations would be outlawed.

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BARK-ING UP THE RIGHT TREE
The ATO's have fixed up a tree in front of their house in a unique
way. Where some bark had come loose exposing the core of the tree,
they filled in concrete, complete with monograms.

A small organization for the
first three years of life, the
SSOC sponsored a phone-in in
February 1967, protesting
American involvement in
Vietnam and a be-in last
March combining protest and
political action with
entertainment.
In May, 1967, an
member was quoted as saying
the UF would be the scene of a
Columbia-style takeover. The
member was, however,
unidentified and the takeover
failed to occur.
SDS-SSOC also participated
in the protests over the Dow
Chemical Co. recruitment on
campus last spring.

Thursday, March 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Last October, SDS-SSOC
applied to the Student
Organizations and Social Affairs
Committee for permission to
come on campus.
Ed Freeman said then that
the group proudly accepts the
label of radical and its two
immediate goals are to end
racism and to completely
restructure the UF.
Freemans plan for
restructuring the UF was to let
the students and faculty elect
the university president and
make him directly
responsible. All the Florida
university presidents would
become the Board of Regents.
In November, the SDS was
dropped from the name of the
organization. Freeman said the
title SDS had been used only
for publicity.
The SSOC sponsored a series
of radical education seminars on
draft evasion and formed the
Gainesville Friends to the Grape
Workers Committee in support
of the Grape Workers in
California.
Last month, the SSOC
launched a campus education
program to present their
viewpoint of the Sen. Tom
Slade-Prof. Ken Megill
controversy.
On Feb,6jtheStudent
Organizations and Social Affairs
Committee approved the SSOCs
charter request by a 54
majority decision.
Last Monday, Vice President
for Student Affairs Lester Hale
recommended to President
OConnell that SSOC not be
recognized as a campus
organizaion.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Marc|| 6, 1969

Gallery Sponsors
Printing Talk
Peter Bunnell of New Yorks
Museum of Modern Art will
discuss photography as
printmaking, 3 p.m. Sunday at
the UF Gallery.
Bunnell, associate curator of
the museums department of
photography, joined the staff in
1966 to review and catalogue
the museums collection of more
than 10,000 photographs.

Coed Wins
Scholarship
A Coral Gables coed at UF has been awarded a
scholarship in honor of a former West Point football
star killed in a 1966 auto accident.
Winner of the $175 scholarship is Karen Kinnin,
21-year-old senior of the Universitys College of
Physical Education and Health.
The award the W. Edward Noble Jr. Memorial
Scholarship was established in the college in 1966
by Mary Noble, a teacher at North Shore
Junior-Senior High School in West Palm Beach.
Miss Noble was a senior at UF when her brother
was killed, shortly after his graduation from the
U.S. Military Academy where he played first string
defensive halfback.
The scholarship is given to a needy student who
has demonstrated the kind of personal
characteristics exemplified by Noble, a graduate of
Robert E. Lee High School in Jacksonville.
B.K. Stevens, professor of physical education and
Dean D.K. Stanley presented the award to Miss
Kinnin, the most outstanding athlete in the Coral
Gables High School class of 1965, home room
president and a member of the National Honor
Society.

Gator Town Apartments
FREE
-Â¥ Free Last Months Rent
With is Month Lease -Â¥
Special Low Summer Rates With
No Lease Required
Now Leasing (or September
9
1, 2 and 3-BEDROOM APARTMENTS LOCATED CONVENIENTLY
TO THE LAW CENTER' CAMPUS' MEDICAL CENTER AND
SHOPPING AREAS. ONE OF THE MOST SPACIOUS
WELL-LANDSCAPED GARDEN APARTMENTS IN GAINESVILLE.'
TWO LARGE SWIMMING POOLS
RECREATION ROOM FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED
COMPLETE LAUNDRY ROOM FACILITIES EXTRA LARGE LIVING ROOMS AND BEDROOMS
FREE GAS BARBECUE GRILLS LARGE WALK-IN CLOSETS
MASTER TV ANTENNA WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING AND DRAPERIES
CABLE SERVICE AVAILABLE CENTRAL AIR AND HEAT
COMPLETELY EQUIPPED KITCHENS
Nine-Month Lease Also Available ** ;
309 Southwest 16th Ave.
Telephone: (904) 378-3457
Lyn Hal pert, Manager

DROPOUTS
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KAREN KINNIN J
.. winner of W. Edward Noble Scholarship 1

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\( FINP ANOTHER
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BY HOWARD POST

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and 1* published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It la published
semi-weekly, and during student bolldtys and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Rails
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. Hie Alligator Is entered
as hms puftor at Um Unitxt BtM tea. Eflft Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver adver'
' adver' tisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will wt consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Adver Advertising
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not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
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Collins Backed For FSU President

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Florida State
University senior Gary Pajcic said Wednesday he
has talked to former Gov. Leoy Collins and is
certain Collins would not turn down the FSU
presidency.
The former governor said this was not the
type of job you seek but the type that seeks out
the man, Pajcic said. So he is not an active
candidate.
The FSU football quarterback made the
statement at a news conference announcing that

Astronauts Fly Near Perfect Test

SPACE CENTER, Houston
(UPI) Two Apollo 9
astronauts flew their spiderlike
lunar lander through a near
perfect initial manned space test
Wednesday, heightening hopes
for a moon landing this summer,
despite space sickness that
threatened to cancel a planned
Thursday spacewalk.
In an 18-hour day devoted to
testing the 16-ton but fragile
shelled craft that will lower two
American astronauts to the
moon, James A. McDivitt and

China Warns Soviet Destruction
If Border Incidents Continue

HONG KONG (UPI) Communist China-
Wednesday bluntly warned the Soviet Union it
would be totally destroyed once and for all if
border incidents continued.
Using some of its strongest words since Korean
War days, Peking radio kept up its steady attack on
the Russians and, for the third day in a row,
reported widespread anti-Soviet demonstrations.
The protests, which one Hungarian newsman in
Peking said even included kindergarten children
carrying anti-Soviet banners, came in the wake of
Sundays bloody clash between the two giant
Communist nations on the frozen
border.

Defiant W. Germans

Elect New President
BERLIN (UPI) West Germany defied Communist protests
Wednesday and elected a new president in West Berlin.
The Soviets cut the citys lifelines through East Germany for four
hours in retaliation but failed to create the general crisis that had been
feared.
Closure of all three autobahns linking the isolated city to West
Germany was the most serious interference with traffic in four years,
but it failed to stop members of the West German electoral college
from electing Gustav Heinemann, the 69-year-old minister of justice,
as the nations new president.
East Germany and the Soviet Union had protested that the holding
of the election in West Berlin was a violation of the World War II
Potsdam agreement. The Communists had threatened strong
retaliatory action, including the possibility of a complete
blockade. In the end, the Soviets made no attempt to interfere with
allied air traffic to the city and seemed satisfied with playing a cat and
mouse game with the highways, alternately opening and closing the
vital roads.
VT i *4 I > i ,y" I
y j -j A I 1
ijj

Hopes Heightened For Summer Moon Landing

Russell Rusty Schweickart
put in one of the busiest
workdays ever in space.
They began by crawling from
the Apollo 9 command craft
through a manhole-sized tunnel
into the landing craft, with
which they docked Monday
three hours after launch from
Cape Kennedy on their 10-day
mission.
Veteran flight commander
McDivitt and Schweickart, a
rookie space pilot, crawled
inside the two-place lunar

300 STUDENTS TO CAMPAIGN

an ad hoc committee of students and faculty
kicked off a campaign to get the job for Collins.
He said about 300 students will be involved in
the campaign which mostly will involve
letter-writing and distribution of 2,000 Im for
Collins buttons.
I already have letters from 25 faculty
members enthusiastically endorsing Collins,
which is a good start, he said.
Pajcic, who was a student leader in Collins

Should you dare to continue to instigate armed
provocations, you will be resolutely, completely,
cleanly and totally destroyed once and for all
whether you come by land, by air, or by sea and no
matter how many of you come with whom you
come, the Peking broadcast said.
A Yugoslav correspondent reported from the
Chinese capital that strengthened security forces
were seen everywhere as reports poured in a
general wave of demonstrations in the area in
which the incident occured.
In Moscow, the Soviet news media continued to
play down the incident although the labor
newspaper Trud disclosed some new details of the
fight, the most serious yet between the two nations.

lander, nicknamed Spider.
The third Apollo 9 pilot, David
R. Scott, stayed behind in the
command craft the astronauts
call Gumdrop.
Inside the lander, McDivitt
and Schweickart tested the
steering rockets on the
long-legged moon machine, tried
out its shirt-sleeve atmosphere
that allowed them to take off
their helmets, and presented a
six-minute television show.
Most important, they proved
out the big, throttable engine

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losing campaign for the U.S. Senate last fall, said
the letters will go to the faculty committee
which plans to nominate five persons for the
position, vacated by the resignation of Dr. John
Champion.
He is qualified too because he is from
outside FSU and not involved in the present
factionalism which led to Champions
resignation and is giving problems to Dr. Stanley
Marshall, now acting president.

that will be used to gently lower
men to the moons surface.
McDivitt spent seven hours
inside the lunar lander, and
Schweickart eight.
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Thursday, March 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 6, 1969

Page 6

EDITORIAL

We Disagree
Sixteen student leaders representing nearly every phase
of student life and activities heard President Stephen C.
OConnell announce his decision Wednesday to deny official
recognition to SSOC SSOCOConnell
OConnell SSOCOConnell refused to budge even an inch from his
apparently arbitrary, possibly political mindbender, despite
facing a student audience which unanimously disagreed with
him.
The decision is made and, judging from a long history of
administrative stubbomess, it will probably stand.
But the following student leaders, although not
necessarily agreeing with or endorsing SSOC, either its
members or its philosophies, have refused to support
President OConnells decision, primarily on the grounds
that SSOC members should be given the privileges given to
all students.
Student Body President Clyde Taylor
Student Body Vice President Gary Goodrich
Administrative Assistant Marc H. Glick
Executive Assistant Ric Katz
Student Body Treasurer Phil Burnett
Honor Court Chancellor Pete Zinober
Florida Blue Key President Manny James
Omicron Delta Kappa President Harvey Alper
Interfraternity Council President Steve Zack
Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich
Alligator Managing Editor Dave Doucette
Student Senate President Jack Vaughn
Student Senate Majority Leader Charles Harris
Committee on Student Rights Chairman Clyde Ellis
Association of Women Students President Joan Schaffel
Second 100 Chairman Jim Holmes
Intercourse Chairman Mick Callahan
Mortar Board Renee Millard
Panhellenic President Diane Barron
Interhall President Mike McNerny
SSOC Spokesman Steve Fahrer
They and the thousands of other students they associate
with every day will now surely wonder about the truth of
the rumor they have heard so often ignorance begets fear;
fear begets injustice.
l! WALK J
1 II
1 L ffix. 1
l r F £ k J
'
; i :
- Unfinished
j

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, whose last paying job
was bringing justice to the State
of Florida, has failed in his third
opportunity to bring justice to
the UF campus.
And in doing so, as in the
Lavon Gentry and Marshall
Jones incidents, he has insulted
the judgement of the vast
majority of the UF community.
He has taken his cue from
past and present administrators
of FSU who, in their
acquiescence to legislative
intervention, have precipitated
crisis after crisis on their own
campus.
He has left UF with scant
hope for justice in the
disposition of the Megill
controversy.
Shortly after having taken
office, OConnell was faced with
a choice between retaining the
services of a highly competent
and respected psychology
professor and bowing to the
demands of powerful
reactionary influences outside
the university.
Dr. Marshall Jones was forced
to leave the university.
Just this fall, OConnell was
confronted with a situation
which vast numbers of
prominent faculty and student
leaders considered selective
enforcement. Furthermore, the
situation was to be handled
outside the university despite a
general consensus that it was a
university affair.
Lavon Gentry went before a
municipal court.
Now, OConnell has failed in
his third opportunity to be
responsive to his academic
constituency. An organization
composed of university students
has applied and been refused,
official recognition because of
their political philosophy.
And the entire university will
suffer for it.
' i i
A university community,
thrice removed from its head
administrator, will again
demonstrate its disenchantment
with the powers that be.
*
Each element will bring
pressure to bear in the way it
knows best, hoping against hope
for change.
The issues will grow in a
geometrical progression.
And if those issues are dealt
with as they have been in the
.past, UF will ultimately explode.
W e wil l no longer have to
wonder how a Berkely or a
Wisconsin or a Columbia starts
out.
(Steve. dont listen to the
whispers and soon you will hear
the shouts.)

)A>t

The American Dream

UF Will Explode

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
'* the exercise of responsibility/'
Wy Harold Aldriph
Editor-In-Chief
PaClAHllfetA/ Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
HW. Executive Editor News Editor
The Fifth Column 1
By Jason Straight
O.K. So it happened.
I mean, if you talked to all the big student politicos, they knew all
along. Right? Lets face it; there was just no way President OConnell
could recognize SSOC (tee SDS).
Because given the political climate in this state particularly, (dont
forget, we just elected Dangerous Dan as a United States Senator) and
in the nation generally, (Diplomat Dick as President?) it just wouldnt
be EXPEDIENT, (cute word great connotation.)
So we run through this little two act play. Picture it:
Les!
Yo, Steve.
That committee did me over.
Im hip, Steve.
Send me a memo, Les, an splain to me why SSOC shouldnt be
recognized . you dig?
Im hip, Steve.
So the memos fly, lending an aura of objectivity and authenticity
to an unfortunate decision. And Stephen C. (of whom we all wished
well) blew it. He really piped it in. An it surprised me.
Because no matter what others said, I somehow (naively?) believed
the man had it in him to get into this. .. this new feeling that is
cutting through the young people of this country. I really thought he
honestly considered his first duty was to the university as a learning
center, and not to the unidentified but always hallowed Florida
Taxpayer.
But everything coalesced, who knows what pressures were brought
to bear, and he made his well-predicted move. John Champion and
Stanley Marshall will smile in their sleep tonight, for the renowned,
but now tarnished integrity of Stephen OConnell has somehow been
incredibly joined with their political conniving.
So wha( does it all mean? Well practically it means that a group of
people admitedly out of the mainstream of American political
thought, can t enjoy the privileges of official campus recognition. But*
more than that, it means that the vise is closing, and the form of
reasoning used to deny SSOC can now be used against any other
group who are out-of-the-mainstream of current Florida Taxpayer
thought.
Elsewhere in this issue you can read all the facts about this current
campus black comedy. There may be a protest rally today and
tomorrow. You should g 0,... if you care. If you dont, then it
proves one thing; education at the University of Florida is in far worse
shape than Tom Slade ever dreamed.
And if you won t shed a tear for SSOC, then shed one for Kenneth
Megill for he now knows what Stephen OConnells definition of
due process is.
* ll
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the Unhajrsity of Floride under the
tfcs Soard of Student Publications.
Editorial, Busioaas, Advertising offices in Room 330, Rate Union, Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
"Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors of of
the writer of the article and not tboae of the University of Florfcto.

By Uncle Javerneck



Korean Boarding
Os Pueblo Illegal

CORONADO, Calif. (UPI) The North Korean navy had no legal
right to board the USS Pueblo, even if the espoinage ship had been in
Korean territorial waters, a sea law expert said Wednesday.
A warship enjoys legal immunity even when it is in the territorial
waters of a foreign state, Capt. John R. Brock, who is in charge of
the international law section of the Navy Judge Advocate Generals
Office, told a five-admiral court of inquiry into the Pueblo affair.
Even the Pueblo s status as an espionage ship would not have given
the North Koreans the right to seize her, Brock said.

Woman Kidnapper Arrested;
Made 'lO Most Wanted List

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Ruth Eisemann-Schier, wanted
in the kidnapping of heiress
Barbara Mackle, was arrested
Wednesday by FBI agents in
Norman, Okla.
The FBI said the 26-year-old
woman was arrested at a
restaurant where she was

Castro Foils Hijacker
With Money Motive

MIAMI (UPI) A long-haired Negro wearing a Fu Manchu
mustache and beard hijacked a National Airlines jet Wednesday and
robbed its passengers as it winged to Havana, but Cuban authorities
made him return the money.
The hijacker, who identified himself as an ex-dope peddler named
Jimmy Carter from San Bernardino, Calif., was met by Cuban
authorities as he stepped from the Boeing 727 jetliner at Jose Marti
Airport. He was disarmed and forced to return the stolen money and
led away.
The 17th hijacking of the year and 12th involving a U.S. plane
occurred before dawn as Nationals Flight 97 was flying from New
York to Miami. The hijacker struck when the plane was about 50
miles south of Norfolk, Va.

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working as a car hop. She was
the first woman ever put on the
FBls 10 most wanted list of
fugitives.
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover
said the investigation for the
woman was intensified in the
Norman area after her
fingerprints were identified by

UPI
NEWS

the Oklahoma State Bureau of
Identification.
Using the alias Donna Wills,
she had applied for a nursing
position at a Norman hospital
Feb. 27 which required the
fingerprinting.
Miss Eisemann-Schier was the
object of a nationwide search
after the FBI identified her as
the accomplice of Gary Steven
Krist in the $500,000
kidnapping plot involving the
daughter of Florida land
developer Robert F. Mackle last
Dec. 17.
Krist was captured in a west
coast Florida swamp neanPunta
Gorda early on the morning of
Dec. 22 after FBI agents had
trailed his boat flight through
the cross-state canal from West
Palm Beach to Ft. Myers, Fla.
Virtually all of the $500,000
ransom paid by Mackle for the
release of his 20-year-old
daughter was recovered in the
swamp area where Krist was
captured.

Sirhans Writings
Read In Court
LOS ANGELES (UPI) Chaotic scribblings in notebooks in which
Sirhan B. Sirhan wrote on page after page that Sen. Robert Kennedy
must be killed were read to the jury at his murder trial Wednesday.
Defense attorney Grant B. Cooper intoned aloud in court the
writings in which Sirhan skipped from threats about Kennedy to
writing his own name over and over again, the names of girl friends
and allusions to large amounts of money.
The bodes were presented by the prosecution as evidence of
Sirhans premeditation in the slaying of the New York senator.
Cooper was attempting to back up the defense contention of an
unbalanced mental condition shown by the ramblings in the books.
On one page Sirhan wrote, Kennedy must be sacrificed for the
cause of the poor exploited people.* On another he wrote, Kennedy
must fall. Kennedy must fall.
The hand that is doing this writing will do the slaying of Robert
F. Kennedy. Cooper questioned him about the use of the personal
pronoun we in the notation we believe that we can effect the
slaying of Kennedy.
S. Viet PM Escapes
Would-Be Assassins
SAIGON (UPI) Terrorists attempted to assassinate Prime
Minister Tran Van Huong Wednesday but were frustrated by South
Vietnamese police in a running gunbattle in downtown Saigon.
Huong, 65, escaped without injury.
Two of the terrorists, who fired on the prime ministers car, were
captured.
One was dressed in a South Vietnamese army uniform.
The terrorists also were carrying a deadly antipersonal bomb.
The attempt to kill Huong came as U.S. Marines began pulling out
of the A Shau Valley after a six-week sweep which spokesmen said
killed at least 1,500 Communists and prevented a major Red assuh in
the northern provinces.
President Nixon warned Tuesday of appropriate response if the
Communists continued to attack civilian centers in violation of an
understanding with North Vietnam.
The Marines paid a heavy price themselves in Operation Dewey
Canyon near the border with Laos.
Officers said at least 117 were killed and 626 wounded.

Thursday, March 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 6, 1969

\S2yWH|lmiunMw
WOW All Week...
MEDIUM EGGS.... 2 sl. IIEKoK
MAYONNAISE..... 39* *-*£**
Qts. KRAFT (7C OKL.-limit 1 Moyonnaise your choice ~SSOO or more ourchase e.clud.ng MILLER HIGH LIFE \ lIW
MAYONNAISE 49 1 m VI U
12-oz. Con CHEK ALL FLAVORED 0010 joAL...lm* 1 S 5 00 or more purchose e.ckding
Drinks 15/Sl Flour 5 49* __l 8
Quantity Rrghts ReservedPrices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon T |M|H
J WINN-DIXIE INC COPYRIGHT
can
nffifil SHE
i?£XM No. 303 Con LIBBY REG A L C FRUIT
ARROW DETERGENT 39* Cocktail 4/sl.
giant ajax 2. 69* Peaches 3/Sl.
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PAPER TOWELS^. 3/Sl. IJg* Pe 5/$1 stew .. 2 /$l
tm * vsi Hash 39*
Corro,s 4 /$l Meat....B/$1
Kraut...3/$l Ssage 5/$l
14-oi LIBBY W TOMATO A MOLASSES DARK BROWN No. 303 Cun LIBBY CREAM STYLE or WHOLE KERNEL
r y y / Beans...B/$l Corn 5/$l
. ,o 4 t ;;., > Rolls 2/49. Pie 3/sl.
w IP I Strudel .49* Bread 2/49*
fTW WLLiFe STAMPS TO^AJLLhTSTAMPS Jj TOP VALUE STAMPS j TOP VAU STAMW ; TOP VALUE STAMPS ; TOP VALUE STAMM j
L GroJ3 Beef *** 'BfcHfr r V'SV£ £mZ*
COOP THRU WAACH is ^ KEY R
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I SUNSHINE No Cons RED BIRD IMITATION 14-oz JACKS
ll ,n ~ Krispy Crackers . 37* Vienna Sausage .2/23 e Coconut Bars .... 39*
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. Mushrooms Potted Meat . ,3/29 c Choco-Lots .... 49^
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t i,W7 1 Corned Beef 45 c Vegetabje All . . 23lJSAaliamar5- T .q--. 41



GRANADA
V> purch*M M rTH I Bread & B 29C J
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USD A CHOICE BEEF w-d brand usda choice
I * BONELESS FULL CUT
Chuck Roast -89* K | Wmmm
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Thursday, March 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE |
iwWWWimMag^^
Rare, white AKC German Shepherd
puppies. Gentle temperment, good
with children. SIOO. Phone
378-0844. (A-st-96-P)
Want to buy a motorcycle??? I can
save you sss. Call 392-8775
evenings. (A-3t-96-P)
TELEVISION RCA, 23 in, all
channels, great condition, SSO or best
offer. Call 378-7805 ask for Karen or
Martee. (A-3t-96-P)
Gibson guitar, steel strings, hollow
dark brown wood, in groovy
condition must sell so best offer will
do. Call 392-9772 after 3:30 p.m.
(A-st-96-P)
1957 Triumph Motorcycle 650 cc,
$250. Call 378-0726. (A-st-95-P)
Honda P-50, 1968, good shape, new
clutch and just tuned up. Helmet,
tool kit, and book strap
included sBs. Call
Terry 376-0642 after 4 p.m.
(A-3t-95-P)
BABY FLYING SQUIRREL, cute
easy to feed and tame $5 or $9/pair.
327 NW 16th St. (5-7 p.m.) or call
376-0968. Ovation electric guitar 4 mo. old
Fender amp. Harmony Sovereign
Acoustic Guitar, good cond. $350
call 378-7612. (A-st-94-P)
A beauty of a buy!! Honda 150
complete with two helmets, tool kit,
and many more extras. Call 378-8905
after 7 pm. (A-st-93-P)
Dachshound puppy, female, black
and tan, 7 weeks old, AKC registered
$50.00. 376-8523. (A-st-93-P)
25% off to students: 2 drawer metal
storage or file cabinets. Refinished
gray, green or tan. J.R. Office
Furniture Co., 620*/2 S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (6t-93-A-P)
Unusually well furnished 10x55
mobile home. A/C and with separate
storage shed with workshop. 5
minutes from Univ. $3250. Call
378-3684 Eves. (A-4t-97=P)
Muntz M6O 8 & 4 track car stereo.
Still under warranty & in new
condition. Must sell. Call Chris Pool
at 3 78-8851 during week.
(A-3t=97-P)
| FOR RENT
WANT TO live in Sin City? Sublet
beautiful 2-bedroom atp. in luxurious
Landmark. Call 378-6494.
(B-st-96-P)
STARTS TODAY
CORRUPTION
WHERE
will %
THE M
BODIES Vli /
TURN UP
NEXT? ### 7:00
my 10:25
STARRING g
PETER CUSHING
AND
SUE LLOYD
ALSO AT 8:50
THE MEANEST REBEL
EVER BORN LIVES ONLY TO
MAKE THEM DIE !M

| FOR RENT
2 Bedroom apt. in triplex. Central air
& heat, kitchen equipped. 3533 SW
24 Ave. Ph. 372-5400, $95 mo.
(B-st-96-P)
One bedroom apt. for sublease. 8
Tanglewood Manor. Beautifully
furnished, central AC, head, cut-rate,
$l3O. Available Mar. 26. Call
378-0990. (B-st-96 P)
1 Bedroom, AC, apt. 1533 NW sth
Ave. Walking distance to campus,
$95 per month. Call 378-8058.
(B-st-95-P)
Ranch style living. One bedroom apt.
Large closets and bath. Fully paneled
and air cond. Use of pool and
bar-b-que house. Walking distance of
new golf course to be opened this
spring. Water, extermination and
garbage collection included. SIOO.OO
a month 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-6t-93-P)
1 bdrm apt to sublease 3 blks from
campus air-conditioning, washing
machine. 1824 NW 3 PI no. 23 Call
372-5567. (B-st-94-P)
Extra furniture free: will sublet or
rent individually 2 br
apt dishwasher, disposal, pool,
central AC 3 qtr and/or
summer Landmark 378-5815.
(B-4t-97-P)
Subletting for spring quarter, two
bedrooms near campus. $405 per
quarter. Starlite Apts. Call 378-7683.
(B-2t-97-P)
| WANTED '"1
;EED 2 male roommates by spring
qt. Have color TV and bar. Call
378-0622, French QT Apt. 104.
(C-2t-96-P)
3 girls need roommate for spring
and/or summer term. Dishwasher,
pool, gym and sauna. Landmark Apt.
21. Ph. 378-8467 ask for Elaine $45.
(C-3t-96-P)
MALE roommate needed in spacious
Gatortown apt. 3 bed, 2 bath, $52.50
mo. Call after 4. Open March and
Spring quarter. 378-6873. (C-4t-96-P)
NEED 1 roommate for Frederick
Gardens, 2 bedroom apartment
spring quarter. Call 378-1978.
(C-st-92-P)

* I 7:50 9:45
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9* ggfe, 7^n00..

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 6, 1969

I wanteiT |
Female roommates wanted. Fredrick
Garden Apartments SIOO per
quarter. Spring Quarter Only. Call
Barb at 376-1045. (C-6t-93-P)
Female roommate for Landmark. 2
bdm. apt. Spring and summer
quarters. Call 378-8708 after 6 p.m.
(C-3t-95-P)
Coed roommate needed. 1 bedrm
apt. 4023 S.W. 34 St. Call 376-3763
i or write Sally Bowers, Drawer 1030,
, Apopka, Fla. $45 per mo. (C-st-94-P)
One female roommate needed spring
quarter Landmark Apts. 174 two
bedroom $45 mo. Call 378-0846.
(C-st-94-P)
Coed to sublet private room Spring
and Summer quarters. Share kitchen
and washer/dryer. AC. Call 372-1973
or come by. 1616 NW 3rd Ave.
(C-st-94-P)
LANDMARK Male roommate
needed. Available March 1. March
rent paid. Call 378-3120, apt. 170.
(C-10t-88-P)
Landmark Female roommate for
spring quarterapt. 173, $45 a
month. Call after 5:00 378-1007.
(C-st-97-P)
NEED one roommate for spring or
spring and summer. Great apt. for
less. March rent paid. Landmark Apt.
98 or call 372-9609. (C-2t-97-P)
COED ROOMMATE wanted, large,
air-conditioned, two-bedroom, 16th
Ave. apt. on pool, $37 mo. Village
Park No. 97, Call 372-4751.
(C-st-95-P)

, msmsimm
MAR. 7-9 T s Eliots B:PM
Florida Players MURDER IN
Modern Dance Group T HE CATHEDRAL :i92-1653 I
MARCEL
Black... *"*
ORpHEUS

| WANTED J
ROOMMATE for poolside apartment
at French Quarter No. 50 for spring
quarter. 378-4507. (C-3t-95-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share Col. Manor Apt. 39 spring
quarter sllO/2 air cond. pool. Call
Julie 378-4785, 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
(C-st-95-P)
1 Female roommate. Must sublet
Village Park Apt. poolside, 2
bedroom. 2nd floor. $41.25 month
for spring and/or summer quarter.
Call 378-9088 anytime. (C-3t-95-P)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt.. Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-10t-94-P)
3rd coed roommate to share house
SW 13th St. own bedroom
$33/month plus utilities. 10 min
walk from campus, roomy. Contact
Sue or Jo 378-0762. (C-3t-97-P)
The single University crowd over
21For the Friday Afternoon
Club will meet this and every
Friday from 5-7:30 at the
Lamplighter. Private pleasant
atmosphere. Drinks $.45. Come early
and bring your friends. (C-6t-96-P)
Coolest pad in town. Need male
roommate. Pool, fine furnishings,
bar, fireplace and much more.
SSO/mo. Call before signing
elsewhere 378-4877. (C-st-97-P)
LIVE OFF CAMPUS C.L.O.
$60.00/M. Room & board. Frosh &
sophs, may break. Contracts total
indepen. Call 376-9420. Come by
117 NW 15 St. (C-7t-97-P)
1 or 2 female roommates for spring
quarter. Roomy, 2 bedr. duplex AC.
Call 378-8790, 1912 NW Ist Ave.
(C-st-97-P)

I
I mmSSSmmm I
I"BUUJTrM^EX^^I
wmmn
I tra 2414 ir | |
s WO VO(M
I COLOR bvDeluxe United Artists
I 1:55 3:50 5:45
SjilHSry THE PICTURE
WITH GENERAL
AUDIENCE APPEAL
RECOMMENDED FOR
ALL AGES!
mw
TECHNICOLOR' TECHMSCOPE
FROM RELEASING CORPORATION
2:05 4:00 5:55



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

p WANTED i
Fourth coed roommate wanted for
spring or spring and summer quarters.
Landmark Apts. Call 378-8731
anytime. (C-3t-95-P)
Male model, adventurer, writer, 20.
Looking for INTERESTING place to
live. All offers considered. Call John
after 6 p.m. 376-7854. (C-3t-97-P)
Williamsburg Apt. need 1 roommate
spring quarter, pool airconditioned,
dishwasher, 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Call
376-9719. (C-st-97-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Spacious apartment one block from
Norman. Have own bedroom.
Available March 17. 378-7638, 1028
SW 7th Ave. $45/month. (C-st-97-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATES needed for
SW 16th Ave. 3 bedroom apt. $42.00
a month plus utilities. Call 376-9596.
(C-2t-97-P)
Roommate for V Pk. No. 10. Avail. 3
qt. Share rent with 3 great girls. Call
376-4121 ask for Tita. Will be
moving out end of March. (C-st-97-P)
| HELP WANTED j
&xvx*:*c*x*x-X':*x*n:X!Xyx*x*x*x*nmww
THIRSTY GATOR needs
bartender sandwich man. Good
pay pretty customers. No phone.
See Jim between 2 & 3 p.m., 633 NW
13th Street. (E-3t-97-P)
I i ****** f j
j JUST UKt THE I
j; ojf' j
AM
* t ~*--******

| HELP WANTED j
THIRSTY GATOR needs waitress
evenings. Good pay handsome
customers. No phone. See Jim
between 2 & 3 p.m., 633 NW 13th
Street. (E-3t-97-P)
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Part-time or full-time Will train.
Must be 21. Dub's Steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)
Are you interested in working at a
summer camp? Red Raider, Ohio,
coed, general counselling, horseback
riding, swimming, handcrafts, tennis.
Interview; March 10, 1:30-2:30,
Room 118, Union. (E-3t-96-P)
PRESTIGE AND MONEY Be
secretary, top man, beautiful office,
best environment, best salary in
town. See Allied Personnel of
Gainesville, 1800 N Main, 376-4611.
(E-93-st-P)
INVESTIGATOR Training class soon
with top co. with real career plan.
Car and benefits and $6600 starting
salary. Call Allied Personnel of
Gainesville, 1800 N Main St.,
376-4611. (E-93-st-P)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nations 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person, Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
AUTOS |
X;-X XvX*X > X'X>X:XvX\\'X*X>iXS?£C'ObC' Xv
1969 PONTIAC GTO HARDTOP
Loaded with extras & sac. warranty
Army duty soon. Your best buy
$3650 372-7376 day 372-1549 nite
& wkend. (G-st-93-P)
1956 inspected Olds. Good
transportation SIOO. Call 376-0320
evenings. (G-4t-95-P)
1960 Ford hardtop, 352 cu. in.,
automatic, ra'dio, heater, very good
condition. New starter, generator,
tune-up.' Best offer over S3OO.
378-5848 after 5 p.m. (G-st-96-P)
Volvo 1225, good condition, one
owner, S9OO or best offer. Call
378-5184. (G-3t-96-P)

I NOTICE 1 ;
These organizations have not paid entrance fees for theirl
entries in the Miss SEMINOLE contest. Please pay ini
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUSINESS OFFICE by|
Friday, March 7, or Miss SEMINOLE results cannot bel
released.
ZETATAU ALPHA ALPHA CHI OMEGA!
PHI SIGMA SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON PHI I
DEj/TA PHI EPSILON SIGMA KAPPA I
DELTA GAMMA x, CHI OMEGA!
PHI MU BETA THETA PHI I
ALPHA DELTA PI DELTA DELTA DELTA!

Thursday, March 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

AUTOS I
S
X-X-X-X-XvX-XvX-X-X-XvX-X-V.-XvXvX-X*!'
1959 3/4 ton Ford pickup, excellent I
condition. Motor rebuilt, new tires, <
inspection sticker. Asking S6OO. Call (
378-4943 after 5:30. (G-3t-96-P)
I
'6B Barracuda sport coupe VB, Facair I
radio delux interior, metallic
midnight blue, vinyl top, wide oval 1
tires, sac warranty, low price.
376-3424. (G-st-97-P)
!
1968 Roadrunner, red delux interior, 1
white seats. Positraction, radio,
4-speed, tinted windows, 12,000 mi.
Call 372-8392. (G-3t-96-P)
1959 PORSCHE coupe, good cond.
AM-FM radio new Pirellis, new
interior, inspected. Best offer.
378-3742. (G-3t-97-P)
yX-X-SX 88 ; I
I PERSONAL 1
FATHER GANNAN will be guest
speaker at the Episcopal Student
Center this Sunday at 11:00.
(J-3t-96-P)
YO-YO: Maybe some were made to
wait. Ill try my best. Don't forget
the best two months of 1968. LOVE,
Apt. 24. (J-lt-97-P)
YOGA LESSONS: 3:30 5:00
weekdays, $3.00, 103 NE 3rd St.
Also by appointment. Mike Geison.
(J-st-94-P)
THE CROCODILE is having an open
meeting Wednesday, 7 p.m. at 1000
SE 3rd Ave. 376-5044. All
welcome writers, artists, aspiring
editors, photographers,
cartoonists y'all come! (J-lt-96-P)
NEED your term paper typed? I'll
type anything. $.50 a page. Broward
Hall. Call 392-9761. (J-2t-97-P)
The Friday AFternoon Clubfor
the university crowd over 21will
meet this and every Friday from
5-7:30 at the Lamplighter. Private
rooms, pleasant atmosphere. Drinks
$.45. Come early and bring your
friends. (J-6t-96-P)
John Happy 21st Whatever turns
you on! Oh yeh!" Love, Sexy Sadie.
(J-lt-97-P)
1
Lost Joni Romain wallet. If found,
call 392-8675. REWARD. (L-3t-95-P)

Page 11

I LOST A FOUND
FOUND: Man's gold wedding band
on Norman Field. Call 378-7362.
(L-lt-96-P)
FOUND: one pair of womens
glasses. Found in Walker Auditorium
Thursday, Feb. 27, 1969. Claim in
lost and found office. (L-3t-96-NC)
FOUND: 1 pr. glasses outside
Matherly. Call 378-8061 5:00 to
7:00. (L-3t-97-NC)
j SERVICES I
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-95-P)

TO THE PATRONS if
II MORRISONS CAFETERIA ||
gfj The FLORIDA ALLIGATOR sincerely >'£
apologizes and assumes full responsibility for a
MoiTisons Cafeteria advertisement appearing y.tf
SSrj Monday, March 3, which incorrectly advertised an
Kg& all-you-can-eat boiled shrimp dinner.
The Alligator apologizes for any incovenience
incurred by the patrons of Morrisons Cafeterias,
jjjjj and any ill will caused by our error. #££
MORRISON'S 1
I CAFETERIAS 1
||> GAINESVILLE MALL M
|r X SPECIALS ||
§§ BROILED CALVES LIVER If
m & onions §§
1 59< 1
II FRIED SHRIMP WITH §|
M FRENCH FRIES, HOT §§
m SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES B.
I $1.09 I
I MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS 1
||L GAINESVILLE MALL j||

Use our handy
mail In order
form.

| SERVICES
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)
Tennis racket restringing, satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call M and R
Tennis Services. 378-2489.
(M-18t-59-P)
I will do typing in German & English.
Average paper in English $.50;
German $1.50. Do also tutor in
German $3.00. Please call 372-5221.
(M-lt-97-P)
INCOME TAX $4.00 up. Expert
service in two locations to serve you:
1227 W. Univ. Ave. (across from
Ramada Inn) & 107 N. Main St.
378-9666. (M-ts-95-P)



Page 12

l, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 6, 1969

l REWEWS
'Charly 1

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Reviewer
Several years ago Daniel
Keyes wrote a short story
Flowers for Algernon. That
won him the Hugo Award, a
citation given to science fiction
writers by their critics and
public for outstanding
accomplishments in that genre.
And some time later Keyes gave
his hero a love interest and
expanded the story into a novel.
Charly, a film currently
showing at the Plaza 2, is that
novel converted almost image
for image for the screen by
Stirling Silliphant and Ralph
Nelson.
The film is recognizable as
Keyes work, but its character
has been subtly changed, gaining
something very pleasing that it
might otherwise have lacked.
For the science element
has been played down and the
emotional content that gave the
novel its real impact has been
accentuated to find a new
vitality in the movie. Charly is
an ultra-modern-day tragedy
that, like 2001: A Space
Odyssey, reaches far beyond
the conceptualized confines of
traditional science fiction.
Cliff Robertson, the films
star, has received an Oscar
nomination for his portrayal of
the moron/mentor Charley
Gordon, and easily deserves to
win the award itself.
This role should show casting
agents and producers that
Robertson has deserved much
more room than the hackneyed
leading-man-type roles hes
occupied for too long. He comes
through the challenging
alterations in Gordons character
with a naturalness and sense of
identification that few actors

Jewish Folk Fest

Joe and Penny Aronson will
bring an evening of Jewish
history to the Med Center
Auditorium tonight beginning at
8.
The folk singing pair are
performing as a part of the
Religion-in-Life Series sponsored
by the University Religious
Association.
Beginning with an ancient
song of David, found in the first
verse of Psalm 133, Behold,
how good and how pleasant it is
for brethren to dwell together in
unity, the Aronsons will define
Judaism as a way of life,
customs and culture, developed
as the result of the historical
experiences of the Jewish people
and not as a religion, as
commonly interpreted.
> 1 i
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
IBR
IB
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS SALES-SERVICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Are. 372-4373

could rival or even correctly
interpret.
Robertson and scriptwriter
Silliphant show their real talents,
however, in the restraint, in the
fact that Gordons incredible
transition is paced and played
with such finesse that one cant
help but accept it.
And actress Ckire Bloom,
cast in the co-starring role as
Robertsons teacher-lover, is
equally believable. She exhibits
well the qualities of
distance-then-warmth,
guidance-t hen-empathetic-intel hen-empathetic-intelligence
ligence hen-empathetic-intelligence necessary to bring off her
dual position in the film.
One expensive flaw only a
producer caught up in the
current gimmicks would have
shot this film in Cinerama.
Such devices should be
employed only when their extra
dimension enhances the effect
as evidence, some films are still
shot in black and white because
it better represents their
content. Nelson should have
kept this as much in mind as he
did all the other elements in this
extremely expressive film.
* >" SB
-, i /£'£,#.,-/ y'*. r '.
gapp
Bt'&g i !vS Jest
CLIFF ROBERTSON
... up for an Oscar

From ancient times, they will
trace the history of the Jews by
means of folk songs that
describe a traditional wedding
and the beginning of Jewish
immigration throughout eastern
Europe, particularly in Russia
and Germany, and finally to the
United States.
One of the songs they offer is
The Peat Bog Soldiers, written
by inmates of the first Nazi
concentration camp in 1935.
No admission will be charged.
NEW '(v,
Hawaiian jsk
Village 'Up
Now leasing for Sept.
3461 S.W. Second Ave.
PHONE 378-5905
Next to Westgate
Shopping Center
Townhouse & Flats
Swimming Pool
neaealion Man
Wall to Wall Carpet
Air Conditioned
Dishwashers & Disposals
Private Patios
Master TV Antenna
Laundry Facilities
1 & 2 BR., 1, 1*/ 2| 2 Baths
MODELS OPEN DAILY 10-5
Hotpoint Appliances

w M-
W H wd i I tm
Jl > m
1 ii jyHUHH
\ Seme Ew s/ '* £
v -: x \, *''
UF'S RAMBLIN' RECS
... Bruder, Farwell & Anderson will perform for the disadvantaged

Ramblin Rees Plan Shows

The Ramblin Rees is a group
recently organized in the
Department of Recreation.
Composed of recreation
majors in the College of Physical
Education and Health, the
variety group plans to perform
at hospitals, orphanages and old
folks homes.
Trying to make a name for
UFs recreation department,
according to Lyn Farwell, the

Where the Bare Facts Cant Be Denied!
Giant Burger
1515 S.W. 13th ST. St. Just South of the Underpass

groups temporary manager, The
Ramblin Rees plan to
individualize each program.

Coeds
Complete hair treatment
is just a walk away
Bettes Hairstylist Jniversity Plaza j

The group should be ready to
start- its benefit shows next
quarter.



____ip_-_-^l^^-
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WHY DOES A us shoppers I
SHOPPER CROSS ~ // CROSS OVER TO T
THE- ROAD? | : I r lllf PUBtIX FOR V
customer* bonus! lift /
NOON V H^S DA £:II SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. I j|
1969. v : : '. JJj VSsSte: 2P ? W iFolctl* HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE I 4 lb. can
j \#Yt>CT\lY:::::::i:;:: ~~7v... | Expires Wednesday. March 12, 1969
plus 100 Extra S&H rtj^rr^kv^ :
Green Stamps with coupon yvjr .ss'.. vjH>y: ;i ijg|M|vy|Mai^^iAMlk^lMFTJf"j EXTRA
,/ ,< "'% o*'"* |lllM^GreenStampsP|
Lcf/7/ii.(A/yffly Imperial Roast ~ 89 c f
/) UMJc/(f/(tKJL/ SWIFTS PREMIUM GOVT-INSPECTED, SHIPPED, USDA GRADE A, Swift s Premium Eng | ish Cut Boneless Any Swift's Premium Beef
/ V h QUICK FROZEN, EVISC., DEEP BASTED (18-lbs. & over) f Roast 3 lbs. or over I
_ | Beef Roast 99 j 1 j
l|| U| ||t per Chuck Steaks 69 c ft-t-i extra p*
111 Klfllii ib. eJ >. lllllUwGreenStampsEP*]
Jw Ckftrf Dike ib AO c
9llwe WB ## Swift's Premium Govt.-Inspected Shipped
| USDA Grade A Quick-Frozen Evisc. Deep-Basted <
Swiss, Premium Boneless Canned T ., 16o *. pluS 100 Extra S&H Green Stamps with COUpOn % (IS lbs. A Over)
Hostess Hams $ 4 99 Sliced Boloana 25c 45c 59c & P urc h ase of any Beef Roast 3-lbs. or over! | urkeys
(plus 200 extra SAN Green Stamps with coupon) 1 .. ..I |* Expires Wednesday, March 12, 1969 <
Swift's Premium Boneless Seofood Treat, Delicious Florida 1 Smoked Daisies 89 c Cooked Crawfish b $ 1 59 {jrezen rfeed Wpecmh Strawberries .. 3pk 9.. $ 1 PTjyjl extra
Swilf, Premium Sli.ed Seofood Treat, Tasty Pi.tswe.t Tender Frox.n Cmtk.d Toa.ty Treat J I I I I I MWhrPPn
Olive & Pimento Loaf ... % 49 c Lake Erie Smelts b. 35 c Squash 2 39 C Frozen Waffles p^'^ l9 c |HU !;
| Swift's Premium Sandwich Spread or Pulslix New Dain-Tresh Flavarful Green Giant Frozen Howard Johnsons Frozen ... ._ .. i
Braunschweiger 2 1.69' Cottage Cheese U 59' R ice Verdi 39' CornToastees 3VwM I V. p "
Herman's Orange Band Caok-Quik Breaded Mrs. Pauls Party Pack Frozen Pet Ritz Frozen || A J
Bag Sausage ;;, b 4 9 Veal Steaks -89' Fish Sticks " 99' Pie Shells Ui 39' | ;
Palm River Tasty Copeland's Old Fashion Chunk Style Treasure Isle Frozen Tasty Delicious Ore-lda Frozen 'ftftftftftaJMkftfMfcftfMkftftft.hr
[Sliced Bacon 9 c Braunschweiger E. r 49 c Breaded Shrimp k, 1 79 c French Fries ... ?£ 39 c fTJTJI a n
I as. .. gy j. (o m lmlWxGreenStainps|M
MimfloWhm quort AOc (Ufrcm Our grocer u JJepf.
.ITIIIUUC vvnip ar 9 T Puhlix Corn Oil Realemon Reconstituted j! Ultra Brite Tooth Paste <
Hkibby's Sliced or Halved Yellow AAnm/rrino *5 1 ,b $1 I -- ft - 240 x. *% QC i 6 3 /l OZ. tube <
_ n 0 #2 /2 one Margarine J i Lemon JtllCe OV ( 5
L ina rGQCtIGS a a O 4c oft label, Kraft's Soft Margarine Expires Wednesday, March 12, 1969
!! "5J
Libby's Delicious Halved rOrKay ctn. AO n. pAArI OlSViM.ftQt b
RrtrtloH Danrc *K #303 RQ C Ta.tytck y whip 9V1( ,. uo 9 ruoa "* ZT Pf'Tl extra r"!
bOf TieTT rears * O con, OV Dessert Topping . 49 c Pi H,bury Assorted ill liWGrn \ mw l
ibby, Dessert Perfect Pill,bury Delicious MJvftC *1 *1 | ["j l J* 1 Ul CCM 01 dlll | k J
: ruit Cocktail 4 # co 3 :s $ l Cinnamon Rolls 33 c Cake Mixes O p***- I *****
VII VULMVIII ***** tan 1 -m wu M .. .. Bremners Choclate, Devils Food, Banana | Schick 4 ct. Krona-Chrome or |
.ibby's Tender Garden Fresh Armour .M.s, W,0n., Med.um B.un |, l|%1 L A QUe -2' 2pk sll Stainless Steel 5 Ct. Double- |
%aa Dane C #303 $1 Cheddar Cheese p k ;. 67 c Jumbo Pies pkg,. I | Edge Raxor Blades 1
JF r 6vll I vQS # v Cans I Kraft Individually Wrapped ... .. A c ...... %> A
American or Pimento Chicken Os The Sea Light Meat *> * Expires Wednesday, March 12, 1969 j|
Libby s Meol-Mokers, Deep- Sliced CheeSe . Fb 69 c Chunk Style Tuna 3 6 V89 C
SrOWH Deans J n, I Kraft Cracker Barrel Variety or pkg. of 5 |(|T|l 1. /A FL.,^l
Libby', Rich. Thick Sharp Cheddar .. 79' Betty Crocker (Three 22/, ai, pkg*. $1.06) llll l
Tomato Catsup ... 4"*1 as., o> Fudge Brownie Mix FREE! u-*-*
.... JJpllCwPSWtl Omih (Plus 50 Extra S&H Green Stamps with Coupon) *> J & J Cosmetic Puffs 2
Heat And Serve, Libby's / *>
| m # 12 OZ. P Delicious Fresh or Smoked (Jf\ / C f & 200 Ct. |
Cornea Beef can 5 V Liverwurst Ih 99 C cJJnm [jj reduce |7. Expires Wednesday, March 12. 1969 §
For Hearty Eating, Libby's Corned ta.ty Ki,ch Fre.h Weather permitting, we also feature such salad Items as
Hash 201 39 Carrot oalad Ib 39 c Endive, Escarole, and Leaf, Bib, Boston and Romaine Lettuce EXTRA
ns k#ms*| HsaithSaiad $.39' Baking'Potatoes ... 10 £; 79* USl!]^!!?!! StampsO
ureen Deans J cans { 6 f{, nl l u rJlii Crisp, Mouth-Watering % cl MD* 1
r aUaPI f orn C #303 $| Gor9 ,e And Mouthwash I¥BCIn¥OSn AppiGS V bog BTT gallon
_ *** * COnS Listerine bo. 69 C Large Crisp Florida |g_ Expire, Wednesday. March 12, 1969 |
C 4 ot $1 Just Wonderful Reg. or Pascal Celery. TL stalks
Sausage 5 .... 1 Hair Spray ... 49' firm .' 1T17r, EXTR A OI
Iremn.r V.nilia, Chetal.,,. D.pl." K-o*. 1.b.1! ,m. V.r,.., Toiticifoes 10 39 T 6611 St 3IH PS LJ
tfrw r I Q7c WITH THIS COUFON AND RUSCMASI OF bioifli
rincess Cremes .. 3ph>. I Dog rood pk9S 07 salted or Roasted
Nabisco Tasty Jif Creamy or Crunchy CSbaII DaMHI|4C 3 1 3-01. OO % GailieS Dog Meal
Fig Newtons X 41* Peanut Butter 'V- 67' f" 11 PeaiiUtS .. j s to. b g |
SSSk. - V SSS^sw- Rj^^Bl -T- I
Bla-G.-terSl.iiwsr i -Billll>iGnetn'stain|is[] 2630 N.W. 13thST.p'p||.|iyXraj iiW Q | |"^ ta g
I Betty Crocker Fudge || Chef Boy-Ar-Dee | 1014 N. MAIN ST. ft\ 'AR KE T S/I Premium Label All-Meat |
| Brownie Mix || Pizta With Sausage | /M % Sw '[* |
Three 22 1 2 oz. pkgs. || .. 13V2 oz. pkg. | A r ... .1 I Ib pk9> |
L 1 2. J| S RpRBT TTBglWWMy.lWtn33rT2r*r969 | 125 J> T. 0 Exp.res Wednesday, March 12. 1969 J

Thursday, March 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 6, 1969

In their first home match of
the season, the UF tennis team
defeated Jacksonville University
9-0 Wednesday.
The Gator netters had little
trouble, winning the six singles

Georgia Coliseum:
Mainly A Cow Palace
With the construction of the new Coliseum at The University of
Georgia, the Georgia Arch takes on a new dimension. As a matter of
fact, the Georgia Arches, which arc the main constructional features
of the new Coliseum, are some of the grandest in modern
construction.
The Coliseum has mans functions, some of which have been widel\
discussed but should be enumerated for those who have not set seen
this building.
The primary functions of the Coliseum are, first. Agriculture, where
provision will be made for cattle shows et|iiipmen! demonstrations,
and exhibitions of agricultural methods and practices. The second
main usage of the building is for convocations such as student bods
assemblies, graduation exercises, pageants, concerts, and banquets.
The third function of the Coliseum is for basketball and the field
house facilities for the Athletic Association Program of the University
which includes the locker rooms, showers, and equipment space for
basketball, football, baseball and minoi sports. The Athletic
Association offices also are provided in this building.
Some interesting statistics of the building are that the seating
capacity is 10,000 permanent seats around the arena. Os these seats.
3,750 are chairs and 6.250 are blcacher-t\pe seating. Seating for
special functions would be approximately 1,500 temporary bleacher
seats in the arena around the basketball floor, making a total for
basketball 1 1,500.
With seating in the arena for an assembly, approximately 13,000
can be seated. Os course, for special occasions and unusual conditions,
these totals could be increased by placing spectators on the stage and
in additional chairs on the arena floor.
Based on 10,000 permanent seats, the cost of the Coliseum is
$368.00 per seat.
In the building there are several floor levels. The lowest is the arena
floor which has the main arena as its central feature. The shape is that
of a U or a horseehoe.
The arena floor is a specially hardened concrete. On this arena floor
is a movable hardwood playing floor providing a regulation basketball
court and two cross-practice courts. At the rear center of the
Coliseum is a stage 70 feet wide by 37 feet deep.
In the center of the stage there is a 20 foot wide section which is an
elevator or a lift and which rises from the arena level to the stage level.
At the arena level this serves as an entrance for trucks, cattle, or e\ :n
elephants. On each side of the stage are dressing rooms for men.
women, and visiting star performers.
Around the arena on three sides are the locker rooms for football,
baseball, minor sports and basketball. Basketball locker spaces are
provided for the University men with two rooms for visiting men and
two rooms for visiting women, lockers for the coaches and officials.
Also here is the Trainers room, Doctors office, Lecture room with
projection facilities, Exercise rooms, four handball courts, general
storage, equipment storage, a large Conference Room and a catering
kitchen for the serving of up to 2,000 at tables set up in the arena.
The Main Concourse is entered at ground level one story above the
Arena level and extends around three sides, providing access to the
seating, toilet facilities, coat check rooms, concession stands, and the
Trophy Lounge. The Trophy Lounge has glass display cases for cups
and plaques and a picture wall for honoring the Greats in Georgias
past and future. On this level at the right rear is the Athletic
Association Business Office, on the left Agricultural Events
Promotional Offices.

XEROX
| OFFSET FACILITES f
j Specializing in ;>
ifc Thesis and DissertatioiiS
$ Reductions and $
Enlargements 5
Open Til 11 P.M. \
f Highest Quality
We Guarantee it!
§ 7 days
| ouik-save ]
University Plaza
j 1620 W. University |
I 378-1001 j
1
j
4U>GA Toss sssssss
cl ASSfFitoS SSSSSSS

UF Netters Smash Jax. 9-0

and three doubles in a little over
an hour and a half. A crowd of
approximately 300 watched as
the hapless Dolphins managed to
win only four games in the six
singles matches.

I ITIIIAII Real Italian Meat A I
I II Al IAN Sau ce Ladled on # V I
MnLIHII Tender Spaghetti. |j
Served with T
spaghetti s=-- O'
/ MW rsp jjggrl

DOLPHINS WIN ONLY 4 GAMES

The Gators were led by
All-American Armi Neely, who
defeated Rich King in two quick
sets 6l, 6o. Honorable
* j J
P m
Wr Hj
STEVE BEELAND
. . No. 3 player
Hip Ailment
Axes Palmer
From Tourney
ORLANDO. Fla. (DPI)
Arnold Palmer, the golfer most
fans prefer to follow, dropped a
bombshell on the Citrus Open
on the eve of the SI 15.000
tournament. He withdrew
because of a recurring hip injury.
Im as sorry as anyone else
that I will be unable to play
here, Palmer said before flying
to his Latrobe, Pa., home for a
weeks rest and treatment. But
in fairness to myself and my golf
game, I think I must give myself
this opportunity to cure this
condition.
Palmer, even though it was
later revealed he was taking
secret treatments, insisted last
week during the Doral Open that
his hip was not bothering him.
His opening round of 69-69
seemed tv) bear this out. but
when lie closed with a pair of
735. lie admitted having trouble.
For the First time, I think
they have pinpointed what the
trouble is, Palmer said. He said
he had consulted with three
doctors and has a form of
fursitis in his right hip.
But theres still plenty of
talent on hand, including all of
the top players in the Doral last
week plus U.S. Open
champion Lee Trevino.

Mention All-American Jaimie
Pressly had little trouble with
Tim Pateracki as he beat him in
all the games of the two sets
6-0, 6-0.
Number three player Steve
Beeland had the most trouble of
the afternoon downing Danny
Cox 6-1,62.
The Gator tennis team leaves
Friday for an important match
with Miami in Coral Gables.
Their next home match is March

IN CAGE ACTION
South 3 Dorm King

South 3 won the dorm all
campus basketball championship
as they defeated Gaddum
section 42-40 in a close battle.
Ken Byron led the South team
in a great comeback effort as lie
scored 18 points.
South trailed at the end of
the first quarter by seven points
but slowly cut the lead
throughout the game until
winning it in the last quarter.
Dennis Blank scored 12 more
for South and Charlie Floyd led
Gaddum with 10.
South reached the finals on
the strength of another big
comeback victory over Thomas
D. Thomas led 21-10 at the end
of the half but once aeain.
* c
Byron cranked in 17 points tv)
lead South back tv) victory,
41-36. John Magnusson led
Thomas with 19 points, Rob
Donald added 10 more, and
Fred Fey and Dennis Blank each
pumped in 10 for South.
Gaddum reached the finals on
a 35-30 win over Towers 3. They
also beat Newins 34-19 in their
first game.
In Orange League handball,
there were no upsets as ATO,
Sigma Nu, and Pi Lam all won
their opening round matches.
ATO easily beat Sigma Chi.
5-0, as all team members won in

McDavids Barber
Shop
Now in the Village Square
Shopping Center
Next to the Red Lion

12 against Presbyterian College.
Results: Neely def. King 6l,
6o; Charlie Owens def. Tommy
Lile 6o, 6-0; Beeland def. Cox
61, 62; Pressly over Pateracki
6o, 6o; Paul Lunetta def. Buz
Wallin 6-0, 6o; Greg Hilley
def. Jim Rychly 6-0, 6o.
Doubles: Neely-Beeland def.
King-Lile 6-3,63;
Ownes-Hilley def. Cox-Pateracki
62, 62; Lunetta-Pressly def.
Wallin-Bruce Malcolm 6-0, 6-0.

two straight games. Singles
players Mark Ely and Frank
Hcwlitt and first doubles
Baldwin and Smith won quick
matches.
Sigma Nu slammed a 5-0 kill
on the SPFs. First singles Steve
Aertker, second singles Rich
Landrum and doubles team
Cheshire and Sexton were all
easy victors.
Pi Lam eliminated SAE, 4-1, as
they were led by singles players
Ken Burdick and Fernando
Storch and r doubles performers
Soden and Resnick. SAE's
Howard Coker and Rick Kirby
teamed up to provide the only
SAF win of the afternoon in the
number three doubles match.
In other action. Pi Kappa
Alpha deleated Kappa Sig 4-1,
Delta Tail Delta whipped
Lambda Chi Alpha 3-2, and KA
defeated Pi Kappa Phi. 3-2.
friday night
is fun night at
THE
DANDYLION
We Need Models
You Get Paid if Used
1236 NVV 3rd Ave



Seniors Play Home Finale Saturday

Saturdays final basketball
game for the Gators will mark
the end of six seniors playing
days at the UF.
The seniors, Richard
Vasquez, Mike Leatherwood,
Kurt Feazel, Mike McGinnis,
Boyd Welsch and Neal Walk, will
be playing their last college
basketball game unless the team
receives a National Invitational
Tournament bid.
With the season final,
scheduled for Saturday night at
7:45 there are more than 3000
is ; Jbl
illHnv &
wi. -*> v
.-llllMHifev ; w
-Ht:;
RICHARD VASQUEZ
... final game 1
/a .
NEAL WALK
... first All-American

WONOE2R
HOUSE
RESTAURANT
SPECIALS GOOD ALL WEEK
VEAL oc
PARMIAGANA
w/ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
K.C. STEAK $1.50
w/Salad, Potato, Veg.
BAKED LASAGNA
w/MEAT BAILS $135
& SALAD
LONDON BROIL d.
OPEN SUNDAYS
14 S.W. HI STREET

M 1 W&M&:. WBrnki.
.ry? l xs3E "-via
an| : b
I'
r | %,V:, -svi v >'*' ,*'- Bk>, 'St
-- ; .\f:,'-Vvy . ; ';-V-- v
BOYD WELSCH
... will graduate
student tickets available. Ticket
windows will be open today and
Friday from 9 to 12 noon, 1 to
5 p.m. and Saturday afternoon
starting at five.
The Baby Gators final game is
set for 5:45 p.m. They will seek
revenge for an earlier season loss
to the Bama Frosh in
Tuscaloosa.
This group will also be
leading a Gator team which has
complied the .finest three-year
home court mark in the schools
history, which now stands at
30-3. A win over Alabama would
bring about the finest
single-season record in Gator
history, 11-1. This record was
set in the 1966-67 season when
Walk, Welsch, Feazel and
McGinnis were sophomores.
A win would enable the
Gators to finish the regular
Bf. DELICIOUS
CTCAIfC
|j FINE FOOD
;
J student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

3000 TICKETS AVAILABLE

season at 18-8, third best record
in history. It would also give the
a career record of 55-22.
Walk, the first player in UF
history to be named a major
All-American, winds up his great
career with all the Gator scoring
records for season and career. He
has already broken the career
scoring mark of 1544 points
which Bob Emrick set in
1953-56 (four seasons), doing so
in only three seasons. He goes
into the Alabama game with
1547 points.
An indication of the
magnitude of Walks
accomplishments is that only
two other Gators have ever
earned all-SEC honors twice, Joe
Hobbs (1957-58) and Gary
Hp.
X *3mSB ~ i W_.
BKk ./jS
<
I|TnWwwr Jm JtiF
: RB^jfrSTO : 3W V c JPp-
MIKE LEATHERWOOD
... consistently good

Should you drink beer
straight from the bottle?

If youre on a blanket party
or something, carrying along a
glass is pretty clumsy. But
when its convenient, we think
its a shame not to use one.
Keeping Budweiser
inside the bottle or JLmA
can is missing half Bwf i <
XU r w' -f S'* Sm/
the fun. JR? //
Those tiny bubbles
getting organized at the
top of your glass have a lot
to do with taste and aroma.
Most beers have carbonation
pumped in mechanically. Not
Budweiser. We go to a barrel

Budweiser, is the King of Beers,
(Rut voii know that.)
ANHEUSER-BUSCH INC ST LOUIS NEWARK LOS ANGELAS TAMPA HOUSTON COLUMBUS

Keller (1966-67) and only
Hobbs, among former UF stars,
has received any All-American
mention.
f
This has been a fine bunch
to work with, says Gator Head
Coach Tommy Bartlett. I
would sure like to see our fans
come out just to show their
appreciation for what these boys
have contributed to Florida
basketball.
it. %
ft
F
' m
fm
KURT FEAZEL
... 30-3 at home
wmmmmmmmmmm
Dick Hclmu
Jeweler/
CLOCK. WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
V* BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
bi^hbbbbb

Thursday, March 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

of trouble and expense to let
Budweiser create its own bub bubbles
bles bubbles with the natural carbona carbonation
tion carbonation of Beechwood Ageing. So
you really cant blame us for
wanting you to get it at its
best, can you?
Just for fun r pour your
next four or five bot botties
ties botties of Bud- into a
WSIA
glass. If you dont
agree that the extra
taste, clarity and
aroma make a big difference,
go back to the bottle.
We wont say another word.

-v
.
' :/ & W: y
Jr #
|f|f< Jr.
jj/ft j^||^^v>>? :
mike McGinnis
... to show appreciation"
I wMer |
SERVICE. 1
I 7th St. & DAY 372-1379
lvMJniv^^^NlGH^7^oo9B
s S
; v
>: _____ *:
£
V
I
1
V
i;i
I WANT I
! ADS I
J 'a*
:> s
* :

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 6, 1969

Wr TF Jfc 5 THESE PRICES GOOD THROUGH MARCH H |l
SPARE RIBS 39c lb. J 1
1859-1969. .110 YEARS YOUNG SUPER RIGHT SMOKED
wcSLAB BACON 49C lb.
1130 N.E. 16 Ave. S/U# %fc/
J SUPER RIGHT SELECT
BEEF LIVER 39c lb.
A OH GRADE A FRESH FLA. OR GA.
I A&K 1 FRYER BREAST or LEG QUARTERS 39< lb.
FROZEN SPINACH SUCED BOLOGNA 49
I qr\ IU OZ. 1 COPELAND HEAT N'SERVE
I IOC PKO I SAUSAGE tooz pko. S9t
CAPTAIN
A& P POPCORN 2 Pound bag 29$ ROUNDER FILLETS LB rkg. 59$
A& P COFFEE CREAMER Boz.jar 45$ BULK PERCH FILLETS 39$ lb.
SULTANA GRAPE JELLY 2 pound JAR 39$ A& P APPLE SAUCE 16 oz Can 5 CANS FOR SI.OO
, :.' ~ - f . ,'' ' .
FRAMED CHIMPANZEES STOKELY GATORADE 46 02 can 49$
PHOTOGRAPHS wc
A& P INSTANT BREAKFAST 59$ box ann PAGE SPAGHETTI ELBOW, REGULAR,
BRIGHT SAIL SPRAY STARCH 24 AN 49$ ffllN OR EXTRA LONG 1 pound BOX 25<
COCONUT CHIP FIDDLE FADDLES 39$ box A& P EGGNOG 32oz CAN 69$
ARGO ITALIAN CUT GREEN BEANS 16 can 2 for 25$ A & p CLEAR PLASTIC FREEZER WRAP 39$
FIRESIDE MINIATURE MARSHMELLOWS soz bag 10$ SOFT PLY TOILET TISSUE 4 rolls 39$
DAILY CAT FOOD 15 oz. can 10 for SI.OO ANGEL SOFT PAPER TOWELS JUMBO ROLL 25$
A& P TABLE SALT 26 oz. box 2 for 23$ ANN PAGE TARTAR SAUCE 10'/2 R 35$
WYLERS LEMONADE MIX 3 G 10$ package ANN PAGE GARLIC, ONION OR
SUNNYFIELD CORN FLAKES 12 oz box 27$ CELERY SALT Bott,e 19
OUR OWN TEA BAGS 125 bags 99$ ANN PAGE HAMBURGER & MEAT LOAF
SEASONING 2 3/4 oz. Bottle 29$
A&P CHUNK LIGHT TUNA O 89$
HLH POTATO STICKS is 4 oz can lOe
SUPER RIGHT CHILI WITH BEANS 3 cans SIOO UI u llklCTAklT 41 m . lrtA
7 HLH INSTANT MASHED POTATOES 3 can 10$
SUPER RIGHT LUNCHEON MEAT 12 can 53$ j, FFY CORN MUFFIN MIX B *ozbox 10$
ANN PAGE BROWNIE MIX oz package 27$ ANN PAGE BARBECUE SAUCE 18bottle43$
F" skimmed n r COLD WATER "1
j EVAPORATED I DETERGENT 1
l MILK 10 oz. I SIZE
PRODUCE
FIRM RIPE GOLDEN BANANAS 10< POUND