Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Ko/. 6J, No. 95

IMHM HMiife,. ir
*S|is? HU
P s?f Tr 81 ? HP"
'' x Nv ; \
IHH I w
PROJECT FOR SURVIVAL

Bill Moy examines the five-year living model he
designed as part of the College of Architecture and
Fine Art's accreditation renewal bid. The mobile

Gainesville Police Check
Into Sunday Firebombings

Gainesville Police are
investigating four firebombings
which occurred Sunday night.
The home of Herbert Alvin,
1215 N.W. 4 Place was the target
of the first molotov cocktail,
thrown against a jalousie door
on the west side of the building.
Damage was estimated at $5.
Another firebomb was thrown
into the bedroom of a dwelling
at 1223 N.W. 4 Place. Damage
was estimated near S3OO.
Voyles Grocery, 1203 N.W.
sth Ave., was hit by a firebomb
which failed to ignite. The police
reported finding pieces of a wine
bottle which had been thrown
through a plate glass window on
the north side of the building.
Damage was estimated at $lO.
Residents in the 1200 block
of N.W. 3rd Ave., reported
hearing a cannon-like shot at
about 5 a.m. Monday. A
firebomb hit the Nile C. Schaffer
home vat 236 N.W. 3rd Ave.,
sometime between midnight and
7:15 a.m. Monday. Damage at
the scene was estimated at $49
and police found two half-pint
whisky bottles and traces of a

Mandatory ROTC has been abolished at the University of
Florida and many students would like to see physical education
meet the same fate, but Atty. Gen: Earl Faircloth warned
against such a move Monday.
Faircloth said Florida universities better have sound,
defensible reasons if they do not offer physical fitness
programs to all students, even though they are not required by
law to do so. f
nnininn was asked after Florida State Universitys
Faculty Senate removed physical education from the list of
required courses ten days ago.
The reasoning was that the present requirement of three
courses for graduation made it difficult for the physical
education department to also maintain a.professional program
for students majoring in physical education.

UF Needs P.E. To Stay Healthy. Faircloth Warns

The
Florida Alligator

flammable liquid'which smelled
like kerosene.

Reitz Union Charter
To Get Breath Os Life
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Life will be put back into the dead body of the Reitz Union
Charter tonight at the Student Senate meeting.
The third revised charter for the Union will be presented tonight in
room 349 in the Reitz Union by Student Senate President, Jack
Vaughn with many major overhauls.
At present, with the old charter, the union is run by an eight
student, six faculty member Board of Managers.
These students and faculty members are ex-officio members in
outside organizations such as Blue Key, Student Publications, and
Florida Mortar Board.
Since they dont really have a special interest in the Union, many
times there are problems getting them to even attend the meetings,
said Vaughn.
The proposed charter allows for eight students, two of which will
be voted on in a general election for the offices of president and vice
president, and four students appointed by the student body president
and approved by the student senate.
The six other members of the Board of Managers will be the
Director of the Union (in a non-voting capacity), a Secretary of the
Union appointed by the President of the Union, and four
non-students appointed by the UF President.
This is the second attempt to change the old charter.
Earlier last quarter a revised charter was presented to the senate for
approval which was granted but then referred to Honor Court.
The Union officers, headed by then-president Roger Brown,
(SEE 'SENATE' PAGE 2)

structure, if constructed, would be capable of
supporting a family for five years in the event of a
national disaster.

ATTORNEY GENERAL GIVES OPINION

University of Florida, Gainesville

Schaffers home had been hit
before by firebombs last year.

Florida law requests the Board of Regents and Cabinet to
require mandatory physical fitness programs in the public
Nowhere did the legislature absolutely require the
establishment of physical fitness programs, nor did it require
that participation in programs so established be made
mandatory, Faircloth advised Chancellor Robert Mautz.
The legislature did, however, request that such programs be
gctahlichoH anH that nartirinatinn in fhpm hp manitatnry for
students not granted a medical exemption.
The attorney general noted that at the time the law was
passed in 1965, records indicated that six of every seven men
graduating from Florida schools and universities failed physical
examinations for military service.

'NOT RIGGED FOR SG
Goodrich Hits
Election Critics
By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writdr
Wednesdays referendum will not skirt the issue of
whether Student Government has been an effective force or
just a political playground, SG Vice President Gary
Goodrich said Monday.
Goodrich denied charges that the election is rigged in
favor of continuation of SG. He said that some had wanted
three choices on the constitutional question: keep, abolish
or change SG.
We are giving those who do not think SG is doing its job a
clear chance to abolish it by having only two choices and
also by not having it during the general election, Goodrich
said.
If we had it during the general election, abolition
wouldnt have a chance because the forces who are
interested in getting their candidates elected, would bring
out the block vote.
Goodrich said the promise made during the campaign last

year by President Clyde Taylor
had put pressure on all student
officers. For the first time they
will be answerable to the
students even if they are not
seeking reelection, Goodrich
said.
Another beneficial effect of
the referendum according to
Goodrich is that SG has been
getting more attention by the
press and the students in the last
two weeks. Normally the only
things you read about SG are
complaints about a bad seat at a
concert, he said.
Now the structure and
programs of SG are being
explained and I think this will
have a good effect in the spring
elections. The students will be
better able to judge the
candidates, he said.
Goodrich agreed with Senate
Majority Leader Charles Harris
that the biggest single
improvement of the SG in the
past year has been the
elimination of what they called
political games from SG.
Harris said he thought the
election would show an
overwhelming sentiment to
retain SG but added, I dont
think they really support SG as
it is. v
He criticized the
administration sor L its late
presentation of the referendum.

Tuesday, March 4, 1969

GARY GOODRICH
... denies charges
They had all year to do it but
they waited so that next years
administration will have to do
the study on improvement of
SG.
The proposed commission
on the public opinion question
could have been studying
changes this year, Harris said.
Goodrich contended,
however, that there had been a
major revision -of the student
body constitution just last year.
He said the elimination of most
of the petty politics had proved
the effectiveness of these
changes.
Harris and his minority
counterpart, Scott Holloway of
the New Movement Party said
the Student Senate had made
great strides towards being a
more representative body.

mm
EARL FAIRCLOTH
... keep PE

America's
Number I
College
Daily



!, The Florid* Alligator, Tuesday. March 4, 1969

Page 2

p h
) ;: ?:'S:|l Wjf
i m.
* / v
4ji b^K
"
m
HHHR
jH I
aH
- & r
I fl
'*%#& J^B
n .m
FLYING HIGH
Ballet fans are in for a treat tonight when Ruth Page's International
Ballet performs in Florida Gym at 8:15. Patricia Klekovic and
Kenneth Johnson (pictured above) star in the presentation. Tickets
are stHI available at the Reitz Union Box Office. Student prices are $2,
$1.25 and sl. Tickets for faculty, staff and general public are $2.50,
$1.50 and $1.25.

Senators Quit Left & Right

By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer
Two or three student senators
resign every week, Jack Vaughn,
president of the UF Student
Senate, said Monday.
Senators usually resign
because of a lack of time, poor
grades or a change in address or
college which disqualifies them
to represent the area or college
they were elected to serve,
Vaughn said.
Another reason for vacancies
in the 80-seat Student Senate is
an automatic resignation
clause in the Senate Rules and
Procedures, Charles Harris,
majority leader, said.
He said a senator with three
unexcused absences from senate
meetings is automatically
suspended. In the past the senate
had to vote a member out if he
missed three meetings, Harris
said. He explained that a very
few students were ever voted out
because of the politics involved.
Currently there are seven
vacant seats in the
according to Harrls7~
Vaughn said vacancies are
filled by appointment. After
filling out an application,
interested students are

VACANCIES OPEN EACH WEEK

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
end exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
.authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Balding, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second dass matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesvflle,
Florida 32601.
The Florida Alligator'reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
as advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
sbjsctimdde.
The Florida Alligator wil not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (I) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
timet. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

interviewed by Vaughn, Harris
and Scott Holloway, minority
leader.
The application asks for a
statement of previous Student
Government experience and
whether the applicant feels the
senate can be improved and if so
how.
This is the first term that
fraternity or sorority affiliation
was not asked for on the
application. Harris said.
1 raditionally the party from
which the vacancy occurs fills
the seat. But right now, party
affiliation doesnt mean a
thing, Vaughn said.
He said, Were interested in
someone who is going to take a
real interest in the senate and his
job. Students with previous
senate experience generally have
the best chance of being
selected, he said.

Senate To Review Charter

FtOM Pitt ONE jj
protested the changes in the
amended charter, and the Honor
Court declared the charter
illegal.
The problem at the time,
according to Vaughn, was the
lack of UF President Stephen C.
OConnells approval.
t**
There is not enough student
participation. We need to realize
the full potential of these
facilities and thats what Im
proposing in this charter. said
Vaughn.
The committee
recommendation that P.E. be
given one credit per quarter and
graded on a satisfactory-unsatis satisfactory-unsatisfactory
factory satisfactory-unsatisfactory basis will be presented.
It also asks that the
requirements be a part of the
students program for six
quarters and will, if approved,
begin September. 1969.

Harris said in the past the
majority or minority leader
would bring someone to fill a
vacant seat previously held by a
member of his party. He said
that this was the reason the old
Legislative Council was loaded
with party yes men.
But we don't necessarily
take the most experienced one,
he added. Paper qualifications
arent everything.
The number of students
applying for vacant seats vary,
Vaughn said.
There were 50 applicants for
one of the off-campus seats:
sometimes there is only one
applicant, he said.
Senators are elected in the
spring and fall quarters. Forty
are elected in the fall by housing
areas, 20 for on-campus and 20
for off-campus housing.
Fraternities and sororities are
included in the off-campus
housing. Another 40 are elected
in the spring by colleges.

AT TONIGHTS MEETING

A bill from the Honor Court
will be presented concerning a
constitutional amendment.
This bill calls for the removal
of the office of the Honor Court
justice appointed by the law
school and recommends a
Vice-Chancellor appointed by
the Chancellor.
The bill also recommends that
the honor court be allowed

Carbon Dioxide Cause
Os Aquanaut Death
After a series of mysterious accidents which plagued and delayed
the Sealab 111 project, aquanaut Berry Cannon, UF graduate, died on
the oceans floor.
Cannon died of carbon dioxide poisoning as he and three other
aquanauts were swimming from a transport capsule to the
laboratory-habitat Feb. 17. They were to spend 1 2 days in the 70-foot
long chamber to test mans ability to live and work in the ocean
depths.
Just after Cannon died, an oxygen valve leading to the chambers
where his eight fellow Sealab 111 aquanauts were undergoing
decompression was tampered with, a hearing in San Diego yesterday
disclosed.
Cmdr. J.M. Tomsky, head of the Sealab 111 project, told a Naval
investigation board Saturday night that an oxygen valve was found
open three times during the decompression period. He said if the
oxygen line had not been blocked at another point, the eight other
divers would have died within minutes.
The Sealab 111 project was scrubbed indefinitely immediately after
Cannon, a 33-year-old veteran diver, died.
The leader of the four-man team told a Navy board of Investigation
that the dive that claimed Cannons life should never have been
made.
We were pushed to the point where mistakes were inevitable,
aquanaut Robert A. Barth testified Sunday night. We were working
too hard and too long.
The fatal dive was the second in 12 hours for the team. The men
were trying yo seal helium leaks in the trouble-plagued yellow capsule
610 feet betow the surface off San Clemente Island.
/ BOOKSTORE ?
PAPER BACK BOOKS ON FLORIDA
THE CROSS IN THE SAND GANNON
MY FLORIDA LYONS
CROSS-CREEK RAWLINGS
THE YEARLING RAWLINGS
BIRDS IN FLORIDA LONGSTEREET
FLORIDA PLANT SELECTOR MAXWELL
FLORIDA LAWNS AND GARDENS MAXWELL
FLORIDA FLOWERS MAXWELL
FLORIDA BIRDS MAXWELL
FLORIDA INSECTS MAXWELL
FLORIDA POISONOUS MAXWELL
PLANTS-SNAKES-INSECTS
ANn MAN Y QTHER TiTLES
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
Caapas Shop & Beekstere

authority to punish civil cases
with penalty hours.
This would mean if the
student senate decided to
disobey a regulation, such as in
the former dispute over the
univeristy Senates
demonstration resolution, then
the student senate leaders would
be penalized for the entire
senates actions.



By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students are the types that go to church on
Sunday, say yes maam and no maam, follow the
rules and are generally from a conservative
background, said Mrs. Hani Van De Riet,
assistant professor in the Department of
Psychology.
Student protestors come from liberal
backgrounds, she said. We dont have this type
of student in great numbers at UF.
A poll taken Monday and Tuesday to find
reasons why the UF has not broken down into a
riot situation received the above response from
a psychologist on campus.
Additional reactions include:
Clifford Swenson Jr., protessor ot psychology,
said the reason students do not riot at UF is
because we have a homey atmosphere as
compared to a stiff and stuffy Berkeley
campus and an estrangement between faculty
and administrators at Columbia University.
We have an informal atmosphere with
genuine interaction between the students and
faculty.
Another professor said that UF President
Stephen C. OConnell is a decent sort of guy

Two Courses
Get Review
Sessions
A course review service, to
stress the main problem areas of
comprehensive humanities and
physical science, has been
organized by the student affairs
department of Student
Government.
Large group reviews of
comprehensive courses have
been scheduled for Friday, and
March 10-14. Secretary of
Student Affairs Rusty Skinner
said these are not designed as
cram sessions, but students
will be encouraged to ask
questions on any problem they
may have concerning certain
segments of the specific courses.
The several department
chairmen in the University
College will be handling the
material of the review sessions
themselves. Members of the
departments will be asked to
hold the reviews.
Skinner said it is hoped that
in the future weekly review
sessions will be held. They
would have the advantage of
solving problems before they
interfere with anything else in
the course, Skinner said.
Skinner is working with Jack
Funkhouser, director of
Teaching Resources Center, to
obtain copies of the music tapes
for humanities. They will be
played in the Rathskeller, whose
managerial board has approved
the use of the sound facilities.
Playing of the tapes is
scheduled for March 10-14 at 2,
4, and 6 p.m.
I Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL
376-4552 AUTHO rizrb
ft DEALER

Prof Says UF Too Homey For Riots

GATORS STEREOTYPED AS CHURCH TYPES

TONIGHT
ruj
RHGEtS
imnnoNMi
BALLET

tuesday march 4th 8:15 pm I
tickets still avail able
<> HE
! gg
a student government production I

rAu igator

INTERPRETIVE

and is trying to make changes at UF. Arthur
Combs, Foundations Education Department
chairman, said everyone knows that OConnell is
making a strong effort to understand demands of
students and faculty and this is one of the
reasons why we have not had a riot here.
Student Mental Health Project Director
Benjamin Barger said the UF is not rigid, strict
or punitive and involves the student in decision
making.
Action Conference, the Rathskeller,
liberalization of visiting hours in the dorms and a
high degree of student of participation in campus
activities are a part of the reasons listed by
Barger.
Director of the Institute of Man. Dr. Sidney
Jourard, said Maybe our turn is next for a
student riot, but added that he couldn't say for
sure.
Jourard would 'like to see more open and

Tuesday, March 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

sustained dialogue between students and
administrators.
Mrs. Van De Riet said she is assuming that
some day we will have a riot at UF.
We dont have enough freedom here, and
People dont know what freedom is at UF. As
the university gets larger we will see more
student unrest on the campus, she said.
We dont take the risks that you take in a
more liberal state, she said. We are somewhat
frightened by the conservative element.
Students want an education, not a training,
she said.
All we are doing is training the person for a
job. She claims that education has become
irrelevant, and the university has become a
research library for scientists where the student is
put last.
She expects this trend to increase in an
atmosphere where the teacher gets little out of
teaching experience and just lives for the research
aspect of the university.
This is not a homey atmosphere, *he said,
when you have over 400 students in one
classroom.
As the state becomes more urban the chances
of having a riot situation on our hands in the
university system increases, she said.

Page 3



Page 4

Th Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 4, 1969

WmS&wWm
2L : Y& &<-' 3^l
UF's NEW OPTICAL OBSERVATORY
...Called Rosemary Hill
'Rosemary Hill-
Astronomy Lab
Rosemary Hill is the name of the UF optical observatory, 30
miles south of Gainesville, which is used by processors and graduate
students of astronomy.
Since its completion in March 6B, the observatory has mainly been
used for photographing stars and galaxies.
There are two major research programs underway at the
observatory; studying the brightness of variable stars, and
photographing galaxies and quasars. A quasar is a spot of light in space
which gives off radioactive waves and more light than an entire galaxy.
Within the observatory, a 30-inch reflecting telescope reveals the
stars. The $65,000 telescope and the $15,000 silver dome were
financed with funds from the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration grant for scientific development.
The director of Rosemary Hill plans the time when certain
phenomena can be observed to the best advantage. Professors and
. graduate students can track and photograph the stars.
In the past few weeks, a new photometer has been installed in the
observatory. The function of the photometer is making accurate
measurements of the brightness of stars.

Prof. Tucker Dies Thursday

Assistant Prof, of
mathematics William B. Tucker
died Thursday at the age of 67.
Tucker had taught
undergraduate math courses at
the university since his
retirement as Rear Admiral of
the U.S. Navy in 1957.
He was a member of the
Appeals Board for the University
College and served as a part-time
student advisor.
University College Dean
Franklin A. Doty said Tucker
always went far beyond the call
of duty in meeting obligations to
students.
Doty said Tucker came in to
work as advisor Thursday
morning before he was stricken.
Tucker was a member of the
First Presbyterian Church and
had been an elder there for five
years. He also served on the
Manse committee and was
XEROX |
1 §
| OFFSET FACILITES |
J: Specializing in jjj
3 Thesis and Dissertations s
Reductions and
i Enlargements
| Open Til 11 P.M. §
i Highest Quality §
We Guarantee it! |
iji 7 days
| OU IK-SAVE I
| University Plaza
11620 W. University f
5 378-1001 1
x*x*x*x*;*x*xa.wwwwsp;ws

assistant supervisor of the adult
Sunday School program.
The funeral was held at First
Presbyterian Church on
Saturday afternoon.
Tucker lived at 1835 N.W.
11 th Road. He is survived by his
widow, Mrs. Frances Tucker, his
step-mother, two daughters,
three sons, two sisters and two
brothers.

f WONDER
I house:
] RESTAURANT
I SPECIALS GOOD ALL WEEK
i VEAL
I PARMIAGANA
I w/ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
| K.C. STEAK $l5O
J w/Salad, Potato, Veg.
I BAKED LASAGNA
I w/MEAT BALLS I SALAD S>l-v)3
f LONDON BROIL f w/Salad, Potato, Veg.
I OPEN SUNDAYS
I 14 S.W. Ist STREET 1

Floridas Oldster
Population Increases

A new method of estimating
population has been developed
which shows that Florida
counties have grown most
rapidly in the age group 45 years
and older during the last 19
years.
The new method makes it
pc ssible to estimate population
more accurately during years
between the national census
which is taken every decade.
Formerly population was
estimated by adding new births
and deaths, new migration and
military population to the 1960
census count for the area.
The new composite method
was introduced because it uses
vital statistics more effectively,
according to Ronald E. Beller,
head of the division of
population statistics of the
College of Business
Administration.
The new method studies
population in three age groups,
using different methods and data
for each group.
The population 45 years and
older is estimated on the basis of
reported deaths for this age
group. There is a relationship
between deaths and resident
population for an area. The
number of people can be
estimated if resident deaths are
divided by relevant death rates.
In the 18 through 44 age
group women and men are
estimated separately. Births to
mothers are compared with rates
developed for births at specific
ages of mothers to reveal the
number of women. Men are
estimated on the basis of
established rates between men
and women in this age group.
The number of people under
18 is estimated by adding
natural increase and net
migration to the 1960 Census
statistics on this group.
There is a problem in
estimating Florida populations
r"sHANNpN ? s"I
I WRECKER I
I SERVICE
1 7th St. & DAY 372-1379 1
jW. Univ. NIGHT 376-40091

because of the large number of
part-time residents.
Floridas growth pattern, as
shown using this new method in
1967 and 1968, has had an
important impact on Floridas
economy.
A large number of people are
too young or too old to
contribute taxes for financing
schools, hospitals and other
services.
Per capita income rate
advances are slowed by the large

j 312 W. Univ. Ave.
J (across from L& W Cafeteria)

: Wholesale Salon Supplies
i <* FEATURING £
i % CLAIROL HELENE CURTIS
| W/h:.* B ." C I.U\\4I

Europe
*262 round trip

Youll be flying the newest scheduled trans transatlantic
atlantic transatlantic airline, International Air Bahama,
Boeing 707 intercontinental fan jets with
multi-million mile American pilots at the con controls
trols controls and five expertly trained stewardesses
handling in-flight services. Youll be served
complimentary beverages and expertly pre pre
- pre pared international cuisine. And, youll get a
whopping 66-pound baggage allowance. (A
$262 round-trip excursion fare is available for
those wishing only transportation to and from
Europe. High season group fare $339 effective
June, July, and August.)
32-DAY TOUR 11 COUNTRIES $795
If you ve been looking at places you can afford
to go on your vacation, dont sell yourself
short. Now you can fly Superior Class on a
scheduled intercontinental fan jet and spend
over a month in eleven countries for only $795
Ptice includes transportation to and from Eu Euiope
iope Euiope and in Europe, sightseeing, professional
multilingual escort, most meals, hotels. Coun Countries
tries Countries include Luxembourg, Germany, Switzer Switzerland,
land, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Italy, France,
Monaco, Spain, England and Bahamas. Tour
originates in Miami, Florida and departs on I
the following Wednesdays: June 11, IS, 25.
July 2,9, 16, 23, 30. August 6, 13.
For complete information write:
s n |)tXT mrrATuvc
OBER UNITED TRAVEL AGENC Y
H<>7 15th STREET, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20005
Name
Address
I ( its

number of people who do not
have or seek employment.
Production of goods and
services is lowered by this fact
also.
The 1968 estimate shows that
Alachua County has increased
20,900 in the last eight years.
Dade, Broward and Pinellas
Counties had the largest growths
during this period.
Four counties, Gulf, Holmes,
Jefferson and Liberty, have lost
population.



Ombudsman
Applicants
Can Still File
Deadline for applications for
Ombudsman director has been
extended to March 12.
Former Ombudsman director
Bob Young said applications
may be picked up at the Reitz
Union Activities Desk.

Apathy Can Ruin Academic Freedom

By Alligator Services
Because good men are doing
nothing, the current wave of
campus violence has the capacity
i ii
Vi Kfj §.
J. WAYNE REITZ
...Ex-UF Prexy
to destroy academic freedom in
this country, former UF
President J. Wayne Reitz said
Friday.
Responsible professors too
often remain silent, he said.
Unless they organize behind
university administrations who
move to halt campus violence,
the educational system can be
severely damaged.
Reitz, who resigned as UF
president in 1967, said many
presidents are poorly equipped
by their training and
temperment to deal with todays
brand of student and faculty
unrest.
The real danger of the campus
demonstrations, Reitz said, is
the public reaction they trigger.
There is a great danger of
Newtons Law applying to
society. (For every action there
is an equal and opposite
reaction.)
People are fed up with the
destroying of freedom in the
name of freedom. Those who
say they are seeking a new
freedom are playing into the
hands of the extremists on the
other side.

toesmv STEAK SPECIAL
11 AM 9 PM
LONDON BROIL STEAK
SFRVED WITH
CHOICE OT POTATOES
TOSSED
HOT
Tr<
1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
% BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

DROPOUTS

lu / -A f ITS AN ORIGINAL \ /^HEY/WRY CCN't' |
HiV YhJJHt- J COMPOSITION IN ( You SET IT J -<
\ THE **. j *7 -I MUSIC? )
s' if l*b* by U.i**d Iwtwn Sy.dic.. Inc. r

This can lead to a real
clampdown. And the people
who know what academic
freedom is all about freedom
with responsibility and
civility are going to be the
victims, along with the
militants.
During the 12-and-one half
years Reitz was president of UF
there was violence and student
demonstrations on campus.
There were panty raids in
which dormitory windows and
doors were smashed. Exuberant
footbal demonstrations spilled
out into the streets to build
bonfires, throw rocks and engage
in police skirmishes.
But it was really minor
compared to what were seeing
now, Reitz commented. There
seems to be one sort of banner
over the whole thing
today this talk of freedom.
In the name of freedom, all
sorts of demands are
made some of them rather
ridiculous. Students have always
wanted to rebel against
authority as away of
demonstrating their adulthood.
The more ridiculous the
demand, the greater the victory
for the students if the university
grants it. The demands are never
very firm. They may change
from day to day.
Very few students take part,
or are interested at first, Reitz
said. Then, a small core of
Caving Film
Scheduled
The Florida Speleological
Society will show a film entitled
Russel Cave National
Monument, Wednesday at 7
p.m. in Reitz Union room 349.
This northern Alabama cave
was the subject of a National
Geographic Society expedition
which discovered evidence of
early Indian occupation.

EX-UF PRESIDENT SAYS

militants provokes policemen
into using excessive force. As a
result, great numbers of
idealistic students side with the
original demonstrators and the
unrest grows and feeds on
itself.
Reitz takes the position that
universities have the right to
establish rules and regulations
for the peaceful accomplishment
of their primary function ed educating
ucating educating students.
Universities have the right to
establish rules and to enforce
those regulations through
disciplinary action against
students who disrupt the
universitys operation, Reitz
says.
If students are acting out of
anti-establishment feelings, then
the intervention of legislators or
other high-ranking state officials
can increase the violence and
scope of the demonstrations,
Reitz stated.

I s l2 All Colors
111 l CHOOSE FROM THE STATES LARGEST |f|
MB HAIROOODS DISPLAY Ijjk
llll| 100XEUROPEAN TEXTURED Mil
lilt HUMAN HAIR f 11111
WIGLETS 4 f
m' TDI UC UADI IV hairgoods m
f I kAIMOKLU f
MtMm (across from Ramada Inn) I DAYTONA BEACH
RAIMCCWII | p COCOA BEACH
mmm uAiivtbviLLt: Jacksonville yfik

3-3

State officials are the
personification of the
establishment, much more so
than university administrators,
Reitz said.
So it is probably better to give

DIAMONDS
and JEWELRY
SAVE Kfl %
UP TO VV
sh-s niluie Monuloi lun r
l M h 1

Tuesday, March 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

BY HOWARD POST

university officials more
authority to deal with
demonstrations, Reitz feels,
until it becomes apparent that
their authority can no longer
maintain law and order.

Page 5



, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 4, 1969

Page 6

EDITORIAL

Hales 'Reasons

Vice President for Student Affairs Lester Hale has
recommended that SSOC not be granted campus
recognition as a legitimate student group.
Apparently, the potential pressure of adverse public
opinion was too much for the kindly, but aging
administrator.
His main resaons for urging that the majority opinion of
the Committee on Student Organizations be overturned by
President Stephen C. OConnell:
SSOC is not a student group because its membership is
not restricted to students.
9 SSOC disclaims any responsibility to the institution.
9 SSOC does not use existing representative structures
for political actions.
9 SSOC did not deny that its source of power was the
potential ability to stop the university from functioning.
Twenty years ago, the Silent Generation might have
bought those reasons. At least they wouldnt have
questioned.
But the reasons simply dont hold water in this decade, in
this year.
Because not only are they illogical, but, worse, they are
irrelevant.
Jr
One at a time:
It would seem that the criterion for being a student group
should be that it includes students. SSOC may not be
exclusively a student group, but it is still primarily for
students.
It permits membership to anyone who believes in the
things they believe in, namely freedom, participatory
democracy, equal and fair justice, self-determination, etc.
But the fact that there are non-students should not be
sufficient cause to deny the students in the group the right
to hold meetings in the Reitz Union.
Secondly, many groups in a free society do not use the
existing structure for the implementation of political action.
They go into limbo outside the structure, or create one of
their own. This is consonant with the principles of our way
of life, as long as the groups do not disrupt or do violence to
the structure accepted and condoned by the majority of
people.
Thirdly, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that loyalty
oaths to the state and federal governments as a condition for
employment are unconstitutional. The high court said a
state cannot discriminate against a prospective employee
because he intellectually believes in violence as response to
tyranny.
Yet our vice president would have us believe that the
university can do what the state cannot do -- demand
loyalty and responsibility to the institution from those who
seek official recognition.
To demand that SSOC disavow any and all thoughts of
disloyalty to the university before it can be admitted to the
universitys sacred domain is clearly unconstitutional.
Fourthly, the expectation that SSOC would DENY that
its source of power was the potential ability to stop the
university from functioning is not only irrelevant, but also
absurd.
This is a source of power for any group who chooses to
exercise it. The Gator Guard, with loaded rifles, could stop
this university from functioning a hell of a lot faster than a
handful of radicals armed only with their brains and hands.
Was such a question posed to the Gator Guard, or any
other group, before it received recognition? We seriously
doubt it.
Was SSOC asked to deny that its source of power was
anything else? Say like, the ability to sell rotten hot dogs in
the Plaza of the Americas. (For those of our readers who
may not be knowledgeable in such things, the smell of
rotten hot dogs can be quite powerful!) Again, we doubt it.
Taken together, Hales reasons are arbitrary, invalid
and beneath the credibility of intelligent people.
SSOC should be allowed on campus. It should be given
permitted the chance to attain identity with this institution
and work vigorously for constructive change where change
is needed.
Hales reasons for urging that SSOC be denied campus
r^cegnitTQiiareiridicativc ofwhat- the group is
fighting stagnation, repression, narrow-mindedness and a
climate of anti-think.
We hope that the man at the top of the ladder in whose
hands the decision now rests, President OConnell, will
recognize an empty barrel when he sees one.
Because Vice President Hales report and
recommendations are now sitting on OConnells desk.

Ham And Grits

Key Is Less Show

The argument to retain
Student Government now being
weakly, but persistently,
plastered on the Alligators
editorial pages, asks readers to
determine that if SG were gone,
could students go it alone.
Editor Harold Aldrich
wonders if students will provide
for themselves all the little
things SG presently pays for.
He lists benefits which
include color T.V. sets in dorms,
band uniforms, lost and found,
babysitting services, intramurals,
and similar items.
It is true that SG has worked
hard to provide these
advantages with student
money. Realistically students are
entitled to them with or
without their present
government.
It would seem highly likely
that any student government
would provide these comforts in
college life and for that matter
any administration would,
also.
It appears then that SG is
really nothing more than a
financial disbursing agency for
redistributing student fees.

Speaking Out

I graduated in April 1967
from the University of Florida. I
was sent a greetings note almost
immediately after graduation. I
decided to try to have a good
attitude about going in and said
maybe I could improve myself as
a person.
I went through my four
months of basic and AIT
(Advanced Individual Training)
where I was introduced to
military life and harrassment.
From t fibre l went to OCS
(Officers Candidate School).
However, I decided it wasnt
worth another year of my life
just to be an officer in addition
to all the extra harrassment so I
quit. Then I received my orders
for Vietnam. As much as I didnt
want to go I knew when I was
first drafted I would end up
there either as an officer or as an
enlisted man.
Right now I am stationed
with Company A, 86th Engineer
Battalion in the Mekong Delta. I
am an operation clerk and as
such spend most of my time in
the orderly room doing
paperwork.
When I arrived in Vietnam, I
thought my only worry would
he GiraTiie and to keep myself
alive. Ironically Charlie isnt my
main problem here. Its the
senior NCOs and officers. The
ROTC department at school
calls them career soldiers. The
EM in Vietnam call them
Lifers.

Vietnam Machinery

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
\*sSm J Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
PtUflulu/v Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
/ Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
J\uV\iWk Executive Editor News Editor

SG workers if this is true
and it seems so -- are probably
more motivated by their own
self interests.
The publicity currently being
given SG seems to have arisen
rather suddenly more out of
fear of losing a good thing than
out of retaining the students
only link between themselves
and the administration.
Moreover, it is apparent that
most publicity about the
bigger SG projects such as
SAMSON, dorm pools,
Ombudsman and others, is
generated in order to give
project backers exposure that
would be healthy when they
pursue their political dreams out
in the big world of Florida state.

We havent had any real
trouble here with Charles for
over 6 months. Just a little
harrassment once in a while, but
nothing really to speak of.
Fortunately or unfortunately,
this has caused the brass to feel
we are back in the World (the
U.S.). In other words, since they
arent overly occupied with
Charlie, the brass has turned
thier attention on the peons (EM
again).
We are not people with
feelings, just machines. Each
morning a button is pushed and
we just grind out the same work,
listen to the same B.S. and
receive the same treatment. I
know we need discipline in a war
zone and should not have any
feelings for they are a sign of
weakness and Charlie will take
advantage of any weaknesses he
can spot. Anyone who
complains is a protestor and
gives the Communists fuel for
propaganda.
We should feel honored our
country has asked us to defend

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
a
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the Univenitv of Florida."

By Dave Osier

A case in point if the vying
for recognition that goes on in
SG when the perpetual
hangers-on, or cronies, play for
cabinet posts and the
chairmanships of the big
projects.
This is called patronage. The
rush for the eight or nine big
jobs, which are considered
major positions by Florida
Blue Key, is tremendous around
election time.
Membership in FBK is
determined on the basis of a
major job in student work.
Additionally, a FBK key
opens the door to Florida
politics.
There are better keys to true
student government.

By Jerry Engle

her. Its the least we can do for
her (our country). But when
people are worried about spit
shining trucks and want detailed
accurate records kept on training
which isnt given and is known
by the higher chain of command
to be in existence only on paper
and even give monthly
inspections between companies
on this.
I think this is only an
exaggeration of harrassment
which isnt needed. True,
vehicles and equipment must be
maintained. I realize this and I
believe most of the guys (I dont
like the word troops) here
realize it too. 1 can only
conclude that the war is turning
in favor of the allies (and will
probably end as the Korean War)
and our career soldiers have
nothing better to do, and if the
ROTC Department feels this is
only one radical view, tell them
to come to Camp Viking,
Company A, 86th Engr Bn, Binh
Due, RVN, and ask any young
American soldier here.



From Out Os The Past...

Marshall Jones Squirrel

MR. EDITOR:
Marshall Jones has a favorite story
in which he tells of how his ten-year-old
son caught a squirrel with the aid of a
box, some bait, a stick, and a long
string.
The lad became something of a
neighborhood hero and Marshall asked
him how he managed the remarkable
feat. The boy thought a minute and
then replied, Well, Dad, first you need
a dumb squirrel...
When asked how a small group of
radicals could accomplish so much on a
Florida campus, Marshall would tell his
squirrel story and say, We have a secret
weapon Tigert is full of dumb
squirrels!
Recently there was the Gentry case,
and not even our ex-Supreme Court
Judge was smart enough to figure out
that scotch tape on a door does not
constitute defacing property. Then

Open UF Education To Ignorant Legislators

(EDITORS NOTE: The fol following
lowing following is a copy of a letter sent
to State Representative David
Lindey who recently pledged to
vote against UF appropriations if
controversial (philosophy)
professor Kenneth Megill were
not removed.)
DEAR SIR:
As a registered voter in
Orange County and a student at

PE: Complaints
But No Concern

MR. EDITOR:
On February 3, 1969, the
Physical Education Investigation
Committee of the Student
Senate held a meeting to hear
student opinion about the
proposed physical education bill.
Although the time for the
Harvey Alper
Says Goodbye
MR. EDITOR:
As you and some of your
readers know, a week ago last
Sunday I was elected president
of the UFs national mens
leadership honorary Omicron
Delta Kappa.
Although I have enjoyed
writing editorials on a limited
basis sor Tire Alligator
throughout this quarter, I feel it
is now incumbent upon me to
resign from my position as
Alligator Contributing Editor.
I do this so that any
questions of conflict of
interests may be put to rest as I
take this new office.
I trust this action will be in
the best interests of both ODK
and The Alligator.
HARVEY M. ALPER

there was the Megill case, with the help
of Slade, an off-campus dumb squirrel.
Now there is the SSOC case with the
Tigert dumb squirrels back at work.
New Party is to be approved, but
SSOC is to be denied approval, at least
partly on the grounds that it may have
off-campus membership -a bit of
selective reasoning that should be
obvious even to dumb squirrels.
We may have some upheaval at the
University of Florida yet. If it comes,
some credit must be given to the hard
working activists on campus, but the
bulk of the credit must be given to
those who deserve it most the dumb
squirrels.
If anyone is interested, I am willing
to donate $3.00 toward a fund to issue
plaques commemorating the Marshall
Jones Dumb Squirrel Award, and
nominate Hale as Dumb Squirrel of the
Week, and Slade as Dumb Squirrel of

the University of Florida, I am
extremely concerned about the
statements you have recently
made about the Megill crisis.
Your lack of knowledge and
careful thought is obvious.
Violence and disruptive
activity at any university are
deplorable; but ultimatums and
statements based on emotion
rather than fact whether
issued by students, faculty, or

meeting was well publicized,
only three students were
interested enough to attend. All
three actively participated in
discussion and their ideas were
considered, in fact most of them
were added to our proposal.
It is a ridiculous state of
affairs when out of 5000
students involved in physical
education only three attend;
there were seven physical
education teachers and two
physical education majors there
to answer questions about the
change of program. It was an
embarrassing situation since the
teachers outnumbered the
students. This committee was
open minded, expecting to hear
opinions from a cross section of
those taking physical education.
For the reasons stated above
the committee wishes to remind
all those who have complaints
that there was an opportunity
for them to express their
opinion. committee was
formed in conjunction with the
students; unfortunately five
senators ended up compiling all
the information without any
students response.
I wonder how many of these
same apathetic students will
complain about the physical
education program next year.
RALPH NOBO
Off-Campus senator
Member of the Physical
Education Investigation
Committee.

the Month. It is only the first of March,
God knows what the year may yet
produce in the way of deserving
recipients for Dumb Squirrel of the
Year.
808 SHETTERLY 7AS
Repressed Logic
MR. EDITOR:
Concerning Hartmans letter on
February 26, I take note of the
following comment: an occupation of
buildings is an inevitable result of
hyper-repression of freedom of
thought.
By implication and extension one
could deduce from Mr. Hartmans
ridiculous remark that the taking over
or simply taking of a mans life is the
result of hyper-repression of freedom of
weaponry. BO nnie H. BERMAN

legislators are just as
dangerous to our state and our
culture. The students at the
University of Florida condemn
violence by an overwhelming
majority approaching 99%; but
they also condemn any
interference with a free
exchange of ideas.
The people of this state own
the university, but they will
never own the thoughts of its
members; and they should never,
for when a democratic state
controls the minds of its people,
it is no longer a democracy.
The solution to whatever
crisis is supposed to exist is not
closing the university, nor is it to
cut off funds. The answer lies in
reasoning and understanding.
Please, Sir, for the good of
our state, make some attempt to
get the facts on all sides of the
matter. At one time, I had great
faith in the Florida Legislature
and in the Republican Party.
The events of the past few days
have made me think that your
proposal to expel all of Megills
supporters is indeed an excellent
idea.

How To Make SG Respond ...
Introduce f Liberty & Freedom

MR. EDITOR:
Theres a very simple
way to make student
government more responsive to
student needs:
Provide in the SG
constitution that there shall be
two (to begin with) political
parties7 such as Liberty and
Freedom, and that the names

SG: Better To Be Ignored
MR. EDITOR:
With all this talk going around with regard to the abolishment of
I find it necessary to elaborate on why it should
be retained. Perhaps it is a ridiculous institution, but after all what
would the Alligator print editorials about and what could apathetic
students ignore if there was no S tudent Government. In addition, how
could Mark Cohen become the next Student Government President in
April if it is abolished in March!
ARTUR FREINER

FORUM:^^
C Ainu, ml Di&Awt J)
hope for the rnmpla&SjS*^^

It would make more room in
our crowded university. Perhaps
the first people to take
advantage of this room should
be a handful of the Republicans
from the Florida Legislature

Tallahassee Replies ..
Dismiss Disruptors
(EDITORS NOTE: The following is a reply to UF Blue Keys
censure of State Senator Tom Slade for his interference in academic
affairs resulting in the Megill controversy.)
DEAR SIR:
I am in receipt of your printed form letter of February 19,1969.
The very thing that you complain about intimidation in my
opinion is exemplified by your letter.
I too condemn those who are irresponsible. I further deplore
interference with the normal academic process. I firmly believe that
students and professors who engage in disrupting this process should
be summarily dismissed.
Also, if these students or professors have caused property damage
while protesting, they should be held civilly liable for those damages.
C. LA VON WARD
Representative
82nd District

of these parties shall not
change ... and that to start a
new party a petition with, say,
five percent of the student body
must be submitted.
This way, your student poli politicians
ticians politicians would be forced to run
on their record and their partys
record. As it is now, a bunch
gets in, fiddles around for a year,
then changes the name of the

Tuesday, March 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

TIGERT:
OUT ON A
LIMB

for many of them obviously
know very little about higher
education.
CHARLES E. HARRIS
Majority Floor Leader
Student Senate

party ... and the cycle is re repeated.
peated. repeated.
While youre at it, you might
require some kind of continuity
as to fraternity membership in a
party.
Its an old idea .. not mine.
Wonder why it never was adopt adopted,
ed, adopted,
NAME WITHHELD
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor-
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 4, 1969

e>

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

FACULTY: There will be a
Dutch treat, German style buffet
Facluty Club get acquainted
dinner, March 11, in the west
side of the cafeteria. $2 a
person.
NURSING SCHOLAR SCHOLARSHIPS:
SHIPS: SCHOLARSHIPS: The 1969 Scholarship
examination will be Oct. 14,
1969. Scholarship loans are
awarded by the Florida State
Board of Education to
applicants making the highest
scores. Applicants must have at
least one high school unit in
each of the biological and
physical sciences. Basic
collegiate nursing scholarship
loans are S6OO a year for four
years or S2OO a quarter for 12
quarters. One-half of the
scholarships are available to
students interested in attending
basic collegiate schools of
nursing and who agree to render
nursing service in a state agency
or institution for at least the
minimum time specified for the
type of scholarship they receive.
Information and application
forms may be obtained from the
County Superintendent of Public
Instruction in each county.
Application forms also are
available in Room H-101,
College of Nursing, J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.
PROJECT SURGE: Students
for Responsible Government.
Persons interested in working on
Project SURGE, a full-time
professional lobby of all Florida
students in Tallahassee, should
pick up applications in Room
331, Reitz Union. No previous
student government experience
is necessary.

NEXT CAR LOAN...
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION I
sh Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours:B:ooq,m 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday

STATE TEACHERS:
General Loan Scholarship
money has arrived. You may
receive it in the Student
Depository from Mrs. Robinson
or Miss Nabers.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
Thursday, March 13, at 1:30
p.m. in 235 Tigert Hall.
VISITING LECTURER: Mr.
Eckhard Schulze-Fielitz will
speak on the subject Urban
Systems" in Room 101 of Little
Hall, March 5, at 8 p.m. He is on
a speaking tour of the U.S.
sponsored by the Goethe
Institute Munich, and is
sponsored locally by the
American Institute of Architects
and the Architecture
Department.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
SPECIAL ELECTIONS: The
Student Government will hold
special elections Wednesday,
March 5, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

BLUE BULLETIN

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, March 4
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 2:45 p.m.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
SGP: RUTH PAGE
INTERNATIONAL
BALLET, Florida Gym, 8:15
p.m.
Wednesday, March 5
''English in Action",
Conversational English
between one American
volunteer and one
International, Baptist Student
Center, 4:00-8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Twilight Concert,
Concert Band, Plaza of the
Americas, 6:45 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 245 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society,
349 Union, 7:00 p^m.
Circle K Meeting, ,362 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Student Government Voting,
Ground Floor Lobby Union,
8:00 a.m.
Center for Latin American
Studies Colloquium, Latin
American Colloquium Room,
College Library, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, March 6
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Movie, "La Boheme", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Christian Science Meeting, 150 B
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.

Biological Sciences Colloquium,
Speaker: Dr. Roger Sperry, J.
Hillis Miller Health Center, H,
611,7:30 p.m.
Semper Fidelis Society Meeting,
150 F & G Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Water Ski Club Meeting,
121 Union, 7:30 p.m.
URA-Hillel Concert, Jewish Folk
Singing, Hillel Foundation,
8:00 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 316 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Hillel Reception, Hillel
Foundation, 9:30 p.m.
Friday, March 7
Movie, "La Boheme", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Dept, of German & Russian,
Illustrated Lecture, Prof.
Reinhold Grimm, Lecturer,
Bless Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Florida Players: T.S. Eliot's
"Murder in the Cathedral",
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
AUDUBON FILM SERIES,
General Public, Faculty &
Staff, $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $.75; Children,
$.50. UNIVERSITY FILM
SERIES, 10 Films, General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$5.00; Univ. of Fla. Students,
$2.50; Univ. of Fla. Students,
5 films, $1.50. FLORIDA
PLAYERS: T.S. Eliot's
"Murder in the Cathedral",
Faculty, Staff & General
Public, $1.50; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $.25; High School
Students, $.75. SGP: VAN
CLIBURN, General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $3.00, $2.25
6 $1.50; Univ. of Fla
Students, $2.50, $1.75 &
SI.OO.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE
1957 Triumph Motorcycle 650 cc,
$250. Call 378-0726. (A-st-95-P)
Honda P-50, 1968, good shape, new
clutch and just tuned up. Helmet,
tool kit, and book strap
included sBs. Call
Terry -376-0642 after 4 p.m.
(A-3t-95-P)
BABY FLYING SQUIRREL, cute
easy to feed and tame $5 or $9/pair.
327 NW 16th St. (5-7 p.m.) or call
376-0968. (A-3t-95-P)
2 Coaxial Speakers i 2 with or
without cabinets S4O. Also pair baby
scales $7 . hassock fan S2O . call
378-3268. (A-3t-94-P)
68 450 CC HONDA SCRAMBLER.
New engine. Lots of extras.
466-3565. (A-2t-94-P)
20,000 BTU Fedders Air Conditioner
only used one summer will easily
cool 2 bedroom apt. perfect
condition S2OO Call 372-7997.
(A-3t-94-P)
GunsGuns Guns-Hnventory over
4 5 0 BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies, custom,
reloadingHAY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
466-3340. (A-ts-69-P)
A beauty of a buy!! Honda 150
complete with two helmets, tool kit,
and many more extras. Call 378-8905
after 7 pm. (A-st-93-P)
Dachshound puppy, female, black
and tan, 7 weeks old, AKC registered
$50.00. 376-8523. (A-st-93-P)
25% off to students: 2 drawer metal
storage or file cabinets. Refinished
gray, green or tan. J.R. Office
Furniture Co., 620Vz S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (6t-93-A-P)

i.n. i JkKllnKHal7 < il I
MAR. 7-9 T s Eliots B:PM
FtorM a "MURDER IN
& THE CATHEDRAL" 3521653
Modern Dance Group fit V ntl/fIML
rA> rJlrt rjS
VI sJ|v vjv wjv %/Jw wjw %/Jw wjw n/Js# Wy# WJW vjw */Jw vjw wjw JJS* J|y JJU JJw JJw ;#
i''' I *' i
| |
Q
f "YOU DON T KNOW WHAT THE f
* FLORIDA QUARTERLY IS ? f
f SAID THE CATERPILLAR. J
I- *-
I
1
f |
f I

| FOR SALE |
6 8 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Excellent condition 883 cc. Call
372-7703 after 6:30 p.m. (A-st-91-P)
Ovation electric guitar 4 mo. old
Fender amp, Harmony Sovereign
Acoustic Guitar, good cond. $350
call 378-7612. (A-st-94-P)
§ FOR RENT "'
Ranch style living. One bedroom apt.
Large closets and bath. Fully paneled
and air cond. Use of pool and
bar-b-que house. Walking distance of
new golf course to be opened this
spring. Water, extermination and
garbage collection included. SIOO.OO
a month 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-6t-93-P)
1 bdrm apt to sublease 3 blks from
campus air-conditioning, washing
machine. 1824 NW 3 PI no. 23 Call
372-5567. (B-st-94-P)
1 Bedroom, AC, apt. 1533 NW sth
Ave. Walking distance to campus,
$95 per month. Call 378-8058.
(B-st-95-P)
| WANTED **l
WQ HHBii SIMM 8 i
Fourth coed roommate .wanted for
spring or spring and summer quarters.
Landmark Apts. Call 378-8731
anytime. (C-3t-95-P)
COED ROOMMATE wanted, large,
air-conditioned, two-bedroom, 16th
Ave. apt. on pool, $37 mo. Village
Park No. 97, Call 372-4751.
(C-st-95-P)

Tuesday, March 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

I WANTED j
ROOMMATE for poolside apartment
at French Quarter No. 50 for spring
quarter. 378-4507. (C-3t-95-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share Col. Manor Apt. 39 spring
quarter sllO/2 air cond. pool. Call
Julie 378-4785, 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
(C-st-95-P)
1 Female roommate. Must sublet
Village Park Apt. poolside, 2
bedroom, 2nd floor. $41.25 month
for. spring and/or summer quarter.
Call 378-9088 anytime. (C-3t-95-P)
WANTED: Female roommate to
share great, 2 bdrm. apt. with grad
student. Start now or April 1.
$42.50. 376-7670. (C-2t-95-P)
Female roommates wanted. Fredrick
Garden Apartments SIOO per
quarter. Spring Quarter Only. Call
Barb at 376-1045. (C-6t-93-P)
2 male roommates for third quarter.
Share furn. 2-bedroom apt. $41.25
month plus utilities. Frederick
Gardens apt. 20. Call 378-6551
(C-3t-94-P)
Coed roommate needed. 1 bedrm
apt. 4023 S.W. 34 St. Call 376-3763
or write Sally Bowers, Drawer 1030,
Apopka, Fla. $45 per mo. (C-st-S4-P)
Sublease with methe best is yet to
be! $65/mo. includes utilities,
offstreet parking, phone, pool, & the
best living in town; half block from
campus call 378-4532, Rick or Dan
at Apt. 302 College Terrace Apts.
(C-3t-94-P)
Coed to share apt near campus AC,
own room, prefer grad student, $45
per month, 909 SW 6 Ave, 378-1837.
(C-2t-94-P)
One female roommate needed spring
quarter Landmark Apts. 174 two
bedroom $45 mo. Call 378-0846.
(C-st-94-P)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-10t-94-P)
Need one female roommate, spring
quarter for two bedroom Landmark
apa.tment, $45 per month.
378-3851. (C-3t-94-P)
Roommate wanted (male) for roomy,
two bedroom apartment in
Tanglewood Manor. Dishwasher, bath
and half-bath, front and rear
entrances. Low-rent poolside living.
For further information call
372-5937. (C-4t-93-P)
Wanted: coed model for amateur
photographer. No experience
necessary. Write PO box 1404,
Gainesville. (C-4t-93-P)
Need one male roomie for spring
quarter in Village Park no. 64. Call
372-0607 or stop by most anytime.
(C-2t-93-P)
Female roommate for Landmark. 2
bdm. apt. Spring and summer
quarters. Call 378-8708 after 6 p.m.
(C-3t-95-P)
Coed to sublet private room Spring
and Summer quarters. Share kitchen
and washer/dryer. AC. Call 372-1973
or come by. 1616 NW 3rd Ave.
(C-st-94-P)
Female roommate landmark 169
2 bedroom apt. $45 month. Can
move in for spring quarter. 378-7782.
(C-st-91-P)
Lets make a deal. Sublet 2 br apt. at
Landmark or 2 roommates to share 2
br. apt. starting spring quarter. Call
378-8982, Apt. 113. (C-st-91-P)
One male roommate wanted
immediately for 2 bedroom garage
apt 2 blocks from campus cable TV.
$45 a month plus utilities call
372-5976. (C-st-92-P)
Openminded coed with car to share 2
bedroom townhouse apartment in
Anglewood Manor. SSO mo. plus
utilities. Call 376-1015. (C-4t-92-P)
MHaaM
NOW PLAYING
" r*" paramount
DOUGLAS
IllillSMHjL b, TECHNICOLOR'
TECHNICOLOR* A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

Page 9

| 1 WANTED
LANDMARK Male roommate
needed. Available March 1. March
rent paid. Call 378-3120, apt. 170.
(C-10t-88-P)
| HELP WANTED
INVESTIGATOR Training class soon
with top co. with real career plan.
Car and benefits and $6600 starting
salary. Call Allied Personnel of
Gainesville, 1800 N Main St.,
376-4611. (E-93-st-P)
PRESTIGE AND MONEY Be
secretary, top man, beautiful office,
best environment, best salary in
town. See Allied Personnel of
Gainesville, 1800 N Main. 376-4611.
(E-93-st-P)
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Part-time or full-time Will train.
Must be 21. Dub's Steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)
Part-time stenographer 5-10 hours wk
flexible hours prefer dictaphone
experience $1.75-2.00 per hr call
376-1933 for interview appointment
Thompson Hayward Chem Co.
(E-3t-93-P)
Girls needed to work on inventory
March 4,1 p.m. 372-2721.
(E-lt-95-P)
.v-x-x-x^-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x^x^cox^
AUTOS |
Swss-x-x-:-x-:-.VNX-:.r::X<-:-x*x<*i*x!S99'>;*
1969 PONTIAC GTO HARDTOP
Loaded with extras & sac. warranty
Army duty soon. Your best buy
$3650 372-7376 day 372-1549 nite
& wkend. (G-st-93-P)
1 956 inspected Olds. Good
transportation SIOO. Call 376-0320
evenings. (G-4t-95-P)
PERSONAL t
;:*x*x*x-xxw;WW*:*xx*x-x-x.:*:;yws?Bow
YOGA LESSONS: 3:30 5:00
weekdays, $3.00, 103 NE 3rd St.
Also by appointment. Mike Geison.
(J-st-94-P)
GAR: Happy 23rd Birthday to my
favorite old man, Love muchly, Scar.
(J-lt-95-P)
Youll love our owls! . and all the
other little creatures in our
CERAMIC ZOO. From Mexico. The
Spanish Main, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Now open nights til 9:00. (J-st-92-P)
Summer Ponchos (sls) and other
clothes are in from Mexico. Woven
headbands. The Spanish Main, 105
W. Univ. Ave. Open nights til
9.(J-st-92-P)
LOST & FOUND |
Lost Jon Romain wallet. If found,
call 392-8675. REWARD. (L-3t-95-P)
Lost Thursday brown Joh Romain
key case. If' found please Call
376-3729 after 4. (L-st-91-P)
LOST Post Versalog slide rule. Name
is inside. Contact Wayne Zellner,
376-1155 evenings. REWARD!
(L-st-91 -P)
Bnaam
E I HURRY!
a% 2 it HO d* H I
imr I *AW
\ LAST i
DAY jfe
col jfjfjjf
hWing alien '' J
Dean 11J§
Martin W*m
Matt Helm 155 J
The Wrecking Crew
ft -
ACADEMY
__] AWARD
CLIFF NOMINEE
ROBERTSON-BEST ACTOR
ft A love story
jfe that begins with
wr an mo-edible
XD experiment!
f o^Ly
_ MUSIC BY
RAVI SHANKAR

r SERVICES f
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. -Main St.
(M-7t-95-P)
INCOME TAX $4.00 up. Expert
service in two locations to serve you:
1227 W. Univ. Ave. (across from
Ramada Inn) & 107 N. Main St.
(M-ts-95-P)
BABYCARE 311 NW 15th Terrace
Infants under 1 yr old $15.00 per
wk. MonFri, 8 am to 5 pm By
the hour 75c. Experienced,
trustworthy, Christian home. Ph.
376-2072. (M-3t-93-P)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)
[ IkCMEMT MWUiWMB
guess who's
I coming to
I dinner COLOH I
SPENCER TRACY
KATHARINE HEPBURN I
SIDNEY POITIER
I KATHARINE HOUGHTON I
l ALSOf I
B Jigsaw coiotj
"a spectator who alt* down to thl* I
picture feeling old and dry will
rlee up feeling young and green.
It bubblee up llhe the eprlng of I
life Itaelf." Tim Magazine j
' :: :
/ : j
QJPII j Ijj
CTWIt^i T ?'" ES
SST?]
iois n. w. nth it. \ I A
j* A brutally tough
* sergeant is gripped
£ by an obsessive ja f m
+ passion JCv,
* fiTTI iIMT
J 1 V 1 dm _tll It
"**&&!' Hr

UMiUISI
' 4 ** i
f F Dlrector I
% n - 0.



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 4, 1969

A K
*
/ v jm^m]
&$. *
V 's§f Y
.%7r*%>v _.. ri....

Yours truly was permitted to vote for the United Press
International All-America basketball team the other day. Since my
choices will be lost in the thousands of ballots that will be tabulated.
Ill list them for what they are worth here:
FIRST TEAM: Neal Walk, UF; Lew Alcindor, UCLA; Dan Issel.
Kentucky; Pete Maravich, LSU; Rick Mount, Purdue
COACH OF THE YEAR: Adolph Rupp, Kentucky
PLAYER OF THE YEAR: Neal Walk, UF
'9
* *
From around the conference:
It will be like homecoming when the Georgia Bulldog Tennis squad
travels to the Sunshine State to meet the Gators April 5. Four Bulldog
racketeers are Floridians: Brant Bailey (Largo), Mike Cmaylo (Fort
Lauderdale), Norman Holmes Jr. (Melbourne) and Jim Watrous
(Tampa).
* *
By the way, high flying Kentucky racked up the rebounds in their
100-point plus games with Louisiam and Alabama last week to take
the team lead from the Gators in that department. The Wildcats are
now averaging 50.5 retrieves per game to the Gators 49.7.
* *
The Tennessee sports fans last week got their first glimpse of
Knoxvilles newest answer to mass rioting Roller Derby. While there
were moments resembling athletics, most of them were interspersed
by the molesting going on between the female participants.
The touring squads will be hitting all the big southern cities and
with the vol student support, it looks like Knoxville may get a
franchise next year. Wowee!
* *
Its no wonder the Gators triple jumper Ron Coleman came in
second in the SEC Indoor meet this past weekend in Montgomery.
Though he set a school record at he placed second to
Tennessees Jeff Gabel who sailed 50-4/4. Gabels coach is former
world record holding long jumper Ralph Bostoh, whos working in
UTs student affairs office.
* *
Auburn football Coach Shug Jordan got ready for spring football
practice with by putting himself under the surgeons knife. There had
been signs Jordan had cancer in the bone marrow but surgery showed
they are gone now. The War Eagles begin spring practice in mid-April
and the veteran field boss is expected to be up and at em by then.
* *
Gainesvilles A1 Giffin, a senior textile major at Auburn cant
decide on professional football or graduate school. But he thinks he
could try a little of both.
A teammate of several Gators out of Gainesville High, Giffin
helped the Plainsmen to a 24-10 win over the UF at this years
homecoming.
At 21, Giffin was drafted by the Denver Broncos of the American
Football League.
If the pros offer me enough, I will play and use that money to go
to school, but if they dont Ill take the scholarship and forget about
football.
Giffin has played a variety of positions ranging from fullback to
defensive end.

"SoocnSrvicinarts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
BALBB-BERVICE BALBB-BERVICEREPAIBS
REPAIBS BALBB-BERVICEREPAIBS
CRANE IMPORTS
yw t. phit. Aw, m-4m
.m
RAKE IN THE &
PROFITS
GATOR AQ.S


The Clipboard

Wowee!

ALL POLAROIDS
20 % OFF
1232 W. UNIV.
376-7657
* \

By Bill Dunn

UF Climbs On Mountaineers
On Path To New Yorks NIT

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
JACKSONVILLE After a
shakey first half the UF cagers
came back from a one-point First
deficit to beat West Virginia
75-57 here Monday night.
With the victory came an
almost sure National Invitational
Tournament bid.
They told us if we beat West
Virginia, that wed probably get
the bid. Coach Tommy Bartlett

They told us if we beat West Virginia, that we'd
probably get the bid.
. . Tommy Bartlett

said. I dont see how they
couldnt take us now.
The Gators knew they were in
for a tough time when they
found they had left their white
uniforms in Gainesville, because
West Virginia played in solid
blue the gators were forced to
wear drab white practice jerseys
with barely visible numerals
which were painted on with a
marking pencil.
UF made a defensive
adjustment in the second half by
pulling out, thus stopping the
outside shooting of the
Mountaineers UF outscored West
Virginia 47-28 in the final
period.
The Gators were led in scoring
by guard Boyd Welschs 24
points. Neal Walk, coming on
strong in the second scored 20
points total after only four in
the first half. Walk set a three
season record by breaking Bob
Emricks record of l ,544 points
with a free throw late in the
game.
The senior center from Miami
Beach dominated the
backboards with 22 rebounds,
but the Mountaineers had 47 as a
team compared with UFs 39.
UF built its lead in the second
half, leading by at least 10-15
points during the last seven and
a half minutes.
With 3:45 to play, the Gators
froze the ball forcing West
Virginia to foul and commit
mistakes which cost them the
ball.

WALK SETS SCORING RECORD

The
Florida
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Sports Editor

Greg Ludwig was the
Mountaineers leading scorer with
22 points. Carey Bailey, 6-foot-5
senior center, had 18 rebounds.
The Gators trailed at the end
of the first half 29-28.
Welsch was the big gun
scoring 15 points as the team
shot a cool .333 percentage.
The Mountaineers dominated
play and the backgrounds,
recovering 23 rebounds
compared to UFs 15 in the first
period. Walk and West Virginias
Bailey each had seven rebounds.

BNAI BRITH
Hillel Foundation
BARBEQUE HAYRIDE
SQUARE DANCE BONFIRE
MARCH 8,1969
Cowboy Riding Stables
8 p.m. to 12 p.m.
"Meet at Hillel
7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
2.00 COUPLE 1.00 PERSON
Everybody welcome students & faculty
16 N.W, 18th St.
Tour new
boyfriend has a
new girlfriend?
4*>
Think it over, over coffee.
The Think Drink.
For your own Think Drink Hug. send 7SC and your name and address to:
Think Drink Mug, Dept. N, P.O. Bo* 559, New York, N.Y. 10046. The International Coffee Organisation

A few seconds after the final
buzzer, the announcer said the
Gators had been extended the
bid to play in the tournament in
New York City, but later had to
withdraw his announcement.
The win gave the Gators a
17-8 overall record. They now
own an 116 SECTecord with
wins coming over Georgia,
Kentucky, LSU, Tennessee and
Auburn.
The Gators play at home
Saturday night against Alabama
at 7:45 in Florida Gym.
Runs Sidewalks
Bill Emmerton, champion
long distance runner, recently
ran" the length of the worlds
longest sidewalk the
promenade bordering Tampas
Bayshore Boulevard which is
about six miles in distance.
ITP-
DLICIOUS
I? I 111
y felony I FINE FOOD
NHCUSKAJ at
student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955



Death Hits Georgia Sports Again

ATLANTA (UPI) The
attractive wife of Atlanta
Falcons Vice President and
General Manager Frank E. Wall
apparently shot her son and
daughter as they slept in the
Walls fashionable suburban
home, then took her own life,
detectives said Monday.
Mrs. Wall, her sandy hair
matted with blood and her fist
still grasping the death weapon,
was found sprawled across her

Gville Driver Blames Tragedy
On 'Hog Patch Strips Safety

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Its pitiful the way they run
drag racing up there, said Terry
Earwood, public events manager
of the hew Gainesville Dragway.
Earwood was reacting to
Sundays drag racing tragedy in
Covington, Ga. He knows what
he was talking about. He was
scheduled to drive there Sunday.
The tragedy w3l set the sport
back years. Eleven were killed,
fifty-some injured when a
funny car spun out of control
and shot through a crowd of
spectators. The driver walked
away from it only to watch as
pickup trucks carried the bodies
away.
It was not a funny thing to
watch. A
But what could and should be
made clear is that the Yellow
River Drag Strip in Covington,
Ga. was an outlaw strip. In
other words, it was not a strip
sanctioned for safety.
By coincidence, Rich Lynch
of Memphis, Tenn., director of
professional racing for the
American Hot Rod Association
was at the track when the
accident occurred.
The track at Yellow River is
an unsanctioned drag strip,
Lynch said. Its an outlaw strip,
what we call tracks unsanctioned
by either the AHRA or the
National Hot Rod Association.
Lynch said the track is not
sanctioned because it is
unsafe.
I have driven that strip and
its no more than a hog patch
full of sand, dips and waves in
the track, said Earwood. That
type of accident could never
happen here.

SPECIAL REBATE
Short Courses Seminars
Upon using our motel rooms*. .
Wo offer a cash rebate to your organization
Other free services will be included.
"University ten motel
U.S. ROUTE 441 SOUTH
I | age GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
CALL Ud PHONE FRanklln 2-6339

MURDER-SUICIDE IN FALCON GM FAMILY

bed.
Wall, a well-to-do businessman
before he took the post with the
Falcons more than two years
ago, discovered the macabre
scene when he returned to the
two-story brick veneer home
early Monday after an
out-of-town weekend trip.
Detectives said Wall returned
home during the night and, not
wishing to disturb his family,
slept in a downstairs bedroom.

Earwood, who last ran on the
Covington strip shortly after
Christmas, says that spectators
there are allowed to hang on a
chicken wire fence right on the
strip itself. Most had pulled their
cars right up along side the strip.
They were maimed when the car
spun out.
To receive a sanction, there
must be protection between cars
and spectators. The Yellow
River track did not have it and
therefore could not qualify
under any association.
The minimum requirement is
a guardrail at least three feet tall
between spectators and the cars
racing.
The Gainesville strip in
comparison, has a 3-foot high
guard rail on the strip.
Spectators are kept 60 feet from
that rail. At the local strip,
which is fully sanctioned for
safety by the NHRA, spectators
are not allowed as far down the
strip as they were at Covington
where such high speeds were
attained. Nor are cars permitted
to park along the strip.
Its a shame that the same
words can be used to describe
that kind of strip and ours, said
Burr Heishman, general manager
of the Gainesville Dragway.
WANT
ADS

He discovered the shootings
when he woke about 8:30 a.m.
The tragedy was the second in
two days in the Georgia sporting
world. Sunday, a drag racing
mishap killed 11 and injured 50.
Frederick Samuel Wall, 10,
clad only in his pajamas, was
dead in his bed. His sister,
Christine Lee Wall, 8, gravely
wounded but alive, was in her
bed.
All three had been shot once

Earwood says he worked
promotion this winter for the
Covington event Sunday before
coming here to work with
Heishman. He had also planned
to drive a super stocker at I
Sundays meeting where the
accident occurred.
I Dick tioiMfs I
Jeweler/ I
' CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY I
REPAIRS |
I TROPHIES ENGRAVING I
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
g V* BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

' I,l '***''"
Dutch Treat"
$ faculty J
get aquainted dinner
All faculty members and wives are
I invited to attend a Dutch Treat Dinner,
Tuesday, March 11, 1969, at the west
side of the Cafeteria (proposed faculty
club area) at 6:30 p.m. The dinner will
Xh feature a typical German style buffet at /m
y $2.00 per person. Free beverage will be
served. Call 392-0495 for reservations
before Friday, March 7, 1969.
Dues, payable now, will be honored
through the summer, 1970.
A short discussion on the faculty
club will be given.

in the head. Police said there was
no sign of a struggle.
Fulton County Medical
Examiner Dr. Tom Dillon in
mid-afternoon ruled definitely
that Mrs. Waifs wound in the
right temple was self inflicted.
There was no note nor was there
an apparent motive.
The girl was rushed to
Piedmont Hospital where she
was to undergo surgery Monday
afternoon. Her condition was

I ROBBIES I
Best In
O WSandwichec
XOLOR TV & BILLIARDS'!
1718 W. University Ave.|
_!OnThe Gold Coast 1 I

Tuesday, March 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

unknown.
Mrs. Wall, a dedicated church
worker for the past decade, was
described by a friend as slender
and attractive. Friends could
give no reason why she might
have committed suicide.
Before taking his post with
the National Football League
Falcons, Wall was a certified
public accountant .who
co-founded his own business in
19 v 56.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 4,1969

Pike Cagers
Closing In
On Cage Title
Pi Kappa Alpha, pushing its
first bid for contention in the
Orange League in many a year,
edged KA in a bracket playoff,
43-39, to gain a semifinal
basketball berth against the
ATOs.
Fresh from taking the
preceeding bowling
championship, the Pikes relied
on Tom Richter who scored 11
points, nine from the free throw
line. Alan Stalings recorded nine
more for the winners.
Jim Drake scored 12 for the
KAs and Charlie Wright scored
nine more in a losing effort.
In the big game of the night
Tau Epsilon Phi made its most
significant move toward the
Presidents Cup by beating Sigma
Nu 36-32 for the bracket
championship.
The Tau Eps played an
outstanding full game freeze as
they only went for the good
shot. With Rick Perillo scoring
15 and Craig Savage 11, the Tau
Eps mounted a 15 point lead in
the last quarter but saw it
evaporate in only three minutes
as Chuck Schaefer scored
three-fourths of his 18 point
total in that stretch.
The Tau Eps now face the
DELTs who are tournament
favorites.
The Tallywhackers eased their
way to the campus Independent
Bowling Championship rolling
over four opponents and
bowling consistent 800 games.
The Whackers beat the B.F.
Bombers for the championship
bowling an 1872 to the Bombers
1582. Mark Jones rolled a
233-401 and Mike Poppa
201- for the Whackers. Jim
Deleonardi led the Bombers with
a 195-373.
The Whackers beat the CLO
in its first match as four men
scored over 200 points. Jones hit
a 204, Poppa 222, Manny
Fernandez a 209, and Joe
Zappia a 202.
Other 200 hitters included
Marvin Dean, 201-363 in a
Student Contractor win over the
Flavet Tigers, Julian Mack with a
202- 13th Street Gang win
over the Newell Ent. Soc., and
Bill Me Clintock 200, Joe Kiefer
207, and Burney White 207 in a
Rope victory over Delta Sigma
Phi.
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
Cars, Trucks, 4-wheel
drive. I
Nrv 1 in Jnnnn I
I Codding r Clark I
1 Motors 1
I 1012 SOUTH Main St. 1
I Open 8 A.M. 8 P.M. I

Scat Meets
Everybody interested in the proposed UF activities center is invited
to attend the organizational meeting of the Student Center Action
Team (SCAT) Tuesday night at 7 p.m. in Room 118 of the Reitz
Union.
Former Gator basketball captain Brooks Henderson and spokesmen
from the Gator Athletic Department will be on hand to inform the
students of the status of the project to date.
By meeting time, an expected agreement on cooperation between
SCAT organizer Steve Rohan and Order of Omega President Jim
Devaney will have been reached, according to Rohan.
Both groups have claimed that they will handle student fund-raising
for the center.
Campus clubs and organizations will be told at the
they can take a part in the fund-raising efforts.
The next six months will be crucial in establishing an activities
center, said Rohan. We want all students to take part.
Devaney and Rohan met Monday to work out how each others
plans could compliment each other without duplicating and dividing
the student effort.
Both agreed that there should be only one group to unify the entire
student effort, Rohan said.
.V,V.%^ I !WMWW; K%w; ; >K MWAvWwK X ivXwMvX XvX /vXvX X l y..vy,
| Attention Batgirls (
: All coeds who have expressed an interest in being Batgirls X
: please come to the Alligator newsroom Wednesday night at
ji 7:30.
: Topics discussed at the meeting will include duties, uniform
: and purpose. Potential Batgirls will be asked to fill out a short
: questionaire also.

The Teachers!..
As a teacher in New York City, you will be helped by an
outstanding corps of consultants and school supervisors who have
been carefully selected and trained to give you sympathetic guidance and expert
assistance. Here are some facts about other benefits enjoyed by our teachers:
A salary schedule that ranks with the highest among the worlds great cities, with
advanced salary placement for experienced teachers Orientation program for newcomers
Tenure and security Health plans, welfare funds, social security coverage,
excellent pension plan Promotional opportunities Innovative approaches
As a teacher in New York City you will be able to enjoy all this and more.
For additional information about joining the Teachers in New York City,
please write, telephone or visit the
Bureau of Recruitment, Office of Personnel,
New York City Board of Education, 110 Livingston Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201.
Telephone: (212) 596-8060
mmmr If
w *map ** *#
jattSgfcsA- 8- Jr
pSfT~T 1
Salary range for teachers:
M |Hflr September 1968-June 1969
BA $6.750-$11,150
m M BA+3O $7,250-311,650 WJS^Mm
MA or equivalent 58.250-512.650
T Jk SMB MA+3O credits 59.350-513.900
Teaching and supervisory positions are based
on a m ent system with ncTdiscrimmation
irl licensure and appointment

'BAMA FEAST SATURDAY
Reitz Union officials have gotten into the spirit of Gator sports by
keeping UF students abreast of coming events. This hungry Gator is a
reminder that cage fans must pick up Alabama ticket assignments
today at Athletic Department ticket windows from 2:30 to 8 p.m.