Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No 94

I H
WBftBHBHHfI Kp
Alligator Managing Editor Dave Doucette and SG Vice-President
Gary Goodrich rev their engines on the starting line of their Gator
Olympics tricycle race. Goodrich won, after Doucette lost his
handlebars due to what he called SG sabotage." The ATO-sponsored
event collected more than SBSO.
SDS Charter Try
Strangled At FSU
By Alligator Services
Florida State Universitys Acting President, who is interested in
having the job permanently, denied recognition to Students for a
Democratic Society on the FSU campus Thursday.
The move brought angry reaction from students and faculty and
accusations of a political ploy by state newspapers.
Bill Mansfield, of the Miami HeraldSt. Petersburg Times News
Service, said Marshall is playing to an alarmed public audience. He
noted Marshalls admission that the public mood, certainly in Florida,
is something less than fully supportive of violence on our campus.
Marshall had previously said, There appears to be nothing legally
objectionable in the national or local constitution of SDS. Failure to
give the organization official recognition gives the SDS students a
convenient cause for the headlines they seek.
SDS members on the campus have continued plans to hold a
general meeting tonight and hear a speech by their national secretary
Tuesday in university facilities violating regulations prohibiting such
use by non-recognized organizations.
Marshall promised stern action against anyone who attempts to
take over university facilities in a speech Thursday afternoon
announcing his decision on SDS.
Speaking to the general faculty and several hundred students,
Marshall warned SDS against occupation of facilities or any other
attempt to interfere with the orderly process of education.
Any threat to orderly education on this campus must be viewed
seriously as the first step towards closing the university, Marshall
said. As long as I am acting president, this is one university that is
(SEE 'SDS' PAGE 2)

Poll Discloses Heavy Support For SG

(EDITORS NOTE: The foUowing
poll was taken during the past two
weeks by an Alligator Opinion Poll
Team.)
If the Student Government
abortion referendum were held
today, SG would be retained by a
nine-to-one majority.
But this prediction based on a
significant Alligator opinion poll
completed Thursday will not be
valid unless 25 per cent of the

The
. : :*
Florida Alligator

student body turns out for the vote.
This means that about 5,000
students must vote in next
Wednesdays special referendum.
And, of these 5,000, at least
3,300 must vote for abolition to
eliminate UFs sometimes
not-so-venerated institution of
student power.
Even though a majority of the
students will vote against abolition,
about 80 per cent apparently do
want reform in SG.

University of Florida, Gainesville

OCONNELLS DECISION NOW

Hale Recommends
Nixing SSOC Bid

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Siding with the minority
report of the Student
Organizations UF
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester L. Hale late
Friday recommended
disapproval of campus
recognition for Southern
Students Organizing Committee.
The organizations committee
in a 5-4 decision recommended
approval, but the minority
dissenters wrote separate
opinions calling for denial.
In a letter to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell dated Feb.
26, but not released to the press
until Friday afternoon, Hale
listed four reasons for
disapproval.
Basically they agree with the
minority opinions from the
committee which heard SSOCs
arguments for charter in open
session Jan. 22.
The reasons, in brief, are:
SSOC is not a student
group because the voting
membership is not restricted to
UF students but to any and all
persons who wish to participate.
f SSOC disclaims any
responsibility to the institution
to which it petitions for official
status.
Hale cited SSOC testimony
which states that it will be
responsible to no one
individual nor to a respressive,
authoritarian institution, but to
our concepts of freedom,
equality and democracy, both
on and off this campus.
SSOC does not aim to use
political action within the
structure of elected
representative government to
bring change.
In quoting SSOCs policy
Hale noted that SSOC represents
itself as actively working to
create a new and effective
reorganization of the power
structure of UF.
He said this plan is more in

# II
What kind of reform?
Asked what form they liked if SG
were abolished, about 37 per cent
preferred a city commission type of
government.
Receiving an equal number of
votes was the two-house legislature.
SG presently operates with a
uni-cameral or one-house legislature.
About 94 per cent indicated they
wanted SGs chief executive
presently called the
president elected by popular vote,

the nature of social action.
SSOC did not deny that its
source of power was the
potential ability to stop the
university from functioning.
Hale said that instead of
disclaiming this statement, from
a radical handbook, it reaffirmed
its intent to abide with UF
regulations.
In explaining his decision he
said that since SSOC did not
intend to go through accepted
constitutional means to make
change, their only other
*

The Principals

iKaRr 'lllp
I mr II I m
LESTER HALE
... thumbs down to bid
Hi
.'HKvivX
' -yy.
iV;:
vhbt : y r
jv.v.v.v.
STANLEY MARSHALL
... FSU's no-man"

Monday, March 3, 1969

alternative would be to legalize
strong and perhaps violent
protest.
I have no idea what the
reaction to my decision might
be, he told the Alligator
Sunday.
I hope that if it becomes
unpopular with certain campus
segments, they use appropriate
means to challenge it, he said.
He said he hoped no
outbursts like those that
occurred at Florida State
(SEE 'HALE PAGE 2)
*

P s
'ffi
i [ f Jf i
STEPHEN O'CONNELL
... up to him now
w'w^
3|H H
JOHN SUGG
... no longer SSOC principal

as opposed to an internal selection
from among already chosen officials.
On the question of student
satisfaction with SG, about half
those quizzed said they werent
happy with the way things are now.
But, although about 39 per cent
said they thought the present
administration was doing a good job
of keeping campaign promises,
another 38 per cent indicated they
didnt know enough about SG in
order to make a value judgment.

America's
Number I
College
Daily



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3,1969

FBK-Sponsored Dialogue
Discusses SG Referendum

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government to be
or not to be is the question
for discussion tonight at
Dialogue, sponsored by Florida
Blue Key. The session is in the
Reitz Uffion, room 349, at 7:30
p.m.
A referendum feffition on
Wednesday, which eTOld decide
the future of SG, is the reason
for the Dialogue.
When students go to the polls
Wednesday, they may vote
twice: to keep the institution of
SG as it is or abolish it; and on
whether there is a need for a

SDS Gets 'No
From FSU Head
BOM PA6E ONE
going to remain open. Open and free.
He said it must be understood by all members of the university
community that stem action will be taken against any who attempt
to take over university facilities.
I urge all members of the university community not to take any
buildings with the expectation of holding them.
Marshall enumerated five points in opposition to SDS recognition:
Although the national and local constitutions reflect no
unlawful purposes, statements of national officers condone violence
and destruction.
The national organization, and its leaders who have shown to be
destructive, will be strengthened by a chapter at FSU.
t Those purporting to be SDS members have failed to follow
reasonable and clearly established procedures on the campus in recent
weeks.
SDS failure to appeal the original denial of recognition by John
Arnold, Vice President for Student Affairs, raises serious questions
about the groups desire to participate constructively in the academic
community.
There are existing university regulations applicable to all student
organizations with which the SDS application appears to conflict.
Marshall said his decision was a subjective judgment, requiring him
to go beyond the four comers of the Board of Regents operating
manual.
He noted that he looked for answers in the Regents regulations
that were not to be found, and the realization came to me in the
fullest sense that those regulations were never intended as the only
guidelines for administering the university.
In the end there is no substitute for the exercise of human
judgment by the man who must accept the final responsibility for the
welfare of the university, he said.
In another section of his speech titled Professional Performance at
FSU, Marshall made statements about the roll of the instructor in
the classroom which angered some faculty members.
What faculty sometimes forget and I think the number is
small is that they are obliged to be as objective as they can in
presenting their views to students, and that their authority in the
classroom is a function of their expertise and their areas of
specialization.
Thus a professor of French literature, for example, or of chemistry
or business management, has no more authority than anyone else to
speak on matters outside his field regardless of the degree of interest
or that of his students.
He may have more knowledge, but he does not have the right to
use his classroom as a platform from which to inform or persuade his
students in any area, save that of his own expertise.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the'official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Budding, University of ihorida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
'entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601. I
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several,
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

study to see about possible
reforms in the area of SG and
student representation.
Included on the ballot is an
opinion question asking students
if they would like to see a task
force appointed by the Student
Body President recommend
reforms.
The results of a poll, released
by Florida Blue Key Sunday,
said most students have heard of
the referendum to abolish SG,
but over half of the students
polled, dont know what they
will be voting for.
Survey results were divided
into two categories: fraternity
members and independents.

Most greeks said they were
satisfied with SG. Independents
said they were dissatisfied with
it, according to Kathi Home,
Dialogue Committee member.
Overall, those students who
answered the poll questions said
SG does not represent the
student body, does not have a
beneficial purpose and has not
fulfilled its political promises.
Dialogue tonight is divided
into the following phases:
The moderator presents
unrehearsed questions to panel
members on SG.
Panel members discuss
questions and the answers given
by members concerning SG.
The audience asks panel
members questions concerning
the SG referendum.
Student panel members are:
Mel Libby, moderator and
Dialogue study director; Clyde
Taylor, student body president;
Charles Shepherd, former
student body president; Jack
Vaughn, Student Senate
president; Mick Callahan,
Student Senate member; and
Manny James, Florida Blue Key
president.
Melvin Sharpe, presidential
assistant, and Franklin Doty,
University College dean, are the
invited administrators.
The amendment to the
Student Government
constitution requires a
two-thirds vote of 25 percent of
the student body before it can
become policy.
Student Government leaders,
remembering past SG elections,
doubt that the approximately
4,500 vote needed to pass the
referendum will be reached.

Hale Gives SSOC Thumbs Down

f FROM PAGE ONE "jj
University in January will
happen here.
Student radicals at FSU
almost rioted when then FSU
President John Champion
overturned a student senate
charter approval for Students for
a Democratic Society.
SSOC was formerly affiliated
with SDS but dropped the title

BURGER CHEFS
ALL WEEK SPECIAL
gjf' 3 BIG shefs
Offer Good At ,f
j g Locations Mon. Thru Sun.
SHOWINO CENTER
'LET'S ALL GO TO 11 TT
BURGER CHEF adi / f

AC Ending, Now)
Waits For Results j
The UFs Action Conference will hold its last meeting this ;
month, then sit back and wait to see if its purpose will be j
fulfilled.
Success for the conference, conceived last May to solve ;
campus problems, depends on its creator, UF President Stephen
C. OConnell.
The proposals passed by the conference do not result in
direct action. They are only recommendations to the president
and the conference cannot override his veto.
The 60-member faculty-student-administrative body has
argued everything from free speech and curriculum to
discrimination and political meddling into campus affairs.
About 40 proposals have been passed, many redirected for
further study and still others passed on to the president for his
approval.
Significant recommendations yet to be implemented call for:
t A coordinator of disadvantaged and minority students.
An 11-member student conduct committee, eliminating
the traditional faculty vote on discipline cases referred from the
deans.
A restructuring of the University Senate to apportion
faculty members by the number of students enrolled in the
various colleges they represent.
Yearly teacher-course evaluation.
Voluntary class attendance for all students except freshmen,
and a pass-fail grading system in elective courses already have
been approved.
Conference Chairman and education Professor Hal Lewis had
some criticism of the conference. I dont think the issues that
the Action Conference has taken up have been earth-shaking. To
a certain extent, theyve been disappointing.
I had hoped we would get into such things as the Student
Honor Court, the structure of Student Government and athletic
fees for students, Lewis said.
I think the conference has been moderately successful, he
continued. Os course, it depends on the expectations you had
to begin with.
When asked about the progress of his appointed body,
OConnell noted it could not continue forever because of the
demands and the great burden it placed on students and faculty
members.
I think it has served an excellent purpose, OConnell said.
That is what members of the Action Conference will be
awaiting.

in its name last quarter after it
made its initial bid for
recognition.
Im in favor of students
gaining a higher level of social
control and responsibility, Hale
said, if they just arent trying
to get institutional
permissiveness.
This is the kind of liberality
Im for, he said.
They should go through the
existing democratic processes,

he added. A good example is
the development of resident hall
government.
SSOC leaders were
unavailable for comment at press
time.
John Sugg, 4JM, has
reportedly withdrawn his
membership from the group. He
was one of the top SSOC
spokesmen during the charter
hearing.
The final decision for charter
now rests with OConnell.



Union Poet Has Drab Notices

By CHRIS SHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
If drivers receive a poem
instead of a parking notice the
next time they enter the Reitz
Union parking lot they shouldnt
be surprised.
Facts are dreary, the new
union parking lot attendant says.
With that the soft-spoken
David Wiley who is a poet
dismisses the facts of his
background or status.
Wiley, the black-haired,
ruddy-cheeked attendant says he
is afraid he just might hand out
poems one of these days instead
of notices which tell drivers not
to park in the union lot unless
they have business at the union.
Id like to, come to think of
it, he added.

||i|
v .' .Jllil \ ' :;^#; l|^^Sfl?;
H& Mt yfj nM ""' 1
' l : ~,' t A 9
BRIAN GOOOHEIM
FACTS ARE DREARY
... Reitz Union resident poet David Wiley surveys his flock

Greeks Survey GDl's
On Fraternities / Rush

What independents think of
fraternities and their rush
programs, will be asked in a
door-to-door survey sponsored
by the Interfraternity Council
(IFC) Monday night.
Men representing all the
fraternity houses will canvass
mens dorms Monday 7:30-8:30
p.m. to gather opinions on the
rush program at UF. If the
students havent been through
rush, they will be asked for their
reasons why.
We want to put together a
better rush program next year,
and attract more people, David
Lottier. IFC rush chairman said
Sunday. The results will be
distributed to all the houses

IN THE MALL
From our Italian Kitchen
FEATURING: X J&M*- 0 . u
M M Spaghetti with meat balls 1.50
Italian hoods J Spaghetti with meat sauce 1.50
Specialty Sandwiches Kk (only above two in child's portion) i.oo
' j. Spaghitti with mushrooms 1.75
Delicious Salads I wtth-meat balls 2.25
Domestis jr Spaghetti oven baked in casserole
Domestic and M with cheese IH
] M /IT MU ill Hi .ill tl (1 with meat sauce and cheese 2.20
Imported JJ with shredded chichen and cheese 2.50
W'ine and Beer fit ..... ..... ...
IftEi r> j I .J) All Spaghetti orders served unth
(m Kntlnq SXI Italian Tossed Salad, roll and butter
CONGENIAL J J
CONTINENTAL \ IS
ATMOSPHERE II & HOME STYLE CHEESE RAVIOLI
with meat balls 2.00
Serving Continuously W Above served with Italian Salad,
11 am to 8:30 pm m Roll and Butter
CLOSED SUNDAYS 11

SEES HIMSELF AS 'RIVER DREAMER

Regular users of the parking
lot have described him from
groovy to spacy to a nice
guy. But others merely inform
him they already know what the
notice says and drive on. A few
dont even stop.
They wanted to give me a
big stop sign to carry but I just
cant see myself doing that, he
smiled.
It seems like 80,000 years,
he says about his hours, from
about 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 daily.
He pauses before each
sentence, looking down, or
straight ahead before speaking.
You become a poet, I think,
when you begin to see life in
metaphors, and see all kinds of
dualities and microcosms.
Poetry is discovery, and that

before their next rush, and
Lottier will use them in drawing
up the general rush program
next year.
1 decided to hold the survey
because weve had the same rush
for some time, Lottier said.

Ss?h airSTYLING
j^JISHAMPOOING RAZOR CUTTING
LONG HAIR STYLING H
APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
p| SIMS BARBER SHOP |J
Ifr 817 w university ave Jk

is pleasant, he says. It is
recreating wonderment.
Wiley, who is not a UF
student, said he has a BA, but
wont give the name of the
college, only that he came from
the north.
In one of his poems he
compares himself to Siddhartha,
the river dreamer. His river for
the next four months is the
stream of cars, coming and
going everyday, he explains.
All machines are projections
of their owners he has observed.
Volkswagens seem to be the
friendliest while owners of oil
cars appear more serene.
General Motor cars are the
most brisk and business-like,
theyre friendly, but in a
pragmatic way, as though
theyre trying to get something
out of you by being friendly.
Thoughts for poems
sometimes come to him on the
job, and he usually writes when
he is either tense or relaxed.
Instead of making order out
of life, the poet relates the
confusion he says.
Wiley was reluctant to be
interviewed because he doesnt
like what journalistic writing
does. It mesmerizes people, the
news will have little effect on
people because everything,
regardless of content, is put into
order, with columns marked
off, the same type, and tone of
objective articles.
Newspapers perpetuate the
myth that there is sanity in a
chaotic world.
The creative writer wakes
people up instead, he says.
Without giving his age, he
revealed he started writing about
ten years ago, and has been
encouraged to publish some of
his poems.
For five years he has been
working on a novel.

Dialogue
Cares

Ultimately, I want to write
poetry, novels, and make films.
He interupted the
conversation to give a ticket, but
the driver passed by him.
Does the job ever become
humiliating?
Yes, sometimes, he said in
a low voice.
He is pressed for details about
his life, but he hesitates, laughs
quietly. They are irrelevant,
remember, facts are dreary, use
your imagination, he says.

CHICKEN
SPECIAL
' : 1-j! ... ;; ;
3 pieces chicken
french fries
cole slant *
hush bubbles
FREE
PORE-BOY DELIVERY
1029 W. UNIV. AVE. DIAL
ACROSS FROM VJQ 4^04
UNIV. CITY BANK 3fO~l*tT*
B Drop your 4iy cloon cloon
cloon Sn ,1 rs BB any our
I1 n your way to .
H up on your
way
MON. FEB. 24 TUES. FEB. 25 WED. FEB. 26
I TROUSERS
I OR SKIRTS
I 4 for $1.89
I (SAVE 9T<)
RIPS ONE HOUR DRY CLEANING
& MARTINIZING PLANTS
7 COMPLETE PLANTS
TO SERVE YOU
204 N.W. 13th Street 130 N.W. 10th Avenue
319 N.W. 13th Street 316 North Main Street
1603 S.W. 13th Street 3444 West University Avenue
1150 N.E. 16th Avenue

Monday, March 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

i
<-* .--n.
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS

Dick HoiMCi
Jeweler/
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY j
REPAIRS I
TROPHIES ENGRAVING |
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 1
Vz BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3, 1969

DeGaulle To Come To US,
Return Nixons French Visit

PARIS (UPI) President
Nixon and President Charles De
Gaulle reached a truce Sunday in
the little cold war between the
United States and France, and
Nixon announced the French
president would visit Washington
next January or February.
They ended nine hours of
private talks with mutual
statements that their
three days of conferences
had been successful. High U.S.
officials said Nixon had
achieved the objectives he had
in mind when he began his trip
a week ago Sunday.
Nixon flew from Paris to
Vatican City for a conference
with Pope Paul VI before flying
home. In eight days he visited
Brussels, London, Bonn, Berlin,
Rome and the Vatican, reaching
what U.S. officials called a new
and friendly relationship with
*
Nixon Tour
Ends; Pope'
Asks Peace
VATICAN CITY
(UPI) President Nixon
concluded his eight-day tour of
Europe Sunday on a plea from
Pope Paul VI to help end all
wars now raging including
Vietnam and a > pledge by
Nixon.
Nixon held last minute talks
in Paris with President Charles
de Gaulle then flew to Vatican
City for talks with the Pope.
There were scuffles between
police and anti-Nixon
demonstrators in St. Peters
Square and a small anti-Nixon
pray-in in St. Peters Basilica.
McDondkfe

French Fries
The best of the very best!
. . made from
Idaho Premiums
. . prepared with
extra care
... crisp and golden
brown
.. served piping hot!
Youve never had French
Fries so good. Come in
any time-and bring the
family for a treat in food
n fun: McDonalds means
goodness in food--and
lots of it.
McDonalds.
is your kind of place.
a Corp 1968
201 N.W. 13th St

the leaders of the five countries
he visited.
Nixon and De Gualle agreed
on the start of four power talks
at the United Nations very
soon to try to find a solution
to the Middle East crises. They
also discussed their divergent
views over Viet Nam.
Before his final meeting with
De Gaulle, who drove him to
Orly Airport, Nixon met with
Ambassador Henry Cabot
Lodge, chief U.S. negotiator at
the Vietnam peace talks," and
with South Vietnam Vice
President Nguyen Cao Ky.
Ky said they discussed many
new approaches on how to
reestablish peace in Vietnam,
but he did not go into detail.
Americans termed the Ky talks a
very worthwhile meeting and
said they were not discouraged
by the deadlocked peace
conference.
The Communists held major
anti-Nixon demonstrations in
Paris but they did not disrupt


e
m
*
#
6 jobs in 6 years is called job hopping?
**.
:
* *#'
* k

. .*
t


We have a practice called
planned mobility, a kind of *
# intramural job hopping. It
means you dont go into a training *
\ program. You go to work-at
.. different growth jobs that broaden
Not necessarily. you professionally, benefit you
Not at Du Pont. personally, and help you find the
specific field you want to grow in.
Heres how it worked for
Jim Davis, an M.E. from the 4
University of Pittsburgh:


.
<
,* My first assignment was
installation of improved polymer
transfer systems, says Jim.
.* Then some research. A patent
was issued on my device to
.* apply steam to a running
threadline. Next I was a college
; recruiter. After that I worked
. on a five-year forecast of the
* \ companys engineering needs.
-c- T .. ~ Now Im in a cost
For Jim, it added up to six reduction group
assignments in six years. F
. This may be some kind of a
record. But he didnt 4
* waste time. Every day of ~ ***., **
it was solid profit. .*
. * Pont Company
t Room 6689
,* Wilmington. DE 19898
0 9 e
V I d hke your latest information on
. opportunities at Du Pont for graduates
with degrees in dies
Your Du Pont recruiter a y ~ ~
guy a lot like Jim. Ask him Name
about planned mobility. TT
Ask him anything. The coupon University
will get you some background Degree r r i *
information before you
meet him. COLI rllN'D ' Address
**u.$. pat on
College Relations . y .*
,_L>
* Zip
An Equal Opportunity Employer (M/F) *',

the Nixon visit as they had
hoped.
Most of the basic political
differences with De Gaulle
remain. But (heir meetings were
so successful De Gaulle agreed to
visit Washington for the first
time since he attended the
funeral of President John F.
Kennedy and he let Nixon make
the announcement at the
airport. If they did not settle the
diplomatic feud betwen Paris
and Washington, they reached at
least a truce.
mmmmmmmmmmmarn
DELICIOUS
n n [fl STEAKS
I (j FINE FOOD
ffHOUSR*
''A student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

UPI
REPORT
\
I BREAKFAST SPECIAL I
I 6AM-11 AM MON. FRI. I
I 2 EXTRA LARGE EGOS I
I GRITS TOAST I
I JELLY COFFEE 4§M 9 I
I OR 1 f I
I i HOT CAKES I COFFEE I
I 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I
mmm mtmmmm



Chinese Attack
Soviet Frontier
MOSCOW (UPI) The Kremlin said Communist Chinese forces
crossed the Sino-Soviet frontier Sunday, opened fire on Russian
border guards and killed several troops. It was the most serious
incident of its kind in the long feud betweem Moscow and Peking.
Tass, the official Soviet news agency, said Russian forces returned
the fire and repulsed the intrusion of Damansky Island in the Ussuri
River. The river forms the boundary between China and Russia in the
Soviet maritime territories along the Sea of Japan.
The area is about 1,800 miles northeast of Peking and 2,400 miles
east of Moscow.
Veteran Moscow observers said it was the first time the Soviets had
admitted casualties in a border battle. No figures were given in the
report on Sundays clash and Tass did not say if there were any
Chinese losses.
Both sides traded protest notes. Tass said the Soviet government
delivered a note to the Communist Chinese foreign ministry
condemning the alleged intrusion as provocative. Chinese sources in
Moscow said Peking handed a reply to Soviet diplomats rejecting the
Kremlin charges.
Tass gave this account:
At 4:10 a.m. Moscow time on March 2, the Chinese authorities
staged an armed provocation in the area of the Nizhnemikhailovka
border post Damansky Island on the Ussuri River. An armed Chinese
unit crossed the Soviet state frontier and proceeded toward Damansky
Island.
The Chinese side suddenly opened fire at Soviet border guards
guarding the area. There were killed and woumded. By the resolute
actions of Soviet border guards the violators of the frontier were
chased away from Soviet territory.
Tank-Supported Troops
Overrun Headquarters

SAIGON (UPI) U.S. troops
supported by tanks and the big
guns of the battleship USS New
Jersey overran a North
Vietnamese regimental
hea dqu arters Sunday and
reported killing 105 Communists
in three days of close quarters
combat just below the
Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).
Near Saigon, Viet Cong
gunners pushed into the second
week of a new Communist
offensive with a damaging
mortar barrage on a U.S.
infantry base and a round of
artillery barrages that hit 25
cities and towns. No
significant ground probes
were reported.
UPI correspondent David
Lamb, reporting on the fighting
near the DMZ, said the combat
was so close that at one point
North Vietnamese troops were
swarming all over American
tanks.
The tank crews inside
slammed shut the hatches and.
the tanks sprayed each other
with machinegun fire, dropping
the attackers to the ground like
flies.
It was like an old fashioned
cavalry charge, said Lt. Col.
Thomas Carpenter 111, 32, of

If You Didn't Have A
Chance To Take Basic
ROTC, You Can Still Take
Advanced Training
If you still have two years
left at the University. you may
qualify for this new 2-year
Army ROTC Program.
Qualify for an officers
commission in 2 yrs.
§ Receive SSO per month
while enrolled in the program.
Continue your education
and learn to be a leader.
Fulfill your military
obligation of 2 years active
duty, as an officer.
For Complete Information
A NEW PROGRAM Contact Maj. Lawrence, Rm. I
OF INTEREST TO ill, Military Building or call
392-1395 not later than 7
ivitlM

Miami, Fla., in describing the
tank assault on the fortified
North Vietnamese headquarters
just four miles below the DMZ.
We had our tanks in line, about
five yards apart, and we just
kept rolling.
The New Jersey pounded the
headquarters from a position in
the Gulf of Tonkin 20 miles
away, sending shell after shell
from its big 16-inch guns
hurtling into the base.
French Viewers |
| See TV Special |
v *J
:j: PARIS (UPI) Television jj
j: viewers did a double-take :
>: Saturday night when a high :
* *
: : : fashion model appeared on £
* *
the screen wearing a £
see-through blouse and no £
underclothing. She was part ;$
of a show on the Paris fashion J;
**
collections produced by the :j:
government-controlled :j
television network. jj
(SHANNONS
24-hour
WRECKER
7tb St. & SERVIC£ 372 137 Q
W. Univ. NIGHT 376-4009

| Eisenhower's
l Condition
( 'lmproving'
|i WASHINGTON
: (UPI) Former President
: Dwight D. Eisenhower
: appeared Sunday to be
: pulling through his latest
: crises. The area of
pneumonia in the right lung
: base is markedly diminished,
: his doctors reported.
£ g
;j: A week after he had
undergone abdominal surgery
only to contact pneumonia
later during his recuperation
£ from she high-risk surgery,
Brig. Gen. Frederic J. Hughes
Jr., commander of the
v hospital, reported:
j; General Eisenhower
X spent another good night. His
gastriointestinal function has
: shown further return toward
§ normalcy, so much so that it
was possible this morning to
increase his diet to include

orange juice, a soft boiled eff,
tea and toast. The area of
v pneumonia in the right lung
base is markedly diminished.
: : : His heart action and other
V
vital signs remain stable.
: ;* ;V.VA^V.V.V.V.V. .V.VAV.V.V.V. .V
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL NU
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
DEALER

a TWO VALUABLE COUPONS
1111 Col. Sanders'
ll&ntuckyTrid
? cum
114 N.W. 34th St.
372-3649
IyiONDAY COUPON SPECIAL ****** I ************!
I V <*
pS-gj CHICKEN DINNER
tine ~ OQ f
3 Pieces Chicken, Cole Slaw, | JLm dF .JL
Mashed Potatoes with Gravy ...
~ WtTH COUPON
1 and Rolls.
*MT
-MONDAY COUPON SPECIAL mrT TTnnnnnnnnfiJui
TUESDAY COUPON SPECIAL
jSSSI CHICKEN DINNER
: REG. ONLY OCa
$1.25
I 3 Pieces Chicken, Cole Slaw,
1
Mashed Potatoes with Gravy WITH COUPON
and Rolls.
1 " r
v ... .T'V*** vsftim
********************** TUESDAY COUPON SPECIAL *************iwiii**iyii*

SALESSERVICERENTALS
AteJV "Authorized
Pi MLff \ Smith Corina
Dealer"
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Office Equipment
SPECIAL REBATE
Conventions Short Courses Seminars
Upon using our motel rooms: .
i
We offer a cash rebate to your organization
Other free services will be included.
"University Inn ttlotel
U.S. ROUTE 441 SOUTH
TAM IIC GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
V.MLL PHONE FRanklin 2-6333
**
/ Climb aboard L
/The S.S. Winnjammer jn
50 Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M wj
Jf Dinners to 12:00 P.M. ij
I Bernie Sher at the Organ A\
" \#\
Thursday, Friday & Saturday Ml
Oysters-& Clams on the half shell i)
Michelob on draft Ms/
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. w
Reservations accepted / W
a 'iv Harry M. Lanton, Manager
Jy 7 Closed Sundays

Monday, March 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator, l

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3,1969

Book Exchange
Was Refined
Under Taylor
By DAVE REDDICK
Alliaator Associate Editor
Included in the additions and
refinements made to student
government by the Taylor
administration was an
Ombudsman program, a
student-run book exchange, a
draft information service and a
teacher evaluation program.
The Ombudsman plan,
modeled after a Swedish
program, was designed to give
students a middleman to go to
in case of problems.
By instituting an always-open
action line, the Ombudsman has
been able to aid students with
both on and off-campus
problems, including student fees
and landlord-student problems.
The book exchange, which
allowed students to sell for more
and buy for less, was not new
this year, but the operation was
moved indoors and the plan
refined.
Also instituted was a draft
information plan which made
various books and pamphlets
available to students in the
college library.
In addition, a
teach-evaluation program was
begun, although it bogged down
with some administrative
problems. The program allows
students to evaluate professors
in the areas of teaching skills,
presentation and course load.
Eventually, the results will be
published and made available to
any UF student.
Students will have a chance
to vote on the future of SG
March 5, in a special
referendum.
Workers Wanted
Student Government needs
more poll workers for the special
referendum this Wednesday,
March 5. Today is the last day to
apply.
Interested students may
apply at the SG offices, room
305 Reitz Union before 5 p.m.
today.
Honorary To Elect
Members of Gamma Sigma
Delta, Honorary Society of
4 Agriculture, will meet Monday
to elect officers and approve
candidates for membership. The
meeting will be in McCarty
Auditorium at 4 p.m.


MONDAY m^
BEEF* NOODLES 4Vy
. p
TUESDAY AQ.
FRIED CHICKEN T'/y
//CAFETERIA I
m*TT-l|J(fU|T*l University Ave

DROPOUTS

sanpY- Would you consider if wm worker | I I^ba-^sAyf R
TOE SITUATION WERE APPROPRIATE, 1 To A mocel 1 (^ T T
IN THE. INTERESTS OF OPTIMUM OS AGO TUEREBY 1/
OPPORTUNITY RPR RESCUE, TOE OURT^OSERr^ J /
CP \
M .mt ..'..... 1,1 Jrl, h.

Florida Journalists
Meet In Seminar

City hall reporters from
Floridas daily newspapers were
challenged to improve the
recording of urban events at the
first annual Urban Affairs
Seminar held in the Reitz Union
last weekend.
In the opening session last
Thursday, Dr. Elizabeth Eddy,
director of the UFs Urban
Affairs bureau, told the
gathering of newsmen that
journalists today play highly
significant roles in informing
people from one segment of
metropolitan life about other
segments.
The sociologist asked the
journalists if more can be done
to headline prominently prior
to catastrophe the events that
may well lead to serious social
consequences unless an informed
citizenry can take steps to
prevent them.
She pointed out that the mass
media are instrumental in
creating images of the city and
metropolitan area.
Are the present images
reflective of the complexities of
urban life today, or do they
reflect a folklore about cities
that are misleading? she asked
the newsmen.
Dr. Eddy was the first in a
scries of speakers who touched
on such topics as Libel and the
Right of Privacy, Research
Suggests Needed Changes in
Covering Racial News and
Reporting Urban Affairs
Today during the three-day
seminar.
Gene Burd, a specialist in
urban affairs, told the newsmen
Friday recent developments in
cities have caused newspapers to
need specialized reporters.
He told the city hall reporters
that newsmen hold an allegiance

to the old city in a combination
of self-interest and civic
devotion.
News beats remain near the
downtown area where press
facilities arc located , he said,
and have been involved in save
the city programs.
Speaking of the future of
mass media, he said there is
indication that it will continue
to reflect urban discontent with
the mass media.
The seminar was sponsored
by the Associated Press
Association of Florida and the
UFs College of Journalism and
Communications^^^^^^^^^

Dialogue
March 3

Ruth Pages
International
Ballet
Tuesday March 4th
8-15 PM
Florida Gym
Tickets Available At
Reitzllnion Box Office
Belk-Lindsey &
Record Bar
A Student Government Production
t

BY HOWARD POST

*7 OUTCAST
If you and your boss are mutual irri irrit.mts,
t.mts, irrit.mts, in America you're free to find a
congenial one. We have tlioit tlioitsands
sands tlioitsands of non-government employers.
But when all industry is nationalized,
/ theres just one employer.
Inevitably, Big Brother assigns you to a
job, a location, even to housing. And if
|f|jiy you dont like it, theres no place to go.
Government regulation of industry is
one thing. Government operation of
industry is another. Another step closer
to Big Brother. Already 20$ of U.S.
electric power is produced by Federal-
F ized systems. Some want to replace or
duplicate the facilities of investor investorowned
owned investorowned utility companies with Federal Federalized
ized Federalized systems. The reasons are obscure.
The reason for opposing any enlarge enlargey'VT
y'VT enlargey'VT ment of Federalized electric power is
clear to anyone who wants more than
*7 w one place to go for a job.
Floridas Electric Companies Taxpaying, Investor-owned
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY GULF POWER COMPANY
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY
a



Shakeys Pizza Parlor
Features Beer And Song

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second in a series
of articles by the Alligator Entertainment Editor
concerning local establishments that cater to the
over-21 college crowd.)
By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Its a grand old flag, its a high-flying flag
And forever in peace may she wave.
Shes the emblem of the land 1 love,
The home of the free and the brave
No, this song isnt used at the opening of
Daughters of the American Revolution or American
Legion meetings, its heard Tuesday through
Saturday at ye ole pizza parlor, Shakeys.
Located on South 13th Street, Shakeys is owned
and managed by Hiram Moore. He has been running
the pizza parlor since it opened in November, 1%7.

CBgflgWl
Bp Tk,
iF' j BraV
>'***'** mmmi
GATOR SUMMER BAND
... at one of its frequent Twilight Concerts
Concert At Twilight
With the first day of spring less than three weeks away, the UP
Concert Band is planning its first Twilight Concert this Wednesday.
Under the direction of Robert E. Foster, associate band director,
the group will present a program with something for everyone.
For relaxing at twilight, the program will consist of pieces of a light
nature.
From a Norwegian March to A Johnny Mercer Medley, featuring
hits from the 4os: Goody-Goody, Fools Rush In and Im An
Old Cowhand, the selections will have general audience appeal.
Ted Twitched, a timpani soloist, will perform Timpat by Robert
Leist.
The Twilight Concert will be held on the University Auditorium
lawn beginning at 6:45. No admission will be charged.
lA K V
q fl
I *
HHI j
B f X Dining Room
H ( \ ) In-Car Service
$1 j/ Carry Hom >*

ENTERTAINMENT SERIES

Shakey's started its chain of parlors in California
15 years ago. Presently there are over 325 in
operation with cites in all 50 states and Mexico.
Shakeys is composed of two rooms one for
minors and one for customers over 21.
The over 21 room features pizza, beer and song.
Honky Tonk Tommy plays the old upright piano
Tuesday through Saturday and Fddie Yerkey joins
him with his banjo on Thursday. Friday and
Saturday evenings.
Music begins at 7:30 and the words of the old
familiar songs are always displayed by a projector.
Some of the favorites are Dixie. Bicycle Built
For Two. Wont You jt'ome Home Bill Bailey?
and HARRIGAN.
In an English pub atmosphere. Shakeys is loud
or restful depending on the mood of customers
and the volume of the music.

Aronsons Sing
Jewish History
Joe and Penny Aronson, a
folksinging duo, will present the
recent history of the Jewish
people through folksong
Thursday at 8 p.tn. in the Med
( enter Auditorium.
The program of
song, drama and narrative is a
part of the Religion-in-Life
Series.
The Aronsons, natives of
Philadelphia, cover several
hundred years of history in their
program, offering facts and
statistics as well as the cultural
aspects of instrumental and
vocal music.
Ha vt
Your Generator
k OVERHAULED Soecial
s£so
INC LABOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
SO* NW Ith AVI QAINCSVIUf
MON.-MN. I AM-7PM SAT. Til S PM
371-4011

I HOUSE OF TRAVEL I
1 complete travel services 1
I credit cards accepted ] \ I
1 specializing in cruises / I 1
1 representing all major J /AS I
airlines a J /
no service charge /
* GF TRAVEi- -!
1 OPEN DAILY: 3415 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
I 8:30 AM. 5:30P.M. GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA I
I SATURDAY WESTSIDE I
I 9 AM.-NOON SHOPPING CENTER 1
||||S |

|. UF REPRESENTATIVE?
\ Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
Dan Sapp Bill Worsham
Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
1 George Corl Harold DeVane
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 \y. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS
Ray Brown tas joined the staff
of barbers over in the Univ. Plaza
Sportsmans Barber Shop. Ray was M
formerly on Univ. Ave. barbering for 6%
years. We are proud to have him with us. C_J
Sportsmans Barber Shop Univ. Plaza.
== 372 9129
cy
ALIBI LOUNGE
EVERY MONDAY
29{ HIGHBALLS
"lts a good excuse
\ ;
-
STAK* SHfIKC
| Student Special
I (With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88< Steakburger I
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink I
| $1.03 Value Only 85{ plus tax
I Steak n Shake |
1 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville i
f

Monday, March 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3,1969

EDITORIAL

Can Students Go It Alone?

The referendum Wednesday on the future
of Student Government brings to the ballot
box a very basic question about how people
choose to live with other people.
Early in pre-historic times, it became
obvious to tribes of nomads living and
wandering together that no man can live
totally alone.
The realization dawned that man needs
other men, and that the pursuit of life and
happiness (even if happiness is only a warm
cave and a full belly) demands that men
cooperate and work together for the
attainment of mutual goals.
Once cooperation became away of life, a
new problem was created. Who decides what
goals the cooperating people should seek?
In those ancient, uncivilized days, the
decisions of life and death were made by the
strongest. A challenge of a leaders authority
meant a brawl, usually ending in the death
of either the challenger or the incumbent.
As the human animal crept toward
knowledge and civilization, life and
cooperation became more complex. The
decisions also became more complex.
And man found ways to answer the
problems. He found government.
Even today, some governments are
essentially the same as those of old the
strongest rules, the weaker obey.
Sometime near the end of the Middle
Ages, an old idea reappeared and captured
much public fancy. The theorists called it
democracy.
It was imported to the American
colonies, and became the cornerstone of the
government eventually founded here.
Its principles can be simply stated,
although not simply understood.
Government exists for the people. The
people choose the rulers, the rulers obey the
peoples will.
Sometimes it doesnt work like it was
designed. Sometimes it breaks down.
Sometimes unscrupulous men who are
greedy for power ascend to the throne of
leadership.
Sometimes the people become
discouraged or angry. But the government
goes on, because the people know they
cannot hope to do alone what they can do
together.
Thus, the very basic question on
Wednesdays ballot. Will UF students,
motivated by disillusionment or apathy,
decide to go it alone, to rid themselves of
their own government?

Jr \i
- -y
Zsbmla\kM. wt* SBRr|
jvwx 9jnSAHyy^^^^^Hi i l ~ '#f
P 181 l au w'FTMVinlir^L
W*l£(-&-FFS^mUtr^ '^S~ T frTlCTll^]j > /
Black Capitalism! After All We've Done For You, Boy?

Will they:
9 Provide their own color televisions in
their dorms, finance their own dances and
movies, build their own parks?
9 Argue with the Athletic Association
over bloc seating, more date tickets for
athletic events, better athletic programs?
9 Purchase their own individual health
insurance policies at a higher premium than
a group policy?
9 Organize their own babysitting services
and provide playground equipment for their
children? Arrange for their own bus service?
9 Shell out money for the Association of
Women Students to operate? to fight for
relaxed curfew regulations? to publish the
Florida Coed? to provide candy-stripers for
the infirmary?
9 Provide funds and uniforms for the
Gator Band, the Mens and Womens Glee
Clubs, the University Choir?
9 Pay for the debate team and the rifle
team to travel all over the country
representing their university?
9 Finance the meat judging contest? or
the Florida Players? or the Council of
International Organizations? or the Reitz
Union Program Council? or the Gator
Guard, the Arnold Air Society, Angel Flight,
Army Sweethearts?
9 Support with cash and manpower
Homecoming and Gator Growl?
9 Organize, finance and support a
campus-wide intramurals program?
9 Operate a free lost and found?
9 Support the University Religious
Association and its Religion-In-Life
program?
Will UF students do the work it takes to
make their lives better? Will they provide
services and activities for their fellow
students?
Will they work literally thousands of
hours every term to make being a UF
student a meaningful experience?
We think not.
But Student Government has. And it will
continue to do so.
Because, despite some surface blemishes,
Student Government cares. Student
Government exists for the students.
It has earned a hearty thank you from
the student body, not a slap in the face.
For yourself and your fellow students,
give SG a vote of confidence Wednesday.
Change it if you will, but keep it.

The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
n th xerciae of responsibility .**
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Puifatiuh Dave Doucette
.Managing Editor
ADO
- Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor
Ham And Grits -
Create Spirit, SG
By Dave Osier
The existence of what Student Body Vice-President Gary Goodrich
calls the most respected political system in the South UFs
Student Government is being placed on the line Wednesday.
In a burst of support for SG, Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich has,
in the last two months, backed it up with editorials praising its good
works.
His reasoning is that if SG were abolished the only link between
students and the administration would be erased.
His reasoning is sound.
But he goes one step further by saying SG is about to burst onto
the threshhold of true government.
True government is one that is responsive to its constituents needs.
It is representative.
SG leaders claim a mandate from voters based on their own
election. The projects they set up are what the students want and
need.
Bull.
Student elections in which the great silent mass off-campus
students who make up more than 60 per cent of the student
body doesnt even bother to vote, are a farce.
In fact generally less than 6,000 students turn out to the polls at
any given time. This is no mandate.
It seems then that SG leaders create needs in order to perpetuate a
system in which cronyism is prevalent.
In a recent Alligator opinion poll more than a third of those
questioned as indicative of the whole student body didnt even
know what the present administrations campaign promises were and
how they were going.
SG projects are based more on personal gain and
exposure than on serving students. Political experience should be
only a by-product of the SG laboratory.
Creativity is fine in government. But when SG leaders create
student need without petitioning the student body it has no place
there.
Create some student spirit for a change, SG.
U.S. Poverty Wedge,
View From The Left
MR. EDITOR:
I have just finished reading a book that has opened my eyes to a
problem that is largely overlooked by most of the students on
campus.
The book is POVERTY: VIEWS FROM THE LEFT, edited by
Jeremy Lamer and Irving Howe. It contained many disturbing ideas
that I think should be considered byall students.
Fact: Approximately one fourth of the population of the United
States is classified as below the poverty income level of'Si'jlOO per
year.
The problems of doleing money out to the poor are the axis of
most of the fights in the poverty programs. Although everyone agrees
that charity makes the poor feel inferior and deadens their incentive
to get out of the Ghettoes, no one can agree on a different method of
help. Because of this the recipients suffer.
It goes without saying that a country as rich as the U.S. cannot
allow one quarter of its population to wallow in poverty.
MARK SCHLEIFSTEIN lUC
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publication*
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reftx Union. Phono
302-1681,392-1682 or 392-1683.
Op in ions ex prim d in the Florida Al%ator are those of the editors or of
the writer of tha article aid not those of th* Uaforritv of Florida.



Violence, Nonviolence, & Black Survival

MR. EDITOR:
Being that nonviolence and
violence are of the most
talked about subjects in America
today, I would like to express
my opinion and JOMOs policy
on nonviolence and violence.
Anyone who teaches a group
of people not to defend
themselves when they are the
constant victims of brutal
attacks is a criminal. If the
element that controls this
country was nonviolent, then
the oppressed and powerless
Black Race could be non-violent
in their struggle for liberation.
If your enemy was
nonviolent, then you can be
nonviolent. If brothers can die
fighting for the American
governments cause 10,000 miles
away, then they can die right

; Bspade-boy^^(

Police View Os The Black Ghetto:
A Psychological Study In Detroit

DETROIT (UPI) A
psychological study of Detroit
policemen has concluded most
white officers do not think
Negroes are discriminated
against and see the black
community as overprivileged.
The study, directed by Dr.
Robert A. Mendelsohn, a social
psychologist at Wayne State
Universitys Lafayette Clinic,
said in general most policemen
believe the black communitys
goal is not equality but actual
domination over whites.
Detroits police department is
92 per cent white. Reflect
Community Opinion
Mendelsohns study, based on a
random sample of interviews of
286 Detroit policemen,
including 36 Negroes, found that
the views of white and black
policemen reflected the view of
the overall white and black
communities.

i
In refer to appear in the Alligator, letters
to must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers names may be withheld from
publication for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters in the
interest of space.

here fighting for the liberation
of some 25 million Black People.
When racist policemen hiding
behind the cloak of law and
order attack Blacks, then it is
the right of these people to
defend themselves ... after all
self preservation is the first law
of nature. Just because the
agressor is the law doesnt
mean that the unjustly aggressed
doesnt have the human
responsibility and right to defend
himself.
With the Black Protest going
on in this country now, I think
that everyone should keep in
mind that Black People are not

FORUM:
hove for the co w P

For instance, 64 per cent of
the white policemen believed the
1967 riot was planned in
advance, compared to 69.4 per
cent of whites in a community
survey.
Mendelsohn said his study
should not be taken as an
indictment of the police
department, because the police
are caught as a buffer between
white raicsts and Negroes.
This is intolerable. Police
become scapegoats, he said.
But he said the patrolmans
beliefs contain a potentially
ominous reality.
The study noted an optimism
among Negro officers who hope
for increased white awarness and
willingness to help.
*= Evidence from the white
community, however, flatly
contradicts the hope for white
support, he said.

part of the American system.
Politically, economically,
judicially or socially, we have no
power. And remember Blacks
are colonized people. From
1619 to 1969 Black People
shared none of the American
productivity. Blacks were
brought here in chains and
blood, and we have struggled in
chains and blood merely to
survive!
To the average White, his goai
was a good career, sports car,
$20,000 home and family with a
good bank account to finish it
off (and got it too). With the
average Black, its having enough

He said the study indicates
the predominant view of lower
echelon white police officers is
that Negroes are a privileged
minority, susceptible to the
influence of agitators.
Inspectors and other higher

The Black Man
As A Klansman
MR. EDITOR:
Messers. Charles Fulwood and David Horne have brought the
supreme question of whether the black persons in this country have
any rights or not to its logical conclusions. They presume to tell the
white community that is has no rights. By this magnificient leap of
faith they assert their manhood (or soul in the vernacular) and at the
same time debase themselves in a manner that no human being of any
color or ethical persuasion should seek to emulate.
These young men have taken the same tack as those who have most
vigorously opposed even the simplest steps in the reformation and /
recreation of a human society, those who have most forcefully denied
them even the right to call themselves members of the human race. It
/jocfrAtr fbo erwo ii ctirrinne nf /laoanon onri
TfITvXT) -ggswat x>v T
advancement in the human soul.
And these young men have courage the same kind of courage
that induced night riders to kill innocent men and women in their,
homes and maniacs to butcher little children in their churches.
Welcome to the Klan, gentlemen you have passed the most crucial
test of all, the one which tests whether you have any brains, humanity
or sense lurking deep within yourselves. I hope you are happy here.
C.Y. WELLES

money to buy the food the next
week, paying the rent by Friday
and dreaming some day of
having a decent environment.
And dont you think that Blacks
being in the bag theyre in is not
intended or is just coincidental.
No, there is a political system
rigged against Blacks. Black
People have tried to go through
the political channels that this
system set up for them ... all
with no results or real change.
All you have now is a few Black
personalities that are controlled
by the system. You have a
minority of Blacks who dont
suffer from colonization. This is
not the Black Masses.
One segment of the race or
society cant be free until the
masses are free. Black People
have gone through every channel
to gain exceptance in to this

ranking officers, however, have a
more tolerant view of the black
community, he said. Mendelsohn
said that may be because higher
ranking officers come into
contact with all elements of the
community, not just criminals
and suspects.

Monday, March 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

society and to gain some control
over themselves: but the
condition of Black Folk is the
same. Not only that, the
majority of White Society who
are supposed to be Americans,
didnt even support the civil
rights struggle. Now, only the
radical element supports the
Human Rights Struggle.
If youre going to talk about
illegal violence then you have
to include legal violence. The
American Revolution wasnt a
nonviolent movement. If Patrick
Henry said GIVE ME
LIBERTY OR GIVE ME
DEATH, then you know what
Im saying cause Patrick Henry
never did catch as much hell as
Black People have in this
country. If Paul Revere is a hero
to you for saying the British
are coming, get a gun, then you
can understand why Brother
Rap is a hero for telling Black
People the same.
It would be amusing to me to
see America, sending their
troops to Vietnam to have sit-in
\ demonstrations in the
| ricepaddies and marches in the
ij streets of Saigon. Crazy, stupid?
If Sure, just as crazy and stupid as

COON-MONKEY
the people are who say that
colonized Black People
shouldnt defend themselves.
When the KKK can get their
probram into action by
demonstrations and
nonviolent protests, then
thats when the Black Liberation
Struggle can do the same.
Remember that Black People
didnt ask to be Militants. Thats
right, White America produced
Rap Brown and Brother Huey.
Violence is an ugly thing but
so is a person who stands still
and lets himself be killed.
Relating back to Blacks not
having Judicial Power. This past
Monday in Pinellas County, an
all white jury found a JOMO
member from the St. Pete JOMO
guilty and the judge sentenced
him to life in prison. A 16 year
old brother stood up and
listened to a white judge say, I
sentence you to spend the rest
of your life in the state
Penitentiary.
As stated by the American
Constitution, The jury is to
consist of the defendants peer
group meaning that jury
members are to be of the same
religion, race, coming from the
same community the defendant
came from. Therefore, JOMO
considers brother Harrington as
a political prisoner because it
was like Harrington being a Jew
on trial in Nazi Germany. This is
part of what I mean by the
powerless Black.
If you have any doubts
whether the American People,
White or Black are violent
people ... walk up to him or her
~and slap him. Then your mind
will be free of any
rationalizations about defense.
As far as JOMO is concerned
about nonviolence and
JOMO does not have a position
on violence, it has a position on
FREEDOM, freedom at its
necessary costs, by any means
necessairy.
CHARLES FULWOOD
State Minister of
Information/ JOMO

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3, 1969

{ t/fc, JrS DO YOU KNOW
wf Campus; Ctt(t dhtfktttat
1 ( iL SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT /\ Xvj X JLIN 1 lAlj
-&*>.* ' . <
MISS AMERICA MISS UNIVERSE
For the fire* time on this campus ond Miss Florida Universe Conte*,
your organization has the opportunity All intorostod organizations ore
f *? v -i i
to sponsor both a Miss America and urged to pick up their applications
Miss Unhrorso contestant For only A. V / >#V .at the Activities Dosk on the
$25, your organization can sponsor V / V/ X 3rd floor of the Union. The
taro candidates which will represent \ I ) ( ) ( )l deadline for joint applications
you m thoMksUniversity of Florida 4 4 wiH be *OOWH March 13.
and * ? r S* B om **"- T Ii T
These winners will be the Universitys
represente tathres to the Miss Florida
C l (Jam*
: ? r r
: |> f>'
'/\' Aj_ n f\fj a
xjnjn jyv\ LVfe^X C Xww^.
( v/nJC 'AynMvi Azvrwiz 'aA KiVatf
W r / /X)
- | ..(TmWmc^v*
jMH- .' tcic
M A&tM£G*^uJ/
-TKFom/iT/CfJ &A) Tf/


* G ATO R CLASSIFIEDS

1 FOR SALE 1
6 8 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Excellent condition 883 cc. Call
372-7703 after 6:30 p.m. (A-st-91-P)
Guns Guns Guns Inventory over
4 5 0 BuySellT rad eRepair.
Reloading supplies, custom,
reloadingHAY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
466-3340. (A-ts-69-P)
A beauty of a buy!! Honda 150
complete with two helmets, tool kit,
and many more extras. Call 378-8905
after 7 pm. (A-st-93-P)
Dachshound puppy, female, black
and tan, 7 weeks old, AKC registered
$50.00. 376-8523. (A-st-93-P)
25% off to students: 2 drawer metal
storage or file cabinets. Refinished
gray, green or tan. J.R. Office
Furniture Co., 620V2 S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (6t-93-A-P)
2 Coaxial Speakers 12 with or
without cabinets S4O. Also pair baby
scales $7 .. hassock fan S2O ... call
378-3268. (A-3t-94-P)
68 450 CC HONDA SCRAMBLER.
New engine. Lots of extras.
466-3565. (A-2t-94-P)
20,000 BTU Fedders Air Conditioner
only used one summer will easily
cool 2 bedroom apt. perfect
condition S2OO Call 372-7997.
(A-3t-94-P)
Ovation electric guitar 4 mo. old
Fender amp, Harmony Sovereign
Acoustic Guitar, good cond. $350
call 378-7612. (A-st-94-P)
f** FOR RENT
RENT SLASHED! Furn. 2 bedroom
apt. on SW 16 Ave for only $l2O mo.
sublet for 3 qtr only. 376-3552.
(B-3t-92-P)
Ranch style living. One bedroom apt.
Large closets and bath. Fully paneled
and air cond. Use of pool and
bar-b-que house. Walking distance of
new golf course to be opened this
spring. Water, extermination and
garbage collection included. SIOO.OO
a month 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-6t-93-P)
Room in private home for mature
student. Central heat, AC, linen and
maid service. Separate entrance.
Phone 376-5360. (B-2t-93-P)
1 bdrm apt to sublease 3 blks from
campus air-conditioning, washing
machine. 1824 NW 3 PI no. 23 Call
372-5567. (B-st-94-P)
y J U U lIM MtTBOTW IXMIC PC 8 8 8 i S9KB9MBC >CS6
I WANTED I
Roommate wanted (male) for roomy,
two bedroom apartment in
Tanglewood Manor. Dishwasher, bath
and half-bath, front and rear
entrances. Low-rent poolside living.
For further information call
372-5937. (C-4t-93-P)
Wanted: coed model for amateur
photographer. No experience
necessary. Write PO box 1404,
Gainesville. (C-4t-93-P)
Need one male roomie for spring
quarter in Village Park no. 64. Call
372-0607 or stop by most anytime.
(C-2t-93-P)
. 4
Male roommate $32/month share
house, own room, from March Ist
on, 309 SE 7th St., 378-5094 or
378-1801. (C-2t-93-P)
Need 1 roommate for Frederick
Gardens 2 bedroom apartment spring
quarter. Call 378-1978. (C-st-92-P)
Female roommate wanted. Fredrick
Garden Apartments. SIOO per
quarter. Spring quarter only Call
Barb at 376-1045 or 378-9945.
(C-6t-93-P)
WANTED: 1 female roommate for
spacious 2 bedroom Camelot Apt.
with fireplace. Call 378-9694.
(C-4t-91-P)
LANDMARK Male roommate
needed. Available March 1. March
rent paid. Call 378-3120, apt. 170.
(C-10t-88-P)
Coed to sublet private room Spring
and Summer quarters. Share kitchen
and washer/dryer. AC. Call 372-1973
or come by. 1616 NW 3rd Ave.
(C-st-94-P)
__ It bubbles up like the
spring of life itself.
A spectator who sits down to
this picture feeling old and
dry will rise up feeling young
and green." -Time Ma|azine
amt

1 wanted^
Female roon)mate Landmark 169
2 bedroom apt. $45 month. Can
move in for spring quarter. 378-7782.
(C-st-91-P)
Lets make a deal. Sublet 2 br apt. at
Landmark or 2 roommates to share 2
br. apt. starting spring quarter. Call
378-8982, Apt. 113. Female roommate for March to Aug.
$41.25/month. Fun type atmosphere
but quiet too. Call 378-0987 ask for
Kathy. (C-4t-91-P)
Male roommate to share 2 bedroom
apt. at Summit House. Cheaper than
you'd think. Call 378-5748.
(C-4t-91-P)
One male roommate wanted
immediately for 2 bedroom garage
apt 2 blocks from campus cable TV.
$45 a month plus utilities call
372-5976. (C-st-92-P)
Openminded coed with car to share 2
bedroom townhouse apartment in
Anglewood Manor. SSO mo. plus
utilities. Call 376-1015. (C-4t-92-P)
WILL SHARE SMALL HOUSE near
Mall with 1 person, S4O for March
only. Own room. Call Mike
Robinson, 392-1681 days, 376-7489
nights. (C-4t-91-P)
2 male roommates for third quarter.
Share furn. 2-bedroom apt. $41.25
month plus utilities. Frederick
Gardens apt. 20. Call 378-6551
(C-3t-94-P)
Coed roommate needed. 1 bedrm
apt. 4023 S.W. 34 St. Call 376-3763
or write Sally Bowers, Drawer 1030,
Apopka, Fla. $45 per mo. (C-st-94-P)
Sublease with methe best is yet to
be! $65/mo. includes utilities,
offstreet parking, phone, pool, & the
best living in town; half block from
campus call 378-4532, Rick or Dan
at Apt. 302 College Terrace Apts.
(C-3t-94-P)
Coed to share apt near campus AC,
own room, prefer grad student, $45
per month, 909 SW 6 Ave, 378-1837.
(C-2t-94-P)
One female roommate needed spring
quarter Landmark Apts. 174 two
bedroom $45 mo. Call 378-0846.
(C-st-94-P)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-10t-94-P)
Need one female roommate, spring
quarter for two bedroom Landmark
apartment, $45 per month.
378-3851. (C-3t-94-P)
HELP WANTED 1
INVESTIGATOR Training class soon
with top co. with real career plan.
Car and benefits and $6600 starting
salary. Call Allied Personnel of
Gainesville, 1800 N Main St.,
376-4611. (E-93-st-P)

Y uil ge
bushels of
savings from
GATOR
ADVERTISERS Jpgg^p|r
I BOX OFFICE OPENS
m 6:30
_ L BIG doubI^ATURE
iimiiiri^^
:jr --- HJMMMMMMpP" 1 "" JMMMjj|um>
1 'll *45
z^ ,^_

Monday, March 3,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

| HELP WANTED |
PRESTIGE AND MONEY Be
secretary, top man, beautiful office,
best environment, best salary in
town. See Allied Personnel of
Gainesville, 1800 N Main, 376-4611.
(E-93-st-P)
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Part-time or full-time Will train.
Must be 21. Dub's Steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)
Part-time stenographer 5-10 hours wk
flexible hours prefer dictaphone
experience $1.75-2.00 per hr call
376-1933 for interview appointment
Thompson Hayward Chem Co.
(E-3t-93-P)
:swwwwiww ?: i:
I PERSONAL
:-xox-x-x.xttsvra*x-x-x-x.Nvww
Time is running out to reserve your
seat for EUROPE this summer, $315,
10 wks. N.Y. London N.Y. or go
for credit -392-1655 or 310 Union.
(J-ts-82-C)
Florida Players: Now is your big
chance. Come to the meeting Mon.
March 3rd and voice your opinions
on future policies. 5 pm. (J-2t-93-P)
Summer Ponchos (sls) and other
clothes are in from Mexico. Woven
headbands. The Spanish Main, 105
W. Univ. Ave. Open nights til
9.(J-st-92-P)
Youll love our owls! . and all the
other little creatures in our
CERAMIC ZOO. From Mexico. The
Spanish Main, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Now open nights til 9:00. (J-st-92-P)
YOGA LESSONS: 3:30 5:00
weekdays, $3.00, 103 NE 3rd St.
Also by appointment. Mike Geison.
(J-st-94-P)
| AUTOS |
1969 PONTIAC GTO HARDTOP
Loaded with extras & sac. warranty
Army duty soon. Your best buy
$3650 372-7376 day 372-1549 nite
& wkend. (G-st-93-P)
'63 MG Midget, well cared for. Brand
new Pirelli tiras. Best offer. Call
378-7996. (G-st-89-P)

.VVVWvlwXXvIvXw/AVIVXVAW/l'A'Xv
LOST & FOUND |
. >:
Lost Thursday brown Joh Romain
key case. If found please Call
376-3729 after 4. (L-st-91-P)
LOST Post Versalog slide rule. Name
is inside. Contact Wayne Zellner,
376-1155 evenings. REWARD!
(L-st-91-P)

Page 11

Do-It-Yourself CLASSIFIEDS

f Services |
BABYCARE 311 NW 15th Terrace
Infants under 1 yr old $15.00 per
wk. MonFri, 8 am to 5 pm By
the hour 75c. Experienced,
trustworthy, Christian home. Ph.
376-2072. (M-3t-93-P)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)
Dissertation and publication figures
, and drawings. Professional Graphic
E artist, Nancy McClelland, 378-4260.
[ (M-st-90-P)

5 I will do ironing in my home. Call
372-5269. (M-4t-90-P)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible. But you'll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave., next to Greyhound
Bus station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-C)
FLY ANYWHERE round trip or
one-way. Pilot offering co-op flying
arrangements anywhere for up to 3
passen. Save $. Info: 392-7969.
(M-2t-92-P)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-P)
EfflKl HURRYI
LAST
\\ ay
Martin
Matt Helm IBS
| The Wrecking Crew
ACADEMY
l AWARD
CLIFF NOMINEE
ROBERTSON-BEST ACTOR
ij A love story
jjfe) that begins with
It an incredible
Lli experiment!
row
MUSIC BY
RAVI SHANKAR

''a*aV#*VaVaVaVa*aVa*a%Va #*a*aVa*a a *Va*aVa'a*a*a"a'a'a'a # # aa a,
MONDAY SPECIAL
: Supper only :
, j*
Boiled Shrimp
,
all-you-can-eat
$1.49 (
*
TUESDAY SPECIAL
Supper only
-4 Fried Chicken^ 1
*
all-you-can-eat
J OQa
y7 V
W MORRISON'S
i CAFFTERIAS
I. I
HoFinenToml ANWNHIRIf GAINESVILLE MALL
' x K.

-ft.
V guess who's 1
coming to
1 dinner COLOR I
SPENCER TRACY
KATHARINE HEPBURN I
SIDNEY POITIER
| KATHAFMNE HOUGHTON I
vU
A brutally tough
4c sergeant is gripped
2 by an obsessive m
* passion 4
* I.TiTH
up




Page 12

!^lj^j** ,ida Alligator, Monday. March 3,1969

111



f-j m fy A JX*X*X*X*X*X X*X*X X X*X X*X X^X*X*XtX*X X*X X*X X X X X*X*X X*X*XV.%*. VVVVVVVVVV%%X%%%MV%%%%%%VfVV**jij
/f% with the {\spitoTi969/
/iu I chemini j
I * % I I :: Ninas designers play with unusual ::
hKO 011 S shapes and great colors all day longso :J
II (\ jll II : you always get the liveliest shoe styles
j ffl Y w :j: around. All fun and no drudgery make j:
f4\ you ge [ a I
j \| mOTPhinrT I Available in all these colors:
lf \ [ Briarwood
I I \ Ljl.' 1 Platinum Patent
// \\ DlKini K g, White Patent
// 1\ UIIMI II Black Patent
fejT bo f h $ig I
"Ty / by Cformfit~fioGers \
/ / Gently underwired bra slip fits ft >
/ / and feels smooth as second J X
I / / skin in nylon tricot, with its own J f \ £
T / / bikini to skin over pantyhose. f £ \
/ / Less layers, one set of straps- P P PP P VP PVP P \
/ How can you resist? | fa he Ma || \ |
/ j ft \ s_
[j \ Village Square TT THftTtttcbetr x
/ / \ \ 2401 S.W. 13th St. >: ?:
(I \ j 1127 W. University Avenue $:
/ j \ \ *
v v &x*xoxoxoxw<x*x*?xp:jxx*x*x*x*>x--X'-:*>x:*A

Monday, March 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3, 1969

By GAY PAULEY
UPI Womens Editor
NEW YORK (UPI) Round
and round it goes, the shape of
the shoe toe for spring.
Any remains of the pointed
toe in womens footwear long
since have been put away. Gone
now is the blunted, squared toe
of last spring. The new look is
the softly rounded one with
some fullness to the shoes
without their being hefty.
To balance the snubbed 4oe,
footwear designers have given
more height to the back, and
added the variety of heel heights
from which to choose. Heels
come in flats, fair to middling,
even go as high as three inches.
The newest looking height,
dictated by the pants in spring
collections, is a bit over two
inches. Its the height Roger
Vivier showed originally with
the Yves St. Laurent pantsuits
from Paris.
The higher heels in no way
resemble the spikes of the
1940s and 19505.
The new highs are broader,
set far back on the shoe and are
minus the old full curve at the
top.
Designers show the rounded
toe in everything from daytime
flats to the most glittering of
evening wear, in materials from
traditional kids and patents to
patterned fabrics. Pair a
patterned shoe with a solid dress
for a change.
Delman, for instance, does a
paisley patterned pump with
two inch heel. And
Mademoiselle shows the
nanny oxford, a three eyelet
-
mVy
VJWKTS n
I HWitNINCr
r IS
cjJ,eooJla I
1 1 % ii swr W 1
| IZXfcW OnWCrg&jj
_

From The Womans View

tie with chunky mid-high heel in
a floral pattern.
Spring shoes open up, and the
open look will be the most
important one for summer,
predicts the National Footwear
Institute. The look calls for
uncovering everywhere at the
front, the middle, the back.
Always, the broad heel. And
some manufacturers are doing
thong-like sandals with ankle
straps and platform soles of the
19405.
NEW YORK (UPI) I Like
to be fit for myself to know.
The words come from a tiny
great-grandmother who all her
life has made physical fitness
part of her daily regimen. Now
at 82, Mrs. T. Charlton Henry,
born a Philadelphia Biddle, has
taken up jogging.
Well, it pays dividends, said
this springtly, delicate blonde.

)..*
mam 3/wt/ieu
GAINESVILLE MALL
If
'lf an ou t-doorable
' : yjfev' Mjjjp \y 1 rain-resister
I | |/J from London Fog
M || I // On downpour days the
I fc a II Brentwood is supersensa-
I (fj; ms 1 tional! Precisely tailored
I t JIJ ffi;V I of wash n wear Dacron
I if 1 polyester/cotton with a
I | ||l > I shower-shedding finish.
I H | v 1 The body-close silhouette
| M l looks so want
I \\ I Bamboo or bluebirdreg-
I ii 1 ular or petite, 45.00.
yl All Weather Coats
- 77 :

Most days she will walk and jog
at least half an hour, sometimes
longer, figuring she averages
about four miles my age
group all think Ill drop dead.
Julia Rush Henry represents
everyones reason for keeping
physically and mentally in tune.
Shes never had a serious
illness although Im afraid to
mention this. Lightning might
strike. She goes to Europe a
couple of times a year. And at
89 to 90 pounds, she weighs the
same as she did when she was a
debutante in Philadelphia where
her father, Alexander Williams
Biddle, was a doctor.
Mrs. Henry is the product of
a family long conscious of public
service three of her ancestors
were signers of the Declaration
of Independence. We Biddles

have always been into
something, she smiles.
She grew up in a family
conscious of sports
too golfing, swimming, tennis
and the like. And each day of
her adult life she has done one
hour of exercise although she
conceded, some days you just
have to make yourself do them.
But its so attractive to look
fit, dont you think?she asked.
And she looked quite so in a
tunic-jacketed beige suit from
Simonetta of Italy and her dark
ranch mink coat.
I invited Mrs. Henry to join
me in a jogging session around
the Plaza Hotel but we settled
for a walk job in a mink
coat! The children would think
Id gone crazy.
Her walking and jogging
clothes are casual when she takes
to the high school track 200

yards from her home at
Chestnut Hill in Philadelphia.
I met this indefatigable
widow when she came to New
York for a gathering of the
National Jogging Association,
which is sponsoring a
three-months tour by Robert
(Bob) Richards, the Olympics
champion. Richards will jog and
cycle coast to coast to dramatize
the need for fitness.
**
In the Junior Sophisticates
collection the return to softness
shows up in the blouson
silhouette that clings to the
body with softness, its raglan
sleeves in a giant daisy silk print
and a wide belt emphasizing a
tiny waist. Blouson dressing in
navy and chamois crepe also
extends the new feeling of gentle
softness.



Monday, March 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Wouldnt You Love to go
down to the sea in something
ladylike and pretty, for a
change? Yes? Then youre in
luck: the newest swimsuit this
year is actually a swimdress.
Looking just like little
dresses with pleats, tucks,
ruffles, high or low
waistlines in drapey jerseys,
delicate sheers and
embroideries its swimdresses
that are THE big fashion news
for the girls of all ages this
summer.

Sears
MM jjlSjm
F 11 m \ MV BAa \
if 1 ItAr v v
ll U\ i wmgM IBf
/ \\ ]H
/Ml Set this one up... for situation,
fun! Shirts: bush styled or scarf-
tied. Vests: trim! Pants: flared,
1 I iS cuffed or pleated. Take em solid in
navy, white, pastels, too! Junior
I IjljJ[ 5 to 15, S-M-L. And you can
charge em all on your Sears
Jlr Revolving Charge..s.9B and 6.98
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back
TOP Oh 1 Ht MmlL
SHOP AT SEARS w N.W. 13th at 23rd Blvd.
AND SAVE OCxdlo Shop Thurs., Fri., Mon.
SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO.

Page 15

*
The Pants Thing is such a
fashion hit, youll want it several
ways this summer. Start now,
with those exciting flare-leg long
pants. Buy that look in pants to
team with shirts and other tops.
Get the brand-new flare-leg
jumpsuit its a knockout. And
you must have one outfit of
flare-leg pants with matching
long tunic top: the great rave
look of summer 69.

FASHIONETTES
The opened shoe is the shoe
to have, starting right now,
getting the jump on summer,
says the National Footwear
Institute. The style, tried last
year, worked well in both
Europe and America. A city
sandal to consider: a criss-cross
of straps. Another is a
shelter-toed shoe buckled off at
the sides and opened at the
back. Other interpretations: an
oxford or spectator with
everything possible pared away
until what remains is a sandal.

If jhmm 3 > y,
tv
*
G
- <
To The Man of Critical Taste..
... there is something special about the good looks,
and comfortable fit of our natural shoulder suits.
He knows it is the proud effort of master craftsmen
who have tailored these suits with infinite care to
reflect the highest standards for a lasting quality
appearance. These suits are available in subtle
stripes and plaids as well as solid tones in regular,
short, long and extra long. Make your selection now.
Nottingham suits from $89.95
Norman Hilton suits from $135
Our custom fitting service is I
among the best in the South. )
Number 6 Main Street South
THE HOME OF HICKEY-FREEMAN CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES

SHAPE . plunging
necklines, higher set in and
seamed waists, close shoulders,
are keeping summer shapes
simple, uncluttered and tailored.
Touches of trim in the form of
ruffles and ties and sashes add
the necessary relief.
The tunic-over-pants remaints
a strong seller, especially in
interesting floral border prints
and contrasting dots. Blouses
with free billowing sleeves and
deep V-necks now sport 40s
bras showing through and
high-tie-up yachting waists. Free
form lace and sheer pants now
sport flesh colored or patterned
bikini briefs. Other summertime
newsmakers include Grecian
draped tunics, 30s and 40s
halters, cuffed shorty shorts,
bare and plunging midriffs,

geometric cutouts, sleeveless
long tunics and tiny
embroidered bolero vests.
FABRIC ... goes all the way
with sheers especially good in
washable Dacron and cotton.
Voiles are sometimes doubled
for that illusion look ... and
peek-a-boo laces appear in eye
appealing raised swirls. Crepes
(now strictly washable) continue
on in the separate and item
category as a basic sought-after
and proven winner.
COLORS ... a combination
of fragile, tender pastels are
blended together to create many
interesting combinations and
great individuality of look.



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3, 1969


SHEER TOGETHERNESS... See-through shirts with crisp white
pants are the way this couple achieves their Together Thing.
l{aA>es-(ove£^
I J '§f
1 1 # **/&. LuZL
||| *$
1.
S )dc(^((o
prr / otf bel£-boffontp |j / <&ncLtiattj, &(ou*£s.
d ComsL,tJ2*u ComsL,tJ2*u-1
-1 ComsL,tJ2*u-1
iA A ...
0 UAOft OCottT
<£ru S tflSL >

Double-duty Sleek Outfit
Solves r Pants Dilemma

By PATRICIA E. DAVIS
NEW YORK (UPI) Actress
Mia Farrow, when denied
entrance to a plush Manhattan
nightspot barring women
wearing slacks, disappeared into
the clubs cloakroom and
emerged in less than a minute
suitably attired.
Magic? Fashion magic,
anyway.
Miss Farrow was wearing the
fashion worlds face-saving outfit
for slacks-lovers floppy
trousers with a matching
midthigh length tuiiic.
If the wearer is asked to leave
a slacks-prohibiting restaurant,
she has merely to step into the
powder room, take off the
offending trousers, and voila!,
she is appropriately attired in a
mini-dress. And she has two
outfits for the price of one.
Look through newspaper ads
and you realize that pants suits
are the rage. The pages are

* >
ORIGINALS
features new spring
Fashions for Her
Pants tops & blouses
from SIO.OO to 18.00
Z* -/ Wide or elephant bell pant
from $12.00 to 20.00
bikinis and cover-ups
from SIB.OO to 22.00
Unique clothing for
MMfEgMjMMA the high fashioned WOMAN
iMLi,
OR,GiN A r^
U p
13th Street
(Across from the University Inn)

jammed with advertisements for
the outfits in hundreds of styles
and at all price ranges. They bear
such eyecatching headlines as
Pants Plus, Pant-AMon Pant-AMonium
ium Pant-AMonium and Suit-A-Bility.
The outfits have reached an
unprecedented popularity
because they are confortable,
warm, versatile and can be worn
anywhere. Well, almost
anywhere.
Most businesses refuse to
allow their female employes to
wear slacks to work. Exceptions
in New York City include a
major womens fashion magazine
that has espoused the idea of
slacks, and several with it
advertising agencies whose
staffers are primarily young and
mod.
Secondary schools as a rule
are anti-slacks, but in one New
York high school where the ban
was rescinded, the girls found
the tables turned when a group
of male students turned up

wearing skirts in pro protest.
test. protest. Some of the more
elegant clubs and retaurants
continue to bar women in slacks,
but many have relaxed their
rules.
The restaurants policies
often hinge on the degree of
elegance of the pants suits. The
supper club in one plush hotel
will permit the outfits if they
look like evening gowns.
Run-o£-the-mill woolen outfits
are out.
A spokesman for another
club said, We make an
exception when we see how they
look.
Manhattans Colony
restaurant, however, adamantly
insists that slacks are just not
allowed here and thats that.
To emphasize further the
restaurants stand, its owner
keeps several emergency skirts
in the cloakroom to offer
slacksclad patrons.



So Whats New? Not Mens Fashions

By WALTER LOGAN
NEW YORK (UPI) Now I
know where the latest styles in
mens wear have been coming
from. The designers have been
sitting up watching the late
shows on television, notably the
sinking of the Titanic and the
dancing of Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers.
I was watching A Night to
Remember on the late show a
few weeks ago and was haunted
by a nagging thought there was
something familiar about it. It
turned out to be the mens
clothes with their high collars
and four and five button coats.
The Titanic sank in 1912
with a loss of 1,517 lives, closing
in tragedy the Edwardian Era
which gave birth to a revolution
in mens clothing very much like
the revolution now under way.
Edward VI had done most of his
style innovations just after the
turn of the century but it took a
few more years until about
1912 for his styles to reach
the masses.
Edward had introduced
among other things the
Homburg hat for daytime wear,
double breasted jacket for
formal day wear, the bowler hat
for wear in town, creases at the
front and back of the leg.
The list is long but one of the
styles was the high buttoning
coat with extremely wide lapels.
Many of the men in A Night to
Remember were wearing such
suits and that particular cult is
fashionable at the moment with
the younger gentry.

? ? *
WBpP "T ...
|j| I .§ I|l | ]
mH".|I I I f I
"Puttin on the dog
from
p &tagn Brag 7
13 W. University Ave. *** Gainesville Mall

Fred Astaire in The Gay
Divorcee in which he and
Ginger Rogers introduced the
song Night and Day and
danced the Continental was

jm/ iiM 1r km
tfr h SyputiiM
fee/Tct/ilwMWfit/
but if you are, youve got
an advantage, because youve
got built-in distinction ....
cmd distinction is the name
of the fashion game.
And we can add to your
natural distinctiveness
with equally distinctive
fashions from: Toni Lynn
Marion Sue
Leading Lady
& many more.
so come on by. Well be expecting you.
'
706 W. UNIV. (ACROSS FROM SANTA FE J.C)

made somewhere back in the
19305. Astaire is still considered
one of the best dressed men in
the world and he was then.

hi Him inc.
'The South's Largest Western Store"
Gainesvilles Largest
Selection
BOOTS JIM
LEVIS DENIMS
Pre-Shrunk" BP h 5
Come see our f] RW/fl
SPRING FASHIONS LI C\*/ I I p |
NOW-ON-DISPLAY i-JUJ 1-J IXLJ
Ladies Bell-Bottoms Wm
New Men's Straw-Hats B
& Western Wear for (j B
entire family B
J RANCHER INC.
US. 44) At 4281 N.W. 6th St
Gaines vie, Fla
376-4595

Monday, March 3,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3, 1969

Wide, Wide Bell Bottoms
Produce Hip Set Pants

By WALTER LOGAN
NEW YORK (UPI) The
United States is in me middle of
another one of its fashion
rages bell bottom trousers up
to 24 inches wide at the bottom.
The fad has even rubbed off
onto the more sedate clothing
lines which are showing some
flare.
The men who are wearing
them are in the teens and early
20s and far too, young to
remember John Held l*., and his
cartoons of the flapper era when
men wore long sideburns, and
pants with Oxford Bag bottoms
and flapper skirts were short
enough to be called mini.
But the feeling is the same.
They are hip hugging in Levi
style, and most sizes run about
22 inches ar the bottom. Some
have 24-inch bottoms and Bill
Miller in Greewich Village has
come up with 24-inch bells with
deep inverted pleats that are set
to make them appear even
wider.
Miller, whose Village Square
has set many trends, reports a
new fad the younger group is
asking for button flies.
The whole thing is mixed up
with the Unisex look among the
youngsters and many of the
more extreme tailors sell their
products to men and women
alike, especially some of the
wilder prints and exotic fabrics
such as cut velvet, fake animal
fur, carpet bagging and even
brocade upholstery material.
Although the bell bottoms
are for the younger set, the
trend has reached the older
group. Dunhill Tailors, one of
the more elegant and
conservative (and expensive)
tailors in New York reports
calls for flared bottoms.
A normal pair of suit
trousers runs 19 inches ar the
knee and about 16 1/4 inches at
the cuff. With flare the knee
goes to 19 1/2 inches and the
bottom to 19 1/2 or 20 inches.
The pants are cut on a sharp
angle at the cuff, high in front
and low in back, to give more of
a flare look.
Jefferson Manufacturing, an
old line house known for years
for a conservative style
approach, has bowed to demand
and come up with bells, not only
for the 20-year-old but modified
for old duffers who think young.
Elephant Bottom
One new house is Tweed N
Twill, run by Jim Bleier, 23, and
Mark Kaminoff, 24. Their
trademark if T *N* T and thats
what the products are. An
elephant bottom have a
20-inch knee and a 24-inch
bottom with heel-to-toe flare. A.
continental model is a high rise
bell with hidden European
pockets and a John Held Jr.
strap in the back.
Saint Laurie might be called
conservative since his bells stop
at 22 inches. But he has pants of
simulated fur with i three-inch
waistband, a St. Cloud model in
French cut velvet in a prison
stripe combination of eggshell
and tagerine.

Paul Ressler Ltd., has some of
the more spectacular Unisex
clothes including array of pants
made without a side seam so the
wild prints and stripes can flow
interrupted by seams. The seam
is on the front and back creases.
A jam jam model for the beach
fastens with a drawstring and has
no fly. Biggest news were see
through pants an intermittent
stripe which looks like a denim
and is separated by a crochet
strip with a peek-a-boo effect.
Moyer is one of the more
conservative houses but only
as far as bell bottoms go. Flare is
achieved by a diagonal cut at the
bottom and conservativism ends
there there are big black and
white prints like an oversized
Dalmatian, vivid stripes in
combinations of orangs, olive,
yellow and brown red, and
splashy flowers.
Esquire, another conservative

CRICKETEER
IT WILL HELP YOU SLAY YOUR DRAGON
v
K couldnt look worse to you
If it threatened to drown you
in a sea of martinis and
smo^er V u in a Qipantic
And even thou 9 h its J ust
seas of the six oclock
//A /jl| jAySmy/ Ny I dragon, Cricketeer
vaA // V has designed a
ia I IIP' // / vested suit of
As lji j j llii'ffljS'-'-- // f ~ Polyester, 45% Wool
/y \ HO frill flrJs \ that carries all
/ 'tojMr jfrVl l natural shoulder,
j pjJjPjj |pi Ej \\ thr6e button
pi* P with this suit
\ L L /YAMy and your ripping
Pli' IT \aat repartee, youre
1?! il'ig jy' SUre t 0 UnClo the SiX
iff / CRICKETEER*
HP / ALUMNI SUIT
/j, x ,85
Sitmrnam.
225 W. University
PiIFOWT WCO. T.M.

firm, used an angle cut for flare
with an 18-inch knee and
19-inch bottoms. Fabrics run
from solids to bold prints big
flowered prints made famous by
designer John Weitz and to
thin, vari colored stripes. There
is also tapestry. One pair was
powder blue and gold, another
was green and gold.
Knit Breeches, Inc. specializes
in knitted instead of woven
slacks and is run by another
youngster, Fred Stein, 24 who
touts them because they (l)have
give 9 and are comfortable
(2) bag, sag or wrinkle and
(3) creases that dont come
out in the rain. A Dorado West
model in imported crepe was in
a two-tone effect like a cord.
One was a two-colored jacquard
knit that gives a raised effect to
the design. The Dorado had a
stove pip leg; the other widths
ran to 21 inches.

* *
Look for doggier heels on
shoes to wear with city
pantsuits. Beth Levine, who with
her husband Herbert are
innovators in shoe styles, says
that because the new pants legs
are wider, they call for a higher
heel or a clog.

Spring Ensemble I
l the latest in Spring Fashion. 4 I
Westgate Shopping Center fwtwL

* *
Cultured pearls in lovely
pastels of blue, gray, rose and
cream are meant to mix and
mingle for spring jewelry
accents. Also watch for baroque
pearls, their romantic shades and
fanciful shapes arranged in new
ways with gold and diamonds.



* *
The sleeveless coat-suit is an
exciting look in the new
Originala collection. One
example: a double-breasted
sleeveless coat in a vicuna color
over white blouse and pants. The
sleeveless cost also tops a high
neck dress that is belted. Other
versions appear in pale wools.
Any of the coats could just as
beautifully make the scene
alone.
* *
Coat dresses in the
Pattullo-Jo Copeland collection
for spring have slightly
closings. Waistlines are
crushed, wrapped or sashed,
either high, low or dead center
at the waist.

T&XJoGue
HIT THE SAND,
BEACH BABEE
IN A GREAT NEW
SWIMSUIT
FROM THE VOGUE
>
%
Easter vacation brings on a razzmatazz joint in
swimsuits, Slip on the you-behyoitt-sweet-bits)
bikini sl3 (style show).
Slide into the voile wide-leg slacks : 575 (style
__ shown), or throw on one of our great coverujis.
You're sure to find the greatest collection of
famous label swimsuit fashions at The l ague.
Come in today!
i ,'
W. University&34th St.

* *
The accent on the Exquisite
Bridals Spring collection is
youth. Todays bride is younger,
according to Seymour Dipkin,
president of the bridal house,
but she is also more
sophisticated. Accordingly,
attention to such details as the
covered necklines, a minimum of
ruffles, hi-rise bodices, is what
makes the collection new. There
is a total look; coordinated gown
and veil, with the back of the
gown treated importantly since
most people see the bride from
the back. Bridesmaids gowns are
designed with a dual purpose
and can be used again for other
occasions. The mother of the
bride dresses can serve later as
cocktail dresses.

. -i
Who will make fashion news this Spring?
Nobody but YOU!
md Sitvetomnfo
. s
has the sweet, swingy and stylish collection
that will help YOU make fashion news .
aw, vs n
\
BUZZ BUZZ
all the new and exciting L \
styles that Faye Silverman \J f \
four buyer) has selected for f \
your wearing pleasure ... j| \
Fresh new shirtwaist styles. ? \
The comfortable wide-leg slacks..
The new sleek spring shirtdress. JL \
F unic tops and low waisted fashion JA \
are in our racks. We invite you / \ \
to visit with us youTt be treated Royally in our / J\ \
Wo4h o| Tojlhm/ w

Monday, March 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3,1969

Hardy Amies Sees 'Return To Dandyism

By WALTER LOGAN
NEW YORK (UPI) Hardy
Amies is the type of urbane
Englishman whom a leading
female fashion writer once
described as tall, fair and flat.
Others see him as a character out
of a Noel Coward drawing room
comedy where every is terribly,
terribly witty and well dressed.
He is all of that and he is big
business as well, designing mens
clothes for the Hepworth chain
in England and the sprawling
giant that is Genesco in the
United States. As he puts it:
Design is fun; big business is
fun; the two together is heaven.
Amies recently staged his first
major mens fashion show in
New York incorporating both
Spring and Fall fashions, most of
them manufactured in the
United States, and achieving
what he called a long torso line,
which is a truly masculine
physical characteristic, before
adding flare to jackets and
overcoats.
And in this day of either one
long center vent or two deep
side vents Amies re-introduced
the unvent. A number of the
jackets flared in an
uninterrupted line although the
basic overall appearance was the
same a slim torso with flair.
In previous showings in New
York Amies more or less took
on the air of a well-mannered
school master as he moved
informally around a tiny stage
improvised in the middle of a
Roger Kent shop with the
models and pointed out the
features of his new wares.
This time it was a full
production with hundreds of
fashion notables jammed into a
one-time night club in the Hotel
Pierre where President Nixon set
up his pre-inauguration
headquarters. Twelve male
models, four of them imported
from London, thundered down
the runway in precision, wearing
his fitted and flared overcoats
and holding their umbrellas like
rifles over their shoulders.
The suits which are in the
$125 price range were dashing
but can be worn by the man of
40 if he hasnt let himself get
too fat. The trousers were slim
and cuffless and some had a bit
of a flair at the bottom but
definitely not belled. And with
the long torso line of the
coat some clothing people call
it the body line almost
anybody can look taller and
slimmer.
Many Looks
There were many
looks almost traditional
jackets with two and three
buttons, coats with Edwardian
type wide collars in both double
and breasted, heavy walking
suits in which the outer coat
worn over a vest is like a
miniature topcoat, and, among
the most handsome, dinner
jackets somewhat longer than
last years.
And since Buckingham Palace
recently proclaimed that
decorations and honors may
now be worn with dinner jackets
tie-antr
tails one of the models, an
American, appeared v/ith royal
medals and decorations all over
his black dinner jacket. And
strictly for kicks he showed a
couple of silver lame dinner
jackets which led a Negro model

to comment, I feel like a black
Liberace.
But those were only for
laughs and the basic line was
widely applauded. It recalled the
days of the dandy who the
dictionary says is a man who
gives fastidious and exaggerated
attention to dress or personal
appearance as by always dressing
in the height of fashion or by
adopting carefully affected
styles of dress.
It is a return to dandyism,
Amies said. Dont forget, a
dandy scorned effeminancy. He
was a cock and not a hen. He
followed strict rules of living and
grooming. The first was Beau
Brummel who was the first to
say black wool and white linen
for evening.
/jr sales & services
(Uik M'Cik)
% wig salon §
JL 1013 w. university ave. J
blocks from campus jL)
V QI 372-1189 VP

/ Happ*ningH \ / Wliol. N. / j 1 l,{ \
/ Fri N*.. 6-9 p \ / h\ V\ \
/ \ / SPRING DRESS / /\ \ \ \ )
| Models | J Selection j IVJ \ V J
l you get Paid 8 I I li 1 I \ '/
wonderful prints .. jf*' \
V New Reg sl6 "Names" j V J \
Vlff_

Amies does not confine
himself to suits and coats. His
name has now been affixed to
ties, shirts, shoes and hats. In the
fashion show they also were
affixed to slacks, handsome

i~~ M ha,
Corkey Bell of Arlington, Texas debuted his Datsun racer for the 1969 season with a stunning
win in the Green Valley, Texas Regional R&ces. Bell not only won his class, but also came in a
stunning second overall in a race that combined all the big engined and supposedly faster
machinery. GIRLS, THIS IS A MANS CAR!
Godding & Clark Motors 1012 South Main

leather jackets, his six brass
button blazers (and some single
breasted) vivid combinations of
sports jackets and slacks and
Raglan shouldered raincoats,
both single and double.

Wbsi the floodgates of
fashion were opened in the
mens field, an awful lot of
rubbish flowed over the weir,
he said. I hope Ive cleared the
water a bit.



By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
A UF basketball team that
refuses to quit ran away from
the floundering Georgia cagers
Saturday night, 96-78.
The Gators chances for the
National Invitational
Tournament berth were kept
alive by their overwhelming win
coupled with Tennessees loss to
Auburn, 71-60. UF is now 11-6
in Southeastern Conference
play, and the Vols fell to a 124
SEC record.
The NIT Selections
Committee is scheduled to meet
Tuesday to choose more
participants for the Madison
Square Garden event which

' Chipmunk Charmed
By Bartletts Cage Tune

By CHUCKPARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
Ropes used to be Boyd Welschs nickname
because he was always so nervous, especially when
Norman Sloan was head basketball coach at the UF.
Chipmunk, tagged on Welsch by UFs
All-American Neal Walk better describes him as he
has perked right up since Tommy Bartlett took over
the head basketball coaching job in 1966.
Actually the players call him Chipmunk cause
when he puckers up his cheeks he looks just like
one. Except that he doesnt have an acorn in his
mouth.
Welsch has also moved up a few notches on the
iJIS sc E!u GRTOI
THAT MAGIC TOUCH
... Welsch sinks crucial two points against Kentucky

OOrwjr:>rwnjr !
I complete xerox j BARGAIN HUNTERS SKOAL
OFFSET FACILITES | EVERY
Specializing in
Reductions ST-" MONDAY NIGHT 6-9 pm ONLY
Enlargements ml
Open Til 11 P.M. M R Ist GARMENT REG. PRICE
Highest Quality i 2nd LIKE GARMENT
We Guarantee It! H
I SALE University Plaza (J
1620 W. University I l/W^TiZlHfli
378-1001 f ..
SAY YOU SAW IT IN 1 MAKES MCULAR * Y CLIANINC OBSOLETE
THEALL IGA TO RI 1104 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. 378-3119 |

Gators NIT Hopes Revived

The Florida Alligator

begins March 13.
If we win our game with
West Virginia Monday night,
then there is a good chance the
committee wont make a final
SEC choice until the season
ends, Head Coach Tommy
Bartlett said.
The Gators have one SEC
game with Alabama remaining

VO IS BITTEN BY TIGERS

tree and become a pressure-player evidenced by his
last-second clutch free throws to lead the Gators
over then fourth ranked Kentucky 82-81 in a
pressure-packed game.
I was so nervous when Coach Sloan was here
that I could hardly hold the ball when it came to
me, Welsch said. But when Coach Bartlett took
over I wasnt as nervous.
Im still nervous now, but its only before a
game, Welsch said. When Neal tips the ball my
nervousness just goes away.
If Welsch is as nervous as he says he is it sure isnt
evident when hes on the court. His Field goal
percentage of .471 is third highest and his free
throw percentage of .792 is tops among the starting
five Gators.
In fact Welsch hit 21-out of-21 free throws early
in the season before missing on his 22nd try in the
Georgia game.
The fan support here is really great, Welsch
said. Knowing the fans are behind me has helped
me to play better ball.
Im really glad I came to the UF, said Welsch, a
senior and 21-year old Gainesville native. The
people and coaches have really been great to me.
t "
My mother first put a basketball in my hand,
Welsch said.
This is funny-peculiar because Welschs father is a
physical education and assistant track coach here at
the UF.
My father always wanted me to run track, but I
really like basketball.
After a successful high school career Welsch came
to the UF on an athletic scholarship. He was on the
first five of the freshman team and saw limited
action in his sophomore and junior years due to
injuries. Welsch got his chances ironically this year
when first teamer Todd Lalich was injured.
Welschs injury problems stem from a back strain
in his junior year which his doctor said he should
grow out of as he gets older.
A few days in New York City would be real
nice, Welsch said. It might even help my back.

and a win would give them a
final 12-6 SEC record. Tennessee
has a game with Vanderbilt and
a game with Kentucky left in
conference play. The Vols are
capable of losing both and
ending the season with 12-6
mark also.
Things look much brighter
now, Bartlett said. Those two

losses make our prospects
better.
Neal Walk paced the Gator
attack against the Bulldogs with
34 points and 25 rebounds.
Andy Owens again hit in double
figures, scoring 18 points, as did
Boyd Welsch.

A H n il
lB " Blll *^R*^*j^TTh^frrs^Hrof7ntrmt!onTrWytlM^S5 li ro^f ll !Tel >^l9^rintel rrri6nJ| l piryt*^^^!^
iPli ~ T v i'
N -| m.
t _c>....
* * ^K-^fliiwwk'^f.
VMSooowoMWifc'Rv' :aft NK^Htv! Q Sv^j^9D£. / W
v/X v V Wj(wv
;ij: if: &jg&
j=*
Wmm > .-.sa igs
H V** = % .">:: Vv
* I
Playtexinvents the first-day tampon
(We took the inside but
to show you how different it is.)
Outside: its softer and silky (not cardboardy).
Inside: its so extra absorbent.. .it even protects on
your first day. Your worst day!
In every lab test against the old cardboardy kind...
the Playtex tampon was always more absorbent.
Actually 45% more absorbent on the average
than the leading regular tampon.
Because its different. Actually adjusts to you.
It flowers out. Ruffs out. Designed to protect every
is almost zero! '.
Try it fast. : WFM^O%j*&%r
Why live in the past? jv j^yKy^

Monday, March 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Walk outscored Georgias
Big Bob Lienhard, who got 19
points, 11 of them after Walk
committed his fourth personal
foul.
The Gators play West Virginia
in the Jacksonville Coliseum
tonight.

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3, 1969

In a meet that was billed as a
preview to the Southeastern
Conference Swim
Championships to be held
Saturday, the Gators toppled
Tennessee this weekend 68-45.
Its a good thing Marie McKee
and Bruce Williams are
roommates for both broke each
others records in Saturdays meet

JmSSik*! Ts::
jB HysHg||
* ' J|§: ~*,
t." 5
Mu' -* kfirfPHrP^F
JH
5-.>/? % | ;
§||fr
TOM KENNEDY
Natters Sweep By Tars, f
But f Not Yet In Groove 1
WINTER PARK The Gator tennis team smashed its way to a
resounding 9-0 win in the seasons first match against the Rollins Tars
in Winter Park Friday.
Coach Bill Potters boys take on Jacksonville in the first home
match Wednesday. Then, on Saturday, its the big one against rival
Miami in Miami.
We are off to a slow start, says Captain Armi Neely, despite the
Rollins win. Our games are not yet in the groove. It may be several
weeks yet before we really click. It will take a super effort to whip
Miami.
I suspect we will be pretty shaky down there this Saturday, says
Neely, and we know they wont be. Especially with the hundreds of
screaming fans that turn out for the Miami matches.
The Gator B-Team also beat Rollins reserves after coming from
behind 2-3 in singles play.
Results:
Neeley (F) def. VanGelder (R) 7-9, 6-2, 6-2; Owens (F) def. Hawley (R) 6-2,
6-2; Beeland (F) def. Montgomery (R) 7-5, 6-4; Pressly (F) def. Lague (R) 6-1,
6-0; Lunetta (F) def. Griffith (R) 3-6, 6-4, 6-3; Hilley (F) def. Strickland (R)
6-4, 6-2; doubles Neeley-Beeland (F) def. VanGelder-Lague (R) 5-7, 6-2, 6-2;
Owens-Hilley (F) def. Hawley-Montgomery (R) 6-4, 7-5; Pressly-Lunetta (F)
def. Griffith-England (R) 6-1, 6-0.
B-Team results:
England def. Sherwood (F) 4-6, 7-5, 6-3; Welch def. Cox (F) Cox (F) 1-6,
6-8, 11-9; Jarman (R) def. Sherman (F) 6-2, 7-5; Bartlett (F) def. Koldhoff 6-0,
6-0; Peterson (R) def. Seidenberg (F) 10-8, 6-3; Norcross (F) def. Gagliardi (R)
6-3, 6-4; Sherwood-Bartlett (F) def. Welch-Strickland (R) 7-5, 6-1; Cox-Sherman
(F) def. Jarman-Koldhoff (R) 6-4, 6-2; Powell-Norcross (F) def.
Gagliardi-Peterson (R) 6-2, 4-6, 7-5.
MONDAY SPECIAL I
11 AM 9 PM I
14 SHRIMP IN A BASKET
Served with
FRENCH jj
cole slaw Cl
ROLL & BUTTER f j
LW 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I
r Vi BLOCK FROM CAMPUS I

Tankers Add Rice To Vo Is Wounds

to pace the strong Gator win.
, Williams, of Eustis, broke
pool records in the 500-yard
freestyle (4:55.1) and the
200-yard freestyle. The previous
500-yard record was held by
McKee (5:60.0). Williams also
swam on the winning 400-yard
freestyle relay.
Meanwhile McKee broke
Williams record in the

GATORS DAMPEN UT WIN STREAK

1,000-yard freestyle by
chopping 28 seconds off the
previous mark with a 10:08.6.
McKee also took the 200-yard
breastsroke as the Gators won
ten of thirteen events for the
prestigious win.
It was the first Vol loss after
ten wins in a row.
The SEC championships will
be held Saturday in Nashville on
the campus of Vanderbilt
University.
Winter Parks Jamie Murphy
topped the 200-yard individual
medley-field in record time:
2.01.
The Gator 400-yard free-relay
team of Bill Hough, Steve
Hairston, Captain Andy
McPherson and Williams also set
a pool record, 3:12.5. This time
qualifies them for the NCAA.
It was an especially sweet win
for the Gators against the former
captain of the 1960 UF swim
team, Roy Tateishi, who is an
assistant swim coach at
Tennessee. Every Gator tanker
shook the Oriental mentors
hand after the meet and
showered the poolside with rice
after the win.
Coach Bill Harlan suspected
for some time that his Gators
were going to have a rough time
of it Saturday, particularly
because of Tateishis acute
knowledge of Gator strategy.
The win left the UF 9-1 in
dual meet competition, their
only loss coming at the hands of
Florida State.
Olympic swimmer Catie Ball
of Jacksonville officially became
a Gator Saturday when she was
presented with an honorary
athletic scholoarship.
However, the pert high
schooler from Englewood, told
the Alligator she does not plan
to use the scholarship to
continue competition.
I think I will sort of retire
unless I get crazy again, said
Got a Sick Car?
Our 5 skilled
Mechanics have
over 80 years
experience
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
Corvair Specialist
1031 So. Main 376-7771

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend
10% discount
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 NT. Main St. Phone 376-7581

Miss Ball. The 17-year old Miss
Ball set world records in the 100
and 200-meter breaststroke
events last year.
Results:
400-medley relay Tennessee
(Gilliam, Baer, McDermott, Ralph),
3:37.7.
1,000-freestyle l, McKee (F); 2,
Naber (T); 3, Westlake (T), 1:08.6.
200-freestyle l, Williams (F); 2,
Hough (F); 3, McGhee (T), 1:46.9.
50-freestyle l, Conner (T); 2,
McPherson (F); 3, Chapman (T),
:2 1.8.
200-IM l, Murphy (F); 2, Baer
(T); 3, Bridges (F) 2:01.0 (pool
record, old record 2:02.6 by Shiels
(FSU).
1-meter dive l, Ruoff (Tj; 2,
Hoffman (F); 3, Link (F), 252.05.
200-butterfly l, Russo (F); 2,
McConnell (T); 3, McDermott (T),
1:59.4.
100-freestyle, 1, McPherson (F);
2, Conner (T); 3, Chapman (T),
:48.7.
200-backstroke -1, Strate (F); 2,
Gilliam (T); 3, Bridges (F), 2:04.0.
500-freestyle l, Williams (F); 2,
Naber (T); 3, McGhee (T), 4:55.1.
200-breaststroke l, McKee (F);
Baer (T); 3, Perkins (F), 2:15.8.
3-meter diving l, Link (F); 2,
Smith (F); Ferry (T), 270.50.

I ROBBIE'S I
Best In
Meals. &J3f Q V Sandwiches
TODLOR TV & BILLIARDS]
11718 W. University Ave.|
1 *On The Gold Coast 1 1
JML 4 STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING UiU K WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c l
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

400-freestyle relay,Florida
(Hough, Hairston, McPherson,
Williams), 3:12.5.
H,
piamono MweeAme of aihmm
fiORDON'B
GAJNESVILIi C^iopp^ R Center
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM-9:00 PM Mon-Fr
i mi i



W. j
THE KICKOFF
Gator swimmers were the first donators Saturday to the SCAT
fund. Each swimmer, plus the coaches, gave a quarter to the fund.
SCAT organizer Steve Rohan hopes to have each UF student donate a
quarter to the Activity Center fund.

Alabama Game Tickets

Tickets for the Gators last
home basketball game against
Alabama will be issued Tuesday
between 2:30-8:00 p.m. at the
ticket offices in the athletic
department.
The Alabama game will be
the last conference game for the
Gators while second place

Gator Olympics
FOOTBALL THROW, Janice Karst, Tri-Delt.
880-RUN, Jerry Graves, Pi Kappa Alpha.
SHOT PUT, 1. Bill Dorsey, Phi Delta Theta; 2. Bob Stephens, Pi
Kappa Alpha; 3. Mike Healy, Beta Theta Pi.
SPECIAL 440 RELAY, 1. Billy Mitchell Drill Team, :49.7;
2. Scabbard and Blade, :52.6; 3. Air Force Cadre, :54.3; 4. Army
Cadre, :55.0.
TRICYCLE RACE, Student Government, Gary Goodrich,: 17.8.
KITE FLYING, Charlene Fox, Kappa Alpha Theta.
880 RELAY, 1. ATO (Lassiter, Getzen, Ely, Alvarez), 2. Pi Kappa
Alpha; 1:31.6.
440 RELAY, 1. ATO (Larry Smith, Andy Cheney, Alvarez, Ely),
:44.8; 2. Delta Tau Delta; 3. Pi Kappa Alpha.
40-SHUTTLE RUN, 1. Alpha Chi Omega ( Rita Carmona, Linda
Norton, Joyce Dowd, Joan Dowd); 2. AOPi, :23.2.
440-SORORITY RELAY, 1. Alpha Chi Omege (Joan Dowd, Joyce
Dowd, Norton, Maureen McNish); 2. ACPi, 1:81.0.
60 SORORITY DASH, l.Judy Koons, Sigma Kappa; 2. Jill
Standquist, Pi Beta Phi; and Sam Poston, Alpha Delta Pi (tie), :8.2
200-WALK-RUN, 1. Standquist; 2. Faith Tulino, ACPi.
100-DASH, l.Shaw, Delta Tau Delta; 2. Smith, ATO; 3. Bill
Mcride, Pi Kappa Alpha,: 10.3.
PARTICIPATION TROPHY, SORORITY, Pi Beta Phi; Alpha Chi
Omega, Alpha Delta Pi 91.4 per cent.
FRATERNITY, Pi Lambda Phi, Phi Delta Theta, ATO, 54.3 per
cent.

-iagiv
'" |r 4m : mKk. WMhKmm.
w rt'i' M' #*- &fIM m*M BMj
f| i, o j
>a, : m
.1 m' ig \ i y j v\ V'*"*'* '*
hhw 7 mhhb flKiHi
| Iff |I
9 Bp
Bb : Jm p JPial
WSBW 9P bm iMsmm- -w* >. Bglg -SSS '% .....
jBBKs&- awSMg^; Jzp-M Wm&ss; W& y \'<^m^^[W^:-^ii^^
%#sA/'< m£c%y'' ':
i" J|||||pp &O%%W'
%|ggg£y& H W .^ nn w^ooajg^fifea)|Mp'< :^:^^^^^^^^:-: ?
£9pF > ff> <^ ;
ISIpl HhP Hi B^*Hi
BEGINNING CF THE END

... for 880 yard runner Ira
Schwartz leading the pack

Tennessee must play Vanderbilt
and Kentucky in its two
remaining games.
I.D. cards and fee cards must
be presented for the purpose of
identification. Student date
tickets may be picked up by one
student with his/her dates cards.

(above), at the halfway mark but
finished next to last

GOLFER MELNYK MEDALIST

Gators Retain State Title

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
The UF golfers with a 72-hole
team score of 1245 captured the
Florida Intercollegiate
tournament at the tough par-72
University of South Florida
course Sunday by 14 strokes
over second place FSU.
UFS All-American Steve
Melnyk and defending
tournament champion was
tournament medalist with a
score of 298.
UFs frosh golfer Andy North

Dragsters Crash Kills 11 Onlookers

COVINGTON, Ga. (UPI) A drag racer roaring
at 180 miles an hour spun off a track at a drag strip
Sunday, plowing into part of a crowd of 5,000
spectators. Authorities said at least 11 persons were
killed and perhaps 50 injured.
Hospitals as far as 30 miles away reported their
emergency rooms were madhouses as ambulances
screamed in carrying the dead and injured.
Doug Slaughter, 21, a spectator near the track,
said the car swerved and ran up on a earthern bank
of the finish of its two-car race.
One spectator, Bemd Nagy, an artist and free
lance photographer for European magazines, said
the orange dragster known in drag racing circles as a
Funny Car, was hitting 180 to 200 miles an hour
as it neared the end of its quarter mile run against a
blue racer at the Yellow River Drag Strip.
I was just shooting, Nagy said. It was the
second race for the Funny Cars. I was just standing
on the finishing line and I was shooting a picture.

TURTLE KING
... Maida Sokol awaits the Delta
Phi Epsilon winning turtle to
cross the finish line in Pi Lam's
First Annual Turtle Race

and FSUs Bob Huber tied for
second with total scores of 312.
This is the Gators third
tournament win of this season as
the Gators have already won the
Senior Bowl Tournament and
the Gaspiralla tournament plus
Sundays Florida Intercollegiate.
FSUs Mike Cheek broke the
USF course record with a
blistering 69 on Saturday.
UFs John Sale and John Darr
both shot 72-hole totals of 320

fljjflfl
THE HANDOFF
... Steve Young (foreground) receives the baton from Rick Smith
jwrfa<>fa 4if*|p 4if*|p|
| 4if*|p| ; * te*,
** "X
rtb&V / 3tf ? *' 4x > W 4s' ?'6i f >:
.j > - - ;- : ''
BUSTING THE TAPE
Mary Tarantino wins the 60 yard dash

Monday, March 3,1969, The Florida Alligator.

I moved the camera just as the car went by.
Suddenly the car swerved off to the right side and
hit the earth barrier. It missed five or six men
standing there and then its parachute came partly
open.
Maybe this driver was squinting into the sun. I
heard a lot of screaming.
I saw one father holding a small child and
yelling Get me a doctor.
People just went crazy. I saw 10 or 12 bodies.
Nagy said the wild dragster went away from the
grandstand but plowed into crowds of persons
standing up around the end of the drag strip and
sitting in automobiles.
Darrell Brock, a teenage spectator from
Mableton, Ga., said he was up in a tree when the
accident happened. He the driver passed me,
then his chute opened. He just took people and cars
with him. It was awful. One man got knocked down
by the chute.

in helping the Gators
successfully defend their
tournament title.
Other team totals were
FSU 1259; University of
Miami- 1278; USF 1284;
Rollins College 1319;
Jacksonville University 1329;
University of West
Florida 1339; St. Leo
College 1345; Biscayne
College 1 375; Stetson
University 1382; Florida
Technical University 1397;
Emory College 1492.

Page 23



Page 24

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 3, 1969

Runners Try Hard
But Finish No. 2

The key to powerful
Tennessees sixth straight
southeastern Conference
championship in Montgomery
Saturday was, as usual, their
fantastic team depth.
Tennessee scored 8 firsts,
4-seconds and 9-thirds in
racking up 111 total points to
UFs 56 points in the 12 track
and field events.
The Gators Ron Jourdan set
Miami's Nine
Pick A Pair
From Gators
There may have been a moon
over Miami this weekend but it
didnt bring any luck to the
Gator baseball squad which was
opening its long schedule there
against the Hurricanes.
Playing in near darkness
Friday afternoon, Gator
outfielders let a fly ball drop in
to drive across the winning run
for Miami. It was the twelfth
M
inning and the entire pitching
crops had been used in a 7-7
deadlock. Miami won it 8-7.
Neither team wanted to quit
despite darkening skies.
On Saturday, a three run
home run by Miamis Ed Garvey
made the difference and let
Miami sweep the two-game series
5-3.
The UF was trailing 5-0 going
into the eighth inning when they
got on the scoreboard with a
run, adding two in the ninth.
Tony Dobies went four for
five at the plate to provide the
bulk of the slugging attack.
The Gators travel to South
Florida Friday and open their
home season Saturday against
the same club.

W.C.FIELDS HEEL-INj
"Iki Fatal Glass Os Bssr" /$L
"Ths PharaagisTjfc JljMft
"The Barist
"Ths Jk
4WFIIBt
9 P.M.

an SEC mark by going 7-0 in the
high jump breaking the old 1968
SEC meet mark of 6-9 held by
Tennessees Karl Kremser, who
finished second this year jumping
6-10.
The UFs John Parker won
the mile in 4:10, a UF record but
not an SEC meet record.
Considering the indoor facilities,
Coach Timmy Carnes is looking
for much-improved times
outdoors.
Gator Bob Lang won the SEC
1,000 in 2:12.4. Eammon
OKeeffe and Lang placed 2nd
and 3rd respectively in the SEC
880 and Jerry Fannin placed
second in the SEC 440.
Ron Coleman broke the old
1968 SEC triple jump record of
48-314 but placed second with a
jump of 49-3 as Tennessees Jeff
Gabel soared 50-414 to set the
new SEC triple jump mark.
LSU finished third with 22
points, Auburn 18, Kentucky 14,
Mississippi 7, Georgia 6, Alabama
4, Mississippi State 2, and Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt 0.
Rifles Win
The UFs outstanding rifle
team dominated the annual
All-Florida Intercollegiate
tournament held Saturday at the
UF range. The Gator shooters
surged from behind to nip
Florida Southern 1059 to 1041.
Trailing, with scores of 1018 and
945 respectively, were the Univ.
of Miami and Stetson.
The UFs Toby Muir
continued his domination of
southern shooting, by capturing
his third consecutive individual
Florida state championship. He
edged out Southerns Lester
Austin, 282 to 279. This is the
third time this quarter that Muir
and the Gators have topped an
intercollegiate tournament.
*>mmamm
Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE- :
REPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

wecare
tujjji Two Convenient Locations
These Prices Effective Thru March 4
SUPER RIGHT FULL2CUT ~
CHUCK STEAK or ROAST 59? lb.
SUPER RIGHT BONELESS
SHOULDER ROASTv 89? lb.
FLA. OR GA. FRESH
FRYER QUARTERS 39? lb.
FLA. OR GA. FRESH ..
FRYER PARTS 49? lb.
SUPER RIGHT ..
1/4 PORK LOINS 59? lb.
24 oz. BOTTLE GIANT SIZE j
WESSON OIL FAB DETERGENT
35 d I 49d I
MARVEL __
ICE CREAM % GAL. CARTON 69^
Whole kernel corn i7ozcan 3/49$
fgreOAP- 4 BARS 25<
TARTER SAUCE 10% OZ JAR 35C
MS8 cktail 3 CANS 79 <
FLAVORED DRINKS BOTTLES 10<
CaVfOOD SO* 10 for 1.00
DAILY
DOG FOOD 15% OZ CAN 10c
ouart 59c
ANGEL SOFT
MAS? 200 count 4 / 1 00
JUMBO TOWEL ROLL 25C
NUTLEY
SOLID MARGERINE 4 POUNDS 69<
FIRESIDE
MARSHMB.LOWS soz bag IOC
A&P
ASPIRIN BOTTLE OF 100 19<
REGULAR OR MENTHOL
SHAVE CREAM noz can 59<
A&P
FLOURIDE TOOTHPASTE ?% oz tube 49<
A&P
MOUTHWASH 14 OZ BOTTLE 39<
A&P
CHARCOAL LIGHTER QUART CAN 39<
BRIGHT SAIL
SCOURNG PADS 10's BOX 23C
A&P
WONDERFOIL 25 FOOT ROLL 29<
ARISTOCRAT
SALTINES 25<
ANN PAGE
THIN MINTS CANDY 12 OZ. BOX 45<
A&P ASP
skimmlSmTk fro zen SFINACH
lAI lot 100 l
lO c OZ I PKG.
FRESH FIRM GOLDEN
BANANAS 10c lb.
PINK OR WHITE
GRAPEFRUIT 5 POUND BAG 39C
FRESH PASCAL
CELERY STALK 19t I
WESTERN FRESH
CARROTS 2 POUND BAG 29c
CANADIAN
RUTABAGAS 7C lb.