Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PRCSS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 93

LONG AS SEATS AVAILABLE
University Senate Opens To Public

Parking
Plan Off
Til Fall
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Board of Regents
approved parking plan for spring
quarter at UF has been delayed
by the University Senate until
September.
A motion to send the Traffic
and Parking Plan back to
committee and maintain the
present parking fee for registered
vehicles at UF was defeated by a
69-32 vote.
Senate members said they
want to place their approval on
the plan before it goes into
effect.
Chairman of the Department
of Architecture, Arnold Butt,
presented the plan to the
University Senate for approval.
Buses for the plan, according
to Butt, are available through a
local supplier, the rules and
regulations for the plan have
been hammered out, there is a
need for aditional off-campus
police to enforce the plan and
we are searching for a traffic
coordinator to administer the
system.
Because of the influx of new
students and faculty members
on campus and the loss of
parking spaces due to the
building program which is taking
approximately 2,000 parking
spaces, Butt recommended that
the Senate approve the parking
plan.
If we dont do anything, we
will go from bad to worse, he
said.
Following Butts remarks,
Senate members offered their
feelings on the proposed parking
system.
One member wanted a
specific parking space assigned
to him for his personal use since
he has to pay a fee to park on
campus.
Impossible, Butt said, we
are giving you a hunting license
to find a parking space on
campus, thats all. There arent
enough spaces for a parking
space to be assigned to each
qualified person on campus, he
pointed out.
Dr. Manning Dauer, Political
Science Department chairman,
wanted to know if the total
annual cost of the plan could be
payed for out of the university
budget.
Butt said that the state
legislature would not fund this
type of program because it was
against their policy.
One faculty member said he
doesn't mind donating to a
parking fee-fund but he does
object to being clobbered with a
fee that the senate had no voice
in formulating.

The
i
Florida Alligator

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UF PRESIDENT STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... addresses the University Senate
Slade Complaint
Answered Soon

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
State Sen. Tom Slade will
have an answer to his complaint
against Dr. Kenneth Megill
within 10 days, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell said
Thursday.
At that time, the case will
either be dropped, if the
complaint is judged invalid, or
an investigation will be held and
formal charges filed.
Slade, a senator from
Jacksonville, two weeks ago

Interhall Takes Curfew Ball

By SUZI WHALEY
Alligator Staff Writer
The responsibility for freshman curfew
policy-making has been given to the Interhall
Council by the Association of Women Students,
Dean of Women Betty W. Cosby said Thursday.
Mike McNerncy, Interhall president, said they
were considering two major questions about
freshman curfew; its necessity and its enforcibility.
McNerney said many freshman ghls need the
curfew a$ a crutch. In a poll taken by Interhall,
many freshman girls and almost all upperclassmen

University of Florida, Gainesville

demanded publicly that
OConnell fire Megill, an
assistant professor of
philosophy, because of a speech
he made during Accent 69
Week. Megill advocated student
control of the UF and called
Black Power the most
significant political force of this
century.
A state-wide furor erupted as
a result of Slades letter, which
reached the press before
OConnell. Many UF factions
(SEE 'SLADE', PAGE 2)

were in favor of a curfew for freshmen.
The present system, McNerney said, is not
enforcible and therefore totally ineffective.
Miss Joyce Thomas, counselor for Graham Area,
said the students should decide their own curfew.
She also feels the present system is very ineffective.
It may be considered a crutch during the first
quarter, but after that the students feel more
responsible and resent the idea of a curfew, she said.
A counselor in Broward Hall, Gail Mrkvicka, said
many students feel the curfew is a comforting
thing, but for the most part, it isnt being
observed.

First Preference
Goes To SG, Press

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Senate
Thursday, after a lengthy
floor debate, voted to let
the public attend open
meetings as long as items
under consideration are not
of a confidential nature.
Former policy for members
of the press and public at Senate
meetings stated that, Meetings
of the Senate shall not be open
to the press.
The proposal passed
Thursday, opens the senate
doors to representatives of the
press, five representatives from
student government, 10 persons
invited by UFs President or the
presiding officer of the Senate
and the general public insofar
as seating capacity permits.
Some members of the senate
opposed Article Four of the new
by-law which allows for
students and staff of the
University of Florida and the
general public to attend senate
meetings.
An ammendment to the
by-law to defeat the general
public article was cut down by a
verbal vote.
Article Seven of the new
by-law outlines the requirements
for a closed session of the senate
as: consideration of candidates
for honorary degrees and
matters of a confidential
nature.
Invited guests of the
executive, members of Student
Government and the general
public are not allowed to vote
on matters before the Senate.
However, the new by-law
allows members of Student
Government to address the
senate when recognized by the
presiding officer. This previlege
is denied to members of the
general public who are not
members of the Senate.
A provision in the by-law
states priority for seating
non-members of the senate.
The seating priorities are as
follows:
Members of the Senate.

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Friday, February 28, 1969

F a c ulty who are not
members of the Senate.
0 The five representatives of
student government.
0 Representatives of the
press.
0 The designees of the
President or presiding officer
who have business before the
Senate or otherwise designated
to attend a specific meeting.
0 The student body and
members of the staff at the UF
and
0 Members of the general
public.
The presiding officer of the
senate is now responsible for
designating a certain area of the
seats at the place of meeting for
the seating of non-members.
Following passage of the
open meeting by-law, members
of the press were invited to
attend the session on the
proposed parking plan at UF.
Administration
Probes SSOC
Membership
By JANIE GOULD 1
Alligator Staff Writer
Two questions seem to be
holding up Southern Students
Organizing Committees charter
* application.
Questioned is whether
SSOCs members are all UF
students, if there is a connection
between SSOC and Students for
a Democratic Society, Assistant
Vice President for Student
Affairs James Hennessey said
Thursday.
It would be difficult for us
to pass SSOC if it is shown that
non-students belong to it, he
said.
He said non-students
formerly belonged to the old
SDS-SSOC. The organization has
since dropped SDS from its
name.
The leftist group applied for a
charter several months ago. Its
application was approved Feb. 4
by the Committee on Student
Organizations and Social Affairs
and has been held up in the
student affairs office ever since.
If it was an on-campus
student organization, I think
wed have no hesitation about
approving its charter,
Hennessey said.
He said the student affairs
office also is trying to figure
out why SSOC took SDS off its
official name. He said the group
applied as SDS-SSOC but
dropped SDS while the
application was under
consideration.
(SEE 'SSOC', PAGE 2)



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, 1969

Page 2

Advertising-PR Day Today

Today is the day for all advertising and public
relations minded individuals to hear experts from all
over the country speak on their fields.
Advertising and Public Relations Day is the
second of three days sponsored by the College of
Journalism and Communications, planned to give
interested students an opportunity to hear from
authorities on their future careers.
Starting the program will be James F. Urbinski,
advertising director of the Tampa Tribune, who will
speak on Newspapers Today.
Julian M. Morris, from the office of Information
of Health, Education and Welfare in Bethesda,
Maryland, will speak about Design for Discovery.
Industrial Advertising and Public Relations is
the tonic of a talk bv Robert Cummins, director of

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!: 20-year-old Texas coed who bears the title "1969 Maid of ;
:: Cotton." :
!: Pictured here during a luncheon in the Reitz Union j
Arrendondo Room, Miss Muirhead talks over her Gainesville
i|: v itinerary with Mayor T. E. Williams. A liberal arts major at j
!: Texas Women's University, Miss Muirhead will appear in fashion :
i shows in Tampa and St. Petersburg before flying to the jj
:: University of Tennessee campus to show off her cotton wares, j
.. !
Slades Complaints
To Receive Answer

FROM PAGE ONE J
labeled the move legislative
meddling, and many legislators
and state officials agreed.
Treatment of blade's
complaint is following policy set
down by the University Senate
in 1963, OConnell said. It calls
for the president to refer the
complaint to the dean of the
professors college (Arts and
Sciences Dean Harry Sisler), for
his opinion.
The chairman of the
philosophy department, Dr.
Thomas Hanna, is also to make a
report on the complaint.
These reports will be sent

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holiday;
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of thei:
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Unior
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator i;
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville
Florida 32 601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone o
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it consider
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unles;
' notice is given to the Advertisin Manager within (I) one dav after tin
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for mon
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run severe,
times. Notices for correction must ne given before next insertion.

back to OConnell, and judging
from their inquiries, the
complaint will either be dropped
or held for further action.
Further action could entail
a formal investigation charges
filed and a hearing before the
University Senate Committee on
Academic Freedom and Tenure.
Well have an answer soon,
OConnell said. This has to be
done properly or not at all, and
in a manner to follow in the
future.
Asked whether Slades
motives were political, (he is
rumored to be running for state
comptroller or treasurer)
OConnell said he always works
under the assumption that the
best motives are involved.

advertising and public relations for the P.R. a or Y
Co. in Indianapolis.
The featured speaker at a luncheon sponsored by
the Florida Public Relations Association will be
Homer E. Hooks, executive director of the Florida
Phosphate Council in Lakeland.
The luncheon will also include a fashion show by
Theta Sigma Phi, womens journalism honorary
John B. Collins, vice president and senior
management supervisor on the National Airlines
advertising account, will talk on National Turned
Florida into an Airline.
The final speaker will be James S. Ellenburg Jr.,
public relations representative for Aluminum
Company of America.

TONIGHT AT 8:15
Play Tells Suicide Story

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Sex, insanity, gore...
All this and more will be
presented in a mixed-media play
by Dr. Didier Graeffe tonight at

Administration Holds
SSOC Member Probe

FROM PAGE ONE
From what we know of SDS
nationally, he said, it would
be dis f icult for any
administration to let it operate
on any campus.
But this is SSOC volumes
have been written about SDS,
but nothing about SSOC.
Apparently the
administration is investigating
possible affiliations of SSO^

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Schedule Os Events
9:05 Welcome by the Dean of College of Journalism and I
Communications, John Paul Jones.
9:15 -James F. Urbinski, of Tampa Tribune, speaks on
Newspapers Today.
9.55 Coffee Break.
10:10 -Julian M. Morris, from the office of Information of
HEW speaks on Design for Discovery.
11:15 Industiral Advertising and Public Relations topic of a
talk by Robert Cummins.
12:30 Luncheon
2 : 30 Address by John B. Collins, National Turned Florida
into An Airline.
3:20 Coffee Break
3:35 Speak by James S. Ellenburg Jr., PR Representative for
Aluminum Company of America.

8:15 in Walker Auditorium.
The play, Appearance and
Reality, is the story of an
apparent suicide, told from four
points of view.
The cast includes Margaret
and Michael Beistle, a couple

with other organizations.
If there are any other
organizations involved in SSOC,
this would have to be weighed
very carefully, he said.
About the only official word
from the student affairs office
on SSOCs charter is that it is
still under consideration.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said he would act on
the matter as soon as the Dr.
Kenneth Megill case is resolved,
which should be in about 10
days.

familiar to all UF students who
have seen plays by Graeffe in
past years; Dr. William
Goldhurst, an assistant professor
in humanities; and Beth
Clutterham, whom many will
remember as the girl in the
bikini in Graeffes Happening
last year.
Appearance and Reality
has been performed for capacity
crowds at freshman lectures this
week. Friday night is the only
time the play will by publicly
performed.
Graeffe, professor of
humanities, has been writing and
pr o d t u ci n g plays for
presentation at UF for 12 years.



By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
Lester L. Hale is a man walking a tightrope.
It is a trembling, unsure tightrope stretching over
a university many fear is a powderkeg with a slow
flame inching toward its fuse.
The tall, silver-haried UF vice president for
student affairs is the administration, but his
job his primary concern is the students.
From Hales spacious, sun-lit office on the first
floor of Tigert Hall, the Plaza of the Americas is
partially visible. Only Venetian blinds, trees and
Peabody Hall separate this fortress of the
establishment from the plaza so often the scene of
UF protests.
Student unrest and the attacks launched upon
Hale and the administration have become an
unhappy way of life for this 34-year veteran of the
university.
I have learned to accept them as the normal
result of trying to do anything, Hale said, but
they dont make life any happier.
Hale fingered a jade colored cigarette lighter as
he spoke of his feelings for the students and the
straight-jacket restraints of being part of the
administration.
He is bothered by the credibility gap dividing
him from the students and wonders why students
cannot understand his interest in communicating
.with them as people, not numbers.
A large part of the credibility problem lies in
Hales distance from the students, literally and
figuratively. In some other Southern universities the
Office of Student Affairs is located in the student
union and the vice president is easily accessible to
the students.
Hale complains often of his isolation and lack of
time to become involved with students because of
his heavy administrative workload.
This gap contributes to the sometimes
muttered sometimes blatant verbal abuse heaped
upon Hale.
Radical elements within the university
community say Hale is a right wing tyrant. They
blame his for administrative oppression and
accuse him of being arbitrary and two-faced in his
dealings with students.
To them he represents not a fatherly figure
concerned with the students but a conservative
bureaucrat who would not think twice before
betraying student interests that oppose his views.
Such is not the stuff of good universities.
The man who was once victim of Huey Long
political intervention in Louisiana that forced him

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LESTER L. HALE:
Walking Tigerts Tightrope
Between Administration
And A Powderkeg?

to leave LSU in 1935 because his wifes family was
on the wrong side of the political fence finds it hard
to face accusations of authoritarianism,
arbitrarianism and rigid establishmentarianism.
Concerned with the public image of the
university, Hale discounted the impression of a
rioting, rebellious student body the public envisions.
Falling back into his chair and staring into the
sunny, green-blue decor of his carpeted office, Hale
lamented the way things are so often distorted and
turned into disruptive forces..
There isnt anything unhealthy about student
unrest, he said, students are concerned about
campus issues and rightfully so and will work
them out if we can keep from having an inflamatory
situation.
Hale, father of three and now a grandfather,
came into the administrative end of the university
almost by accident in 1956. Then UF President J.
Wayne Reitz appointed him dean of men after Hale
spent several years in the administration of UFs
Speech and Hearing Center.
Hale looks back on the university from his
present responsibility of 20,000 students and recalls
its growth from the small, all-male college he first
came to during the days of the New Deal.
He complains that the rapidity of growth has
made it difficult to keep up with the increasing
number of students.
It has been difficult in recent years to maintain
a high quality of teaching, Hale said.
He sees the university gearing itself more toward
upper division and graduate programs with the
development of the states junior college system.
However, he is confident UF will maintain the
strong lower division he feels is necessary to keep a
complete spectrum of the student body.
This is one of the real opportunities of a large
institution, he said speaking from behind his large
walnut desk.
Behind him on the shelf beneath the window are
pictures of his three children: Evelyn, 30; Cynthia,
23; and Lester Jr., 19. A picture of his wife of
nearly 35 years rests on his desk. Surrounding him is
memorabilia collected from his third of a century at
UF an old-fashioned, ornate wall phone given to
him by WRUF radio, certificates of membership
Kiwanis Club and other community groups, shelves
of books on counseling and psychology.
Hale presides over his domain like a legendary
king of old.
Once a first string football player at the
University of Wisconsin, his undergraduate alma
mater, Hale now is contented with cheering on the
Green Bay Packers. By nature, he never shrinks
from combat, on the football field or behind his
Tigert desk.
Last spring Hale was challenged by the Student
board of Investigation. In a We Accuse leaflet
distributed over the campus he was accused of
repeatedly tarnishing the reputation of the
University of Florida by discriminatory use of his
authority. The group of Woodrow Wilson Fellows,

/ /zave learned to accept attacks
on me as the normal result of trying
to do anything . but they dont
make life any happier ...
'
. .... f
j
7/ 5 hard to be accused of being
authoritarian, arbitrarian, and
rigidly establishmentarian ...
*s
zl/zc/ u7ztf/ */o do about the
credibility gap .... campus
demonstrators . communicating
with students . .'

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Ford Foundation Fellows and Phi Beta Kappa
demanded Hale be Fired and an investigation
conducted.
A subsequent investigation found these charges
untrue and he weathered the storm.
I havent lost my faith in people and in the
outcome of trumoil, Hale reflected.
He finds his job frustrating at times, confining
and separating him from his activities with students.
Hale said he would not give up his annual
presentation of the Christmas Carol, a 27 year
tradition at UF, for the world. Hale recently
spent an evening at the Sigma Chi house reading
short stories and talking to students. Hale revels in
these activities, feeling it aids his relations with
students to see him in a different light.
Hales relations with students arent always on
the fairy-tale level, however, as he is one of the
favorite targets for campus demonstrators.
He thinks the recent Megill-Slade letter
controversy has the potential to blow up into
campus disturbances like those at Berkeley,
Columbia and Wisconsin.
Citing a study made by a psychologist at the
University of California at Berkeley, Hale ticked off
the ingredients for student revolts: stage one, find a
sacred issue, one the university cant back down
on; stage two, press and media coverage; and stage
three, reaction against campus authorities called in
to handle the disturbances.
Hale sees UF in stage two, and fears legitimate
student concerns are being sucked into being used
by campus radical groups.
The SSOC and others like them seem to be
waging a war with society, not necessarily the
university, he said.
The former boy scout troop leader is
apprehensive about public reaction to the SSOC
charter decision, whatever way it is decided.
We sometimes get caught in the middle of these
things because real hard core concerns seem to be
directed at the democratic principles, he mused.
The vice president believes communication is the
basis for all human and university relations.
Problems can be worked out between people who
want to find their solutions, not tactics to disrupt,
he said.
There have always been and always will be
things the university has to do to adapt to the times
and the rapid educational explosion, Hale
commented.
And so Hale walks the tightrope. Occassionally
he slips and the impact of the fall is bait for his
enemies, but" the tightrope stretches on and Hale is
not a quiter.
Thirty-four years has given Hale a perspective on
endurance.

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Friday, February 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, 1969

Black Revolution
Topic Os Talk
Prof. Donald H. Smith will
give an address entitled The
Black Revolution: Implications
for Teacher Training, this
afternoon at 1:30 in McCarty
Hall Auditorium.
Smith is a prominent scholar
and an expert on urban affairs.

THE CHEERS^ WWiW^wwwws w |
I Roman Riots Greet Nixonl

ROME (UPI) President Nixon, welcomed
with cheers by a huge crowd in West Berlin,
arrived in Rome Thursday for a visit that triggered
anti-American rioting by thousands of leftists.
They battled some 40,000 riot policy with
clubs, overturned cars, smashed windows and
waved Red flags in the heart of the eternal city.
Hundreds of demonstrators protesting Nixons
visit also battled police outside the U.S.
consulate in Milan and more than a thousand
gave way to policy baton-charges in the streets of
Bologna, the Communist party stronghold near
Florence.

WHATS
HAPPENING
_ By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
THE PHYETTES: Is
currently looking for new
members. Anyone interested in
this womens auxiliary of Alpha
Phi Omega Mens service
fraternity, is invited to a 7:30
p.m. meeting Tuesday in Reitz
Union room 150-B.
FOLK FESTIVAL: Auditions
will be held April 12 in
conjunction with Gator
Weekend (April 10-12). They
will be held at the Bent Card.
For more information, call Cheri
Weihl, 378-5107.
GRADE APPEALS BOARD:
Currently pending before
department chairman of the
College of Arts and Sciences. If
approved March 10, it will then
go to the A&S faculty for final
approval.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
FOR PRACTICING
PHYSICIANS: Dr. Robert Q.
Marston, director of the
National Institute of Health
(NIH), recently announced a
$73,000 contract for seven
hospitals in the Jacksonville
area. UFs College of Medicine
will participate with other
centers in assisting a limited
number of Jacksonville
physicians who will serve as
instructors.
BARBEQUE TO BENEFIT
GATOR LOAN FUND. Broward
Hall will hold its annual Gator
Loan Fund barbecue Sunday at
Broward Field. J.K. and the Jug
will furnish the music from 4:30
to 6:30 p.m. The 51.50 tickets
are available at Broward or at
the gate Sunday.
DELICIOUS
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Nixon, who was greeted warmly by a small
crowd at Rome airport, was not involved and did
not see any of the clashes. A massive security
force kept demonstrators away from his Appian
Way motorcade route and .The Quirinale
presidential palace where he remained for the
day and overnight.
University student died Thursday
night of injuries that resulted when he fell from a
university window during the disorders. Scores of
civilians and 23 police were injured, five of the
police seriously, in furious hand-to-hand brawling
over a wide area of Rome.

BY HOWARD POST
[-they probably" )
/ Neep the /



Greek News I
By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writer

LAMBDA CHI
ALPHA With student revolts
and building take-overs in the air
it is only natural that a
fraternity house should fall
victim to the craze.
Last weekend the Frolics
dates of the Lambda Chi
brothers began a full scale
attack on the house, holding
it until sometime Saturday
morning. This has now become
an annual event, one that began
last year when the dates
approached the house with
luggage loaded with soap, toilet
paper, shaving cream, body paint
and other weapons to aid in
evicting the brothers.
DELTA SIGMA PHI At
present the Delta Sigs lead in
the race to win this years IFC
Blood Drive trophy. They won
last year with 100 per cent of
the membership joining in on
the donations.
Plans for a new house on
number 12 Fraternity Row were
presented to the university
administration for approval.
PI KAPPA PHI The Pi Kaps
now have 14 new brothers.
At their neophyte banquet
last week an award was given to
John Kesler for the Best All
Around Brother and Eric
Schmierer was honored with the
Best Pledge Award.
PHI MU Phi Mus extend
congratulations to Karen Smith
a new Phi Kappa Tau little sister.
Janey McCrillus and Susan White
are new Delta Chi little sisters,
while Denise Valiante was
elected president and Lauralee
Steers secretary-treasurer of
Delta Chi little sisters. Sarah
Jane LaFrance was tapped for
Savant. Liz Hall is the new
treasurer of Alpha Phi Omega
and Janey McCrillus was chosen
assistant Panhellenic Rush
Chairman.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
President Steve Aptheker was
awarded the IFC Fleming
Scholarship for outstanding
academic achievement. Miles
Wilkin, IFC Treasurer, was
recently tapped for the Order of
Omega, a national honorary
leadership fraternity.
PI LAMBDA PHI The Pi
Lams will sponsor a turtle race
Saturday at 2 p.m. This will be
an annual event with all
proceeds going to the Gator
Loan Fund. This year it will be
held in conjunction with the
Gator Olympics.

MANAGER POSITION OPEN
U of F Faculty Club, Inc.
the Rathskeller is now
accepting applications for
Club Manager a
I salaried management
position
Apply
T Student Activities Desk
I\T 3rd Floor Reitz Union

CHI OMEGA Chi Omegas
started off the new year under
the leadership of Cathy Bennett,
president; Marsha Madden, vice
president; Linda Otto, secretary;
Bernie Sechen, treasurer; Mary
Lasseter, personnel; and Sue
Railey as rush chairman.
Four Chi Omegas are new
Lambda Chi Little Sisters;
Bobbie Bautz, Cheryl Cantrell,
Karen Crannell and Rosemary
Verhoestra. Jane Reed is a new
member of Phi Kappa Tau Little
Sisters of the Laurel.
Chi 0 pledges helped Delta
Chi entertain 40 Gainesville
underpriviledged children at a
barbecue. New Delta Chi Little
Sisters are Cindy Frambach,
Dayle Hosek and Beti Sechen.
Angel Flight chose three Chi
Omegas: TWary Amann, Cindy
Frambach and Kathy Schoen as
new members.
SIGMA CHI-Sigma Chi
welcomed eight new brothers
earlier this quarter.
New officers are: John
McPhail, president; Bob Gossett,
vice president; Bob Marshall,
secretary; and Tommy
Thompson, pledge trainer.
Scholastically last quarter the
Sigs made the. third highest
average of the campus
fraternities.
JOINT SERVICE
PROJECT Kappa Delta
sorority and Phi Delta Theta
fraternity jointly sponsored a
recent party for the children of
Sunland Training Center.
WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIR
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Friday, February 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, 1969

Gainesville Missionary:
Library Science Teacher

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Mrs. Ludi Spears is no
bookworm. The UF library
science teacher is in Gainesville
on a missionary endeavor.
Most of her non-teaching
time is spent spreading the
doctrines of the Bahai faith, one
of the worlds newest religions.
She came here two years ago for
that purpose, and she plans to
leave as soon as nine adults have
accepted her faith.
When her goal is reached,
shell be on her way to Africa,
which is the dream of every
Bahai, she said, because their
hearts are purer. Since four
adults in town have become
Bahais, Mrs. Spears has begun
Swahili lessons to get ready for
her trip.
Even though she has not had
great numerical success in
Gainesville, the petite librarian
believes that there will be a mass
conversion to the Bahai faith by
the end of the century,
preparing for world tribulation.
World peace, she believes will
then be established.
Her religion bases its
doctrines on the teachings of the
prophet Bahaullah, born in Iran
in the 19th century. This man
was, Baha'is believe, simply the
latest in a number of prophets
sent from God, including
Mohammed, Buddha, and Christ.
God sends a new prophet to
remind the people of his
teachings and sometimes lo
readjust them to current social
laws.
The prophet Bahaullah spent
42 years in prison, where he had
time to record his teachings,
which deal with all phases of
human endeavor. The first
international attention drawn to
these teachings was a year after
his death, in 1893, when a booth
was set up at the worlds fair in
Chicago. Today the religion
claims three million members in
all parts of the world, including
20,000 in the U.S.
One of the basic tenets of
Mrs. Spears faith 'is that
prejudice is evil. The Bahais
believe in equality for all.
Justice is love in action, she
said. Because living her faith is
very important to her, Mrs.
Spears and her family chose to
make theii home in the black
community. They 'usually have
one or two black children living
with them temporarily until a
suitable home for them can be
found.
She believes anybody who
accepts the guidance of God will
go to Heaven, but that Heaven is
not a physical place. Nothing is
binding enough but the
spiritual, she added.
Local meetings, called
firesides, are held Friday
evenings in her home to answer
people's questions. The crowd
Welcome to
Weekend
dCOUOt
y wmi J&B

-* SfpSfflHj&K. i O ~:;;.. Jijje
: ft
m -3
MRS. LUDI SPEARS
... In town on missionary endeavor

varies from zero to ten. Most
intere .ted people find out about
the meetings through public
meeting notices. Mrs. Spears
feels this is sufficient because
people everywhere are
searching.
We h?ve them look for us,
she said.
In reaching her co-workers
and students, Mrs. Spears said
the most effective way is
through actions rather than
words. She gives information
only when asked; then, she is
most willing to give an
enthusiastic explanation of her
faith.
Special meetings just for
Bahai members are held every
19 days. Besides the four adult
Bahais in Gainesville, there are
also three UF students and a
number of teenagers and
children who attend these
feasts.
Kerry McCord, lUC, said that
he and the cTther two Bahai
students on campus are working
to form a student organization.
The charter has been sent to
their national organization for
approval and they hope to have
meetings underway by the end
of this quarter. The meetings
would primarily consist of a
group of students talking about
current problems, he said.
In answer to Madalyn
Murray's charges that the
worlds worst crimes were

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committed by religious people,
Mrs. Spears said she believes
many crimes were committed in
the name of religions, but that
they were done in direct
disobedience of religious laws.
She said Bahais feel all divison is
due to a corruption of Gods
laws.
Bahai headquarters are on
Mt. Carmel in Haifa, Israel,
where their nine-member
Universal House of Justice meets
to study the writings of
Bahaullah. They believe these
writings infallible, and also
profess that the House of Justice
can make infallible
pronouncements. They do not,
however, accept the Pope as an
infallible interpreter of the
Bible.
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Friday

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, i 969

Ravin a"

Campus Demonstration

It seems that too many placid people,
particularly State Senators and University Senators
have recently become extremely perturbed over the
threat of unruly campus demonstrations. As
peaceful protest abounds in the Plaza of the
Americas, there seems to be no reason for such
concern. But, of course, the holier-than-thou
quasi-legislators can never discuss UF students in
terms of UF.
You see, its not whats happened at UF that
worries these people. I dont MEAN to IMPLY
that danger lurks on the UF campus dont get me
wrong, mind you BUT lode what happened at
Columbia . and SF State .. and
Berkeley... etc. They dont want another
Columbia or another SF State, so they start
'heming in an effort to keep UF students in line.
That line of reasoning judge one student body
in terms of another is almost too farcical to
believe. Like Dean Rusks Yellow Peril, the Student
Conspiracy is always in danger of spreading,
to our would-be saviours.
The irritating thing is not the admonition to
cease from disruption (I dont like to put down
anarchy, but, after all, laws are necessary) but the
attitude of people who try to dictate guidelines for
behavior that should not be dictated. Why not
condemn the presence of Florida Bureau of Law
Enforcement agents in the Plaza during teach-ins?

Demonstration Guidelines
Set By Mautz Request

MR. EDITOR:
May I please comment on one
error in fact which appears in
the otherwise fine story in the
Feb. 21 Alligator concerning the
Policy on Demonstrations passed
by the University Senate. This
error has persisted in almost
every story for the past several
weeks.
It is not true that the idea
for the resolution on
demonstrations began as a
proposal introduced in
December by Dr. John
Greenman .. . At the August
1968 Senate meeting, President
OConnell read portions of a
letter from Chancellor Mautz

iMn
jF%
>sr / j
JuBBL.
"' ,< "S'
HBIBPI *. ~mfy
j^Wjg:'-,,i

requesting all presidents in the
Florida University system to
prepare plans, if not already
prepared, to cope with
disturbances and to regulate
mass demonstrations and to
guarantee the rights of all.
President OConnell, at this
meeting, requested that the
Senate take the lead in
formulating such policy rather
than having it formulated by
administrative directive.
.Accordingly, an ad hoc
/ committee, consisting of five
faculty members, three from the
Senate membership and two
non-Senate members, was
elected by the Senate at the
September meeting, with

When someone (David Noble, for example) can
point out plain-clothes officers milling around
during a speech, it seems that the Administration'
has, to put it mildly, shown a lack of trust in
participatory democracy. Os such things are
Revolutions made.
Treat the students like human beings, not IBM
cards, and demonstrations will become obsolete.
But students are not being treated like human
beings. Jerry Farber, a teacher at Cal. State, wrote
an excellent article entitled The Student As
Nigger, in which he opined that students are taught
to stay in ones place, to accept unfair treatment
without opening ones mouth.
It is not surprising that black students are in the
vanguard of most of todays college take-overs,
because, having been treated like dirt by a racist
society, they go off to college, only to find a similar
attitude awaiting them. Theyre still niggers, not
human beings.
There doesnt seem to be much chance of a
take-over at UF in the near future. But the way to
bring it about is to raise an inordinate fuss
concerning demonstrations, investigate doctors of
philosophy for opening their mouths, and generally
convince students that the Administration is in
power merely for the purpose of keeping the
students in their place. But, then again what do I
know? Im just a student.

By David Miller.

instructions to prepare a policy
for Senate consideration and to
report back to the Senate as
soon as possible.
It was the deliberations of
this committee which were
placed on the agenda for the
January meeting and which were
subsequently modified after
joint meetings of the committee
and representatives from
Student Government and the
student body. This modified
statement, which I believe to be
superior to the first statement,
was passed by the Senate last
Thursday.
Professor Greenman was one
of the elected members of this
committee but it was prior to his
election and the deliberations of
the committee that he,
personally, had prepared a
resolution in support of
President OConnel!. Another
resolution had also been
prepared by the Executive
Committee of AAUP. These two
resolutions, by action of the
Steering Committee of the
Senate, did finally appear on the
December agenda of the Senate
but were, at that meeting,
referred to our committee for
recommendation. It was the
feeling of the committee that
our recommended Police
Statement, together with the
resolution of support for
President O'Connell, more
nearly met the request of
Chancellor Mautz and President
O'Connell and our instructions
from the Senate, hence its
presentation and adoption.
Although there is much more
history which could he related. 1
trust this clears up the confusion
which appeared in the Alligator
and the State press, and which
has persisted.
Professor of Chemistry
JOHN F. BAXTER

The Florida Alligator
#"Th* price of froodom
it the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
PuimAmi Dave D u<*tte
Managing Editor
Ml
Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
liIMUM. Executive Editor News Editor
EDITORIAI
SG Stirs To Life
One of the basic deficiencies in Student Government as it
presently exists is a lack of the authority needed to be a real
government.
In realistic terms, about the only power SG has is its
prestige and the threat of student opinion. With these as a
base, it must deal with the administration and faculty to
accomplish goals for the student body.
Often it runs headlong into a solid brick wall, and the
goals are scuttled.
But there are some very positive indications that change
is coming, that a true government for and by students is in
the making.
One indication is an increasing abundance of idealists in
SG, young people who, though not ignoring the political
realities of dealism and compromise, are willing to stick
their necks out for the students they lead.
They are committed more to genuine service than to
personal aggrandisement. SG has long needed such leaders,
and they are coming now as products of campus unrest and
student disillusionment with the historical do-nothingness
of the established system. -:'
Under their leadership, SG has begun to move toward
relevant involvement. As more and more idealists join the
ranks of leadership, the pace will quicken.
Another indication that a true government is in the
formative stages came in a proposal approved by the Action
Conference Wednesday.
The proposal calls for the creation of an all-student
conduct committee. This proposal, coupled with an earlier
proposal that SG assume original jurisdiction over all
student conduct regulations, will provide a significant
impetus to the move toward meaningful student
government.
If these two proposals are adopted by the appropriate
university groups without being watered down, UF students
will for the first time, through their government, have a
direct and authoritative voice in directing their own lives
and determining their own destinies.
If students handle the new responsibilities with wisdom
and maturity, long strides will have been made for greater
student participation in the affairs of the university.
A responsible, dedicated government would serve as an
ideal example of how students can conduct themselves and
their lives. It would certainly lead to greater trust on the
part of the administration and greater involvement in
decisions over which students now have little or no voice,
such as curriculum, academic freedom and tenure, petitions
and others.
The effect of greater involvement, responsibility and
maturity will likely have a spiral effect, in that students and
their government will be given even more authority over
themselves.
, The signs of progress for students and Student
Government are undeniable. Constructive change,
slow-moving and long in coming, is approaching reality.
It would be a travesty it SG were abolished in next
Wednesday s election, just as it is about to burst onto the
threshhold of true government.
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial. Business, Advertising offices ir. Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
G ... \
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are tho* of the editors or of
the writer oi ths article and not thoae of the Untveratv of Florida."
i



f THREAT TO PEACE'

Russia Is Superior
In Civil Defense

MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Korenblits critisism
(Feb. 13) of Dr. Broyles letter
will not stand up under the
facts. Korenblits claim that
Russian civil defense is in its
infancy relative to ours is false,
as was shown years ago by the
definitive studies of Cannel and
Foster (Stanford Research
Institute, 1960) and Goure
(University of California Press,
1962). These studies showed
Russias vast superiority in:
(1) Dispersion. From
adherence to a pre-World-War-II
decree that no new industry
would be established in existing
cities, 600 new industrial centers
have been created.
(2) Shelter. The Soviets are
constructing shelters for
protection from chemical and
biological weapons and nuclear
radiation, blast, and fire. We
merely mark space in existing
buildings which afford radiation
protection.
(3) Training and personnel.
Besides compulsory training
courses (not feasible in our
democracy) taken by most of
the population, Russia has a
professional paramilitary corps
of 40,000.
Similarly, Mr. Korenblitss

ABM Shelter System:
A Chance For Survival

MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Sam Greenlaw has written an interesting
letter presenting arguments opposing missile defense
systems (the ABM and shelter systems). I believe,
however, that his arguments are not correct for the
following reasons.
Mr. Greenlaw defines nuclear sufficiency as
that deliverable megatonnage which would
annihilate ones enemys society in any conceivable
total war situation. He then quotes Herman Khan
as stating that, by this definition, the currently
possessed capabilities of both the Soviet Union and
the United States are completely sufficient.
But Mr. Khans statement was made about twelve
years ago, before the Russians had begun to deploy
their anti-missile missiles (ABM) and before recent
improvements made in their missile guidance
systems as well as their satelite observation
capability.
These Russian improvements open up the
possibility of their eliminating many of our attack
missiles by striking our launching sites. It is difficult
to be certain how many of our attacking missiles
they could destroy with their ABM system. Herman
Khans statement was also made before the studies
that showed that the Russians could cut their losses
to 2.5 million by building shelters on the peripheries
of their cities and evacuating people to these
shelters.
The time for this evacuation may be bought by
striking fi'rst or by destroying the iirst waves of
attacking missiles with ABMs. The, point is simply
this: Herman Khan's statement was correct when it
was made. It may still be true. But if we remain
complacent and do not upgrade our attack and
defense systems, it may not be true some day. 1 he
Russians may then resort to blackmail or may
attack.
Mr. Greenlaw is quite correct when he says that
their leaders must believe that our side would
retaliate. But would our leaders order a retaliatory
strike if it meant suicide because we have an
inadequate civil defense? Suppose, for example, the
Russians attacked and destroyed New York City
and threatened to attack the--whole country u we
retaliated. Would we sacfrficc SO.f to 90,r el our

claim of a new humaneness in
the Russian dictatorship has, like
so many similiar wishful claims
of the past century for both
Czarist and Communist regimes,
been refuted by events the
Czech invasion and new Jewish
and literary repressions. We may
hope but not yet claim.
That this civil defense gap has
widened since 1962 is shown by
Levey (of the Oak Ridge
National Laboratories) in the
forthcoming issue of SURVIVE,
a national journal of civil
defense. Incidentally, four of six
editorial committee members of
SURVIVE, including Dr.
Broyles, are University faculty
members.
Thus, the great present threat
to peace is not our superiority in
offense, which is disappearing;
rather it is the increasing
superiority in civil defense of an

. . the great present threat to peace is not our
superiority in offense, which is disappearing; rather it
is the increasing superiority in civil defense of an
opportunistic autocracy. Our danger is that the very
loss of LOO million which makes war unthinkable to us
makes war attractive to a dictator who can limit his
loss to 2 million through strong civil defense.

population in order to find revenge for the loss of
New York? I do not believe that our promise to
retaliate is believable unless we are prepared to fight
that kind of war AND SURVIVE IT.
The thing that disturbs me most about this whole
balance of terror concept is the assumption that
the enemy is entirely rational and that he will see
things in the same way that we see them. Those of
us that remember Pearl Harbor can recall how
irrationally we thought the Japanese were behaving
at that time. We had believed it to be obvious that
we could crush them in short order. How wrong we
were!
In the recent Pueblo hearings it has become clear
that help was not available to the Pueblo because
our Navy Admirals had considered an attack on
such a ship in international waters to be too remote
a possibility How many mistakes are we going to
make because we believe we can accurately predict
enemy action?
Finally there are some statements of fact that
Mr. Greenlaw has made that I would like to
question. It is not clear to me that lags in deploying
defensive systems are greater than offensive systems,
particularly after we gain experience in the former.
1 do not know where Mr. Greenlaw gets his S2OO
billion figure for a U. S. ABM shelter system. The
1964 Harbor Report to the National Academy of
Sciences gives a figure of S2O billion for blast
shelters. Fallout shelters should add only another
one or two billion. Construction would probably be
spread over a period of five years so that $5 billion
per year would probably provide thy shelters. The
ABM system currently being considered by our
government is estimated to cost $5 billion total.
A possible complete ABM system costing S6O
billion total has been suggested but is not. as far as 1
know, under active consideration. These figures
should be compared with our current annual
defense budget proposals of about SBQ billion. In
my opinion, the cost of an ABM shelter system is
not too high to pay since it may well' mean the
difference between survival or death.
ARTHUR A. BROYLES
Professor of Physics
and Physical Sciences
V, -s-

opportunistic autocracy. Our
danger is tjhat the very loss of
100 millioh which makes war
unthinkable to us makes war
attractive to a dictator who can
limit his loss to 2 million
through strong civil defense.
Dr. Broyles is one who sees
the irony of losing the peace
through gross neglect of civil
defense, the least provocative
quantity of the security
equation.
A, >
HERBERT A. SAWYER, JR.

(\A hone fr,r the rnmpUeertJ****'''

THE
ABM
BLANKET Q
lirn
in

Research Library
Fines 'Arbitrary
MR. EDITOR:
The present system of fines at the Research Library is punitive,
naive and arbitrarily enforced. I have recently paid $2.40 for six
books which were four days overdue and which I returned with a view
to renewing. In the first place, these books were recorded on four
cards (as I had two two-volume editions). It would appear that I am to
ease the clerical work of the library employees by completing only
one card for two-volume editions, but when fines are due this system
is conveniently forgotten.
Secondly, no recall slip was sent to me to return them, so
obviously no other reader had requested them. I am aware that many
library books have been irrevocably lost in the past, but it is sheer
bureaucratic fantasy to assume that you can rectify this situation by
penalizing those who return books which they have officially checked
out. Furthermore, several other employees expressed surprise at the
situation and suggested that they would not have enforced the fine.
What kind of ludicrous nonsense is this? Either it is a rule or it is not.
No graduate student that I know of has time to compile a calendar
of when his library books are overdue, let alone make surreptitious
inquiries as to who enforces the fines and who doesnt. I suppose that
we can expect jail sentences in the future for chair-squeaking,
enforced with blase indifference (depending on who catches you.)
J. ERWIN DUNLOP, 7AS
No Honor Anywhere,
Not Even In Classes
MR. EDITOR:
The Honor System is dead!
Recently I was subjected to some of the most harsh treatment I
have ever encountered at this University.
As I was entering the large lecture room to take a PCL 220
midterm, the professor, Dr. John Todd, ordered me to place my
school books in the front of the room and place my two blue books in
a large past board box.
After everyone had been seated, his assistant passed out the books.
First of all, 1 thought we operated under the honor system at this
university. I must have been wrong.
Secondly, even if 1 had planned to cheat. I would not have been so
obvious as to carry in a stack of books.
And even if I had gone so far as to write some-key facts in the back
of the blue book, although I may not have benefited from them,
someone would have.
The honor system is dead.
A guy can't even cheat fairly any more.
BOLIVAR SHAGNASTY 3JM

Friday, February 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, 1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
CELEBRATION: A festival of
the Arts is now accepting
interview applications from all
students interested in the
program. Students wishing to
participate in this festival,
encompassing all the arts
including music, drama, the
dance and the visual arts, should
complete applications at once.
Such applications are available at
the Student Activities Desk,
Reitz ..'nion; the Office of the
bean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts;
Room 129 Tigert Hall, and in
the dean's offices in the other
colleges. CELEBRATION needs
students who want to be part of
the biggest artistic production in
UF history. CELEBRATION
will be presented throughout the
Spring Quarter of 1970.
Students completing
CELEBRATION applications
will be contacted by telephone
shortly.
m
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
SPECIAL ELECTIONS: The
Student Government will hold
special elections Wednesday,
March 5, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
*
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY DEADLINE:
Candidates for admission to the
junior class of September, 1969.
should complete the
department's applicaiton
procedures during the winter
quarter.
MARCH 4: COUNTY
SOLICITOR, BROWARD
COUNTY, FT. LAUDERDALE
interviewing law graduates
interested in trial work.

- FOR^^. NEXT CAR LOAN '"
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION CJ A
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours:B:ooa.m, 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday X^/ w

JMBA: The John Marshall
Bar Association luncheon series
presents Mark Halsey,
president-elect of the Florida
Bar Association, Friday Feb. 28,
at 12:30, at the Holiday Inn on
1-75. His topic will be
"Investigation Practices of the
Florida Bar Association."
VISITING LECTURER: Mr.
Eckhard Schulze-Fielitz will
speak on the subject "Urban
Systems" in Room 101 of Little
Hall, March 5, at 8 p.m. He is on
a speaking tour of the U.S.
sponsored by the Goethe
Institute Munich, and is
sponsored locally by the
American Institute of Architects
and the Architecture
Department.
ALL CATHOLIC FOREIGN
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
are invited to the annual covered
dish supper to be held at the
Catholic Student Center at 6:30
p.m. Saturday, March 1. Married
couples may bring a dessert or a
bunch of carrots or celery.
Entertainment will be provided.
%
FEB. 28: U.S. CIVIL
SERVICE COMMISSION Civil
Service Exam Test; for positions
throughout the U.S. Limited
overseas employment.
CHEMICAL CONSTRUCTION
CORP. usually interviews for
ChE, CE, ME, EE.

BLUB BULLETIN

PHI ETA SIGMA
SCHOLARSHIPS: Graduating
seniors who plan to work for
graduate or professional degrees
and who are members of Phi Eta
Sigma, Freshman Honor Society,
should get in touch with Dean
Mott, faculty advisor of the local
chapter. Room 129, Tigert Hall.
Local deadline for submitting
applications is Feb. 27, 1969.
Only members of Phi Eta Sigma
are eligible for these gift
scholarships, consisting of at
least nine S3OO scholarships each
year. National deadline for
submitting applications in March
1, 1969.

FACULTY: There will be a
Dutch treat, German style buffet
Facluty Club get acquainted
dinner, March 11, in the west
side of the cafeteria. $2 a
person."
PROJECT SURGE: Students
for Responsible Government.
Persons interested in working on
Project SURGE, a full-time
professional lobby of all Florida
students in Tallahassee, should
pick up applications in Room
331, Reitz Union. No previous
student government experience
is necessary.
PLACEMtuT
Sign-uo sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Friday, February 28
Advertising Public Relations
Day, Union Ballroom, 9:00
a.m.
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Movie, "Alfie", Union Aud.,
6:00, 8:30 & 11:00 p.m.
Citrus Club Banquet, Holiday
Inn, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Club, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Baptist Student Union, "Folk
Shop," Baptist Student
Center, 8:00 p.m.
Dance, "New York Rock & Roll
Ensemble" Union Ballroom,
8:00 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie,
"Fantastic Voyage," West
Wing Main Cafeteria, 7:00 &
9:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movie,
"Abbot & Costello", 7:30
p.m.; "Major Dundee", 9:00
p.m.; "20 Million Miles to
Earth", 12:00 midnight.
South Hall Movie Room.
Florida Players, "Agter the
Rain", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 1
Pi Lambda Phi, "TURTLE
RACE," Beta Field, 2:00
p.m., Proceeds: Dollars for
Scholars.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. Vs.
Georgia, Florida Gym, 7:45
p.m.
Movie, "Alfie", Union Aud.,
6:00, 8:30 & 11:00 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie,
"Fantastic Voyage," West
Wing Main Cafeteria, 7:00 &
9:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movie,
"Abbot & Costello", 7:30
p.m.; "Major Dundee", 9:00
p.m.; "20 Million Miles to
Earth", 12:00 midnight,
South Hall Movie Room.
Florida Players "After the
Rain", Constans Theatre,
Mat. 2:00 p.m.. Eve. 8:00
p.m.

Sunday, March 2
Hillel Lox and Begal Brunch,
Hillel Foundation, 11:00 a.m.
Music Dept.: Chamber Music for
Clarinet, University Aud.,
4:00 p.m.
University Film Series, "Anna
Karenina" Union Aud., 7:00
& 9:15 p.m.
Monday, March 3
"English in Action",
Converstional English
between one American
v olu nteer and one
International, Baptist Student
Center, 4:00-8:00 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 246 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, 525 E & I Bldg.,
8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, March 4
Children's Ballet Lessons, f'-A
Union, 2:45 p.m.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
SGP: RUTH PAGE
INTERNATIONAL
BALLET, Florida Gym, 8:15
p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE- Tickets
are now on sale for:
AUDUBON FILM SERIES,
General Public, Faculty &
Staff, $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $.75; Children,
$.50. UNIVERSITY FILM
SERIES, 10 films, General
Public, * Faculty & Staff,
$5.00; Univ. of Fla. Students,
$2.50; Univ. of Fla. Students,
5 films, $1.50. FLORIDA
PLAYERS: "AFTER THE
RAIN", Univ. of Fla.
Students, $.25; High School
Students, $.75; General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$1.50. SGP: RUTH PAGE
INTERNATIONAL
BALLET, General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $2.50,
51.50, & $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $2.00, $1.25 &
SI.OO.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE |
Portable TV B & W good reception
$45. Call 378-7857 after 6.
(A-st-89-P)
Mobile home Bx3o. Occupancy in the
spring quarter. See at Lot L 3, 3860
Archer Rd. SW Town and Country or
call 392-3082 from 8 to 4. L. Shaw.
(A-st-89-P)
ARMY OFFICERS winter green
uniform coat size 38 trouser size
29 Excellent condition $25.
Telephone 372-7997. (A-3t-91-P)
6 8 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Excellent condition 883 cc. Call
372-7703 after 6:30 p.m. (A-st-91-P)
1969 Suzuki 250 roll bar, luggage
rack. Excellent cond. under
warrenty, $550 Firm. Call Paul
372-5552. (A-3t-91-P)
GIBSOty J-50 with delux case blond
finish f2OO. Epiphone Texan model,
with ca-j $l3O. Call Jim at 378-9512
between 5 & 7 p.m. (A-3t-91-P)
Guns GunsGunsInventory over
450 Bu y S el IT radeRepair.
Reloading supplies, custom,
reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
466-3340. (A-ts-69-P)
A beauty of a buy!! Honda 150
complete with two helmets, tool kit,
and many more extras. Call 378-8905
after 7 pm. (A-st-93-P)
Dachshound puppy, female, black
and tan, 7 weeks old, AKC registered
$50.00. 376-8523. (A-st-93-P)
25% off to students: 2 drawer metal
storage or file cabinets. Refinished
gray, green or tan. J.R. Office
Furniture Co., 620 1 /? S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (6t-93-A-P)
2 Fisher XP-55 speakers $35.00 each
call 378-1253 after 7:30 pm.
(A-2t-92-P)
I FOR RENT |
1 br apt. central heat & air, w-w
carpt., quiet location. Rent sllO/mo.
Paid for Feb. Furnished for married
or singles. Call Jim 378-0426 after
5:00 p.m. (B-4t-90-P)
2 bdrm apt, 2 blocks from campus,
must sublet spring and summer qtrs,
$l4O month, washing machine. Call
372-6559 between 5 and 7 p.m. and
after 11 p.m. (B-85-86-p)
Must sub-lease immediately my share
spacious 2-br furn. University
Gardens apt. $42.50 mo. Call Steve
378-9728. (B-st-89-P)
RENT SLASHED! Furn. 2 bedroom
apt. on SW 16 Ave for only $l2O mo.
sublet for 3 qtr only. 376-3552.
(B-3t-92-P)
Sublet large one bedroom apartment
33 colonial manor, air-conditioned,
pool, carpeted, $l2O/month call
372-7111 students. (B-2t-92-P)
Ranch style living. One bedroom apt.
Large closets and bath. Fully paneled
and air cond. Use of pool and
bar-b-que house. Walking distance of
new golf course to be opened this
spring. Water, extermination and
garbage collection included. SIOO.OO
a month 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-6t-93-P)
Room in private home for mature
student. Central heat, AC, linen and
maid service. Separate entrance.
Phone 376-5360. (B-2t-93-P)
WANTED |
2 Roommates for spring quarter,
males. Williamburg apt. Finest living
in G'ville. Air cond, pool, dishwasher.
Call Apt. 41, 376-9719. (C-st-89-P)
1 coed roommate for Spring qtr.
Starlight *£pt 3 blocks from campus
approx $33/month. Call after 4 p.m.
preferred, 378-3449. (C-st-89-P)
2 female roommates to share 2 bdrm
apt. spring and summer qtrs. 2 blocks
from campus $lO5 qtr. 372-6559
btwn 5 and 7 p.m. and after 11 p.m.
(c-Bt-86-p)
Roommate wanted (male) for roomy,
two bedroom apartment in
Tanglewood Manor. Dishwasher, bath
and half-bath, front and rear
entrances. Low-rent poolside living.
For further information call
372-5937. (C-4t-93-P)
Wanted: coed model for amateur
photographer. No experience
necessary. Write PO box 1404,
Gainesville. (C-4t-93-P)
Need one male roomie for spring
quarter in Village Park no. 64. Call
372-0607 or stop by most anytime.
(C-2t-93-P)
Male roommate $32/month share
house, own roorn, from March Ist
on, 309 SE 7th St., 378-5094 or
378-1801. (C-2t-93-P)
Need 1 roommate for Frederick
Gardens 2~ bedroom apartment spring
quarter. Call 378-1978. (C-st-92-P)

Friday. February 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

1 WANTED I
Female roommate wanted. Fredrick
Garden Apartments. SIOO per
quarter. Spring quarter only Call
Barb at 376-1045 or 378-9945
(C-6t-93-P)
WANTED: 1 female roommate for
spacious 2 bedroom Camelot Apt.
with fireplace. Call 378-9694
(C-4t-91-P)
LA^ mark ~ Male roommate
needed. Available March 1. March
rent paid. Call 378-3120, apt. 170
(C-10t-88-P) P U
Female roommate Landmark 169
2 bedroom apt. $45 month. Can
move in for spring quarter. 378-7782
(C-st-91-P)
Lets make a deal. Sublet 2 br apt. at
Landmark or 2 roommates to share 2
br. apt. starting spring quarter. Call
378-8982, Apt. 113. (C-st-91-P)
Will share small house near Mall with
1 person, S4O for March only. Own
room. Call Mike Robinson, 392-1681
Days, 376-7489 nights. (C-4t-91-P)

ALSO sL *3
1
I j : fHliii far id
'IMMOU* 1 PIOuRLS
II
Siamng
Hill ID IRENE PJPSS LIHIER ADLER Smcm uKS^-mhn
|HH| *""> TECHNICOLOR- Music Scoied 6, LALO SCHIFRW PARAMOUNT PICTURE J{jj|
tRANCOIS TRUFFAUtTSUN.MON.TUES*''*^
jug
* I M of life
U I l itself"
JEANNE MOREAU N&/ I
~HSs SUNDAY, MARCHT
JACKSONVILLE COLISEUM 8 P.M.
TICKETS $5.00 $4.00 $3.00 ON SALE NOW AT
COLISEUM DOWNTOWN TICKET OFC. HEMING PARK AUDITORIUM
FOB RESERVATIONS CALL 354-2Q41 HOWL

Page 11

|pv>' *:
: : :w?; ag o wM.i.SiiWi i : r .vw-twyw
Female roommate for March to Aug.
$41.25/month. Fun type atmosphere
but quiet too. Call 378-0987 ask for
Kathy. (C-4t-91-P)
Male roommate to share 2 bedroom
apt. at Summit House. Cheaper than
youd think. Call 378-5748.
(C-4t-91-P)
One male roommate wanted
immediately for 2 bedroom garage
apt 2 blocks from campus cable TV.
$45 a month plus utilities call
372-5976. (C-st-92-P)
Openminded coed with car to share 2
bedroom townhouse apartment in
Anglewood Manor. SSO mo. plus
utilities. Call 376-1015. (C-4t-92-P)

rwiTwri i
! ONE OF THE YEAR'S TEN BEST!" i
Hollis Alport. Saturday Honow
j musical beds with |
I makes friends with |
s',. :.%CENP.'!WE'V* Tf / CHRISTIAN DOERtfER / CALVIN LoShART*.
I < Uh cMr **7frwiSn
- --
iW5n. w. mst. yiyl I*
H PICTURE OF MANY
! EXCELLENCES! ruggle i
i for love, a gradual unmasking of
J the he-man. Strong on exposition, J
J honest in its approach to the
i varieties of the human condition J
J ...shocking
. i
Who I
would l
bar.
suspected
the H Bl
rod siEiGEraHr i
!AS THE sergeant:
dI restricted-persons under i not admitted.| ttmuipAi nn I
111 UNLESS ACCOMPANIED BY PARENT OR ADOUGUAROIAN. TcCHRICOLOR
W ACADEMY 1 A
BEES i
j BEST PICTURE
: / Wm
i :/ ; M-', *1 i
; >r :
Franco/kii i helm I
InrtllH ((> l i
Romeo i
\ LLIET R /
> "ARAMOUNI PTCTUa; ticmn*cou>r [Hill / /



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

V t r*VVmV%VV
WANTED
The single university crowd over 21
for the Friday Afternoon Club
Will meet this & every Friday from 5
7:30 at the Lamplighter; private
rooms, pleasant atmosphere. Drinks
45c. Come early & bring your
friends. Fridays a great day to have
fun. (C-3t-86-P)
HELP WANTED |
RATHSKELLER job opportunities.
Positions open asst, business
manager, asst, public relations
chairman, asst, club supervisor.
Apply Student Activities Desk, 3rd
floor Reitz Union. (E-3t-91-C)
INVESTIGATOR Training class soon
with top co. with real career plan.
Car and benefits and $6600 starting
salary. Call Allied Personnel of
Gainesville, 1800 N Main St.,
376-4611. (E-93-st-P)
PRESTIGE AND MONEY Be
secretary, top man, beautiful office,
best environment, best salary in
town. See Allied Personnel of
Gainesville, 1800 N Main, 376-4611.
(E-93-st-P)
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Part-time or full-time Will train.
Must be 21. Dub's Steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)
Part-time stenographer 5-10 hours wk
flexible hours prefer dictaphone
experience $1.75-2.00 per hr call
376-1933 for interview appointment
Thompson Hayward Chem Co.
(E-3t-93-P)
AUTOS
>Ns?xyx*xxx*x-snsyx-x*X'X&xw99 c { :w
1969 PONTIAC GTO HARDTOP
Loaded with extras & sac. warranty
Army duty soon. Your best buy
$3650 372-7376 day 372-1549 nite
& wkend. (G-st-93-P)
1966 MG Midget. Wire wheels and
tonneau. 21,000 miles. Book price
$1125. Phone 376-7947 after 5 and
weekends. (G-st-89-P)
'62 Comet automatic, radio, heater, 4
door, very good condition, S4OO. Call
378-7857 after 6. (G-st-89-P)
'63 MG Midget, well cared for. Brand
new Pirelli tires. Best offer. Call
378-7996. (G-st-89-P)
6B VW bus 8000 miles showroom
condition, radio, 18 mos. left on
warrenty. Best offer over $2300
takes it by Sunday. 372-4177 after 6
p.m. (G-3t-91-P)
63 VALIANT $450. Excellent
condition, heater, radio. See to
appreciate. Call 392-8577.
(G-2t-92-P)
PERSONAL I
v £
Talent Anyone! Gator Gras Folk
Festival Auditions Fri. Feb. 28, 8:00
pm at the Bent Card Coffee Shop,
1826 W. University Ave. (J-2t-92-P)
Get */? chicken & more at Browards
Bar-B-Que Mar. 2, Sun. 4:30-6:30 for
Gator Loan fund. J.K. & the Jug will
entertain. $1.50 each. (J-4t-90-P)
The Friday Afternoon Club for the
university crowd over 21 will meet
this and every Friday from 5 7:30
at the Lamplighter. Private rooms,
pleasant atmosphere. Drinks 45c.
Come early & bring your friends
Friday is a great day to have fun.
(J-3t-86-P)
Tmute is the nite, N Y R RE nite 8 pm
Reitz Union Ballroom introducing
IUFF also painted go-go girl contest
absense is out. (J-93-lt-C)
Time is running out to reserve you
seat foi EUROPE this summer, s3l 5,
10 wks. N.Y. London N.Y. or go
fm cied't 392-1655 or 310 Union.
(J-ts-82-C)
Florida Players: Now is vour big
chance. Come to the meeting Mon.
Mao h 3id and voice youi opinions
on hit me policies. 5 pm. (J-2t-93-P)
Susan H.ipt.iv Lnthday to the
cii na'i. st i ppm mat i in-law eve.i.. W>t h
ne and nlect'On The Club
1.1 !.' 93. P).
t nd r 'Hi: f Ill'll' 'c it'. llm
i He. F Nd. >_' I 1 a''''
C ivh 11a ->' i' Icl iii S.T S' R-O f() A M
U ACAOIMY AWARD WINNER
1 guess who's |
% coming to
I dinner COLOR I
I SPENCER TRACY I
I KATHARINE Htl- L URN
SIDNEY POH iER
# KATHARINE HOUGHTON 1
[ : Jigsaw ciHOPj

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, 1969

Page 12

I PERSONAL
A A
*y;:xxxx< xx*x*xv.:.vxv:*x*x*x*x*x*x*:*
Youll love our turtles! . and all
the other little creatures in our
CERAMIC ZOO. From Mexico. The
Spanish Main, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Now open nights til 9:00. (J-st-92-P)
Summer Ponchos (sls) and other
clothes are in from Mexico. Woven
headbands. The Spanish Main, 105
W. Univ. Ave. Open nights til
9.(J-st-92-P)
Hey Jack, sorry you missed Daytona.
Why dont you take your car to the
GVille Mall Sunday 12:30 for the
Gymkana. Win trophies and stuff!
(J-2t-92-P)

BK| 1:50 3:45 5:40 9:35
P*SaaS?fcJl PHiillNl THE DEMOLITION
T IS DELICIOUS! !
I EXTRA k. i 4% I
I days Dean Martin
I Elke Sommer Sharon Tate Nancy Kwan Nigel Green Tina Louise
Music Lomuospd and conducled bv Hugo Monteneqro Screenplay by William McGivern
Baseo on tne noer bv Oona'o Hamilton Produced by Irving Allen Directed by Phil Karlson f
I AMeadway Claude P'Cture Sug9 ., d to J? TUBE 1 TECHNICOLOR' jQ \ ¥
(parental diacration adviaed)
CLIFF ROBERTSOV C)f/iJ|Ly CLAIRE BLOOM
i FQN JANNEY RAVI SELI& J. SIIRLING j RALPH TECHNICOLOR'
RJIHWHITE NELSON /SHANKAR ;SELIGMAN SILLIPHANT mD', ;[ tecmniscope
MATURE AI . 1:40 3:35 5:40.7:40 9:40

WOW%>ViVWWiV.V.V.v.'.v.'.v.v.v.v.*..-^
PERSONAL
s {
ii;i;i;iSS I X X X XXSS X X X X X X*SS*I X X4t\
Need your term paper typed? Ill
type anything. 50c a page. Broward
Hall. Call 392-9761. (J-2t-92-P)
HAPPINESS IS A FREE warm
puppy. Br ng a little happiness into
both your life and that of a little girl.
Sne wants them to go to good homes
rather than the pound and then into
oblivion. I do too! Call 376-9969 by
tomorrow noon. (J-lt-93-P)
1
Margie, did Freddy tell you that
deadline for financial aid applications
for next year is this Friday Feb. 28?
Better see Marian room 23 Tigert.
(J-93-lt-C)

Do-It-Yourself CLASSIFIEDS

LOST 4 FOUND
Found prescription sunglasses.
Tolbert area handball courts. Call
378-7571. (L-3t-91-P)
Lost Thursday brown Joh Romain
key case. If found please Call
376-3729 after 4. (L-st-91-P)
Found one pr glasses outside
Matherly. Call 378-5061 5:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m. and claim same.
(L-3t-91-P)
LOST Post Versalog slide rule. Name
is inside. Contact Wayne Zellner,
376-1 155 evenings. REWARD!
(L-st-91-P)
WOMANS brown rimed reading
glasses in red and white case. If
found, call 392-9463. REWARD.
(L-3t-91-P)

1 SERVICES |
S. v.:.ssx:WXX*>X4W'
** -
BABYCARE 311 NW 15th Terrace
Infants under 1 yr old $15.00 pet
wk. Mon -Fri, 8 am to 5 pm By
the hour 75c. Ex pci ionc cd,
trustworthy, Christian home. Ph.
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f After The Rain
A Feast For Thought

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Reviewer
Playwright John Bowen has
created a feast for thought and
called it After the Rain. And
this week the Florida Players
under the direction of James
Lauricella have been bringing
it to life nightly in the Constans
Theatre.
The play offers a full menu of
talent on several levels and a
banquet worth savoring in the
multiple ideas and controversies
touched upon during the
performance.
Its action centers around an
event most will find quite
familiar the classroom lecture.
And yet, this lecture
addressed as such to the
audience supposedly takes
place 200 years from now and
concerns the great flood, a
catastrophe which spares only a
handful to recreate life
All this is portrayed by means
of a troupe of hypnotized
prisoners who, under the
lecturers direction and watchful
eye, act out the experiences of
these sole survivors on then thensmall
small thensmall raft -a performance
whose dual purpose informs the
audience and rehabilitates the
prisoners.
But thats just the surface.
Under this structure are played
numerous allegories concerning
such meaty points of contention
as the nature and purpose of
God and life.
Further, weaved throughout
the plays fabric are ample
opportunities for not only
strong drama and equally light
comedy, but also wry, extremely
communicative satire and a

'CelloComical Clash

The Absence of a Cello, a
comical clash between Madison
Ave. and the Groves of
Academe, is playing this
weekend and next at the
Gainesville Little Theatre.
Seats are still available for
tonights and Saturdays
performances. Reservations for
next weekend may be made by
calling the Theatre.
Reserved seats must be
claimed by 8:20 pm and curtain
time is 8:30.
Tickets are 51.50 on

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/The S.S. Winnjammer
Luncheons served from 11:00A.M. < )
: Dinners to 12:00 P.M. //
f. \\
\ Bernie Sher at the Organ
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Thursday, Friday & Saturday
Oysters & Clams oh the half sheP $
Micfrelob on draft \i
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.IVi. *
Reservations accepted jA'
( -v- Harry M. Lanton, Manager
Closed Sundays
~

THEATRE REVIEW

social criticism that continues to
sting long after the houselights
re-establish the audiences sense
of reality.
Somehow, Lauricella and the
Players have managed to meet
the difficult challenges presented
by Bowens creation and even do
a bit of creating themselves, so
that the end product is not only
thought-provoking but
exceedingly engaging as well.
First of all, the play would
really be nothing without the
setting, costumes, and lighting it
is performed against and with.
All add remarkably to (and in
some instances create) the strong
effect achieved, making it all
quite attractive and believable in
its dual context of lecture and
performance.
As in most all of the Players
other productions this year,
Mary Davis, Michael Gillette,
and A1 Wehlburg have done
more than enough
Also, special note should be
made of the music, sound and
lighting effects, and props that
compliment the production.
Theres an extra spark of good
theatre in the row boat, the
burning ark, the haunting echo
at the end, the.extremely funny
rubber fish, and the somehow
frightening squid of rope.
Lauricellas direction and
staging are also deserving of
numerous accolades as is his
casting -for the variety of
action and characterizations he
has created and the panoramic
effect he has given the whole
production are considerable.
Worthy of extra attention are
his arrangement of the sweeping
storm scenes and the unusut.
presentation of the speech the

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are 50 cents less. ______
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old man delivers from the ark.
For the most part the acting
is of such merit as to make it
quite difficult and unfair to
single out any particular member
(or members) of the cast for
special praise. This reviewer was
especially impressed, however,
by the very natural and striking
efforts of Ruth Johns, Duane
Ford, and Stewart Solomon
the former two who,
unfortunately, have seldom (if
ever before) graced the Constans
stage, and the latter who
promises to cdntinue to move
his audiences.
Short of the somewhat
overdone enthusiasm exhibited
by Claude Pinkston and Janice
Hobbs in certain spots, the cast
carries out its respective tasks
with such expertise as to make
one forget that its a college
production.
It cant be much of an
overstatement to say that After
the Rain is one of the most
successful and significant gifts
the Players have given this
campus in quite some time.
Dick Holme/
JfWEIfRJ
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
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HAVE YOU EVER SEEN A
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Performing in the University of Florida Gym
Tuesday March 4th at 8:15 PM
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Friday, February 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, 1969

Keith Ryan A Singing Doctor?

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
An audience barometer, that
intangible radar, is the stuff of
which entertainers are made.
Keith Ryan, the emcee and
regular singer at the Rathskeller,
is an entertainer.
How will the audience react?
Will the jokes go over? These
questions are uppermost in his
mind.
It perturbs him when the
lights are not set right, or when
they do not convey the mood of
the song. He goes out on a limb
if he stops a serious song dead
with a punchline.
He admits to nervousness
every night and is glad of it. If
you are not nervous you never
do as well.
The blonde, 22-year-old
Voice of the Rathskeller has
been singing long while,
but younger students may not
remember him when he sang for
Gator Growl, and Fall Frolics in
1964.
He was singing in his
hometown in Virginia.
Political rallys were among
his playing spots occasionally
but certainly not for any
aesthetic gratification, he said,
recalling the shouting, pushing
and the balloons.
Despite the long experience
with coffeehouses he would
really like to play in nightclubs.

flNtifl
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KEITH RYAN AT RATHSKELLER
. . sings for entertainment rather than protest
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I like to entertain people who
are out for a good time, I dont
sing primarily to give a message,
like a protest singer, he said.
In coffeehouses, its like
sitting in a livingroom with your
friends, you can do that
anytime.
His music defies classification,
he says. It is not pure folk, he
likes variety, sometimes he sings
songs written [by his friends,
others range into Broadway
tunes, and ballads.
Quasi-folk, he calls it.
If he doesnt want to be
pinned down to one type of
music, neither will he wear one
style of singing.
I sing like I feel, he says.
How do the Rathskeller
audiences compare to others he
has played for?
He grinned. I thought you
would get to that.
The audience vacillates
between rough and enjoyable.
When they are rough, o
unresponsive, it is like walking
against a brick wall. But if they
respond, listen, sing along, it is
great.
Sometimes I have more fun
up there in 30 or 40 minutes,
than I have in three or four
nights, he says about a good
audience.
It seems the two things the
UF audiences respond to are sex
and topics that are familiar to
them, he says.

But the Washington D.C.
audience he rates as the most
responsive, well-versed and
easiest to get to.
He started out with a
baritone ukelele but dropped it
when a coffeehouse in
Washington told him it didnt fit
their image.
He has used a guitar ever
since.
Keith has never had formal
music lessons, he is not even
going to major in some field of
music.
The singer wants to be a
doctor. He cant explain it, but
he has had the desire ever since
he was little. Music and a career
will not interfere, though.
Music will be my avocation and
medicine my career, he says.
Right now he is majoring in
bacteriology, and carries 19
hours on top of his
30-hour-a-week job at the
Rathskeller. He is also an active
member of Phi Kappa Tau
Fraternity.
A tight squeeze he calls his
schedule.
Perhaps his background as
well as natural talent
compensates for his lack of
formal music lessons.
His mother is a former chorus
girl for Hollywood Revue, a

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traveling show which carried
names like Red Skelton and Bob
Hope.
His sister is going to be a
ballerina. When he goes home to
Virginia, he often helps his
mother paint at her gallery. She
does mostly portraits.
Keith Ryan, the entertainer,
excuses himself, mentally gauges
the audience, and goes out to
sing and introduce acts.
The room is always dim in
the old style German pub, and
he jokes on stage that its a good
thing the footlights beaming on
him are so bright. That way 1
cant tell if the audience gets up
and leaves, he quips.
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Miss Ruth Pages Inter International
national International Ballet will be presented
Tuesday by Student Govern Government
ment Government Productions in the Florida
Gym at 8:15 pm.
j Tickets may be obtained
from the Union Box Office.
Student prices are $2, $1.25 and
$1 and tickets for faculty, staff
and the general public are $2.50,
$1.50 and $1.25.
The touring company will

JSwjk* 1 iiuji grilLfii fjMu tM
' l |T s n#ir v - -.rV '
'
/ RUTH PAGE'S INTERNATIONAL BALIET

a)
I j.
TABLE FOB TWO
OR FOUR, OR 25, OR 90, OR 220, OR ANYWHERE IN BETWEEN
ALL UNIVERSITY AFFILIATED Individuals, Clubs, Committees, U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc.
Classes groups, etc. can now make Reservations at the R(JtH Sk 6 1 1 6 f
r 1 Reservations can be made for For Reservations oi
Info^natio^caiil r 2:00 p M thru Midnight Monday, Tuesday Wednesday I Information Call I
392-2097 2:00 PM thru 8:00 PM Thursday, Friday Saturday 392-2097

TO PERFORM TUESDAY=^^=
'Bolero 6B Ballet
Story Os Seduction

feature two internationally
known dancers: Anna-Marie
Holmes and David Holmes.
Three ballets will be per performed:
formed: performed: Romeo and Juliet by
Tchaikowski. Carmina Burana
by Orff and Bolero 6B by
Ravel.
While Romeo and Juliet is
tragic and Carmina Burana,
concerned with the cycle of life,

I
is more thoughtful than amu amusing,
sing, amusing, 'Bolero 6B is risque.
In this story of seduction, the
girls dressed in flesh-colored
tights try to attract a handsome
Latin male. He is more inter interested
ested interested in a masked, completely
clad, shrouded woman who
appears.
He dances after her and
proceeds to undress her down to
her pink tights. As they embrace
they are joined by the rest of the
cast.
It treats sex as a sophisticated
joke and mocks the absurdity of
abandon.
(AFTER
THE RAIN
Good Service Starts
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CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SEF VICE VICEREPAIRS
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Ensemble Rocks With
Painted Girl Contest

Tonight at 8 pm, the Union
Program Council is presenting,
among other things, a Painted
Go-Go Girl Contest an event
attempting to make this week weekend
end weekend a bit different from all the
others.
They are offering us this
tidbit in the Union Baiiroom,
and have invited all comers:
organizations, fraternities, and
sororities to enter a painted
lady in the contest.
There will be gift certificates
and prizes from the various
Gainesville clothing and music
stores going to the most original
and most beautiful entries and
to the best dancers.

TOEPOLKSHOP {
I What Is It? |
\ The biggest coffeehouse jamboree of the year. The A
\ program includes continuous live entertainment from 8 \
pm to 2 am, provided by local and campus groups and \
? individuals, with country and folk-singing, comedy, \
* audience participation, slapstick films and other
7 activities. v
| The Date: February 28 I
# The Place: The Baptist Student Center J
| Admission: SI.OO |
A All proceeds go to Student Summer Missions A
^ai

Friday, February 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Also on the docket are a
concert by the New York Rock
Ensemble and a dance with
entertainment by the Riff.
The Ensemble, a group mix mixing
ing mixing Bach with rock, is number
one in New York at the present
time and has engagements
throughout the country during
the next few months.
They have performed at Car Carnegie
negie Carnegie Hall, and are scheduled to
mix media with Leonardemstein
on an upcoming Concert.
The Riff will play for those
who wish to dance, and will fill
the auditorium with what has
been called the most fantastic
light show in the country.

Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator Friday, February 28. 1969

The disgruntled track fan has
been asking why Coach Jimmy
Carnes has only planned three
home meets this season. There
are a lot of disappointed
students who realize that they
will only get to see the Gator
talent three times. More are
asking why all three are
scheduled at the quarter break
when most will be home.
But Carnes has heard the
murmuring and is planning to do
something about it; it will be
something BIG.
We will be holding the First
Annual Florida Invitation
outdoor Track Meet here April

MUST DETHRONE VOLS
Track Closes Indoor Circuit At SEC Meet

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Correspondent
The era of jet-set athletics
appears to be here.
And no group knows it any
better than track athletes who
every winter engage in the ritual
smilingly referred to as hitting
the indoor circuit. That circuit
ends this weekend when the
Gators participate in the SEC
Championships (indoor) in
Montgomery, Ala.
The tracks are small, usually
wooden affairs, usually only 160
yards to the lap, the crowds are
noisy, close and intense, and the
competition is, very simply, the
best available. The reason is that
the meets are invitational, which
means that the meet director
contracts with a team or
individuals and pays their way,
including expenses, to the host
city.
The athletes get the feeling of
being a touring company, seeing
each other weekend after
weekend at the same places,
hence the reference to the
indoor circuit.
No one knows the ritual any
better than UFs top ranked high
jumper Ron Jourdan, track club
distance ace Jack Bacheler and
school record- breaking two mile
relay team. The six athletes have
found themselves anywhere
from Cleveland to New York to
Boston almost every weekend
for the last two months.
The indoor circuit is great in
some ways, says former
Olympian Bacheler. But it does
have its drawbacks. For one
thing, its the most consistently
intense competition in track to
be found outside the Olympics.
No matter where you go, youre

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Olympians Invited Here In April

12, said Carnes. All the
Olympic contenders and
participants will be invited.
Invitations to members of the
famed California Striders
including ace pole vaulter John
Pennel have been sent out.
I realize we have scheduled
only three meets here, said
Carnes. But we are only trying
to get the best teams to come
here. Most are committed,
despite wanting to run us.
Carnes is busy working on
next years schedule and is
seeking such elite powers in the
track world as Brigham Young,

always running against some big
gun.
Ron Jourdan, with a string of
no less than ten victories at
heights over seven feet before
finishing fourth at 6-10 last
weekend in New York, has
somewhat different ideas about
indoor track.
You really get the feeling
that everyone is with you. When
youre going for the meet record
and you miss, the whole crowd
sympathizes with you. And
when you make a height,
especially seven, everyone loves
it. Except your opponents, of
course, says Ron.
Top Gator half miler Bob
Lang added some interesting
comments about the winter
season.
Oh, indoors is the greatest.
Flying elbows and all. Its almost
a contact sport on some of those
tight turns. But there is one
problem. My girl friend forgot
what I looked like. Last
weekend I had to show her some
old letters just to get her to let
me hold her hand. And my
professors love indoor season.

THE CLIPBOARD

Southern Cal, Oregon State,
Villanova, Kansas and Oregon.
He said that the UF has
already applied for the
Southeastern Conference
outdoor track championships
next season and that there is a
good chance well get it.
Though the athletic
department has not received any
confirmations from those invited
to the Invitational,Carnes says
the key hurdle has yet to
come getting the athletic
department and Coach Graves to
approve footing the performers
expenses to bring the noted
Olympians to the UF track.

Two of them thought I had
dropped out of school. But
thats no problem. When they
ask me to take my finals, Ill just
pull out my newspaper
clippings, said Lang.
Track Coach Jimmy Hawk
Carnes views the season more
pragmatically.
When you can send even one
athlete to indoor meets, its a
great boost to your program. It
means that you really have top
athletes and they are carrying
the name of the school to all
parts of the country. Its a
tremendous boost for recruiting,
also. Young athletes like to go to
a name school. A school that
you hear of in the track world,
especially indoors.
And the finances are very
satisfactory. It doesnt cost the
school very much to send
athletes when they are good
enough to have their expenses
paid. Really, the only problem is
that the boys miss a lot of study
time.
But there is one advantage of
the indoor circuit that no one
denies.
After running against
Villanova all winter, says
distance man John Parker,
when we meet Tennessees two
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It doesnt do us a bit of
good to schedule a Podunk
college that we know we can
beat. We have to go for the big
names and thats what were
starting to do with the Florida
Invitational Carnes said.
There has been an economic
barrier in the way of Carnes
efforts most of the top track
schools excluding the UF and
Tennessee are located in
California, Oregon or the
northeast. There are a few
among the elite in the Big Ten.
The schools cant afford the
expense of such long-distance

mile relay team in the
conference meet, itll look like
meeting something recruited
from Romper Room.
All the Gators hope they can
bring this most successful indoor
season to a successful end
beginning this afternoon in
Montgomery.

Ray Brown las joined the staff
of barbers over in the Univ. Plaza
Sportsmans Barber Shop. Ray was M
formerly on Univ. Ave. barbering for 6Vi
years. We dre proud to have him with us. r 1
Sportsmans Barber Shop Univ. Plaza.
372-9129
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We offer a cash rebate to your organization
Other free services will be included.
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By Bill Dunn

travel and generally dont make
such trips without at least
splitting the fares with the host
school. Most top teams wjfnt all
expenses paid.
But we are doing all we can,
and we hope the fans won t be
let down. Carnes adds.
The three home meets will
be March 22 and 25 against Ohio
State and Yale and Southern
Illinois respectively. The Florida
Relays is set for March 28-29
but most sutdents wont see
them because all three meets are
within the quarter break which
begins March 21 and extends to
the 31st.

Dialogue
March 3



Potpourri 1
n mm
Contrary to public opinion, the GaSre^are^^oufofcontwition
for a National Invitational Tournament berth.
It is very probable that the NIT will select two Southeastern
Conference basketball teams. The attraction of having Neal Walk play
in Madison Square Garden, and drawing a big crowd is one reason UF
may get a bid.
Another factor is that the Gators have proven, by beating
then-fourth-ranked Kentucky and SEC power Tennessee, they can
handle the best.
* *
Crowd support has been good the last couple games, but it isnt
time to let up yet.
Georgias Big Bob Lienhard comes to town Saturday with the
Bulldogs and there are over 1,000 seats left in Florida Gym. If we let
the biggest Bulldog of them all get away without experiencing the
UF fans it would be a shame.
Pick up your seats at the Athletic Department ticket offices today
from 8:30 to 11:30 and from 1:30 to 4.
* *
UF has signed an All-State quarterback from Texas Gene Nichol. In
his senior year Gene completed 71 of 129 passes for 1,011 yards and
13 TDs.
Coach Ray Graves called Gene one of the keys to our recruiting
plans.
This brings UFs total recruits to 32 plus two junior college
transfers, who will be able to play varsity next year.
* *
Speaking of recruits:
Congratulations to Cheerleader Janet Martin and former Gator
fullback Graham McKeel on their engagement.
Graham was captain of the 1967 UF football team.
Graham and Janet are about to enter the toughest game of all.
* *
With all the talk of a coliseum at the UF lets not forget Coach Bill
Harlans swimmers. It gets mighty cold in that outdoor pool during
the winter months.
A Natatorium could be partially financed by the federal
government, according to Harlan.
Os course you cant just ask for the money and have them turn it
over, but it seems that we could qualify.
The structure would probably be separate from the coliseum, but it
is time to get started on this project also.
* *
Attention Batgirls.
Thanks for the tremendous response.
All of you who have expressed an interest to know more about it,
so we are having a meeting Thursday night at 7:30 in the Alligator
newsroom.
Well see you then.

;.y.v.v.v.v.v.v.%v.v/.VA%VAV.\*.v;;v,
| Olympics
GATOR OLYMPICS £
* SCHEDULE OF EVENTS £
£ March 1, 1969 £
Noon
v Prelim lOO dash Frats £
£ 12:15 £
* Prelim 6O dash Sorority £
| 12:25 £
4 440 Relay Fraternity
12:35 £
X 440 Relay Sorority £
>: 12:45 t £
X 440 Relay AF vs Army X
£ 12:55 j|:
X Tricycle Race-SG vs Alligator :j:
I 1:05 £
§ Final 100 Dash Frats
X 1:10 £
*
§ Final 60 Dash Sorority
$ 1:15 $
X *
* 880 Run Fraternity <
§ 1:25 £
y 440 Walk Sorority X
| 1:35 :j
v4O Shuttle Relay Sorority : :
:j: 1:45 j:
£ 880 Relay Fraternity ;
£ 2:00 >
Pi Lam Turtle Race All :
'
$ Organizations
BOWLING
SUNDAY
SPECIAL
35< per game
or 3 games Si.oo
ALL DAY
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

DOUBLE YOUR PLEASURE
ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW
Do your own thing
Bring your instrument and
Swing Along with
BOBBY GRIFFIN
A of one during
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Cagers Fight Dogs

The rigors of the road now
behind, UF returns home to
close out its basketball season
with three contests, the first of
which is a crucial meeting with
Georgia Saturday night in
Gainesville.
This is one of the biggest
games weve played this year,
Head Coach Tommy Bartlett
said. We are in third place in
the league at 10-6 and Georgia is
9-7. And, we havent given up on
our opportunity to play in the
National Invitational
Tournament in New York.
In this regard, victories in the
three remaining games are a
must. After the Georgia game,
the Gators travel to Jacksonville
to face West Virginia Monday
night in the Jacksonville
Coliseum. They then come back
to Florida Gym to conclude the
season against Alabama next
Saturday.
The Gators have been on one
of their hottest streaks in years,
despite being cooled somewhat in
Monday nights 79-77 upset loss
at Ole Miss. They have captured
nine of the last 11 and the only
losses were by one point
(overtime at Auburn) and the
Ole Miss margin of two points.
During this string we have
played very good basketball in
every game except at Ole Miss,
Bartlett said. We played a poor
basketball game there.
Bartlett had words of praise
this week for junior Andy
Owens of Tampa, who has
scored in double-figures in his
last 14 contests and is playing
the finest basketball of his
career.
Owens hit on 17 of 23 shots
from the field in his two-game
swing of the Mississippi schools.

The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Sports Editor
tacked on 21 rebounds and
played consistently good
basketball all the way around.
Andy deserves much of the
credit for the surge we have
had, Bartlett said. I think hes

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Friday, February 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

playing the kind of basketball
which should merit
all-conference attention.
Owens has upped his scoring
average to over 16 points per
game.
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Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, 1969

Pivotal Swim Meet With Vols Friday

The UF swimming team, long
time leader in the Southeastern
Conference, will get its toughest
league test in years when
the Gators host the University of
Tennessee Saturday. It could
well mean the conference crown.
The Volunteers coached by
Ray Bussard and former Gator
swimming captain, Roy Tateishi,
bring to Gainesville a 10-0
record for the 2 p.m. meet slated
for Florida Pool.
The Gators enter the
competition with a 7-1 record,
their only loss being to Florida
State. It is Tennessees second
year back in the pool after a

She DigsGator-Infested Pools

By BETH GRAVES
Alligator Sports Writer
Saturday, it will be official
and the first girl swimmer, Catie
Ball of Jacksonville, will accept
an honorary scholarship to the
UF.-
At the age of seventeen, she
presently holds four World
records, two of which are in the
100 and 200 meter breast stroke
(her favorite) and five American
records. Catie swam on the relay
team that brought home a gold
medal for the United States in
the summer Olympics, and
competed in three other events.
Her trial times for these
events.far surpassed those of her
opponents, but due to illness
prior to the final times, she fell
behind.
Catie is not swimming now,
and has no plans to date for
future swimming competition.
According to Athletic Director,
Ray Graves, though, she will
have access to practice with the
swimming team and to possibly
swim in exhibition lanes at
meets.
The honorary scholarship
offered to Catie is one of
gratitude and appreciation from
the UF for the recognition she
has brought to the state of
Florida, Graves said.
Funds for the scholarship will
be donated from interested
friends and alumni; combined
they will complete her special
grant.
We want her to be able to
continue her higher education in
the state and at the same time
honor her achievements, he
added.
Catie has been swimming
sinoe she was seven and worked
out not only in the summer but
also throughout the school year.
During school I swam for an
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20-year layoff from the sport.
Both teams earned victories
over Georgia and Alabama but
the Volunteers margins of
victory have consistently been
greater than the Gators. Last
season was the first for the Vol
swimmers and since then they
have compiled a 18-1 dual meet
record.
Last season Tennessee
Finished a surprising second to
the Gators in the Southeastern
Conference meet. Florida has
won the championship a record
13 consecutive times and 20 out
of 27 meets held.
This should be a great meet,
*

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0 jfl,'
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. . gets swim grant
hour before school and two
hours after classes every day. In
the summer I practiced
two-and-a-half hours in the
morning and about two hours in
the afternoon, the
World-record-holder said.
Born in Jacksonville, Catie
has lived there all her life and
now attends Robert E. Lee High.

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one of the besi ever held at
Florida Pool, says Harlan.
Tennessee has an excellent;
team and 1 know they will be
ready for us. But we will need
the best crowd support'ever to'
psyche us up.
Tennessees ace swimmer
David Edgar is believed to be
sidelined with an injury. The
freestyler from Ft. Lauderdale
had the leading time in the
nation in the 50-free with a 21.0
clocking. He injured his hip in a
car accident and according to
Tennessee officials will miss
both the meet with Florida and
the conference meet.

She has yet to decide what she
wants to major in; the University
College will be her first
challenge.
Originally, Catie had applied
to the University of North
Carolina, not considering any
state universities. As the time
grew closer for a decision to be
made, interested friends
mentioned the UF. The pros
were dominating the cons, and
then came the scholarship offer.
Right along her line, she
enjoys water skiing on the side,
but swimming takes up the
majority of her time.
Her seventeen years have
proven very successful; few girls
can compare to. Saturday, at a
luncheon in Yon Hall at noon,
prior to the swim meet against
Tennessee, Catie Ball will be
recognized and awarded for her
achievement. Friends, family,
coaches, and officials will attend
the banquet to welcome her to
the UF and award her a
scholarship deserving her
excellence.

gut Harlan says hes not
buying that story completely.
The Vols will have two
co nfe r e nce ch am p ions
performing for them
Saturday Bill Ferry in the
1-meter diving and Steve Gilliam
in the 100-yard backstroke.
Saturday's swimming meet
will be the homecoming for
many past Gator lettermen.
Director of Athletics Ray
Graves and swimming coach Bill
Harlan have invited all past
lettermen to return
The festivities will begin with
the Gator-Vol meet at 2 p.m.
After the meet the former

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lettermen will be honored at a
banquet at 6:30 p.m. in Reitz
Union.
We hope all the swimmers
that helped make Florida
swimming what it is today will
return this Saturday." says
Harlan.
Former all-Americans Ted
Robinson (1954), Jim Borland
(1954), Criag White (1955), Phil
Drake (1957), Steve Mcride
(1961-62), Jerry Livingston
( 1 962-63-64), and Tom
Dioguardi (1965-66-67) have
been invited to the affair.



Two Gator Squads
Seek State Golf Title

By Alligator Services
Golf coach Buster Bishop will
seek the Florida Intercollegiate
Crown this weekend in Tampa.
Bishop plans to enter two
squads in the one day affair that
includes all the top college golf
teams in Florida. /
Last weekend the Gators got
a sneak preview by defeating St.
Leo, Rollins and South Florida
in Tampa.
Florida State is expected to
give the Gators their toughest
competition. Earlier this season
the golfers dropped a match to
the Seminoles in Tallahassee.
Competing for one Gator
squad will be captain Steve
Melnyk, John Darr, John Sale,
Richard Spears, Andy North and
David Barnes. Both North and
Barnes are highly touted
freshmen.
The second group consists of
Mike Estridge, Hal Hutchinson,
Ron Mahood, Marie Landrum,
Robert Baggs and Jay Horton.
Melnyk, Darr, Sale and Spears
were members of last years
team that captured Southeastern
Conference and NCAA titles.

B-SQUAD 2-0
UF Netters At Rollins
UFs long drive towards a possible NCAA tennis title gets under
way today when the Gators travel to Winter Park to meet Rollins
College.
Last season the Gators captured the Southeastern Conference
Crown and placed sth in the NCAA. Every member of last years
championship team returns for the 1969 season.
The top six Gator performers are Armi Neely of Tampa, Jamie
Pressly of Palm Beach, Steve Beeland of Winter Haven, Greg Hilley of
Mobile, Ala., Paul Lunetta of Miami and Charlie Owens of Tuscaloosa,
Alabama.
After the Rollins match the Gators will return home for a match
with Jacksonville University on March 5.
Also travelling to Rollins is the UF B-Squad. Coach M. B. Chafins
netters will be seeking their third win.
This season they have defeated Bolles School and St. Johns River
Jr. College. Their next match is March 3 against St. Johns in Palatka.
I Turtles Run Saturday |

The first annual Turtle Race
sponsored by Pi Lambda Phi
fraternity will wrap up the Gator
Olympic events Saturday.
The race will include
competition between
fraternities, sororities, and
organizations. Each will sponsor
a turtle, paint it and enter him in
the race.
Trophies will be given for the
best decorated turtle and the
winner. The turtles are being
flown up from Miami, and entry
fee per turtle is sls.
Cliff Dropkin and Brad Raffle

DONT MISS
Greta Garbo
Starring in
in the 1935 Version
of
Anna Karinina
Reitz Union Auditorium
' t
Sunday March 2 7:00-9:00PM

This is one tournament we
would like to win, Bishop said.
The boys have been playing
sn /
3*
V
RON MAHOOD
. . plays for 2nd team

are co-chairmen for the race and
have stated that they hope to
make it an annual event. It has
been very popular at other
universities; Pittsburgh and
American University both hold
an International Turtle Race.
It is scheduled for 2:00 p.m.
at the Florida Track and all
proceeds will go to the Gator
Loan Fund, formerly Dollars for
Scholars. WDVH will be on hand
to emcee the race; anyone
interested in entering a turtle
contact Dropkin or Raffle at the
Pi Lambda Phi House, 376-9217.

well and I hope they have top
performances this weekend.
Melnyk and Darr have been
leading the Gators this season.
Last year both players earned
all-American honors.
Melnyk, a 6-1, 235-pounder,
resembles former teammate Bob
Murphy and Jack Nicklaus in
size. He is considered one of the
brightest amateurs in the nation.
UFs next match will be
March 15, when they host
Florida State in Gainesville.
Jack Bugged
MIAMI (UPI) Jack
Nicklaus, who has won just
about every other golf prize in
sight, is anxious to make amends
for never having won a PGA
tournament here in Florida his
adopted state.
Its bugged me for some
time that I havent been able to
win on the Florida leg of the
tour, Nicklaus said Wednesday.
The Doral Open is the first of
Five Florida Tournaments which
will pay out $665,000 to the
touring pros while they are in
the Sunshine State.
Following Doral, stop No. 8
on the 1969 PGA tour, the
golfers go to the Citrus Open at
Orlando, Fla., the Monsanto
Open at Pensacola, Fla., the
Greater Jacksonville Fla. Open
and then return here for the
$200,000 National Airlines
Open.

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Friday, February 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 28, 1969

I The ** EXTRA* *
350 calorie ' £7 ~
mpill OyvvJ/lCh
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Mark McKee 1
For Your Needs!
I TEXTBOOKS
Althought it was a frustrating weekend for Florida I *un iiccr\
athletic teams in general the Gators got an outstanding I NEW AND USED
individual effort out of swimmer Mark McKee, and for I A Pf*U|TEf*Tl ID A I
this he is this week's Alligator Player of the Week. I AKV.nIIEV.IUKAL
Order Your McKee, a sophomore from Philadephia, Pa., broke his I EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIED
own 200-yard breaststroke mark in the Southern I mcri 1 gurruw
Intercollegiate Swim Meet in Athens, Ga. with a ART SUPPLIES
clocking of 2:15.4
The Gator swim team, however, failed to repeat as I STUDY LAMPS
champions as Southern Illinois captured the title this I
time around. I pyu OUTFITS
Seminole McKee was pushed for his honors by fellow swimmer I wUIrIID
Bruce Williams, who captured the 200-yard butterfly in I c\A/E ATCUIDTC
record time and by basketball stars Andy Owens and I 3 VVfcA I brllK I b
Mike Leatherwood, who helped guide the Gators to an I ro ,, crc DETC
_ m m m impressive victory over Mississippi State Saturday and I tOLLEVJE rfclb
m I lll Played well in defeat against Ole Miss at Oxford I I-***-
|l I | HI Monday. I COLLEGE SEAL
McKee, 5-10 and 155, swims all strokes for the I a
I m II Gators and is one of the key performers to watch I MASCOT STATIONERY
Saturday at 2 p.m. when Coach Bill Harlan's team takes
on unbeaten Tennessee at Florida Pool. I FILM AND DEVELOPING f
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