Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
AC Proposes All-Student Conduct Group

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Action Conference
Wednesday passed a proposal to
eliminate faculty on the Student
Conduct Committee and replace
them with students.
Student members of the
conference applauded the move
as a step towards a stronger
voice for students in disciplinary
actions.
The Code of Conduct covers
most areas of student behavior
outside of cheating, stealing and
passing bad checks.
Examples of items included
in the code are: obscene conduct

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol. 61, No. 92

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or public profanity; illegal
manufacture, sale, possession or
use of narcotics, marijuana,
hypnotics; participation in
hazing; disorderly conduct or
unlawful assembly; damage or
misuse of publkrproperty and
raiding university living quarters.
Presently, the Committee on
Student Conduct recommends
what action be taken against
offenders of the code to the
University Senate and
OConnell.
This present committee is
composed of five students, six
faculty and four alternate
faculty members. No alternate
student members are appointed

University of Florida Gainesville



which means that it is possible
for the present committee to be
made up of faculty members
only.
The proposed disciplinary
committee would not have
faculty members thus
eliminating the faculty majority
possibility.
Student members of the
student conduct committee are
appointed by the Student Body
President with faculty members
appointed by the University
President.
The new disciplinary
committee would have its
members selected by the Board
of Masters of the Honor Court

Thursday, February 27, 1969

RANDY BASSETT
LONG LINE RIDERS
Registration comes but
thrice a year (for most
students) but it's still a
pain in the neck. Long lines,
uncooperative computers,
and rejection after rejection
after...
In the midst of the
crowded Tigert basement
(above) Sharia Herndon
(below) found no place to
work out her schedule, so she
worked on the floor. The fate
of many long-thought-out
schedules was, in the end,
rejection by the omniscient
computer, as Charlotte
Brannon (left) learns from
computer worker Ann
Cheves.
\

after being placed into
nomination by other students,
faculty and administrators. A
review of personal and academic
records would then be made by
the Dean of Men and the Dean
of Women to make sure they are
in good standing with the
university, according to the
Action conference proposal
prepared by the Task Force on
Minimal Conduct Expectations
for Faculty, Students and
Administrators.
Criteria for membership on
the disciplinary committee
include:
t Students must be in good
standing at the UF.
Members must have been
enrolled at UF at least two full
quarters prior to their selection
for the committee.
They are required to be
full-time students at UF
according to standards of the
university registrar.
Final approval of those
members nominated to serve on
the disciplinary committee
would come from the Student
Senate after a two-thirds vote.
Terms of office for each
committee member is four
consecutive quarters except that
(SEE "CONDUCT" PAGE 2)

Coliseum Fund
Fever Spreads

By BILL DUNN
Assistant Sports Editor
Recent student enthusiasm
over the proposed coliseum has
grown so, that a new
coordinating group, the Student
Coliseum Action Team, (SCAT)
may be duplicating the efforts of
another group The Order of
Omega, mens leadership
honorary.
So says James Devaney,
president of the order, which
claims it has been working out
an Intricate campus fund-rasing
plan for the past 18 months. The
former Interfraternity Council
president said that his group was
planning to release the plan later
this quarter but will be forced to
do so sooner now that SCAT has
arrived on the scene.
SCAT organizer Steve Rohan
says fie thinks there is need
for a student unit tp organize
all student-fund raising efforts
including those of fraternities
but one without a fraternity
link.
Devaneys group will proceed
with plans today at 10 a.m. to
present a SSOO check to the
University of Florida
Foundation Fund. The check is
part of $2,500 that was netted
from an Interfraternity
IFC-Order of Omega Beachboys
concert last spring.
I thought it was already
understood that we were
organizing the campus wide fund
raising effort, Devaney told the
Alligator. I think Rohan has
just answered Mondays
Alligator editorial that called for
a coordinating student,
organization.
If they have been working
out such an elaborate plan, then
I and most of the student body
hasnt known about it, Rohan
replied.

DEAN FRANKLIN DOTY
...discusses AC proposal

Devaney says that although
his group contains only
fraternity men,"he foresees some
sort of board of managers of the
fund that would not be limited
to fraternity men.
Rohan and Devaney had not
talked to each other at press
time but both agreed that some
cooperation of both groups was
needed so that an image of
student disorganization was not
given the public.
SCAT has not officially
organized yet but plans to do so
March 4.
Ombudsman
Resigns; SG
Seeks Another
SG Ombudsman Robert
Young resigned his post Tuesday
and Student Government is now
looking for a replacement.
We knew the resignation was
coming for several weeks, said
Gary Goodrich, vice-president of
Student Government. Young
will graduate from law school
this quarter, and he will need
from now until the end of the
quarter to prepare for his bar
examination.
Between now and the time
SG can find a suitable
replacement, Goodrich has
become the
Ombudsman, filling the position
he created and first held last
year.
Right now, Goodrich said,
were looking for a replacement
until September. Anyone
interested in applying may do so
in the Student Government
offices.
(SEE OMBUDSMAN" PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 27,1969

Demonstration Resolution Okayed

4 By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The once-controversial student demonstrations resolution
previously presented to the University Senate, was passed unanimously
by the Student Senate Tuesday night.
The resolution authorizes student demonstrations anywhere on
campus, so long as they do not disrupt the normal operation of the
university or infringe on the rights of other members of the university
community.
This resolution is the by-product of the Greenman resolution
introduced to the University Senate in December by Dr. John
Greenman, agricultural economics professor, which urged the
administration to use any and all means to quell student disruptions.
The now-approved statement says that non-compliance with this
resolution may result in arrest by campus police or outside law
enforcement.
In addition to this bill a dead issue was again brought back to
life in another censor the Alligator bill presented by James Lott for
Jimmy Bailey.
Bailey decreed that the Alligator be prohibited from either
endorsing or giving preferential treatment to any Student Government
candidate or issue under penalty of Honor Court disciplinary action.
The editor-in-chief would be responsible for the conduct of his
JOMO To Establish
Local Freedom House
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Junta of Military Organizations (JOMO) has taken root in
Gainesville, but plans for a campus organization are vague.
According to Charles Fullwood, JOMO Minister of Information
from the groups headquarters in St. Petersburg, there is a JOMO
organization in Gainesville large enough to carry on the necessary
work.
Weve given the idea of a campus organization of JOMO some
thought, but it will be up to the black students here, Fullwood said.
We cant declare its existence, the blacks have to make it so.
Fullwood described JOMO as an all-black separatist organization,
aimed at acculturization of blacks.
We dont describe ourselves as racist, Fullwood said, but as
separatists. We want to educate our own people, and take care of our
own business.
At a Feb. 11 rally, Fullwood urged the creation of a separate
black nation in America.
JOMO has entered into a permanent coalition with the SSOC in
Gainesville, and recently added their support to SSOC condemnation
of the Megill incident.
This is indeed a permanent coalition, Fullwood said. While
SSOC is predominantly white, we share many similar aims, and we
will be able to help each other.
One of the first actions JOMO will take in Gainesville is the
establishment of Freedom House, now being furnished at 327 N.E.
7th Terr.
At the beginning of Freedom Houses existence, support will
come from the local community and the state organization,
Fullwood said. Services will include a Free Store, Black History
classes, and offices for JOMO in Gainesville.
Eventually, we hope to make Freedom House self-supporting,
Fullwood said. This will come through the establishment of an
African Shop, such as now supports JOMO in St. Pete.
Part of JOMO in Gainesville will be a Defense Squad, to be made
up of members who will arm the ghetto for any eventual necessity.
Fullwood would not say how far along JOMO was in its
membership drive here.
We have a policy of not releasing membership figures, Fullwood
said.
JOMOs campus plans will hinge on the actions of SSOC, according
to Fullwood. Also, any plans for a campus JOMO will receive full
support from the state organization.
There are few blacks at this university, Fullwood said. The ones
that are here seem content to accept the status quo, but if they wish
to join with us, I will give them every support possible from the state
group.
JOMO had earlier been reported to be recruiting membership in UF
dormitories. However, Fullwood denied this, saying that it was a part
of SSOCs weekend education program on the Megill case.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

SENATEPASSES UNANIMOUSLY

staff and would have to take the punishment dealt by the Honor
amendments were recommended in jest, among them was
one to rename the Alligator the Warsaw a > ews. failed
The amendments were useless however as the bill tailed
unanimously. funds was tabled
An authorization cutting off ROK Held trip u
until the author of the bill, Clyde Ellis, was present at a student senate
meeting to give his whys and wherefors. c
Two g committee chairmen were appointed: Daryl Cochran for the
Campus Development Committee; and Charles Riggs, Chairman of the
Excuse Committee.
The meeting adjourned in record-breaking time 45 minutes after
the call to order.
UF Awarded $71,000
A grant of $71,000 has been awarded to the UF College of
Education for the support of 10 doctoral fellows during the 1969-70
academic year.
The grant was awarded by the U.S. Office of Education under the
Educational Personnel Development Act.
Each fellowship stipend provides $4,000 in living expenses, S6OO
for each dependent, and the waiver of university registration fees.
Conduct Committee

FROM PAGE ONE jj
initial appointments will be:
two serving for one quarter,
Faculty committee members
called for in the proposal would
be two members of the faculty
at large appointed . .as
non-voting members. These
members will be appointed by
the president. Also, the
Ombudsman
Steps Down
aw urn m
We prefer a graduate student
in law or personnel services,
Goodrich said.
Goodrich explained the
reason for wanting, a law
student was because one-third to
one-fourth of all questions
received are legal matters.
Especially, Goodrich said,
we will need someone who is
acquainted with the UF
bureaucracy.
The person .must have a
disposition to get along with
unhappy students, he said,
and also, to be able to take the
student out of the case until it is
decided whether the university
or the student is at fault.
Applications may be made
until March 3.

To ALL STUDENTS and university personnels.
DAILY 10% DISCOUNT
J&b* LUNCHEON off OUR LOW-LOW EVERYDAY PRICES!
special 20 VARIETIES OF PASTRY BAKED FRESH
DA,LY
mji£ OTA # LARGEST VARIETY OF FRESHLY MADE
RmJTjp O / y SALADS
|OTrU 7 VARIETIES OF FRESHLY BAKED ROLLS
wMjtmfT 2 VARIETIES OF CARVED MEATS DAILY
7n f.
\Y yj2j 11:30 A.M. 2:00 PJA.
AFETEH|A THROUGHOUT dinner
Nk FLORIDA 4:30 p M 7; 3o
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
N. MAIN STREET
MINUTES FROM CAMPUS)

Chairman of the committee
would be a law faculty
member who serves for three
years and votes only to break a
tie.
In other action the
conference:
Passed a resolution
supporting the concept of a
Grade Appeals Board.
Proposed the establishment
of faculty student lounge areas.
Proposed that required
physical education courses be
given a credit of one hour on a
pass-fail system.

Tomorrow Nite
New York Rork &
Roll Ensemble
Ri f r
painted go-go girl contest
Union Ballroom
8:00 P.M. SI.OO

UF Inherits
Map Treasure
For Library,
The UFs Department 0 f
Geography has inherited a map
treasure from the estate of Dr
Erwin J. Raisz, world famous
cartographer and former UF
professor.
The Raisz collection, still
packed in 42 boxes, includes a
number of unpublished maps
and the Library of Congress is
seeking a portion of the
collection for permanent
display.
Dr. J. R. Anderson, chairman
of the geography department
conciders the gift a real
windfall.
Raisz was the author of the
Atlas of Florida and was a
visiting research professor at UF
from 1957-1962. At the time of
his death he was a lecturer at
Harvard University and lived in
Boston.
Raisz established Columbia
Universitys first course in
cartography and his legacy v/I
be used to advance the study
here.
University professors will
attempt to complete several
unfinished works and graduate
students will analyze his
techniques.
After the massive collection is
catalogued much of it will be
place in the permanent
collection of the universitys
Research Library.



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8S r -SSk?IL.
ARE YOU LOST?
Students have taken over the UF entrance booth and
everybody's happy. The smiling students are members of Alpha Phi
Omega, national service fraternity. The young men volunteered to
man the information booth for more than 20 hours each week,
releasing campus policemen for other duties. Larry Miller, 3EG, gives
information to Donald Royston, lUC.
WHATS
HAPPENING

MANAGING EDITORS
SEMINAR: Will be held today
through Saturday in the Reitz
Union. Main speaker, Dr.
Elizabeth Eddy, will address the
24 chief journalists at 3:45
today. The keynote
address Reporting Urban
Affairs Todaywill be
presented Friday at 2 p.m. by
Dr. Gene Burd.
Grade Appeal
Still Tentative
Contrary to a story in
Wednesdays Alligator, a
proposed grade appeals board
still has not reached the stage
of even a tentative approval
by Arts and" Sciences
administrators.
The proposed appeals
board has been approved by
neither Arts and Sciences
Dean Harry H. Sisler not the
chairmen of the college
departments, who do nor
meet until March 10, the first
opportunity they would have
to decide whether to give
approval.
In addition, no action was
taken by the Arts and
Sciences Student Council
when the proposal was
presented at a meeting two
weeks ago. The concensus of
the board members, however,
was that grade appeals boards
were unnecessary and that
complaints about grades
could be handled by the
professor involved or the
dean or department head.
SSSSSSE33S
e DELICIOUS
STEAKS
FINE FOOD
at
student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

RETIREMENT PARTY: Will
be held Friday for Col. Arlo W.
Mitchell, departing Army ROTC
professor of military science.
The party will start at 10 a.m. in
the Military Science Building.
FLORIDA BAR
ASSOCIATION: Will hold John
Marshall B.A. luncheon Friday
with Mark Hulsey as guest
speaker. Hulsey, president-elect
of Florida Bar Association, will
speak on the investigative
practices of the state boarcf.
Luncheon will start at 12:30 at
the 1-75 Holiday Inn. Cost is
$1.50 for members and $1.75
for others.
STUDENT SENATE: Five
vacancies are currently available
in the senate. They are:
journalism, education,
off-campus, Corry Village, and
business administration. Those
interested can come by the
senate office on Reitz Union
third floor.
ALACHUA COUNTY
HEART FUND: Kappa Delta
and Sigma Phi Epsilon members
will be selling boxed chicken
dinners through March 12 at
$1.25 with all proceeds going to
the heart fund. Dinners can also
be ordered by calling 372-9303
or 372-9473. They will be
delivered in the campus area
Saturday and Sunday from 11-1
p.m. and 4-6 p.m.

DIAMONDS
and JEWELRY
SAVE Pjfl %
UP TO VV
f-'' v ,l,^/
fh- p. ntturfc ManuiovluMl
ts
q -, / * ot S W I Hh' l

UF Students Dont Want
Classes Disrupted Says Poll

By VICKI VEGA
Assistant News Editor
A select group of UF
students almost to a man
agree that demonstrators
should not interfer with
those who want to attend
class.
At least thats the opinion
James Terhunes public opinion
class derived from a
campus-wide poll a couple weeks
ago.
The College of Journalism
class personally interviewed the
more than 250 students for a
week starting Feb. 4. The names
were drawn in a complex
seven-step random sample
process.
Survey findings include:
99 per cent of the student
body feels that demonstrating
students do not have the right to
keep other students from
attending classes; 77 per cent of
UF students would try to cross
picket lines and attend regularly
scheduled classes.
60 per cent of the student
body feels that the
administration has the right to
suspend or expel demonstrators,
and a majority of students
consider the university
generally responsive to
student respects for more rights.
53 per cent feels that such
organizations as SDS and SSOC
should be recognized and
chartered as on-campus
organizations. About 25 per cent
are opposed to recognition and
charter of such organizations.
9 31 per cent of UF students
think demonstrations would
improve conditions; 11 per cent
think an opposite effect would
result; 30 per cent feel that
demonstrations would not
change anything.
47 per cent of UF students
feel that the news media is giving
inaccurate coverage; 32 per cent
feel that the news media is doing
an accurate job.
9 When dealing with student
demonstrators, the UF campus
police tend to be fair say 45
per cent of the students; 17 per
cent said campus police tend to
be unfair and 38 per cent
dont know.
9 46 per cent say the right of

assembly is being abused by
protestors in most
demonstrations; 41 per cent say
it is not; 12 per cent are
undecided.
9 27 per cent consider the
faculty liberal; 35 per cent say
they are middle of the road.
9 Compared to other
institutions regarding student
demonstrations, the UF is
considered generally passive
by 42 per cent of the student
body; 32 per cent feel the UF is
about average.
9 59 per cent say they would
participate in a student
demonstration if they felt
strongly about an issue.
9 45 per cent of the student
body says that the SDS is active
on campus; 49 per cent realize
I SHANNONS I
I wII&KER I
I 7th St. 372-1379 I
IW. Univ. NIGHT 376 40091

| Me Davids Barber |
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A <7 j
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S Shopping Center |
v Next to the Red Lion 5
Gator PAWN SHOP
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
DIAMONDS
GUNS
BUY SELL TRADE
"We specialize in Gator-Aid"
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2310 S. W. 13th Street 1505 N. W. 13th Street

Thursday, February 27, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

that the SSOC is active on
campus.
Oood Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-BER VICE VICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS VICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
SO6 E. Unlv. Ait. 372-4373
Miller-Brown I
I
I
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL MU
376-4552
AUTHORIZED %
DEALER I

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 27, 1969

SCAT Meeting
Set March 4
The Student Coliseum Action
Team (SCAT) will hold its first
meeting at 7 p.m. March 4.
All students and
representatives of organizations
wanting a new coliseum on
campus should be at the
meeting, which will be held in
room 118 of the Reitz Union.

By AAHPER
Phys Ed Prof Honored

A UF professor of physical education has been
named to the highest honor of the Southern District
of the American Association for Health, Physical
Education and Recreation (AAHPER).
Dr. Norma Muriel Leavitt was announced as a
1969 Honor Award Recipient for the southern
divisions 36th annual convention last week at
Memphis, Tenn.
This is the highest honor bestowed by our
association and marks Dr. Leavitt as one recognized

| UF Journalists Place I
| In Hearst Contest |
University of Florida student journalists took third and
!: fourth places nationally in the William Randolf Hearst ft
Foundation competition in spot news reporting. $
ft Skip Perez and Raul Ramirez won third and fourth place $
ft awards respectively. Third place receives S4OO in prize money, ij!
: and fourth place gets S3OO. :!
: Florida won first place nationally last year after winning the
: national championship in 1965. Only Nebraska and Florida have
: won the honor twice. ft
ft: These latest honors put UF on its way for the first place ft
national prize again this year. The national rating is based on $
points accumulated in the monthly competition. ft
UF journalists have placed in the top 20 six out of eight $
ft times so far this year.
*' **
ft Ramirez is executive editor of the Florida Alligator. ft
Students To Select
Teachers For Awards

ByJANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Excellence in teaching will
get its oWn reward $ 1,000
prizes from the Standard Oil
Company of Indiana.
The company allocated to the
UF last fall $3,000 to be
awarded to three professors
chosen for excellence in
undergraduate teaching.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, along with the
Council of Deans, decided that
students should make the
selections.
These students, along with
Teacher Evaluation Director
David Burke, form the selection
committee, whose chairman is
Robert Edmunds.
About the middle of May,

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they will report their choices to
O Connell, who will then narrow
down the list to three.
NEW
Hawaiian gjC
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Now leasing for Sept.
3461 S.W. Second Ave.
PHONE 378-5905
Next to Westgate
Shopping Center
Townhouse & Flats
Swimming Pool
Recreation Hall
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Dishwashers & Disposals
Private Patios
Master TV Antenna
Laundry Facilities
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MODELS OPEN DAILY 10-5
Hotpoint Appliances

as distinguished by her professional colleagues,
Elizabeth Moore of Louisiana State University,
chairman of the Southern District awards
committee said. <>
Dr. Leavitt has been professor of professional
physical education at the University since 1953. She
began her teaching career at Wesleyan Junior
college, Athens, Tenn., then taught high school girls
and supervised elementary school phycial education
in Fairfield, Conn. j

friday night
is fun night at
THE
DANDYLION
We Need Models
You Get Paid if Used
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DETROIT (UPI) General
Motors Corp. Wednesday
announced the most massive
recall campaign in U.S.
automaking history, the callback
of 4.9 million cars and trucks for
cbrrections of hazards of
exhaust fumes which have
been blamed for four deaths
and sticking throttles.

Israeli Soldier Killed
In 34th Arab Clash

By United Press International
An Israeli soldier was killed
and two others wounded
Wednesday in a clash with Arab
infiltrators who retreated across
the Jordan River cease-fire line
under covering fire from
Jordanian forces, it was
announced in Jerusalem.
Another Israeli soldier was
seriously wounded by a sniper
along the Suez Canal, another
communique said. The Israelis
said it was the 34th confirmed
shooting incident on the
Egyptian-Israeli truce line since
Sunday.
Terrorist incidents also were
reported in the Gaza Strip along
the Mediterranean Sea, occupied
Keep Alliances
Nixon Urges
BONN (UPI) President
Nixon, in an historic address to
the West German parliament,
urged Americas European allies
Wednesday not to abandon the
Atlantic alliance on the eve of
critical negotiations he intends
to open with the Soviet Union.
Nixon, who flew to West
Germany from London on the
third leg of his European tour,
spoke after winning assurance
that Chancellor Kurt Georg
Kiesinger had full confidence
in his conduct of forthcoming
talks with Russia.
The U. S. President, after
receiving the most enthusiastic
welcome of his trip so far, spoke
for 14 minutes to the Bonn
parliament. It was the first time
in its 20 year history the
parliament had granted a foreign
head of state the right to speak
to it.
Defending freedom* Nixon
told the German lawmakers that
NATO has succeeded in
defending the freedom of its
members for 20 y£ars, but must
keep up its strength in the years
to come.
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GM Recalls 4.9 Million Autos

MOST IN AUTO-MAKING HISTORY

GM said it had received
reports of four deaths due to
exhaust fumes, three of them at
one time. Several other persons
were reported to have been
overcome by the fumes, a GM
spokesman said.
GM said it will recall 2.4
million 1965 through 1969
model Chevrolets because

by Israel since the 1967 war.
The scattered incidents came
even as UPI correspondent Peter
D. Lynch reported increased
fears in Cairo that the death of
Israeli Premier Levi Eshkol
would further complicate the
crisis in the Middle East.

jh j
B
Hr

*
MondayFriday ipm 4pm
Room 330 Reitz Union
h' e
l3| You will be notified in the Alligator when the p~*| t
yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole,

exhaust fumes could enter the
passenger compartment.
An additional 2.5 million
1968 and 1969 model
Chevrolets, Pontiacs,
Oldsmobiles, Buicks, Cadillacs
and GMC trucks will be recalled
because a carburetor cam could
break apart and cause a throttle
to stick in a partly open
position, it said.
The GM spokesman said Mr.
and Mrs. Charles L. Hunt and
Susan Koehler were asphyxiated
in a 1968 Chevrolet Impala near
sales & services
Wilt A' CM
% wig salon i
jl 1013 w. university ave. y
VX2 blocks from campus jLJ

Hebei City. Utah, July 11,1968.
Three days later, he said, Mrs.
Charles Dunaway was reported
asphyxiated in a 1966 Impala in
Baton Rouge, La.

20% OFF
ALL POLAROIDS
A 1232 W. UNIV. I
i 376-7657 I
I o

)"{ | ,.
;; flgggL r' .;
jBbJM Hp mBP
wf *l*iff J§ HHV
viafj:fl Ir '"^^S
iilffl rn ISiIKiH HiHrcSEniPIHK
i%f
* Su bk! m s 1
ffi.'§:. Kl|Lk-.--. I^W^L,^:
a 'T HHBrc%v sS* j

Thursday, February 27, 1969, The Florida Alligator, I

-~ /
Dick Hcimi/
Jeweler/
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
/ 2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 27, 1969

Speaking Out

I was recently disturbed by
the reaction of the audience to a
television show. It was one of
those daytime Johnny Carson
shows where they try but
somehow dont equal the real
thing.'
There was a comedian and he
told jokes I had heard three
months ago and the audience
laughed. And the comedian
laughed the loudest.
Then it started. Joan Baez
sang a beautiful song about her
sisters wedding. And it wasnt
an ordinary wedding and the
bridegroom wasnt what the
middle class american would
approve of. But the audience let
it go by and even clapped after
the song. WOW!
But the fake Johnny Carson
wasnt happy. He wanted his
show to have something special,
so he did it. What about your
husband and the draft, and the
war, and what do you think
about our great country? And
she did it. She fell into the trap.
But she knew it and she just
wanted to say what was on her
mind. But she went too far.
She actually told the audience
that the war was wrong and that
America was killing people. And

The Dissenter

Thou Shalt Not Kill. Yes sir,
thats what it says right there in
the Christian Bible. The Bible,
well . For those of you who
dont know what this is, it is,
among other things, a myth of
creation, the story of the
supposedly chosen people of
God, called by name Jews, and
various and sundry other stories
and parables.
Also occurring in this book is
the relating of how ol Jehovah
handed down to one Moses a set
of moral precepts, which were
thenceforth known as the Ten
Commandments.
Now, being as how these are
all absolute moral dictums,
straight from the horses mouth,
so to speak, all good and true
Christians believe in and obey
them to the letter absolutely, no
exceptions. Supposedly, that is.
Let us say now, here we have
a fine young fellow, who has
been raised in the American and
Christian way. Our fine fellow,

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the Univ.*rfty of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Businas, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions ex press d in the Florida AUifatar are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the Univenitv of Florida.

America Laughs

Praying For Death

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
* the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
PcWtoftfe&V Dave Doucette
... 1 Managing Editor
All
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor

she said the bad, no-no word:
LOVE. And the audience didnt
clap. And they didnt laugh and
the comedian didnt tell a joke
and they all just sat there and
didnt.
So Joan told a story. And the
story was about a man that was
confronted with violence and
used non-violence to control the
aggressor. Kind of funny, huh?
And worse than that, he
overcame the forces of evil. And
the audience laughed. And the
comedian laughed. And Joan
didnt. She just sat there and
didnt.

also in the American tradition,
just cant wait to get his hands
on the dirty Communist Cong
over there in God-forsaken
Vietnam. Hes ready to kill, kill,
kill for his country.
Perhaps you see a
contradiction here. Being a
Christian, one is supposed to
refrain from murder. Oh, but no,
my friends, there is no problem.
For as everyone knows, God is
now and forever shall be on the
side of America. Therefore, it is
quite all right to kill for
anything whatsoever, as long as
it is in the name of the IJ.S.A.
If you read closely enough
you will discover, to your
complete surprise, Im sure, that
there are no buts,ifs, or
excepts qualifying the Sixth
Commandment. Most certainly
it does not say, you can shoot
'em all dead for the right side
or that you should go to church
to pray for the opponent to
drop dead because the President

By George Mclnis

And then it was the
comedians turn. And he got out
his flag and waved it high. But it
had stains on it and it was torn
and some of the stars were
divided from the rest. But the
audience didnt notice. And they
clapped. And the comedian took
his bows. And I was disturbed.
They laughed at the singer and
clapped for the comedian.
WOW! Somehow things just
werent like they were in the
beginning. And I just sat there
and didnt.
Laugh on, America. Laugh on.

By Lee Hilliker

or anybody else says he is
wrong.
It is somewhat paradoxical
that anyone who professes to be
a Christian could condone war
for any reason whatsoever.
Those who act upon true
Christian sentiments are too
often labeled Communist and
coward for their refusal to fight
for America or anything else.
For their belief that human life
is sacred above all else, they are
hated and vilified.
There is currently a poster out
which pictures a drawing of
Christ and offers a reward for his
capture. He is wanted for,
among other things, sedition and
undermining the morals of the
country. It is tragic but true that
if Christ appeared on earth
today he would be crucified
with even greater alacrity than
he was 2000 years ago.
This country has no place for
men of peace and love, for they
do not perpetuate the status
quo. There is more than enough
room for pseudo-Christians
paying lip-service to their
religion but lending their minds
and bodies to antithetic goals.
Theres a word for it. Everybody
knows it. Hypocrisy. Rolls off
the tongue quite easily.
HYPOCRITES.
And, how are you. Mr.
Soldier President Citizen, did
your mind have a pleasant
morning in church?

editorial
Open The
Gradebook
r
Anyone can make a mistake.
And anyone should be willing to make an account of his
actions, especially when he is a university professor and
balances, in his gradebook, the educational lives of hundreds
of young people.
Thats why its not too much to ask that a grade appeals
board be set up at the University of Florida.
There are numerous situations in which normal channels
do not suffice for effective student-faculty communications.
There are professors who maintain a policy of never
discussing grade changes.
There are, regrettably, professors who treat any criticism
of their grading or teaching system as a personal insult.
There are students, who through pride or shyness, never
dare to confront their professor personally.
There are students whose cases require far deeper
investigation than their professors are willing or able to
undertake.
While teacher evaluation is ultimately a valuable
communications asset to student and professor alike, there
is no just and uniform method available for solution of the
more immediate problem that results from grade
misunderstanding.
Under a proposal approved by the Action Conference:
Any student who feels that his instructor has allowed
extraneous information to influence his grading, would have
recourse to a grade appeals board.
At least one of the board members would have had
recent experience in teaching the course in question.
t The committee would have no power to change the
grade arbitrarily, but would make a recommendation lo the
course instructor.
The committee would serve the function of advisor to
the student in solving future grade difficulties.
The Alligator strongly supports the formation of such a
board. We feel that it could play an important part in
closing the student-faculty communications gap.
And it would be a concession to justice that the
university could easily afford to make.
Justice is a rare commodity in this world. But if it is ever
to be increased, it must be increased here, on the learning
level.
Because men must leam justice before they are able to
practice it.
ifiM' 'j/Ss
Unitv"



R jl
i j a scandal rag

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Hip 4 W :|||
H/ IntiAbMA
Da MH4i |{ -''Wall |m ~*i
mMfmJ £ V |ap|T] I ?Ht a g^F
K# MBoi jALiI
11l- UayLy^^p^^^^HaM^b
Trying to figure it out.
WSMXSM-
The Jock Gang

MR. EDITOR:
When I read in Fridays
edition of the Alligator that the
football team had decided to
attend Intercourse to protect
President OConnell, I must
admit that I failed to
comprehend their true motive
for this action.
I think that the football team
should realize that this is
supposed to be the one place in
our society where everything
and anything can and ought to
be questioned. President
OConnell was, Im sure, fully
aware that the radicals would
be there to question him
regarding selective law
enforcement and fraternity
gang-type wars, and anything
else that may have been on their
minds.
Furthermore, it seems that
they (football team) have failed
in their noble quest to recognize
the very purpose of Intercourse,
as a dialectic of some sort
between the administration and
the students; an effort to create
a better understanding between
these two sometimes polemical
forces.
Although I may not always
agree with the radical viewpoint,
I would venture to assert that
radicals are not only a creative
force in our society, supposedly
a free one, but also a
constructive force; as such, I
dont think that we, or President
OConnell, need any
pseudo-brown-shirt tactics for
protection.

In fact, it could be that the
football team defeats
OConnells purpose in showing
up for the program. He could
just as easily be a John
Champion and hide behind his
desk or conveniently take a trip.
The teams underlying motive
may have been benevolent, but
certainly misguided and asanine
to say the least.
RICHARD FOSTER, 4AS
Whos Who
Raising Hell
MR. EDITOR:
I would like to commend the
U of F Cheer Leaders and
especially Head Hatchet Man
Roddy Grubbs for their
excellent, imaginative and
original cheers so much in
evidence at Gator athletic
events, particularly the ones like,
Damn Good Team, and Give
Em Hell, Gators.
It certainly brings a mist to
your eye and a lump to your
throat to hear the old
red-head hysterically screaming
GO TO HELL, (TENNESSEE,
KENTUCKY, FLAGLER) !!
Perhaps it was this type
performance and originality
which elected him to the Hall of
Fame and Whos Who.
Would it be too much to ask
for some original, GOOD cheers?
JACK N. FORSYTHE, 7ED

Florida Alligator's
Stupidity Exposed
*

MR. EDITOR:
This scandal rag has finally
nauseated me to the point that I
feel compelled to ask just what
terrible sin the student body of
this fine institution has
collectively committed that
resulted in the publishing,
obviously as an awesome form
of punishment, of that aggregate
of poor journalism, bad taste,
and abominable stupidity that
pleases to call itself the Florida
Alligator.
By punishment, I not only
refer to the act of producing the
Alligator, although that clearly
must purgatory, in itself, to
judge from the trash that
appears in it daily, but also the
nausea and headaches that it
causes for the hapless students
who read it of a morning.
Examples of what I mean are
painfully all too numerous, but
three, in particular, rankle at the
moment.
First, to Beth Graves, re poor
journalism: I believe that it is
generally considered a mark of
poor journalism to expound on a
subject, and by doing so, show
complete ignorance of the same
subject. I refer to your article on
Jocks Favorite Foods, in which
you refer to pot liquor. There

Print Publicity Releases

MR. EDITOR:
Sunday, Feb. 16, the University of Florida
Symphony Orchestra gave a very fine concert in
University Auditorium. The auditorium was about
three-quarters full (about 900 people) of which
maybe two-thirds were students.
The majority of the student body is either
unaware of the existence of the orchestra, was not

Overtime Article Misleading

MR. EDITOR:
Your very recent article on
overtime at the University is
ridiculously misleading.
Your article and Mr. Robert
Buttons statement give one the
impression payment will be
made to anyone working
overtime, pronto!! Nothing
could be further from the truth.
Mr. Button would have us
believe that the University now

I . would like to know why the funds that go to
the Alligator cannot be diverted to a better and more
useful purpose than that which they now serve, such
as, for instance, a fund for the relief of starving,
syphilitic Sikhs in Lower East Kurdistan.

is no such thing. There is a
traditional Southern delicacy
known variously as pot likker or
pot licker, which consists of the
juices left after the cooking of
turnip greens and pieces,
sometimes used to sop
cornbread, in the same manner
that others juxtapose bread and
gravy.
Secondly, to the writer of
sports articles responsible for the
piece ending with the assertion
that God Is Fabulous, re bad
taste: the question of whether
God has, or doesnt have, any
particular attribute is one which
I, for one, am not about to
debate in this space. I maintain
that it is, however, in extremely
poor taste to couch such an
opinion in the flippant,
disrespectful language that you
used, and then offer it for the
consumption of a captive
audience, some members of
which it can only offend.

compensates its employees in
the same way any other
business would.
Perhaps he could clarify the
policy in print so we wont be
expecting this non-existent

In order to appear in the Alligator, letters
to the editor must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers names may be withheld from
publication for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters in the
interest of space.

Thursday, February 27, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

aware that it was performing a concert, or had other
things to do.
For the benefit of those who do not Know that
this campus does have a Student Government
sponsored orchestra and for those who would like
to know when it performs, I think it would be a
nice gesture for the Alligator to print the publicity
releases that the orchestra makes available.
DAVID E. PAUL, SAR

Thirdly, to the writer of the
editorial which questioned the
real reason for Scott
DeGarmos dismissal as a library
assistant, re stupidity: How can
anyone with an intelligence level
above that of a sophisticated
beet actually assume that there
was any reason for his dismissal
other than the fact that he did,
in fact, assist an ugly broad in
her birthday suit to enter the
Graduate Library after hours,
and then take and publish
pictures of her in said condition?
I also would like to know
why the funds that go to the
Alligator cannot be diverted to a
better and more useful purpose
than that which they now serve,
such as, for instance, a fund for
the relief of starving, syphilitic
Sikhs in Lower East Kurdistan.
We could get no less value for
our money.
ALLEN R. FRYE, 2UC

reward any and every time duty
calls.
ELIZABETH HILL
Technician
Dept, of Psychiatry
Health Center

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 27,1969

Page 8

Wu un ww
WUW All Week...
Gt. WHITE, BLUE & COLD WATER ARROW SOUTHERN BISCUIT Plain or Self-Rising
Limit one w/$5. 00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes I B MU BB I
Detergent 39* Flour 5 39/ e f|*|
Eggs 2 sl. Aiax2 Ml RKf(]U
Cooking Oil ...69* gMA
Corn 5/sl. Mayonnaise...s9* rr= i
No. 303 Can REAL SOUTHERN W/SNAPS CIGARETTES
Acre Peas 4/sl. Arrow Napkins 10
40-oz DEEP SOUTH 150 KING SIZE ALCOA (WITH A 20$ COUPON IN OUR AD)
Peanut Butter9 Alum. Foil 99* Jf
f* CAMPBELLS b. crackin' good
VESET I.' fl SALTINES 2/49*
r AllflC I Swidi 3/sl. Bread 29*
\llllr l I IB Jks 19* Stix 29*
tJVIH I £ n ; H Rings 49* Cup5....2/39*
N1 AND 6/sle HEALTH and BEAUTY AIDS
18-ox. TROPICAL __ No. 2% Con SWEETREAT SLICED 20oz. ANTISEPTIC
Grape Jelly 3/sl. Pineapple 3/sl. LISTERINE 38*
Cuke Chips 3/sl. Chec. Drink 4/sl. PRELL SHAMPOO (8*
JUMBO GALA 7oz. CHERRY STAR WHITE MEAT PERSONAL SIZE COLGATE
Pnper Jewels 3/sl. Tunn Fish... 3/sl. TOOTHPASTE 28*
No. 2'A Can THRIFTY MAID No. 303 Can THRIFTY MAID 9'A-ox. JERGENS '.OO-Ct. ST. JOSEPH
Bart. Pears 3/sl. Lima Beans 5/sl. L0ti0n.....69 < Aspirin....3B*
Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Thursday thru Wednesday, Feb. 27 Morch 5
....
more
B purchase
B W W ,a'/i.o, DUNCAN
Coffee 39" Cake Mixes 3/l.
i I [IIIW S^SSISTAMPS ; I UTIT i W SSHT : |"I i | {j3HT STAMPS Hj ] kl> VAU^STAMPS I TOi> VA 1
I B. oi'h mi wv. ami courON *mo rvicxtu ot ' ,M coupon .lichavi o* tovro* o with mwahi covw>m and tuiCHAU ot w.,- .* Mfyir J f I L/r VALUE J I A/ylrJ
1 P H, m>.N, CWNN
I No. 303 Con DIET DELIGHT 14-oz. JACKS CHOCOLATE B* BB Bi Good Only at WINN-DIXIE Bi BBIHB
Halves Apricots . 39" Nut Cookies 39? I U'- i,h 'c his v f! uabl f coupon 150 "
' 1 >ul 07" tm King Size Alcoa Wrap
Na 303 Con DIET DELIGHT 16-oz. KEEBLER I
G fruit Sections . 35" Zesta Saltines ... 27 | I
Sliced Peaches . 27" Duet Crackers . 45" j J
Bartlett Pears . 37" Fruit Cocktail 31" L__
I BB BB tm Good Through Morch 5 BB BB 888
fly 1 r#l sWrflllTl*TlllTnHFl^



on These Specials
Prices U thru l/IMnesdai/ Mar. 5-^llp
:KM 8 j J, J 2p V 4/
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round steak 99-
CHUCK STEAK 69*
" -- CALIF. ROAST 79*
II H Ilf 4si ROAST 89* R 185... 59
lIMHM STEAK. T STEW....T
d m Quantity Prices Good All Week Thursday thru Wednesday, March
WINN-DIXIE STORES, INC GOPYRIOHTIEE
8-oz. BORDEN'S SUPERBRAND COTTAGE SWIFT'S PREMIUM 2-Lb. FREEZER QUEEN GravyiSli. BeeF Veal Parmagian. Meat Loaf or
Cream Cheese.... 37* Cheese 2 59* Franks 65* Salis. 5teak....51.49
6-oz. BORDENS SLICED 10-Ct. EXTRA LIGHT BALLARDS 8-oz. OSCAR MAYER BRAUNSCHWEIGER 5-Lb. DRESSED
Muenster Cheese49* Can Biscuits... 4/41* Sand. Spread 43* Whiting 99*
10-Ct. EXTRA LIGHT PILLSBURY 8-oz. KRAFTS SWISS GRADE "A* QUICK FROZEN TURKEY TASTE O' SEA BONELESS PERCH (In Meat Dept.)
Can Biscuits.... 4/41* Stick Cheese 55* Leg Quarters.... 29* Fish Fillets >39*
8-oz. SHARP 12-oz. SUNNYLAND TAME OR FRESH BOSTON BUTT COPELAND BREAKFAST
Stick Cheese 55* Tangy Franks 45* Pork Roast > 59* Link Sausage ... 79*
OLD FASHION WISCONSIN 1-Lb. 808 WHITE REGULAR FRESH )-lb. Bag or Link TARNOW WHOLE HOG
Daisy Cheese.... >79* Sliced Bacon 59* Pork Steaks 69* Sausage 69*
ij&Jtriwberries 31
tr wmaiawa I Rananac Orange Juice 4/89* Meat Dinners 2/89*
Strawberries 3/89* Coffee Rich 2/sl.
WATnnrCT W t f*7 Potatoes 5 89* Pie Shells 89*
FRESH J Lenten Specials SBPIES 69*
1-lb. BASKET SALAD YOUNG TENDER POLE b '^ A | T | SEAHoddocl( FlounderorPerch GREEN PEAS 5/Sl.
Tomatoes 49< Beans 2 49' Fj!!ets2/sl. spinach 3/49*
Cabbage 2 39' Fruit 5-49' *!"" M r-prm p EAS 5 /t|.
Carrots 2/39* Onions ...5 ; 39' taKes 29 < SPAGHEni 4/89'
MILD SWEET U.S. No. 1 RUSSET BAKING
Rutabagas... 10* Potatoes 10 79* jiMgg^lilMiyiiis^OllPliyi^arial
TWO FL on AOR SHIPPED J ONE PKG QUARTER
LARGE FRESH HEADS WASH. STATE Extra Fancy Golden or Red Delicious \ whole or cut.up fresh pork loin sliced into S-pk.mo. w dchoitio
Lettuce 2 4Q* Annlec OQ< wW -fiiss. i
VI I VvVooo A M illflflvoooaoo* 16 Mm M .Lgaaiia.,. ,*.**. \ EQeBU .:>* -- >I 2S&SM

4-02. ALL FLAVORS MY-T-FINE 15-oz. SWITCH s's BLACKBURN MADE
Puddings 12* Cat Food 10* Syrup 63 d *l£2?
3-ox. B. B. CHOPPED 7'/z-oz. GERBER JUNIOR 12-oz. TORRIDO Margarine I
Mushrooms . 37 Veg. Ham . 3/49* Peppers 33 d 43*
1-Lb. SUNSHINE 7%-or. GERBER JUNIOR BANANA & 6-oz. MEXI-PEP ^LjrTstteT" 11 '
Krispy Crackers . 37* Pinapple .... 3/49* H ot Sauce .... 25*
No. 1 HENNY PEN J, 6-oz. VILLAGE INN BEEF FLAV. RICE, CHICKEN FLV. RICE 25-Ct. GLAD MargO Tine
Dog Food .. 3/29* Spanish Rice .. .39* Storage Bags .. 39* 37*
nwiffiffliiimiw.BmifflM

Thursday, February 27,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

jl in v r fin- iiir;~~~ nnmwiQggtpr i1 ~ ~
1 FOR SALE
Portable TV B & W good reception
$45. Call 378-7857 after 6.
(A-st-89-P)
Mobile home Bx3o. Occupancy in the
spring quarter. See at Lot L 3, 3860
Archer Rd. SW Town and Country or
call 392-3082 from 8 to 4. L. Shaw.
(A-st-89-P)
*62 Sprite needs clutch work S3OO.
Also Elmo Bcz sir power zoom 8 mm
movie camera S7O. Call 378-7247 ask
for Tom. (A-3t-90-P)
ELECTRONIC ORGAN, combo
type: S2OO. 376-0435. (A-3t-90-P)
Remington 1100 12 Ga. skeet, wing
presentation II Target bow and Acc.
SBO each, see George at 303 NW 17
St. Apt. 13. (Ai2t-91-P)
ARMY OFFICERS winter green
uniform coat size 38 trouser size
29. Excellent co nd ition s2s.
Telephone 372-7997. (A-3t-91-P)
6 8 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Excellent condition 883 cc. Call
372-7703 after 6:30 p.m. (A-st-91-P)
1969 Suzuki 250 roll bar, luggage
rack. Excellent cond. under
warrenty, $550 Firm. Call Paul
372-5552. (A-3t-91-P)
GIBSON J-50 with delux case blond
finish ssoo. Epiphone Texan model,
with ca%i $l3O. Call Jim at 378-9512
between 5 & 7 p.m. (A-3t-91-P)
TYPEWRITER. Brand new
Smith-Corona portable. Must sell for
spring tuition. Only used once. Best
offer. 392-8428 evenings. (A-lt-92-P)
2 Fisher XP-55 speakers $35.00 each
call 378-1253 after 7:30 pm.
(A-2t-92-P)
| FOR RENT
1 br apt. central heat & air, w-w
carpt., quiet location. Rent sllO/mo.
Paid for Feb. Furnished for married
or singles. Call Jim 378-0426 after
5:00 p.m. (B-4t-90-P)
SUBLET 1 br apt. 3 blks from
campus AC, washing machine, ample
parking water, garage free. $360/qtr.
call 372-0747 or come by 1824 NW
3rd PI. No. 26. (B-2t-91-P)
2 bdrm apt, 2 blocks from campus,
Njnust sublet spring and summer qtrs,
$l4O month, washing machine. Call
3(72-6559 between 5 and 7 p.m. and
after-O p.m. (B-85-86-p)
Sublet Camelot apt. 2 seniors want 2
coeds to share 2 bedroom 2 bath apt
overlooking pool. Most spacious floor
plan and Spanish decor. Call
378-8458 for further information.
(B-st-88-P)
12x60 trailer sublet spring and/or
summer quarter. Furnished 2
bedroom. Perfect for 2 single
students or married couple. Call
372-7576 after 6. (B-3t-90-P)
Must sub-lease immediately my share
spacious 2-br furn. University
Gardens apt. $42.50 mo. Call Steve
378-9728. (B-st-89-P)
MUST SUBLET apt. for 1,2, 3
people for spring quarter, ac, pool, 2
blocks from campus, SBS per month.
1513 NW 5 Ave. Call 378-8537.
(B-st-90-P)
RENT SLASHED! Furn. 2 bedroom
apt. on SW 16 Ave for only $l2O mo.
sublet for 3 qtr only. 376-3552.
(B-3t-92-P)
Sublet large one bedroom apartment
33 colonial manor, air-conditioned,
pool, carpeted, $l2O/month call
372-7111 students. (B-2t-92-P)
1 WANTED
k-iMiVIWM IWOBB
2 Roommates for spring quarter,
males. Williamburg apt. Finest living
in G'ville. Air cond, pool, dishwasher.
Call Apt. 41, 376-9719. (C-st-89-P)
1 coed roommate for Spring qtr.
Starlight apt 3 blocks from campus
approx $33/month. Call after 4 p.m.
preferred, 378-3449. (C-st-89-P)
2 female roommates to share 2 bdrm
apt. spring and summer qtrs. 2 blocks
from campus $lO5 qtr. 372-6559
btwn 5 and 7 p.m. and after 11 p.m.
(c-Bt-86-p)
I Irani if* Mum hamd
I atawa i nwm wmhu
guess who's
coining to
. I dinner COLOR I
I SPENCER TRACY
KATHARINE HEPBURN I
SIDNEY POITIER g
I KATHARINE HOUGHTON |
ALSO lincnuT' l
| Jigsaw coionj

WANTED |
COED WANTED to share 2-story
duplex, 1 block behind Norman for
spring quarter. $27.50 a mo. plus
utilities. Call 378-5739. (C-3t-90-P)
NEED SOMEONE to share 3*/i acre,
2-bedroom paradise on Cowpens
Lake. Start now or March. Call Craig
481-2753. (C-2t-87-P)
WANTED: 1 female roommate for
spacious 2 bedroom Camelot Apt.
with fireplace. Call 378-9694.
(C-4t-91-P)
LANDMARK Male roommate
needed. Available March 1. March
rent paid. Call 378-3120, apt. 170.
(C-10t-88-P)
Female roommate Landmark 169
2 bedroom apt. $45 month. Can
move in for spring quarter. 378-7782.
(C-st-91-P)
Lets make a deal. Sublet 2 br apt. at
Landmark or 2 roommates to share 2
br. apt. starting spring quarter. Call
378-8982, Apt. 113. (C-st-91-P)
Will share small house near Mall with
1 person, S4O for March only. Own
room. Call Mike Robinson, 392-1681
Days, 376-7489 nights. (C-4t-91-P)
Female roommate for March to Aug.
$41.25/month. Fun type atmosphere
but quiet too. Call 378-0987 aske for
Kathy. (C-4t-91-P)
Male roommate to share 2 bedroom
apt. at Summit House. Cheaper than
youd think. Call 378-5748.
(C-4t-91-P)
One male roommate wanted
immediately for 2 bedroom garage
apt 2 blocks from campus cable TV.
$45 a month plus utilities call
372-5976. (C-st-92-P)
Openminded coed with car to share 2
bedroom townhouse apartment in
Anglewood Manor. SSO mo. plus
utilities. Call 376-1015. (C-4t-92-P)
Need 1 roommate for Frederick
Gardens 2 bedroom apartment spring
quarter. Call 378-1978. (C-st-92-P)
The single university crowd over 21
for the Friday Afternoon Club
Will meet this & every Friday from 5
7:30 at the Lamplighter; private
rooms, pleasant atmosphere. Drinks
45c. Come early & bring your
friends. Fridays a great day to have
fun. (C-3t-86-P)
INSTANT ROOMMATE: One got
married. Need fourth. All the
comforts of home. Landmark t 62.
Visit or call after 1:00. 378-0432.
(C-lt-92-P)
§ HELP WANTED
RATHSKELLER job opportunities.
Positions open asst, business
manager, asst, public relations
chairman, asst, club supervisor.
Apply Student Activities Desk, 3rd
floor Reitz Union. (E-3t-91-C)
AUTOS
SWWI'WWWSaaXWM 0 j WOTBBW B B fl
1960 Buick LeSabre, V-8, automatic
transmission, power brakes &
steering. Call Flipper 372-0491. See
at 1125 SW 2nd Avenue. G-4t-89-P)
AUTOS I
v
I*
1966 MG Midget. Wire wheels and
tonneau. 21,000 miles. Book price
$1125. Phone 376-7947 after 5 and
weekends. (G-st-89-P)
IAFTER IAFTERTHE
THE IAFTERTHE RAIN

| GET HAPPY
1 Tonight all your favorite drinks
will be double for the price of
a single. We have free
I entertainment to soothe your pain.
I Bring your buddy, wife, date,
| fraternity, or sorority along
to the
HH : s
333^W^niv.

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 27, 196J*

Page 10

AUTOS I
LIKE NEW Beautiful 65 Faicoir
Futura 2 door-hardtop 6 cyl radfo
automatic new wsw. Must sell A real
bargain. Call 392-1473 or 3725703.
(G-7t-86-p)
62 Comet automatic, radio, heater, 4
door, very good condition, S4OO. Call
378-7857 after 6. (G-st-89-P)
63 MG Midget, well cared for. Brand
new Pirelli tires. Best offer. Call
378-7996. (G-st-89-P)
'6B VW bus 8000 miles showroom
condition, radio, 18 mos. left on
warrenty. Best offer over $2300
takes it by Sunday. 372-4177 after 6
p.m. (G-3t-91-P)
63 VALIANT $450. Excellent
condition, heater, radio. See to
appreciate. Call 392-8577.
(G-2t-92-P)
JiiijWfriWQ 980805 SWttgWiWWtW
PERSONAL 1
Talent Anyone! Gator Gras Folk
Festival Auditions Fri. Feb. 28, 8:00
pm at the Bent Card Coffee Shop,
1826 W. University Ave. (J-2t-92-P)
Get V 2 chicken & more at Broward's
Bar-B-Que Mar. 2, Sun. 4:30-6:30 for
Gator Loan fund. J.K. & the Jug will
entertain. $1.50 each. (J-4t-90-P)
This may be your only chance to see
the New York Rock & Roll Ensemble
this easily at this price, this Fri. nite,
8:00, Reitz Union Ballroom. SI.OO
(J-3t-90-P)
NANCY ls your name is Nancy
and you were at the Red Lion last
Thurs. nite with Jan, Please Call Bob
376-8668. (J-2t-91-P)
Happy Birthday, fellow mouseketeer
even though we're divorced, I
would not forget your day Love
from your wife and three freshman
sons. (J-lt-92-P)
The Friday Afternoon Club for the
university crowd over 21 will meet
this and every Friday from 5 7:30
at the Lamplighter. Private rooms,
pleasant atmosphere. Drinks 45c.
Come early & bring your friends
Friday is a great day to have fun.
(J-3t-86-P)
Time is running out to reserve your
seat for EUROPE this summer, $315,
10 wks. N.Y. London N.Y. or go
for credit 392-1655 or 310 Union.
(J-ts-82-C)
To the biggest Louie at Towers. Had
a great weekend nauseous please
no. Hurry home. Love, Marrlene.
(J-lt-92-P)
Hey Jack, sorry you missed Daytona.
Why dont you take your car to the
GVille Mall Sunday 12:30 for the
Gymkana. Win trophies and stuff!
(J-2t-92-P)
isinaiiaK
mmKattm
PARAMOUNT lE*' 8
KIRK DOUGLAS BPj
THE BROTHERHOODBLM
* ucHNtoicr a faraaiount picture fiiifes*

fnrmnmmn g banrnrrnnnnnn
I PERSONAL
Youll love our turtles! . and all
the other little creatures in our
CERAMIC ZOO. From Mexico. The
Spanish Main, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Now open nights til 9:00. (J-st-92-P)
Summer Ponchos (sls) and other
clothes are in from Mexico. Woven
headbands. The Spanish Main, 105
W. Univ. Ave. Open nights til
9.(J-st-92-P)
Need your term paper typed? Ill
type anything. 50c a page. Broward
Hall. Call 392-9761. (J-2t-92-P)
LOST & FOUND f
WOMANS brown rimed reading
glasses in red and white case. If
found, call 392-9463. REWARD.
(L-3t-91-P)
Found prescription sunglasses.
Tolbert area handball courts. Call
378-7571. (L-3t-91-P)
LOST Post Versalog slide rule. Name
is inside. Contact Wayne Zellner,
376-1155 evenings. REWARD!
(L-st-91-P)
Found one pr glasses outside
Matherly. Call 378-5061 5:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m. and claim same.
(L-3t-91-P)
Lost Thursday brown Joh Romain
key case. If found please Call
376-3729 after 4. (L-st-91-P)

_l!l NOW! JL Dean Martin I
S U &lK 1 S as Matt Helm ,n
>. 4t 21tti NO £ n MiA
J? < hr | W mM JP | I ll
1 11 ? iwWreckmg Crew
M TECHNICOLOR* g
HURRY! LAST g
IN.W. 13th St , 23rd RO f J r ID
> _Ttlaphon^7BJ!434^^Ut W 0 VV 1%
A love I
that begins with Actor 00 I
an incredible Academy Award Nominee I
jM K yfa I
'jbL fl
v f JB
/sL. Swfe- MBHBBHBBpMR f |
> v
SELMUR PICTURES in collaboration with
ROBERTSON ASSOCIATES presents
CUFF ROBERTSON. CLAIRE BLOOM I
LILIA SKALA LEON JANNEY RUTH WHITE I
NELSON / SHANKAR / SELIGMAN / SILLiKt L, /NELSON I
TECHNICOLOR TECHNISCOPE " RELEASING CORPORATION Of.gi na I Sou n<3 Trac h K
Album Available on

y.sy.NNNNV.ViS^WW^WS^WWX*:*:*:*!*!*!*!^
1 lost & FOUND I
!y:\vx-x > x-:*XX-x*x*vvvv*K x*>x*x x*x>!> FOUND DOG belonging to Carol
Ann Lacock. Call Vicki 378-9455.
(L-3t-90-P)
SERVICES I
v & y
>:*v;?;ywxx-x.x;xx*:*x*x*x*x.;.sns*;*:*:*mw
Dissertation and publication figures
and drawings. Professional Graphic
artist, Nancy McClelland, 378-4260.
(M-st-90-P)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-P)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)
Tennis racket restringing, satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call M and R
Tennis Services. 378-2489.
(M-18t-59-P)
FLY ANYWHERE round trip or one
way. Pilot offering co-op flying
arrangements anywhere for up to 3
passen. Save $. Info: 392-7969.
(M-2t-92-P)
COLOR by DeLuxe
IsiiVj I



IE3I .^.FILLVDOR^raiNTHE
PBMp mm *?sf vfl^
_jfT | l Crackr Karr* I ;v...
M I VfcvlMH Sausage
Brown'N Serve:r;63
/ j X Premium
JiP ssr*i Beef Liver . r 69*
NUrten'i Frozen
Macaroni & Cheese 5 X M Sw,,, * Pr mium Butt.r-Ba.ted Roast
WpWg| Morton's Frozen with Moot So wee TmmLau ~ $479
Spaghetti sS*l IMrUCj e eoisMo.rk> ,;,; A
p£%J?Sl; 'f* Cold CUtS. ee e *'.: $ |
Ncwmt Frexon Crinkle Cut
MBs OnM Giant Frann
w Buttered Rice X 33* p-mi* n.w D .iri-Fr..h
Booth's Froxon ______________________________
Froxon
Old Fashion German Style
: i oa ., Sliced Bologna ... ;r 79*
Potato Salad rr 39*
.:;:: ; .:5 .J H \ Delicious Fresh Made
S|jcSf^^ r (fPfff^/ Y) g! PDBIIX jl
Mackerel Bs |S ;' -... T ./|
Florida Medium :,. ,$/?;*
* coos Jtfpmz
Shrimp pem,*1 0S

Thursday, February 27, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

:, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 27,1969

:CH COMES IN
ice Cream"! a T**
Swift's Sherbets 5 ,t*l
. O NOE RL ANO Ot, B*d OrapA, Diet or Pin*op|il* P_
Khtfifl Hawaiian Punch 3tr*l
F.F.V. Cookies Lady Betty Delicious, Healthful
Fudge & Nut "kg* 39 JIUICG 4 E OI 49^
i A I I Sunshine Cookies
Cling Peaches 4:x $ l
V Liquid Dove 49* Sw .., r at
.lOftNlll' J.. .1 Arc T..ly, .d DsMSSMMnIa #lV
Mej £ Kidney Beans... 2'! 29 c rinetippiC ee <"
/ l [\\ \ \ N \\\ Hormel's Delicious Treat!
m. '£. \l\* \V\V\ Heinz Thick, Tomato M _ m
HHiiW' Ketchup - 39* Chili with Beans e o 3, s r 5 l
h S; FAR Bartlett
Bbrnd /luk AS AN ADDED CUSTOMER Pef|f HalveS oee o e # <~ 39*
A I THE PRICES
THIS AD ARE EFFECTIVE Potatoes ;r 49 c
/ / j Green
mr thru Wednesday noon, golden Corn 3 59*
MARCH 5, 1969 Green Giant Cream Style
nMDERLANn Golden Corn .... 3-59*
Green Giant Kitchen Sliced
n aJi J-01, ... d^SMfll Wmz& Green Beans 3 # 59*
Dream Whip 25* Green Giant French Style
jeinoT: x io f7fi Green Beans 3 tz? 59*
that Heavy \ wV
WITH THIS COUTOH AHD TUICHAU
Smoked Fully-Cooked Hams <* j / |\\
Redeem your Folger's 8c Coupon at Your A
Freezer Queen N b P bl" M kt! <|il| \ f/^
[|sTilcswGreenTtamps[wl[|J|]cJwGrWn H Sbmps[^||illl^Gr'eenTtamps[^lMll^WGreen K StaiTips|p]|itlicswGreenStaiiiDS^
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(Breck Reg.,or with Body |j| Gillette Injector Breakstone's Temp Tee |J| Valley Frost Frozen ;[i> Brillant Frozen
Creme Rinse . |]| Razor Blades Whipped Cream Cheese |]l Whole Strawberries f !j j Cooked Shrima
8-oz. pkg. |sl 7-count pkg. < 8-oz. cup | | IVa-lb. pkg. J|; 10-oz. pkg
WIT < I \% JL <[
3. (Enpirei Sat., March 1, 19*0) ||J * (Ixpir*. Sot., March I, I 960) <, 5. (Expires Setw March 1, 1*69) (Ixpires Sot., March 1, 1969) jji 7. (Expires Set Marsh 1 I 960) 3



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Tomatoes 4 jsl 99* nrl
Serve CjT 1| |
Sweet Potatoes ...,J2* Sk i ;fim
Tender butter /[y Hkl j V : ; : : 5&:-: : :' : ;
Sweet Carrots 2 J£ 19*
U.S. No. isa |j\ I y \\\\^kk.
Potatoes 20 89 c L rf £ | AiiiKnJAim[
Rhubarb ,39*
. *., js||||E ' Sat., March 1969)
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HgB r Premium Tasty Pork |
Bag Sausage |
n i-ib. pkg. I
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Hcflflfl & Beautt Alii OMCuA n 'Assorted* VarVeties'
Qr. reg. pkg.
New with MFP! Colgate Jfey
Dental Cream AfriEfe 0| Jf - j
fcMARKETii
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Spray
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JSJRedCr... ft UpW. Horn Ch.dd.rt.., 125 5.W..34tH ST. K..1...T./1
Cotton Balls < Beef Stroganoff or Chicken R% fM
65-count pkg. Baronet reg. pkg.
* (Cxpir.t Sat., March 1, 1969) J (lipirn lt., Manh I, Hit) 1 2630 N.W. 13th ST. BS^R
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Thursday, February 73. 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



[, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 27,1969

Page 14

DEAR MR. DUNN:
Emotion is difficult to control, particularly during an athletic
contest where emotional contagion runs high. The home-town fans
naturally want their team to win, especially when the opposing team
has a player capable of either winning the game single-handedly or
sparking his teammates to greater efforts.
It is natural for these fans to get on the opposing star, hoping
their jeers and catcalls will disconcert him to the point of losing his
effectiveness. This practice not only pervades the sports world, but
was seen during many political rallies and at the Chicago convention
this past summer.
Since these actions are natural, however, there is absolutely no need
for the type of disgusting sportsmanship you displayed in your
column when you encouraged Florida fans to give it to Justus.
*
There would have been nothing amiss in urging Gator rooters to
yell and yell harder for the team and for Neal Walk in particular, but
by using negative emotional appeal, you showed yourself to be a
particularly immature, irresponsible journalist who has little business
expressing his opinions in print where others can be influenced by
your juvenile vituperation.
I encourage you to consider all of the facts before you attempt to
write another pack of lies like this story. I have sent a copy of your
story to both Mississippi State and Ole Miss, hoping that they will
take some action to put you in-your place. If you have any comment
concerning this letter, please feel free to write me.
Sincerely,
PETE BISHOP NICK NIXON
Associate News Editor Sports Editor

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
The last weeds are being
pulled from the infield clay.
Players in sweatclothes are doing
jumping jacks and holding hot
pepper sessions to mould their
leather mitts into shape along
with their own agility.
Theres the sound of
horsehide against leather;
horsehide against wood; a sharp
crack of a broken bat; infield
chatter to harrass a batter.
Friday, it will be batter up.
The Gators baseball team will
open the 1969 campaign with a
doubleheader against Miami
away.
With a long 43-game schedule
ahead veteran Coach Dave Fuller
plans to pitch his enitre staff
against the Hurricanes. With all
eight of the pitchers back from
last years conference runnerups,
Fullers mound corps will be his
forte.
Led by righthander Glen
8 wmS'
OVCA SLIDES
.. .UF catcher at home

Msports letters!!
Volunteers Upset By Gator Razzing

Gator Glovemen Open In Miami
UFs SEC Runnerups Seek Title

Pickren and southpaw Jim
Courier, the crew should be one
of the soundest in the SEC, at
least on paper. Pickren paced the
hurlers last season with a 10-2
record and a 1.30 ERA. Courier
has rid himself of tendonitis
problems in his throwing arm
that left him with a mediocre
5-3 record last year and returns
in top physical shape.
Besides a few freshmen and
junior college transfers who have
a shot at the starting nine, the
two newest faces are those of
footballers Guy McTheny and
Bobby Downs. Both are
shooting for a spot somewhere
in the infield but have regulars
at every spot but shortstop to
outperform.
With the loss of Richard
Trapp, all-conference shortstop,
the Gators have given the nod to
rookie Ron Williams, a one year
letterman from Plant City. But
Fuller says McTheny is pushing
for the same job.
Leading hitter in 1968, Nick
Nicosia, returns to centerfield.
The senior from Miami hit a
healthy .418 last year.
Skip Lujack, the Gators
leading hitter in 1967 returns to
action this year. The first
baseman missed last season with
a leg injury. He likes to go for
the homerun ball.
Fuller will probably start
with Mike Ovca behind the
plate, Lujack at first, Len
Bloodworth at second, Williams
at short, Rod Wright at third,
Tony Dobies in left, Nicosia in
center and slugger Dale
Turlington in right. Ovca,
Bloodworth, Wright, Dobies,
Nicosia and Turlington are
returning starters.

MR. DUNN:
While reading a Knoxville
newspaper recently, I came
across a scorching editorial
having to do with your remarks
about our basketball team and
especially about Captain Bill
Justus. Those remarks may have
received enthusiastic support on
your campus but were met here
with various disapproving
remarks about such childishness
as you exhibited in the article.
What is the* whole point of
your little narrative? It concerns
the razzing dealt Florida when
they played the Vols in
Knoxville. Are the home teams

UM Grad Horrified
Dear Assistant Sports Editor:
As an old University of Michigan graduate I was horrified to see the
picture of the U of Michigan sports arena printed recently in the
Alligator upside down!
I think you should plug strongly for things like this! Even the
taxpayers wont strongly fight this improvement.
W.B. DUNN
Michigan 3s

v *-
| ''
NICE ONE
. .Lujack (right) crosses plate
After the three game series
with Miami, the Gators will meet
South Florida in Tampa, March
7th then host them in
Gainesville on March Bth for the
home opener.
The balance of the

9r I 7
M.
' JJ ** '*** *** ll rM *f
BLOODWORTH SWATS ONE
.. .UF's second baseman connects on long one

UT Fan Claims Sports Editor
Exhibited Childishness In Column

fans supposed to sit silently by
with no verbal support for their
SEC championship contending
team? If your top player is so
seriously affected by such team
spirit, if he collapses at such
demonstrations of faith and fails
to concentrate on the game,
then maybe hes not so good
after all!
And then theres Justus
maybe your little player got
lucky the night he was assigned
to cover Justus but those two
points did hurt, didnt they? If
youve forgotten just ask the
man who was supposedly
covering Justus for the last two

JBI |
m x If ip
PICKREN DELIVERS
.. .Gator ace moundsman
moundsmen includes left
handers Mike Jacobs, Larry
Sheffield and Tom Seybold and
righthanders Wayne Rogers,
David Kahn and Rod Macon.
Veteran Steve Arthur dislocated
a shoulder last summer and has
been having trouble ever since
with his throwing arm.
Right now, shortstop is the
only real open spot, says
Fuller. But he insists that many
of his newcomers have been
swatting the ball better than
regulars, that he may be forced

seconds of the game. Im sure he
remembers it well.
No matter how the game in
Gainesville comes out, Im sure
the Vols wont be the slightest
bit dismayed by your
psychological barriers. And
win or lose, Im sure the editor
of the U. T. Beacon wouldnt
stoop so low as to make
derogatory remarks about the
Gator team, its captain and its
fans!
Sincerely,
A VOL FAN
P.S. Justus sacrificed his average
for the team. You picked a good
player to yell at!! Too BAD it
didnt bother him!
(EDITORS NOTE: Like I said
before we cant please everyone.
And our purpose is definitely
not to please Tennessee fans. 1
do wish these UT people would
get their facts straight before
they get diarrhea of the
typewriter. Bill Justus is a fine
basketball player but he isnt a
Neal Walk.

~ .x&ddm.
w- i
f
COACH DAVE FULLER
.. .starts 22nd year
to replace a proved defensive
player who cant hit with a
young one who can.
McTheny, transfers Tom
Eason and Jim Gruber have
showed slugging promise of the
new bunch. Fuller insists that his
veterans will have to pick up
their batting if they want to
hang onto their spots. Last year,
for example, catcher Ovca hit a
modest .260; Bloodworth .200;
and Wright .255.
But this years big bats are
expected to be from the
outfield. Veteran Trulington is
the clubs long ball hitter.
Stocky Will Harmon, a transfer
from Forth Keys Junior College
has been hot in the batting cage
and will pusli Dobies for his job
We have lots and lots of
potential. Honestly, I cant see
us doing much worse than the
division championship. Any less
would surprise and disappoint
me, Fuller says.



Will Sororities Fast WomenShapeUp?

Once agaiTi this Saturday the
old two rivals, rain and sunshine,
will he going at it at Florida
Track. If the sun prevails, the
postponed Gator Olympics will
be run beginning at 1 p.m.
The Spirit of Competition has
been running high across campus
for the last three weeks as
well-known rivals ready for
their next encounter. In the
fraternity Division several
questions arise: will the Pi Lams
edge out the TLPs by a nose? Is
it true the ATOs consider the
Betas their stiffest competition?
Is it possible the Phi Delts will
give the SAEs and their Lion
another shellacking? Can John
Mica once again rally support for
an event?
Among sororities, noted for
their fast women, several
rivalries are also shaping up. The
Thetas will be out to defend
their kite-flying crown; the
DGs, led by Captain Nancy
Allen, hope to sail to victory;
the ADPis are expecting Ann

Chi Phis Set Pace
In Blues Cage Action
Chi Phi continued to roll along in the Blue League beating second
place Delta Chi 29-24 in basketball. Bob Wattles led the scoring with
13 for the Chi Phis.
DU won by the biggest margin of the year with a 69-8 trouncing of
Phi Kappa Psi. Henry Adorno set the pace for the DUs with 12 points.
Phi Tau, however, beat the DUs four days earlier and are about to
take the bracket championship. The Phi Taus must now face the Phi
Psis with the winner expected to be the Taus. Phi Tau will then play
Chi Phi Monday March 3 for the Blue League Championship.
Four big upsets highlighted Orange League competition Tuesday
night as favored Sigma Nu dropped a 29-27 decision to league-leading
TEP. Larry Newman led the TEP midgets as he cracked the hoop for
17 big points in the win.
It was Newman, with his worst night of the year, who had allowed
the TEPs to lose their only game to the Lambda Chi Alphas. Newman
sunk his .final two points with 15 seconds remaining in the game to
give the TEPs the lead. The TEPs had been holding for the last shot.
Pi Lam prevented a three way tie in that bracket by upsetting
Lambda Chi Alpha 36-34. Tom Bell led the Pi Lams with 13.
SPE unended favored Sigma Chi as they handily won 44-37. Mike
Hawley led the way for the SPEs with 18 points. Richard Bennett
scored 15 for the Sigs.
The Delts easily won their final game over the Betas 57-35 as the
formerly first place Betas lost their third straight game. Ralph
Erickson connected for 12 points for the Delts.
Pi Kappa Phi upset favored PiKA to throw that bracket into a tie
between the Pikes and the KAs, who upset the SAEs. Pi Phi was led
by Jim Manning with 16 points. Alan Starling scored 15 for the Pikes.
SAE hopes for the Presidents Cup diminished as they fell 46-39 to
the KAs. Woody Lynn scared 16 and Jim Drake 14 for the KAs.
ATO also won its bracket easily as it beat AEPi 41-34. Ken
Hartsaw led the ATOs with 14 points.
Bracket playoffs will be played tonight starting at 7:45.

LA. DRY
Rain falls an average of 20
days a year in the Los Angeles
area.
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jiCOMPLETE XEROX!
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jj OFFSET FACIUTES |
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Thesis and Dissertations
Reductions and
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i Open Til 11 P.M. §
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} University Plaza
1620 W. University :
| 378-1001
v>X'>>WKo;->>>XXVWBWny9wit

The Florida Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

Do re to shut out the
competition; and the Sigma
Kappas will be out to better
their Homecoming performance
at the Florida Track.
The many unusual teams
which have developed as a result
of the introduction of coed
dorms will also have an
opportunity to demonstrate
their hidden talents in
Saturdays meet.
The Gung-Ho Army ROTC
Brigade has vowed to clip the

MANAGER POSITION OPEN
U of F Faculty Club, Inc.
the Rathskeller is now
accepting applications for
Club Manager a
J salaried management
position,
fyfosjl Apply
* T Student Activities Desk
\ 1/ 3rd Floor Reitz Union

IN GATOR OLYMPICS

wing tips of the high-flying An
Force in a featured 440 yard
relay.
Once again Student
Government and the Alligator
will be battling it out in the
feature event, a 440 yard
tricycle race. Big Wheeling Gary
Goodrich has issued a strong
challenge which was quickly
accepted by Alligator Editor
Harold Aldrich.
But the biggest rival of all is
the SI,BOO needed to send
Johnnie Lee Samuels to the Deaf
Olympics in Yugoslavia. The
rivalry can only be met by an
NIT CHOOSES
BC FIRST
NEW YORK (UPI) Boston
College, passed over by the
NCAA tournament, Tuesday
became the first team extended
a bid to play in the National
Invitaion Basketball tournament.
The Eagles, who have won 13
games in a row for an 18-3
season record, were expecting an
at-large bid to participate in the
Eastern regionals of the NCAA
tourney, but the NCAA turned
instead to St. Johns, Villanova
and Duquesne to fill the Eastern
at-large berths.
The NIT committee
immediately jumped at the
chance to land Boston College
but put off further selections
until later in the week as many
of the leading independents were
taken by the NCAA tournament
earlier in the day.
The tournament is also
hopeful of landing the runnerups
iiv the Atlantic Coast
Conference, the Southeastern
Conference, and the Big Eight
Conference-

overwhelming participation b\
all the student bod\.

r/)5.3A
cr£pit ?
J llJ /kJk \ cyi c arrnje -C^f
//////sU/) / AHHHt / \3 70 *T--Cm.tf r >V
f THURSDAY SPECIAL I
I 11AM 9 PM I
HOT ROAST BEEF
Served with I
ICOLE SLAW m m I
HOT ROLLS mA I
I&BUTTER #f I
I I
I /.O*' W 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I
M^LOC^ROAMJAMPUsI

pr
A NEW PROGRAM
OF INTEREST TO
MEN

AT DUBS ]
I Monday ...
CHUG-A-LUG CONTEST |
AT 12
$25 PRIZE
FREE BEER 9-10 p.m.
Thursday ...
MINI-SKIRT CONTEST
: Mon. thru Sat. ...
DANCING WITH THE
GATEKEEPERS
.'

Thursday, February 27, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Dialogue
March 3

If You Didn't Have A
Chance To Take Basic
ROTC, You Can Still Tak
Advanced Training
If you still have two years
left at the University, you may
qualify for this new 2-year
Army ROTC Program.
Qualify for an officers
commission in 2 yrs.
Receive SSO per month
while enrolled in the program.
Continue your education
and learn to be a leader.
Fulfill your military
obligation of 2 years active
duty, as an officer.
lor Complete Information
Contact Maj. Lawrence, Rm.
111, Military Building or call
392-1395 not later than 7
March.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator. Thursday. February 27, 1969

we care
Mfift \
flJjnWjff
1859-1969...110 YEARS YOUNG
Two Convenient Locations
601 $. W. 2 Ave.
1130 N.E. 16 Ave.

r 24 oz. BOTTLE 1
I WESSON oil J
MARVEL
ICE CREAM GAL car 69c
SULTANA 17 oz can
WHOLE KERNEL CORN 3/49<
JERGEN
BAR SOAP 4 BARS 25(
A&P
TARTER SAUCE 10y 02 JAR 35c
STOKLEY No. 303
FRUIT COCKTAIL 3 CANS 79c
CANADA DRY
FLAVORED DRINKS £, 10c
daily plus dep
CAT FOOD ,50zcan 10 for 1.00
DAILY
DOG FOOD 15% OZ CAN 10(£
ANN PAGE
MAYONNAISE QUART 59c
ANGEL SOFT
NAPKINS 200 COUNT 4/1.00
ANGEL SOFT
JUMBO TOWEL 256
f EVAPORATED ]
I SKIMMED MILK I
CURIOUS CREEKS
FRESH FIRM GOLDEN
BANANAS 10< lb.
PINK OR WHITE
GRAPEFRUIT 5 POUND BAG 39c
FRESH PASCAL
CELERY l9 c
WESTERN FRESH
CARROTS z pound bag 29c
CANADIAN
RUTABAGAS 7c lb.

These prices effective from 1 i
Wednesday Feb. 26 through
Tuesday March 4.

SUPER RIGHT FULL CUT
CHUCK STEAKROAST 59e lb
SUPER RIGHT BONELESS
SHOULDER ROAST 89t lb
FLA. OR GA. FRESH
FRYER QUARTERS 39< lb
FLA. OR GA. FRESH
FRYER PARTS 49$ lb
SUPER RIGHT
1/4 PORK LOINS 59c lb
GIANT SIZE
I FAB DETERGENT J
NUTLEY
SOLID MARGERINE 4 POUNDS 69c
FIRESIDE
MARSHMELLOWS 50ZBAG 10c
A&P
ASPIRIN BOTTLE OFIOO 19c
A&P REGULAR OR MENTHOL
SHAVE CREAM noz can 59c
A&P
FLOURIDE TOOTHPASTE oz tube 49c
A&P
MOUTHWASH 14 02 BOTTLE 39
A&P
CHARCOAL LIGHTER QUART CAN QO>
BRIGHT SAIL V
A&P 10's box 23c
WONDERFOIL 25 foot roll 29c
ARISTOCRAT
SALTINES 25c
ANN PAGE
THIN MINTS CANDY oz. box 459
f FROZEN SPINACH 1
I 10c 10 oz. I