Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Pacemaker
All-American

Ko/. 61, No. 90

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MEG ILL SPEAKS

Controversial UF Philosophy Prof. Kenneth
Megill talks with an interested audience in the Reitz
Union Sunday night. Megill discussed his views on

SCAT Heads Toward New Coliseum

The Student Coliseum Action Team (SCAT) will take its first steps
next week toward coordinating student fund raising efforts fora new
coliseum.
The first meeting of the organization will he held March 4. at 9
p.m. in room I IS of the Reitz Union. SCAT organizer Steve Rohan.
ILW. said Monday.
Rohan asked that all students and organizations who would like to
see a new coliseum on campus attend the meeting.
SCAT may publish a speakers bureau to talk to clubs throughout
the state.
Bringing students together in their fund-raising efforts, the club will
work closely with the UF Planning Department. Rohan said.
Walter Matberly. director of planning. ha-v,'rgani/-l t fusibility

HE BLEW IT

The
Florida Alligator

Two of the 23 non-finishers in the Daytona 500
Sunday smoke up the back straightaway after 100
milesboth blown-engine casualties. Bobby
Allison, Hueytown, Ala. (upper left) and Pete
Hamilton. Dedham, Mass. both Dodge

the university and the flap surrounding his opinions.
See story on page three.

University of Florida, Gainesville

study for joint operation of a coliseum between the UF, the city of
Gainesville and Alachua County.
Rohan said SCAT will have a representative at the meetings so that
students can be kept informed of what is happening.
The first part of Matherlys five-phase planning schedule began
Monday when he and W. E. Jones, another university planner, left for
a tour of coliseums at Georgia, Auburn, Tennessee, Illinois,
Mississippi, North Carolina, Alabama and Louisiana State.
The final planning step in the schedule will be completed in
February. 1971. but Muthcrly said bids on construction could be
taken as early as June. 197().
Matherk estimated the entire coliseum project could tcntativcK
covIST.O! million.

FOR FALL TEEM
Change Made
In Registration
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer

Beginning this year, students eligible for early registration
will be able to choose courses for fall quarter in mid-May.
According to Vernon Voyles, director of registration, the
idea for an early-early registration was planned for last
year, but budget limitations prevented its implementation.
The present system, which calls for most UF students to

make mid-summer trips to
Gainesville to register, was the
best which could be given under
the circumstances, according to
Voyles.
We havent set the exact date
yet, Voyles said, but it will
definitely be during the middle
part of May, perhaps the week
after registration for summer
quarter.
Fee cards and other
information will be sent in late
August to the students
permanent home address.
The problem with registering
so early will be that we cant be
sure if every class we say will be
offered will be covered by the
new budget, Voyles said.
Some students may find that a

drivers blew their engines almost simultaneously
as they were running in seventh and eighth place.
Allison pocketed $1,160 for 43rd place, while
Hamilton won $1,885. See more pictures on 500 on
page 12.

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Tuesday, February 25, 1969

'MM
Sjpi;:! W
Hpp h'v,
|jji Kjip TR iL wM
Hk .. ,. Jlf
r fli
VERNON VOYLES
. . registration director
class they registered for has been
cut."
Voyles said the fall quarter
registration book will be based
primarily on the one for Fall,
196 K.
We aren't expecting drastic
increases in enrollments, but
again, we can't be certain,
Voyles said. This again, will be
a problem which we will try to
non tint between now and the
tune tor fall legist rat ion.
Ducats Available
Tickets for the UF's next two
basketball games, against
Georgia and West Virginia, can
be picked up today at the Gate
IT window from 2 TO 8 p.m.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 25, 1969

SPECIAL SEMINAR GROOMS STUDENTS
AC To Discuss Changes In Conduct Committee

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
A plan for an all-student conduct
committee termed a radical change in handling-
student discipline Wednesday is scheduled to
go before the Action Conference.
Written by Honor Court Chancellor Pete
Zinober and his AC task force on minimal
conduct, the plan calls for a totally student
conduct committee replacing the present
five-student, six-faculty member committee.
The new set-up provides for eight full-time
student members from upper division and in
good standing at UF. They will be appointed by
the deans of men and women upon
recommendation by the Honor Court Board of
Masters.
The appointments would be confirmed by a
two-thirds vote of the Student Senate.

:* ft wwwwu UNlON BECOMES BATTLEGROUND wvwvwuw
Stillman Students Wont Budge

Students at Alabamas predominantly Negro
Stillman College defied an ultimatum to end
their occupation of the student union building
Monday.
Pickets called for a class boycott at the
University of Illinois. Ten Negro students seized
a building at Rutgers University.

Elsewhere on the fields of conflict in the
nationwide campus rebellion, student protesters
held mass meetings at the University of
California and the University of Pennsylvania. A
student strike was planned at the University of
Missouri. Pennsylvania State University students
demanded an administration reply to
non-negotiable demands.
Dr. Harold N. Stinson, Stillman College
president, closed the small Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
school Sunday after a five-day class boycott by
the 750 students to enforce their demands for
improved food and living quarters.
The students promptly occupied the student
union. John Byrd, a student spokesman said
police would have to drag us out. Were not
going to leave voluntarily.
Negro students at New Jerseys Rutgers
University seized Conklin Hall, the main

g mmmmmmm ---mmmummmm inywwwuVW^WW
Student Senate To Hear
Demonstration Resolution

The revised demonstration
resolution passed by the
University Senate will be
presented tonight to the Student
Senate at 7:30 in room 349 of
the Reitz Union.
The resolution was passed in
the University Senate last
Thursday after several
committee meetings with
Student Senators, Clyde Ellis
and Charles Harris, and Alligator
Editor Harold Aldrich.
The resolution proposed to
the Student Senate is the exact
resolution that appeared on the
University Senate floor.
It is much improved from

IHK F- I.ORIDA ALLKiATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Mo rid a and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at (iainesville
Florida 32 601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
Ihc Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of pavment for any
advertisemenT involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (I) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

the resolution first presented to
the University Senate before the
committee meetings, Harris
said.
Also on tonights agenda is a
ROTC authorization.
To be presented by Ellis, the
authorization questions the
funding of ROTU programs with
student monies.
Ellis is said to feel that the
United States Government
should support the program
since it sponsors it.
In several other schools, the
government subsidizes the
ROTC program without student
body funds.

The Board of Masters is comprised of three
law students appointed by the student body
president and confirmed by the Student Senate.
It is headed by the Honor Court chancellor and
vice-chancellor.
Also, like the Supreme Court, it interprets the
Student Body constitution and all statutes passed
by the Student Senate.
The committee would be backed up by two,
non-voting faculty members appointed by the
UF president. The committee chairman would be
a law faculty member, appointed by the
president, and voting only in case of a tie.
Cases heard by the committee would be those
covered by the Code of Student Conduct. It
would not have appellate powers.
The present student-faculty committee is
presidentially appointed, and can hear appeals.
Generally the present committee hears all
cases not covered by the Honor Court on

classroom building at the school, and renamed it
Liberation Hall. The protesters demanded
active recruitment of Negro and Puerto Rican
students by the school.
Students for a Democratic Society held a mass
meeting in the University of Pennsylvanias Irvine
Auditorium Monday to explain to students an
agreement with university trustees which ended a
six-day sit-in at College Hall Sunday night.
The agreed to guarantee housing for a
nearby Negro community disrupted by an urban
renewal project. The university plans to build a
science center on the renewal tract.
/f
About 25 white pickets appeared outside
Lincoln Hall at the University of Illinois
Champaign campus Monday, urging a classroom
boycott by the schools 30,000 students. Most
students ignored the pickets and attendance at a
teach-in sponsored by SDS was sparse.
Pennsylvania State University students
demanded that Dr. Eric A. Walker, the schools
president, reply to their non-negotiable
demands for abolition of academic credit for
ROTC, a ban on military recruiting on the
campus, and permission for women students to
live off campus.

Two students, Marsha
Kauffman and Jerry Abascal,
have been recommended for
university committees.
They will be presented for
approval at tonights meeting.

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Student Financial Aid
$6 Million For 1970

Students who fail to fill out
an application for financial aid
by Friday will miss out on the
nearly $6 million allotted for
next year, according to I.
Douglas Turner, director of
student financial aid.
By the deadline 4,000 to
5,000 students will have applied
for grants, loans, student
assistantships and custodial
scholarships those sent to the
university from outside donors.
During the 60 days following
the deadline Friday each
application will be individually
examined.
The procedure is to look at
the parents financial resources,
make a decision as to what the
student needs, send a notice
giving a firm commitment of
what funds will be available to
him, and await the return of the
signed notice of acceptance.
Turner said.
High school students need to
know this information
immediately because they are
required to pay housing fees
early.
Nearly 30 percent of all UF
students are receiving some form
of financial aid, he said. More
than 4,000 students receive aid
in the form of loans and 2,000
work as student assistants.
__ The university's policy on
financial aid is to take into
consideration all the information
on the student and then supply
him with what he needs to go to

cheating, stealing and passing bad checks.
Other items on the ACs agenda Wednesday
include a proposal for an integrated campus legal
system, a plan for classification and assignment
of instructional space, a set-up for a
faculty-student lounge, and a plan for one-hour
credit in physical education.
The proposal for the new judiciary system
calls for a presently non-existent presidents
advisory committee. It would set-up a line of
appeal from the Honor Court through the court
of appeals directly to this committee.
It would eliminate the power of appeal in the
Student Conduct Committee and give it power to
hear only original cases.
The presidents advisory committee would
consist of three to five law professors.
The AC meets every two weeks on Wednesday
at 2:30 p.m. in room 101, Little Hall.

school, not more or less.
Otherwise there would be
students getting money from us
and from outside sources,' and
actually makir.g money while
going to school. This is not the
intent of financial assistance,
either from us or outside donors,
Turner said.
Hale Still Holds
SSOC Charter
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell had not received the
Southern Students Organizing
Committee (SSOC) charter
Monday.
Lester Hale, vice president for
student affairs, said he had the
charter for review and he hoped
to speak with OConnell
concerning it this week.
The charter application for.
SSOC was approved by a 5 -4
vote of members of the Student
Organizations and Social Affairs
Committee and their report was
sent to OConnell on Feb. 6.
SSOC needs a charter from
the university in order to use
university rooms and facilities.
The organization has been
ofl-campus since 1965 and made
its bid for a charter in November
of 1968.



Student Freedom: Form Os Enslavement?

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Freedom for UF students means choosing
between forms of enslavement. Dr. Kenneth
Mcgil! said Sunday.
The UF is like a funnel all pressure is
directed against those on the bottom the
students and faculty, he added.
To take over the university, it is necessary to
turn the funnel over so that those who live and
work here can control those over us, he said in
an informal question and answer session
sponsored by the Reitz Union Program Council
at the union.
To do this, students must organize to fight for
a newspaper completely free of non-student
contiol: an office of student affairs which
answers to them, and a student senate which
asserts their rights.
We must create a new kind of institution a
free and democratic institution, he said.

Learn By Doing Seminar
Successful, Chiefs Say

By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer
College of education students
are learning by doing in a special
seminar which began in January.
Now in its eighth week, the
program is termed a success by
both its originator and
participants.
Dr. Arthur W. Combs,
professor of education, said the
program is based on the
principle of giving students
practical teaching experience
along with regular class work.
He said the 60 students
currently in the program are
assigned to teach at various
schools in the area in addition to
attending a seminar twice a week
in which they discuss any
problems they have.
Abortion
Attempted
A 20-year-old UF coed wjis
admitted to Alachua County
Hospital Monda\ morning after
a n at t e ill pled abor t ion.
according to the Cainesville
Police Depart ment.
The girl's parents and Dean of
Women Betty Cosby were
notified but Dean Cosby could
not be reached lor comment
Monday night.
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Student reaction to the
program is generally good.
Miriam Garr, 3ED, said she
likes the idea. Miss Garr said she
is getting a lot out of the field
experience, but doesnt feel she
is gaining much from the
seminar. She added that she will
probably get more from the
seminar once she gets more
involved in the program.
Miss Garr is assigned to help
teach a class of third graders at
Terwillager Elementary School.
Diane Deal, 3ED, said she
likes the program a lot. She said
there were several problems at
first but it is working out
wonderfully. She also is assigned
to a third grade class at
Terwillager school.
Christine Cronkhite, 3ED,

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MEGILL SPEAKS OUT AT SESSION

Another way to make the UF freer and more
of a public institution, would be to stop
constant raising of tuition. The UF is a white
institution made up ot students from wealthy
families, he said. The parents of 58 per cent earn
more than S 10.000 per year, while only three per
cent come from families earning less than
53,000.
Mcgill stressed that by take-over he means
taking control of UF; the question is not
participation.it is control.
He would not condemn physical take-overs of
universities, through demonstrations or
occupations of buildings, though he said they are
neither necessary nor possible at the .UF now.
But sometimes students have no other choice
than the politics of confrontation, he said.
He cited the UFs revised Code of Student
Conduct, which he said never would have
become reality if students had not slept in Tigert
Hall all night to protest the administrations
handling of the Pamme Brewer case.
His belief-that people have the right to
control where they live and work is just

likes the program because she
can work at her own pace. The
program takes from four to
seven quarters depending on the
speed the student works at. She
plans to finish in five quarters.
Miss Deal attributed much of
the success of the program to
the professors who work with
the students. She said they are
the best in their fields.
Respect for student opinion is
what she likes best about the
seminar meetings. The students
and professors work together to
solve the problems that arise,
Miss Deal said.
Pamela Williams, 3ED,
thought the overall idea was
good but did not think enough
time was spent in class.

normal radical rhetoric held by more than a
minority of the population, and that is why his
speech angered the legislators so much.
Megill, an assistant professor of philosophy, is
the center of a furor that was aroused when Sen.
Tom Slade demanded publicly that he be fired
for statements he made in an Accent *69 speech.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell said Megill
will get due process for the complaints made
against him.
Due process scares the hell out of me, Megill
said. This might set a nice precedent; I think
theres all kinds of people around here who
deserve due process.
The administration has been fair but rather
slow, he said, and the longer the question goes
unresolved, the more it will seem Ive done
something wrong.
The overwhelmingly favorable reaction in his
mail and from the press has been surprising,
Megill noted. He said the legislators who reacted
to his speech were probably edgy because of
incidents of student eruptions at other
universities.

Miller-Brown
ONE MILE
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THE MALL MU
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
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Ray Brown has joined the staff of
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Sportsmans Barber Shop. Ray was
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years. We are proud to have him with us.
Sportsmans Barber Shop Univ. Plaza.
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Tuesday. February 25, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 3



1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 25,1969

Page 4

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UNDERGROUND SPRING
... at Florida State Museum site
Natural Spring
Under Museum
Anthropologists working in the New Florida State Museum
will literally be walking on water when the museum now under
construction is completed in May, 1970.
A natural spring is flowing from the ground on the site of the
new museum. According to James C. Kelly, superintendent for
Auchter Construction Co., several changes in the building
specifications hadto be made because of the spring.
Kelly said drainage pipes will be laid to divert the water from
under the foundation of the building. These pipes will be
connected to a storm sewer under Newell Drive.
The three story museum being built at the corner of Radio
Road and Newell Drive will follow a primitive Mayan pyramid
theme on the outside, according to Dr. J. C. Dickinson, museum
director.
Architect Bill Morgan of Atlantic Beach designed the
building. He got the inspiration for the main entrance a 404
foot long sodded ceremonial Indian mound, from the Indian
burial grounds near Crystal River.
The interior will be nothing elaborate, said Dr. Dickinson.
He said there will be no elevators, no carpeting or other
expensive furnishings. Access to the different levels of the
building will be by twin stairways flanking the main entrance.
Ground was broken for the new museum Saturday morning
when UF President Stephen C. OConnell turned the first shovel
full of dirt using a 2,500 year old stone spade.
The new museum will have 107,000 square feet of floor
space, three times as much as they now have in the Seagle
Building on West University Avenue.
The major display areas will be on the top floor. These
include a hall of earth sciences, life sciences, prehistoric man,
Florida history, special exhibits, and general education. The
second floor is for natural sciences research and the ground
floor for anthropology.

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Mariner 6 Heads For Mars

CAPE KENNEDY (UPI)
The United States targeted a
television probe named Mariner
6 toward Mars Monday night in
what may be the opening shot in
a race with Russia to explore the
planet that has long intrigued
astronomers.
The countdown was aiming
toward an 8:14 p.m. EST launch
for the $64 million spacecraft on
a 156-day voyage, covering 226
million miles.
It was the beginning of a
space tripleheader this week.
Next was the launch of a
weather satellite early
Micas Hat
In SG Ring
John Mica, past secretary of
academic affairs for Student
Government, is actively seeking
the office of Student Body
President.
Mica, 6ED, claims to have the
support of six UF fraternity
houses, with three more coming
over to his side by Wednesday.
The presidential election is
scheduled for April 24.
One of his projects is to
clean house on paper shufflers
in Student Government.
Mica has held the following
posts in Student Government:
secretary of public functions,
director of teacher evaluations,
director of the student
government high school
recruitment program and past
project director and coordinator
of Project Samson.
He has served on the student
conduct, academic affairs and
public functions committees in,
Student Government and the UF
Committee on Disadvantaged
Students.
Mica is now serving as
presidential aid to Student Body
President Clyde Taylor. He was
Florida Blue Key project
coordinator for the
Outstanding Professor Contest
held this month.

Wednesday and the series
climaxes with the blastoff of
Apollo 9 astronauts James
McDivitt, David Scott and
Russell Schweickart Friday.
The Apollo 9 Astronauts
passed their last major physicals
Monday and were reported in
good shape from head to toe.
Because of the haunting
possibility that Mars may harbor
some primitive form of life,
American scientists have placed
the red planet at the top of their
planetary exploration priorities.
The Soviet Union also has
shown great interest in Mars and
has failed in seven Mars shots
since 1960. Donald P. Hearth,
director of the U. S. Space
Agencys planetary programs,
said he expects Russia to try

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again during the present launch
opportunity which ends in April.
Mariner 6 will not be able to
detect life. But by measuring
surface temperatures, looking
for water and probing the thin
Martian atmosphere, Mariners
instruments are expected to tell
scientists whether there is a
chance for life on Mars.
The twin television cameras
aboard the 910-pound
spacecraft, set to photograph the
planet from as close as 2,000
miles July 31, are expected to
clear up once and for all the
nature of the puzzling canals
on the planet.
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PCL Prof
Dies From
Lung Cancer
Dr. Charles D. Farris, UF
Political Science Professor and
1966 winner of the Florida Blue
Key Award for distinguished
teaching, died of lung cancer
Monday at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center.
A member of the UF Political
Science faculty for 11 years, Dr.
Farris received his BS degree
from the UF in 1936 and his
Ph.D. from the University of
Chicago in 1953.
He was an assistant professor
of Political Science at the
University of Alabama from
1949 to 1958 and an associate
professor and professor of
Political Science at the UF since
1958.
. Several grants were awarded
him by the Social Science
Research Council, the Rokefeller
Foundation and the National
Science Foundation.
He was the author of many
articles on American politics and
political behavior and co-author
of a book, Profiles In Town
Politics.
Dr. Farris had just finished
serving a 2-year-period as a
member of the American
Political Science Association.
He is survived by his wife
Patricia, daughter Lee, and son
Charles.
Services will be held at the
Unitarian Fellowship on NW 43
Street (Old Millhopper Road)
Wednesday at 3 p.m. Interment
will follow at Evergreen
Cemetary.
Contributions to a Memorial
Book Fund at the Gainesville
Public Library will be accepted
instead of flowers.

No Investigation, Schultz Says

Speaker of the Florida House
of Representatives Fred Schultz.
R-Jacksonville, is one legislator
who appears to be for
non-intervention in UF affairs
Schultz said Friday, after a
speech to the North central
chapter of the Florida
Engineering Society, There will
be no investigation from
Tallahassee or any interference
in the day to day affairs of the
university.

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Florida Quarterly Has New Look

Florida Quarterly, UFs literary magazine, will have a new look
when it goes on sale March 4.
The new issue, unlike past issues, will display student work in a
predominant amount, said Jessica Everingham, acting editor of the
Quarterly. In the past, most of the work was by faculty members or
by contributors outside the community.
Were not a sodgy facultyoriented magazine anymore, Miss
Everingham said.
For instance, among the contributors for this quarters issue are
Kitty Oliver, president of Lambda lota Tau, English honorary,
entering work for the prose section, and art work by winners of the
Student Art Show in the magazines art section.
Contributions have also been entered by Wendell Berry and Robert
Wallace, nationally know poets.
We are trying to prove there is good art being produced, good
prose and poetry being written, all on this campus, Miss Everingham
said. In the past we havent had too much.

SG Seeks JC Leaders

SGs Department of Junior
College Affairs is interested in
recruiting to UF student
leaders at the junior college
level.
The junior college affairs
department is planning to attend
the F.J.C.S.G.A. convention in
Jacksonville on April 10-12.
Plans include presenting a
display on the UF at the
convention and addressing a
general session of the group.
A follow-up program to the
convention representation will
be inviting junior college student

He said, We (the legislature)
are concerned only with policy
making not with administrat administrating.
ing. administrating.
We do reserve the right to be
informed about what is going on
in our state institutions of higher
learning.
In his speech to the
Engineering Society meeting at
the Ramada Inn, Schultz said

NEXT ISSUE MARCH 4

leaders to the UF for a first-hand
view of Student Government
and campus activities. These
students will be on campus
various weekends from March
till May, with a special emphasis
on Gator Weekend, April 11-13.
An advanced orientation
program presented was started
last year. Secretary of Junior
College Affairs Ron Brown, said,
The program was very
successful last year for 600
junior college transfers. It is
hoped that the department will
be instrumental in encouraging

education construction will have
to come first over roads at this
time.
He said the state must catch
up in the area of education.
Also attending the banquet
was Ralph Turlington,
D-Gainesville, a former speaker
of the house of representatives.

A NEW PROGRAM
OF INTEREST TO
MEN

f WHAT'S 50
ABOUT
"WAT?
%

Were also trying to build up a state-wide audience a Florida
magazine from the state of Florida for the state of Florida.
The Florida Quarterly staff is described by Miss Everingham as
enthusiastic.
We have been trying to work for clarity in what were doing we
had apparently been failing in communication on our pages, she said.
The Quarterly staff is presently printing this quarters issue and
laying out pages for the next issue, due out next quarter.
Deadline for submitting entries in the poetry, prose and artwork
sections for the next issue has been set for March 22. Except for large
art entries, a stamped, self-addressed envelop must accompany each
entry so that work may be returned.
Pieces may be brought into the Florida Quarterly office, room 336
of the Reitz Union. The Quarterly office is open 3:30-5:30 p.m. daily.
The Quarterly will be sold in front of the Library, Little Hall and
the Hub at $ 1.25 a copy.

the administration to expand
and improve the program next
year.
A two-week long workshop,
conducted by the Mental Health
Department and the office of
Junior College Relations headed
by Dean Ralph Page, was held
last week.
During the conference there
was recorded dialogue between
the junior college counselors and
the UF transfers. They discussed
various problems in transferring
which these counselors can
relate to potential transfers.
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If You Didn't Have A
Chance To Take Basic
ROTC, You Can Still Take
Advanced Training
If you still have two years
left at the University, you may
qualify for this new 2-year
Army ROTC Program.
Qualify for an officers
commission in 2 yrs.
Receive SSO per month
while enrolled in the program.
Continue your education
and learn to be a leader.
Fulfill your military
obligation of 2 years active
duty, as an officer.
For Complete Information
Contact Maj. Lawrence, Rm.
111, Military Building or call
392-1395 not later than 7
March.

Tuesday, February 25, 1969, The Florida Alligator, I

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Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 25, 1969

Protest Policy: Product Os Understanding

Several student and faculty leaders learned a
valuable lesson about communication and
understanding during the past few weeks.
The setting for the lesson was a small office
in the chemistry building across from the old
Florida Union. Five faculty members, three of
them members of the University Senate, and
four students exchanged ideas frankly and
honestly.
Out of the interchange came a
well-considered policy statement on campus
demonstrations. Also came a greater
appreciation of what men and women of good
will can accomplish when they try to reason
together, try to understand each other.
Also came an awareness that this will be a
better community when students, faculty and
administrators set aside the vested interests
which separate us and embrace the common
interests which unite us.
The faculty members at the meeting
composed the University Senates Ad Hoc
Committee on Campus Demonstrations, which
was appointed in September to draft a clear,
precise policy to govern campus
demonstrations, be they students, faculty or
staff.
The students at the meeting were Student
Senate representatives and an Alligator editor.
Hardly anyone outside of the University
Senate knew the ad hoc committee existed.
One of its members, Prof. John Greenman of
agriculture, brought the committee and its
work into the public spotlight when he
independently submitted a strongly-worded

On Campus Demonstration...

EDITORS NOTE: The
following is the complete text of
the new university policy
statement on campus
demonstrations. The policy was
passed last week by a large
majority in the University
Senate.
It is agreed that no one has
the right to disrupt the
operation of the University or to
interfere with the ordinary rights
of other members of the
University Community. It is also
agreed that the legal rights of
students or other members of
the University body, as of any
citizens, must not be abridged;
that this policy statement shall
not be used in any way to
infringe upon the legitimate
freedoms of any person or group
of persons; that this policy will
be impartially enforced, with
due process afforded all.
In order, then, to underscore
the rights and responsibilities of
all individuals concerned with
University activities, to insure
freedom of expression, to
maintain normal operation of
the University, and to protect
the rights of all members of the
University Community, the
following policy regarding
demonstrations is adopted:
1. Demonstrations may be held

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opaiions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the reticle and not those of the University of Floode."

anywhere on the campus, so
long as they do not disrupt the
normal operation of the
University or infringe on the
rights of other members of the
University Community, except
that no demonstrations
(including mass protests, parades
or picketing) are permitted
inside University buildings.
Although no specific areas on
the campus are designated for
the purpose of demonstrations
oi* impromptu speeches,
exclusive use of the Plaza of the
Americas for this purpose may
be obtained by prior clearance
through the Office of Student
Affairs. Any use of PA
equipment or sound
amplification anywhere on the
campus must have prior
clearance through this same
office.
2. In order that demonstrators
no interfere with the operation
of the University or the rights of
others, they shall not for
example:
a) obstruct vehicular, bicycle,
pedestrian or other traffic;
b) obstruct entrances or exits
to buildings or driveways;
c) interfere with educational
activities inside or outside any
building;
d) harass passersby or

editorial

| The
Florida Alligator
#'Th price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility-"
Harold Aldrich
Dave Doucette
PWhtdtfto Managing Editor
M Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
AvtdMSPk Executive Editor News Editor
resolution to the Senate.
The resolution, which drew heavy criticism
from the more liberal elements of the
university, urged firm, fast action to stop any
demonstration which became unlawful or
disrupted the university.
Its authors intent to demonstrate faculty
faith in President OConnell was lost in the
severity of the language. The students learned
after talking to him that his intent was not
severe. True, he is a conservative politically,
but he does not believe in actions which would
deny lawful freedom of expression and
assembly.
When the resolution was scheduled for
Senate consideration, several student leaders
went to the meeting to speak on the subject.
The resolution never came to the floor.
When it was rescheduled, student leaders
again went to the meeting but were asked to
leave that time because the Senates

otherwise disrupt normal
activities;
e) interfere with or preclude
a scheduled speaker from being
heard;
f) interfere with scheduled
University ceremonies or events;
g) damage property,
including lawns, shrubs or trees.
3. In the event of disruptive
action, University members
involved in demonstrations shall
identify themselves by
presenting appropriate
documents such as ID cards
when requested to do so by the
President or his designated
representative, and such
representative will identify
himself when making this
request.
Demonstrators not officially
related to the University of

v
t cccecccc) aaaaaaagh !

constitution calls for closed meetings.
The Student Senate then unanimously
approved a strongly-worded resolution which
said in part that students would not feel
compelled to honor policies they had not been
allowed to at least speak on.
There followed quickly a letter from the
chairman of the ad hoc committee, inviting
student representatives to discuss the proposed
policies with the committee.
For the University of Florida, a milestone
had been crossed. When the four students met
with the committee, it was the first time in
history that students had met officially with a
committee of the University Senate, which
fonnulates most university policies.
The proposed policies were discussed at
length. The students had some questions and
objections. The committee met again two
weeks later with the students, who presented
suggested changes.
The changes were discussed and debated.
And were included in the proposal sent to the
Senate.
The Senate approved the statement almost
unanimously. Because its a precise statement.
Its fair. It protects everyones rights. It is the
product of communication and understanding.
From the experience, the university
community can learn much. The lesson is a
simple one:
The real measure of our progress toward
becoming a better community will be found in
our dedication to the causes which unite us
rather than in the ones which divide us.

Florida will be directed to leave
the campus immediately or be
subject to arrest for a violation
of the law.
4. If, in the opinion of the
President or his designated
representative, a demonstration
is disrupting normal University
operations or infringing on the
rights of other members of the
University Community, the
President or his representative
may:
a) identify himself to the
demonstrators giving his name
and official position;
b) inform the demonstrators
that they are in violation of
University policy and/or in
violation of the law and specify
the nature of the violation;
c) request that the violation
cease.

. . no one has the right to disrupt the
operation of the university or to interfere
with the ordinary rights of other members of
the university community.

In the event of
non-compliance with this
request, the President or his
representative can enlist the
assistance of the Campus Police
in restoring order and enforcing
the law.
5. The Campus Police have the
responsibility to:
a) if circumstances warrant,
declare a demonstration to be in
violation of law and request all
demonstrators to cease and
desist and to disperse and clear
the area or be subject to arrest
and/or University disciplinary
action;
b) arrest any demonstrators
observed to be in violation of
the law;
c) enlist the assistance of
outside law enforcement
agencies, if necessary.



m,
m f V Bft J P mi M

Mac Gill
p
By Donald Carter

Intro:
we all are hypocrites
to large or small extent
and in any odd sight
our passions vent
Mac:
With violence and the press
be free
Control the university
With interest for all
Lets go out and maul
This crud we call
Society
The Bearded in Broward
The Loved in Leigh
All triumphant in Tigert
In Flint the Free!
Faculty and students over all
So that this college will not fall
To crass dependency.
Sade:
For the love of Christ
Ill pay any price
To gain in any way
An office Ill seek
Though the ways may reek
From here to eternity ...
What, hark, look here!
Thru old spilled beer
on news page once neat and
clean,
A scoundrel there
Without long hair!
Saying things quite mean.
A letter Ill write
To that small tyke
Who runs the campus cool
To him Ill say
By weeks first day
Have Mac thrown out of school

Senator Misunderstands

MR. EDITOR:
As a student (not a disciple or protege) of Dr.
Kenneth Megill, I feel compelled to respond to the
allegations and demands made by Senator Tom
Slade in his recent letter to President Stephen
OConnell concerning the dismissal of Dr. Megill.
Unquestionably, one of the purposes of
education is to instill an attitude of openness,
tolerance and critical questioning in the mind of the
student. By necessity this requires the freedom
for unfettered exchange of ideas. Senator Slades
demands would appear to be detrimental to this
fundamental prerequisite of education, the free
exchange of ideas.
Charges of political meddling have been hurled
against Senator Slade and 1 think rightly so. Justice
Harlan in the Supreme Court case of Yates vs. U. S,
(354 US 298) distinguished incitement to action

r 4 y S
T/m
"TBi i IIII^IHMI

Conser:
A note Ive not got
From an old big shot
In capitol far away
But the papers state
That Im not to wait,
For Mac Gill has gone astray.
Yet due process I feel
Wont cause things to reel
I*ll watch the others play
For all the rest
Who work at their best
Want only to steal the day.
Students:
What are we to do
The red, white, and blue
Flutters floatingly all day
And the men up there
All seem to care
That our thoughts are pure as
gray
If we think them wrong
Then wont be long
Till the campus will be naught.
But think them right
(God, what a fright)
And our conscience will be
bought.
For it seems to me
That to be free
Is to think just as one might
Not to burn, and kill, and
turn
But in the air of thoughts
suppression
What is one to do
On this last question of
repression
We leave it all to you

from the mere teaching of abstract principles
which call for the overthrow of government.
Government may restrict the former but not the
latter, for such would then be an abridgement of
freedom of speech.
Until such time that it can be shown that the
teachings of Dr. Megill constitute a clear and
present danger or even a probable danger of
violently disrupting this campus, Senator Slade has
no justification for political interference with the
internal affairs of this university.
Yes, Senator Slade has a responsibility to the
people of this state. However, he seems to have
misunderstood his responsibilities. In the interest of
better education, Senator Slades responsibility
should be to promote the free exchange of ideas on
this campus, not to prevent such an exchange.
JEFFREY H. KLINK, 4AS

{open FORUM:
JkArtWL ml
There is no hope for the complacent man.

SLADE NOT THE ISSUE

Fear Not Radicals,
But 'Gullible Profs 7

MR. EDITOR:
The February 13, 1969
headline (Fire Megill, Senator
Slade Demands), as well as the
tenor of The Alligators front
page evaluation of the
Slade-Megill matter, exhibited a
definite, blatant slanting of the
wording of Senator Slades letter
which was included in the
editorial page of the same issue.
First, Senator Slade
personally made no demand.
However, since The Alligator in
general supported ACLU, SSOC,
etc., demands, it is difficult to
believe that the act itself should
be condemned if he had.
Second, the Senator
thoughtfully alerted President
OConnell to (as the Senator sees
it) the mood of the legislature
toward the REPORTED
statements of Dr. Megill.
Protocol was, however, not
followed in revealing the letter
to the news media before it
reached the President.
If in fact Dr. Megill did make
these statements which have
got to make the blood of every
(sic) Florida taxpayer boil,
THEN the Senator believes that
the legislature would at a
February 17, 1969 session for

these and other reasons
undertake direct involvement in
the affairs of the university
system. This involvement, the
Senator implies, he would NOT
like to see. Believe it or not.
If indeed Dr. Megill did at a
student-teacher meeting
convince some well-fed students
living the good life at Sin City
that they are oppressed and
need to join with the relevant
black power radicals and a
strong teachers union to take

Hicks, Radicals,
& Glory- Seekers
MR. EDITOR:
Once again, some certain outrage seems to have been perpetrated
from without on this university. No doubt,fa torrent of protest is
welling behind a straining dam, and a flurry of more or less ridiculous
letters is to be unleashed. Caught in the tide and buffeted about, yet I
can appreciate the whole scene.
Step 1:
Hick Senator seeks to aggrandize his glory. Pretense of loyalty,
educational quality, etc., etc. Finds vulnerable enemy pawn,
attacks.
Step 2:
Concerned and/or Radical Students seek to aggrandize their glory.
Pretense of academic freedom, university autonomy, etc., etc.
Find rallying cause, counter-attack.
Step 3:
Dispassionate Student seeks to aggrandize his glory. Pretense of
enlightenment, exegesis, etc., etc. Finds topical issue, writes.
Step 4:
Baffled University President, having already garnered his glory,
realizing he is safe as long as he doesnt boggle matters too badly, does
nothing until proper procedure is clear, etc., etc., and does
nothing.
So to and fro the whole thing go, and what will be will be anyhow
because who holds the power will not surrender it. Therefore, it seems
clear, that when they (whomever they are) get in your (whoever you
happen to be) way, put them up against the wall and give them what
they deserve if you can do it with impunity. And if you can do
that, you probably will have done it with complete impunity.
ERIC G. PRESS, 2UC

Tuesday, February 25, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

The A lliga tors fro n t
page evaluation of the
Slade-M egil matter,
exhibited a definite, blatant
slanting of the wording of
Senator Slade's letter.

over the University, then my
PERSONAL fear is not of the
Senator, the Professor, or even
the radicals, but that my
children could be someday
taught by such gullible teachers.
Most readers of The Alligator
are not that gullible, however,
and they would appreciate
ACCURATE news reporting by
our Pacemaker Award-winning
paper.
DAVID MULLIGAN, 7EG

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 25, 1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
/

Administrative Notices

SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHERS EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of College
classification, are required to satisfy
the speech screening requirement
before being admitted into the
Advanced Professional Sequence or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and
elementary block. English and speech
majors do not take the test, as SCH
201 is required in all of their
programs. Appointments now are
being made in Room 124 Norman
Hall.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
CELEBRATION: A festival of
the Arts is now accepting
interview applications from all
students interested ir. the
program. Students wishing to
participate in this festival,
encompassing all the arts
including music, drama, the
dance and the visual arts, should
complete applications at once.
Such applications are available at
the Student Activities Desk,
Reitz Union; the Office of the
Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts;
Room 129 Tigert Hall, and in
the dean's offices in the other
colleges. CELEBRATION needs
students who want to be part of
the biggest artistic production in
UF history. CELEBRATION
will be presented throughout the
Spring Quarter of 1970.
Students completing
CELEBRATION applications
will be contacted by telephone
shortly.
PROJECT SURGE: Students
for Responsible Government.
Persons interested in working on
Project SURGE, a full-time
professional lobby of all Florida
students in Tallahassee, should
pick up applications in Room
331, Reitz Union. No previous
student government experience
is necessary.
SCHO LARSHIP/LOANS:
Application for Florida Bankers
Educational Foundation
Scholarship/Loans are now being
accepted by the Department of
Finance and Insurance, Room
204, Matherly Hall. To be
eligible students must be
residents of Florida, intend to
pursue a career in commercial
banking, intend to major in
finance and be classified 3BA by
the winning of the Spring
quarter. Application blanks and
additional information may be
obtained from the Department
of Finance and Insurance and
must be completed by February
28.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
SPECIAL ELECTIONS: The
Student Government will hold

_ FORYOUR NEXT CAR LOAN...
GAINESVILLE FLORIDACAMPUSFEDERALCREDITUNION r'
,_Sth_Avenue_at_the_comer_oM2th_Street Hours^OOo^n. 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday

special elections Wednesday,
March 5, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
PHARMACY DISCUSSION:
There will be a discussion for all
Physical and Biological Science
undergraduate students
Wednesday, Feb. 26, at 3:30
p.m. in room 204, Pharmacy
wing of the medical center. Dr.
Kenneth F. Finger, dean of the
College of Pharmacy, will discuss
requirements, opportunities,
application procedures and
trends in the physical and
biological areas of
pharmaceutical sciences.
JAZZ CONCERT: The 19th
Annual Jazz Concert by the
Gator Variety Bands will be held
Tuesday, Feb. 25, at 8:15 p.m.
in the University Auditorium.
ALL CATHOLIC FOREIGN
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
are invited to the annual covered
dish supper to be held at the
Catholic Student Center at 6:30
p.m. Saturday, March 1. Married
couples may bring a dessert or a
bunch of carrots or celery.
Entertainment will be provided.
POETRY READING: There
will be a poetry reading by Dr.
Melvin New on "Translations of
Latin Poetry by Contemporary
Poets" from 4:40 to 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 27, in Lounges
122 and 123, Reitz Union.
PHI ETA SIGMA
SCHOLARSHIPS: Graduating
seniors who plan to work for
graduate or professional degrees
and who are members of Phi Eta
Sigma, Freshman Honor Society,
should get in touch with Dean
Mott, faculty advisor of the local
chapter. Room 129, Tigert Hall.
Local deadline for submitting
applications is Feb. 27, 1969.
Only members of Phi Eta Sigma
are eligible for these gift
scholarships, consisting of at
least nine S3OO scholarships each
year. National deadline for
submitting applications in March
1, 1969.
PLACEMENT
Sign-i n sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
FEB. 25: LOS ALAMOS
SCIENTIFIC LAB. Physics,
Math, Chem, ChE. EE, ME, NE,
MetE. BELL TELEPHONE
LAB., INC. Doctorate level,
physics, Chem, Math, Met, EE,
Eng. Phy. PRATT AND
WHITNEY UNITED
AIRCRAFT Usually
interviews for technical majors.

BLUE BULLETIN

CHARMIN PAPER PRODUCTS
CO. CE, Chem.E., EE, IE, ME.
AL JOHNSON CONSTRUC CONSTRUCTION
TION CONSTRUCTION CO. BBC, CE.
SEA-LAND SERVICE,
INC. Lib. Arts, Bus. Ad. U.S.
DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE
CONSUMER & MKT.
DIV. Ag, Bus. Ad, Sci., Ec,
Home Ec. CHICAGO BRIDGE
& IRON CO. CE, ME.
STOUFFER FOODS
CORP. Mgt, Food &
Nutrition, Home Ec.
ATLANTIC RICHFIELD
CO. Operations Research, Ind.
& Syst. Eng. INTERSTATE
COMMERCE COMMISSION
Acct, Law. FIREMAN'S
AMERICAN FUND
INS. Usually interviews any
majors. NORTHWESTERN
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE
CO. Usually interviews
insurance sales and sales magt.
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE
AGENCY Bus. Ad, Acct, Eco,
EE, ME, Journ, Law, Foreign
Lang, Geol, Geog, Inter. Studies,
Math/Phy, PcL.
FEB. 26: CENTRAL
INTELLIGENCE AGENCY.
U.S. FOREST SERVICE-CE,
For, Acct, Bus. Ad.
HAZELTINE CORP. EE, ME,
IE. E.l. DUPONT DE
NEMOURS & CO. Ag. DUKE
POWER CO. EE, CE, ME, NE.
U.S. ARMY MATERIAL
COMMAND All eng. degrees,
Phy., Chem. METROPOLITAN
LIFE INSURANCE CO. Bus.
Ad, Acct. TRANSWORLD
AIRLINES, INC. Usually
interviews for EE, ME, IE, CE.
MARITIME ADMINISTRA
TION Usually interviews for
Eng. Bus. Ad., Acct. F.W.
WOOLWORTH'S Usually
intervi ws Bus. Ad. U.S.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY SURVEYWATER
WATER SURVEYWATER RESOURCES
DIV.-Ag. Eng., CE. SMITH,
KLINE AND FRENCH
LABS. Chem, Zoology.
FEB. 27: NEW YORK
STATE DEPT. OF
TRANSPORTATION CE.
U.S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE COMMERCEOFFICE
OFFICE COMMERCEOFFICE OF AUDITS-Audi AUDITS-Auditors,
tors, AUDITS-Auditors, Acct. S.S. KRESGE
CO. Bus. Ad. RICH'S
INC. Bus. Ad., Lib. ARts.
HUGHES AIRCRAFT
CO. Usually interviews ME,
EE, Math, Physics.
ASSOCIATES CORPORATES
SERVICES CO., INC. Usually
interviews Bus. Ad. TOUCH,
ROSS, BAILEY AND SMART,
CPA.-Acct. GRAND UNION
CO. Usually interviews for
trainees. Bus. Ad.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, February 25
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 2:45 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Supper Club, Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Sigma Tau Pledge Meeting, 273
E & I Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
History Dept. Meeting for
History Majors, 346 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Student Occupational Therapy
Assoc. Open House for all
interested Students, J. Hillis
Miller, A-48, 7:30 p.nm.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Audubon Wildlife Film,
Lecturer: Mary Jane
Dockeray, Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
Journalism Dames Meeting, Dr.
Christiansen's Home, 8:00
p.m.
F lorida Players: "After the
Rain", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Gator Variety
Band, 19th Annual Jazz
Concert, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, February 26
*
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
English in Action,
Con se rvational English
between one American
volunteer an J one
International, Baptist Student
Cent, 4:00-8:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union,
p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 362 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Florida Players, "After the
Rain," Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Thursday, February 27
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Accounting Lecture, Dr. Peter
A. Fermin, Room 18,
Matherly Hall, 3:30 p.m.
Poetry Reading, Prof. Melvin
New on "Translation of Latin
Poetry By Contempory
Poets", 122 Union, 4:40 p.m.

Christian Science Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Assoc. Meeting, 101 Little
Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Players, "After the
Rain", Constans ~ Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
P.K. Yonge Senior Class Play,
"The Crucible", P.K. Yonge
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Lecturer: William
O'Hare, "La Boheme", Union
Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Friday, February 28
Advertising Public Relations
Day, Union Ballroom, 9:00
a.m.
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Movie, "Alfie", Union Aud.,
6:00, 8:30 & 11:00 p.m.
Citrus Club Banquet, Holiday
Inn, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Club, 118 Union 7:00
p.m.
Florida Players, "After the
Rain," Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Dance, "New York Rock and
Roll Ensemble," Union
Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE- Tickets
are now on sale for:
AUDUBON FILM SERIES,
General Public, Faculty &
Staff, $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $.75; Children,
$.50. UNIVERSITY FILM
SERIES, 10 films, General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$5.00; Univ. of Fla. Students,
$2.50; Univ of Fla. Students,
5 films, $1.50. FLORIDA
PLAYERS: "AFTER THE
RAIN," Univ of Fla.
Students, $.25; High School
Students, $.75; General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$1.50. SGP: RUTH PAGE
INTERNATIONAL
BALLET, General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $2.50,
$1.50, & $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $2.00, $1.25 &
SI.OO.



- ww w m w w m
* GATOR CLASSIFIEDS*

FOR SALE
Portable TV B & W good reception
$45. Call 378-7857 after 6.
(A-st-89-P)
Mobile home Bx3o. Occupancy in the
spring quarter. See at Lot L 3, 3860
Archer Rd. SW Town and Country or
call 392-3082 from 8 to 4. L. Shaw.
(A-st-89-P)
1964 New Moon trailer, 10x50, air
conditioned, screen porch, front
kitchen and 2 bedrooms. 392-1823
day, 372-7976 after 5 p.m. $2500.
(A-2t-89-P)
Yamaha 250 cc. Like new br green
white naga seat new tires, chain
sprocket, brakes. Excellent
condition. $350. Call 376-9271.
George Room 15. (A-3t-89-P)
BMWR 27 Excellent condition. Call
392-3500 8:30-4:00 or see at 2020
N.W. 31st PL. (A-st-86-p)
MUST SELL 10 X 50 mobile home 2
brm very nice come and see washer
included. Front kitchen 2150 or
make offer after 5 oclock 372-5742.
Arrendondo Estate. (A-st-86-p)
YAMAHA 60cc 1967 in excellent
condition, tool box and helmet
included, $175. Phone 372-8077.
(A-3t-86-P)
DO IT UNDER-WATER! Scuba tank,
wts, and reg. only $l4O. A real steal.
Call now 376-5133 ask for Weird
Jaw. Do it now. Its only a Northern
song. (A-3t-89-P)
Must sell 6 mo old Vivitar 35mm to
2*/4 condenser enlarger with two
lenses and carriers. Call 378-4817
after 5 pm. (A-3t-88-P)
SOUP'S on the rug that is, so clean
the spot with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-90-C)
*'
'62 Sprite needs clutch work S3OO.
Also Elmo Bcz sir power zoom Bmm
movie camera S7O. Call 378-7247 ask
for Tom. (A-3t-90-P)
ELECTRONIC ORGAN, combo
type: S2OO. 376-0435. (A-3t-90-P)

BREATHTAKING, I recommend
H MBASD £%!*''- V
fir SI6NE
1 SUITE 3
HAVE YOU HEARD?
THE FLORIDA QUARTERLY
IS COMING SOON!

| FOR RENT
SUBLET LARGE 2 br aircond. new
furn. 2 blocks from campus 120.
Now to Sept. Call Dave 378-0286 or
Carl 378-2128. (B-st-87-P)
Luxurious living in high rise apt.
complex just a few blocks from
campus. Now renting at La Fontana
Apts. Call 378-0372 or see at 207
N.W. 17th St. Apt. 506. (B-st-86-p)
2 bdrm apt, 2 blocks from campus,
must sublet spring and summer qtrs,
$l4O month, washing machine. Call
372-6559 between 5 and 7 p.m. and
after 11 p.m. (B-85-86-p)
Sublet College Terrace Apt.
Immediate occupancy preferred will
sacrifice rest of quarters rent + util,
or S4O. Call Rick 378-4532 weekend
or before 2 daily. (B-4t-88-P)
Furnished two bedroom 1 bath house
for rent, air conditioned $125 a mo.
Call 392-1575 before 5 or 378-6829
5:30 and weekends. (B-st-89-P)
Furn. 2 br apt. Camelot Sublet or
assume lease, aft. March. Ideal for 2,
3 or 4. 372-7463 aft 5 p.m.
(B-3t-89-P)
Sublet Camelot apt. 2 seniors want 2
coeds to share 2 bedroom 2 bath apt
overlooking pool. Most spacious floor
plan and Spanish decor. Call
378-8458 for further information.
(B-st-88-P)
Must sub-lease immediately my share
spacious 2-br furn. University
Gardens apt. $42.50 mo. Call Steve
378-9728. (B-st-89-P)
12x60 trailer sublet spring and/or
summer quarter. Furnished 2
bedroom. Perfect for 2 single
students or married couple. Call
372-7576 after 6. (B-3t-90-P)
Sublet 2 br apt. Central heat & air,
big fenced yard, near campus, $95
per month. Rent before March 1 &
keep our deposit. Call 376-0478.
(B-2t-90.-P)
MUST SUBLET apt. for 1,2, 3
people for spring quarter, ac, pool, 2
blocks from campus, SBS per month.
1513 NW 5 Ave. Call 378-8537.
(B-st-90-P)

Tuesday, February 25, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

I FOR RENT
V j>
:*x*xNSNN x x*x*x x*x*X"VX x*x*x x o >xxi*
1 br apt. central heat & air, w-w
carpt., quiet location. Rent sllO/mo.
Paid for Feb. Furnished for married
or singles. Call Jim 378-0426 after
5:00 p.m. (B-4t-90-P)
-^rrmtToocMa
WANTED I
One roommate for French Quarter
Apt. spring quarter. No. 82 on pool.
Call 378-5125. (C-2t-89-P)
1 wanna bicycle, damn it!!!!! Cash
for mens 3 or 5-speed. Get rid of
that piece of junk while you can,
moron! Call 372-6598. (C-2t-89-P)
Need 1 roommate for Ig 2 br apt. AC
carpeted must be seen to be
appreciated have your own bedrm.
Call 376-8312 ask for Bob. Avail for3
quarter. (C-3t-89-P)
2 Roommates for spring quarter,
males. Williamburg apt. Finest living
ip G'ville. Air cond, pool, dishwasher.
Call Apt. 41, 376-9719. (C-st-89-P)
1 coed roommate for Spring qtr.
Starlight apt 3 blocks from campus
approx $33/month. Call after 4 p.m.
preferred, 378-3449. (C-st-89-P)
LANDMARK Male roommate
needed. Available March 1. March
rent paid. Call 378-3120, apt. 170.
(C-10t-88-P)
Male roomate needed in spacious
Gatortown apt. 3 bed 2 bath 52.50
mo. Call Bill after 5 378-6873 open
March and spring quarter. (C-3t-88-P)
I
Iftlftftll nEMD I
,JMUIItW UNBELIEVABLE TERROR I
TECHNICOLOR
| NO. 2 AT 1:52 |
I I
'.'ig.mtgww"
iffliir
7:40 l
% The Wrecking
% Crew M
IB 2nd WEEK 1
,JS| BslU I
3:50 IT Mi Jour!
7:40 i WINNER BEST PICTURE I
9:40 VENICE film festival M

ITS LADIES NIGHT
AT. THE ALIBI LOUNGE
EVERY TUESDAY
LADIES DRINKS
ONLY 19<
3334 W Univ.

Page 9

WANTED
*i %*
'!( Xv//WVSWK X K >XWW!WW ; X X'*!
WANTED . subjects with
near-sighted vision for visual
experiment. $1.50/hr. Call 392-3031.
(E-st-90-C)
2 female roommates to share 2 bdrm
apt. spring and summer qtrs. 2 blocks
from campus $lO5 qtr. 372-6559
btwn 5 and 7 p.m. and after 11 p.m.
(c-Bt-86-p)
MALE ROOMMATE to share apt.
S3O plus V? utilities per month.
3 72-335 8, 3 78-5583, Jack.
(C-2t-90-P)
COED WANTED to share 2-story
duplex, 1 block behind Norman for
spring quarter. $27.50 a mo. plus
utilities. Call 378-5739. (C-3t-90-P)
NEED SOMEONE to share 3V? acre,
2-bedroom paradise on Cowpens
Lake. Start now or March. Call Craig
481-1753. (C-2t-87-P)
The single university crowd over
2 1 For the Friday Afternoon
Club will meet this & every Friday
from 5-7:30 at the Lamplighter.
Private rooms, pleasant atmosphere.
Drinks $.45, ladies $.20. Come early
& bring your friends. Fridays a great
day to have fun. (C-3t-86-P)
Female roommate to share apt. with
female grad student. Start now or
spring quarter. $42.50. Great apt.
376-7670. (C-2t-90-P)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1-hr session. Must be native
English-speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University Ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5. (E-10t-71-C)
j:rasss
HELP WANTED
DRAFTSMAN part time fast
neat hand lettering required. Call
W.J. Kessler, Associates Consulting
Engineers, 376-3157. (E-2t-89-P)
AUTOS
:S;?Wtxxx*x*xx-xx?m*x-X4*>ww3w*:*>!*
LIKE NEW Beautiful 65 Falcon
Futura 2 door hardtop 6 cyl radio
automatic new wsw. Must sell A real
bargain. Call 392-1473 or 3725703.
(G-7t-86-p)
1960 Buick LeSabre, V-8, automatic
transmission, power brakes &
steering. Call Flipper 372*0491. See
at 1125 SW 2nd Avenue. G-4t-89-P)
1966 MG Midget. Wire wheels and
tonneau. 21,000 miles. Book price
$1125. Phone 376-7947 after 5 anti
weekends. (G-st-89-P)
'62 Comet automatic, radio, heater, 4
door, very good condition, S4OO. Call
378-7857 after 6. (G-st-89-P)
;:;x
PERSONAL
£x<*X-X*X.:WSXMO<*X-X*MttM!QfcWtf
CELEBRATION needs you, if you
are interested in planning the largest
exhibition of music, dance,
and visual arts in Florida history.
Pick up an applica ton at the Student
Activities Desk, Reitz Union; the
Office of the Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts; or in
Rifl, 129, Tigert Hall. (J-st-87-P)
The Friday Afternoon Club for the
university crowd over 21 will meet
this and every Friday from 5-7:30 at
the Lamplighter. Private rooms,
pleasant atmosphere. Drinks $.45,
ladies $.20. Come early & bring your
friends. Friday is a great day to have
fun. (J-3t-86-P)
Time is running out to reserve your
seat for EUROPE this summer, $315,
10 wks. N.Y. London N.Y. or go
for credit 392-1655 or 310 Union.
(J-ts-82-C)

| PERSONAL

:yw?; w xwwofrfrx;xi!arwxxxx:>:>!>?i
Get V? chicken & more at Browards
Bar-B-Que Mar. 2, Sun. 4:30-6:30 for
Gator Loan fund. J.K. & the Jug will
entertain. $1.50 each. (J-4t-90-P)
This may be your only chance to see
the New York Rock & Roll Ensemble
this easily at this price, this Fri. nite,
8:00, Reitz Union Ballroom. SI.OO
(J-3t-90-P)
Any underclass coeds desiring dates
for any coming weekends, call
972-9120 btwn. 6-10 and ask for
Bert. Chance to meet dates before.
(J-lt-90-P)
FOUND DOG belonging to Carol
Ann Lacock. Call Vicki 378-9455.
(L-3t-90-P)
Dissertation and publication figures
and drawings. Professional Graphic
artist, Nancy McClelland, 378-4260.
(M-st-90-P)
1 will do ironing in my home. Call
372-5269. (M-4t-90-P)
!* SERVICES s
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS.
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
joKM
"mCRC
I THE 900 m
I HIGH iHy
1 COMMISSIONER]
IIN COLOR fROM RAMA RELEASING CORPORAIION I
4 carrt~|Gj
Mmm escape
p
A GREGORY PECK /
A" EVA MARIE
hSEVI
P the \
W fixer :
Based on the Pulitzer £
Prize winning novel
by Bernard Malamud
|oewfewOelN#*vJlJe^
| 211 W. Mvnltr 1 |Rfl|
I DAZZLING! \
Picture
Wb v of the
A Month' |
evrnleen
jflMMI W §
~



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 25, 1969~

Walk, Owens Named To UPI All-SEC

By Alligator Services
Neal Walk paced an All-SEC
United Press International
basketball team that was
dominated by the Class of 7O.
Named with UFs
All-American center were Pete
Maravich, LSU, Tom Hagan,
Vanderbilt, Dan Issel, Kentucky,
and Bob Lienhard, Georgia.
The team was selected in
balloting by newspaper, radio
and television sports editors
from throughout the Southeast.
Kentuckys Mike Casey, the
other non-senior on last years
first team, slipped to the second
five this time where he was
joined by Tennessees Bill
Justus, also second team last
year, Kentuckys Mike Pratt,
Auburns John Mengelt and
Georgias Jerry Epling.
Walk, Hagan and Justus are
the only seniors on this years
10-man squad and Mengelt is the
only sophomore.
Maravich, highest two-year
scorer in NCAA history, was the
only unanimous choice.

ALL-SEC
FIRST TEAM
Pete Maravich, 6-5, LSU
Neal Walk, 6-10, UF
Dan issel, 6-8, Kentucky
Tom Hagan, 6-3, Vanderbilt
Bob Lienhard, 6-1 1, Georgia
SECOND TEAM
Bill Justus, 6-1, Tennessee
Mike Casey, 64, Kentucky
Mike Pratt, 64, Kentucky
John Mengelt, 6-2, Auburn
Jerry Epling, 5-11, Georgia
THIRD TEAM
Gary Elliot, 6-3, Alabama
Bill Hann, 6-3, Tennessee
Andy Owens, 6-5, UF
Bobby Croft, 6-10, Tennessee
Manuel Washington,
6-4, Mississippi State

TUESDAY IS
BANANA SPLIT'
\ \ VTjL./''
39' %. 39'
DAY AT
. KING'S Food Host US A.
V'nT y-
V\CINGS Home of Friendly Family Dining
VFcxKiHost l43o SW 13th St. 1802 W. Univ. Ave
f 378-1656 372-6820
No take-out orders on this special, please.

MARAVICH ONLY UNANIMOUS CHOICE

Sk Mr**
y-ysk SM
* *'** HpdK
: WMiMim&JbmmL ri
: X I r wl
.mTX Mb
"*WW* u
Wem*?' f IlllS
NEAL WALK
. . All-SEC
This comes as no surprise. The
lanky, 6-foot-5 junior, who set
an NCAA record last year with

Rebels Dim Gators
NIT Hopes 79-77

OXFORD, Miss. A
foul-plagued UF basketball team
had its National Invitational
Tournament hopes dimmed by a
fired-up Mississippi team
Monday night.
The Gators trailed throughout
the second half coming as close
as 69-68 with 3:51 remaining
before dropping a 79-77
Southeastern Conference game.
UF now has a 15 8 overall
record and 9 6in the SEC.
Neal Walk has a 28 point
performance despite fouling out
in the last half minute of play
add missing about eight minutes
of play. Andy Owens also fouled
out, but with 1:25 to play.
Other Gator foul trouble
included Mike Leatherwood, Ed
Lukco, Boyd Welsch and Mike

MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

his 43.8 point average, is running
away with national scoring
honors again this season and was
averaging 43.9 prior to Monday
nights game at Tennessee.
The Louisiana State star
moved into the No. 1 position
for two-year scoring this past
weekend when he climbed to
2,104 points nine more than
Elvin Hayes previous
record with four games left to
play.
. ~\
The 6-foot-10 Walk, leading
rebounder in the nation last
season, had a 23.4 scoring
average and a 17.4 rebound
average at weeks end; the
6-foot-8 Issel was 25.6 and 13.0;

McGinnis, who all accumulated
four fouls.
The high point man for Ole
Miss was Ken Turner, with 26.
The game was marred by the
fans throwing paper and ice on
the court with the Rebels
leading 69-67 and 4:36 left to
play.
At that point UF came to life
as they cut the lead to one
point, but then fell behind again
73-68 with two minutes left.
With a half minute to play
Welsch was fouled, with the
Gators trailing 78-74. Welsch
made the first two free throws.
Ole Miss grabbed the rebound
and was fouled to stop a freeze.
The Rebels made the shot and
lead 79-75.
The last field goal was made
by McGinnis with two seconds
to play.
UF missed easy shots and lost
the ball on mistakes as they
trailed the Rebels 40-30 at the
half, the same score they were
leading Mississippi State by at the
half Saturday.
UFs All-American center
accumulated three fouls in the
first half, the team as a whole
had 10 fouls.

Offers to MEN AND WOMEN \ j
\ 1 y
A Two-Year Graduate Program Leading to a
' I'
MASTER OF SOCIAL
WORK DEGREE B ~
Apply Now for 1969
Scholarships, Loans and Stipends available
+
Henry A. McGinnis, p h.D., AgSW
Miami Shores, Florida 33161

and the 6-foot-l 1 Lienhard was
23.3 and 15.7.
Hagan, the shortest member
of the UPI quint at 6-foot-3 and
the lowest scorer with 22.8 per
game, is the only player to be
named to the top 10 three years
in a row. The Commodore ace
was a second teamer in 1967.
Justus, spearhead of Tennessee
was a third teamer in 1967.
Making up this years third
team were Gary Elliott,
Alabama, Bill Hann, Tennessee,
Andy Owens, UF, Bobby Croft,
Tennessee and Manuel
Washington, Mississippi State.
The 1969 UPI All-SEC first
team averages 6-foot-7/2 in
height and, thanks to the big

TURTLES
are
COMING

k jjj ~
SPECIAL REBATE
Conventions Short Courses Seminars
Upon using our motel rooms. .
We offer a cash rebate to your organization
Other free services will be included.
*
U.S. ROUTE 441 SOUTH
A| I IIC GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
v,HLt w J PHONE FRanklin 2-6333

ANDY OWENS
. . third team All-SEC
boost from Pistol Pete, is
averaging 27.8 points making
it the biggest and highest scoring
top five in the SECs 37-year
history.

AFTER
" THE RAIN



KNOXVILLE, Tenn.
(UPI) A basketball referee
seldom has an easy time of it,
but at Louisiana State and
Vanderbilt his life is especially
tough.
Thats the way the
Southeastern Conference
referees see it themselves in a
poll conducted by the Knoxville
News-Sentinel and released
Friday.
The officials rate coach Press
Maravieh of LSU as the most
inflammatory, and LSU crowds
as the worst behaved. Vandys

Hukcos Plan Cage Family

By STEVE BERGMAN
Alligator Correspondent
Do you have problems
keeping your husband from
eating too many potato chips?
If you were Mrs. Ed Lukco
you would.
Being a good watchdog and
keeping your husband from/
eating too much before
tomorrows game is just one of
the problems of being married to
Gator basketball forward Ed
Lukco.
You also have to be an
interested spectator. Thats
probably why you will usually
find Mrs. Lukco at most cage
practices, at all the home
basketball games, and reading
the scouting reports to find out
who her husband will be
guarding that night.
I used to try to get him up
for his games, but when hes
calm and doesnt think about
the game he plays better. So
now I read the scouting reports
to find out who Ed is guarding
that night and before the game
Ill say something like, better be
good tonight that guy youre
playing against is real tall.
Being a good cook helps also,
that is, if you want your
husband to eat his meals home
and not at the training table
with all the other athletes.
Ed usually eats his meals at
home except on days of the
games, then he eats at the
training table. Hed rather eat
home, he likes my home
cooking.
It takes a certain amount of
patience to be a basketball
wife, expecially those long
weekends when your husband is
at another school playing away
.games.
The worst part is when he
goes away, I really miss him
then. And when our son Stevie
misses him it makes me miss him
more.
Though these problems can be
annoying, the Lukcos dont
really mind sacrificing the time.
It is their big dream that Ed will
eventually play professional
basketball, hopefully someplace
woo^sSrvie^TJart* 1
at
CRANE IMPORTS
i
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Untv. Ave. 372-4373

COACH MABAVICH 'MOST INFLAMMATORY
SEC Referees Rate LSU Worst

crowd behavior rates a close
second for ill manners, the SEC
referees say.
On the other hand, Kentucky,
the SEC basketball leader is the
best of it all around. The crowds
are the best behaved and are
rated the most knowledge knowledgeable.
able. knowledgeable.
The poll was conducted on a
numerical rating system, five
points for a first place vote,
three for second and one for
third. And heres how it worked
out:
Worst crowds LSU 42

tWkwmmSm I ,fM t y~,
THE LUKCOS
Ed Lukco, son and wife await plane for Mississippi trip.

near Ohio (the Lukcos home
state).
Its our hope that Ed will
play pro ball somewhere near
Ohio, like for the Detriot Pistons
or the Cincinnati Royals. But I
dont care, Ill take anywhere.
The Lukcos greatest wish is
that their two-year-old son
Stevie will follow in his fathers
sneakers. It was just a couple
weeks ago that Stevie sunk his
first two baskets. Neal Walk
lifted little Stevie up so he could
put the ball through the hoop.
Im as proud of Stevie as I
am of Ed. I bought him a little
basketball to play with and Ed is
going to set him up a small
basket. Someone figured out for
us that Stevie will grow tall
enough to play center. Thats
what we hope.
The Lukcos are not content
with just raising a center for a
basketball team, they intend on

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points, Vanderbilt 32, Auburn 9,
Ole Miss 4, Florida and
Mississippi State 1.
Best crowds Kentucky 26,
Tennessee 24, Florida 8, Georgia
and Mississippi State 7, Auburn
6, Alabama 5, Vanderbilt 3, Ole
Miss and LSU 1.
Most inflammatory
coach Maravieh (unanimous
first place) 45 points, Ken
Rosemond of Georgia 15, Ray
Mears of Tennessee 4, Cob Jarvis
of Ole Miss 3, Adolph Rupp of
Kentucky 2, Roy Skinner of
Vandy and Bill Lynn of Auburn,

having twins to play guard and
forward.
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Least inflammatory
coach Joe Dan Gold of
Mississippi State 35, Tom
Bartlett of Florida 22; followed
in order by C.M. Newton of
Alabama, Lynn, Mears, Rupp,
Skinner, Rosemond, Jarvis and
Maravieh.
One official rated the
students as best sports in the
crowds and added, At
Vanderbilt, students are far
outnumbered by townspeople
and this explains why Vanderbilt
is the worst.
Technical fouls are more

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Tuesday, February 25, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

common at LSU, the officials
said.
No school came away totally
untouched. A few nights ago at
Kentucky the students began to
chant, Go to hell, referee, go to
hell.
At LSU, Vandy, Florida and
other schools, athletic directors
have had to appeal for orderly
playing conditions. Not long
ago, a referee had a Florida
spectator tossed out for tossing
rubbish onto the basketball
floor.

Page 11



Page 12

xu_ pi:-i- Ai:j._ tor Tuesday, Fcb-:~' 5, 19G3

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.r.v.vwv.v.*.:.t.v.v 0 LIP BOA R 0
#
Coeds For Batboysj
~,v ;, ,....... -.. By Bill Dunn ; .x. w |

A TTENTION: Coeds
who look tuff in minis!
WANTED: Neat looking
damsels to assist large
university glove concern
with menial field work and
public relations beginning
March 18. Opportunity to
meet young male field
workers for firm with
sound base.
Youve heard of Batman.
Well, heres your chance to be a
Batgirl for the Gator baseball
team.
Its not an original idea,
says Coach Bill Fuller. Its been
tried by a championship
Southern Illinois team last
season and by the University of
Miami this year.
The idea: coeds for batboys!
For years, baseball deans have
been concerned with putting
c olor back into the game.
Americas pasttime was indeed
* i *au Jas
becoming a thing of the past.
Then men like the Chicago
White Sox Bill Veeck thought it
a challenge to liven up the game
with numerous stunts, electronic
scoreboards and special game
features. Baseball was forced,
like many other sports, to
promote itself.

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69 Seminole
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Room 330 Reitz Union
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9| Please reserve copies of the 1969 Seminole IE
|S| You will be notified in the Alligator when the pj^|
yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole,

Southern Illinois conceived
the batboy idea and its become
a fad with other colleges
following suit.
Im susceptible to trying it
here, says Fuller, but the girls
would have to realize that its
for more than just having a good
time. Theres work that must be
done chasing foul balls,
placing bats in the rack, and
stpring helmets.
The 21-year veteran baseball
coach says if the response here
was significant enough, he would
think about even providing the
visiting team with several batgirls
as a public relations jesture.
We could either use a few
girls regularly, said Fuller, or
rotate the jobs from game to
game with different applicants.

FLORIDA PLAYERS presents J^
JOHN BOWEN'S m s V
"THEATRE TO @3 I
EXTEND THE MIND" J j

But we couldnt take a chance
of having new girls not knowing
what to do.
The Gators open their 1959
campaign at the University of
Miami with three games this
weekend. The home opener is
March 18 against South Florida.
All coeds interested in
applying for Gator batboys
should contact Alligator Sports
Desk 392-1688. Information
on specific game chores will be
arranged at that time.
SHANNONS I
WRECKER I
7th St. I
W. Univ. NIGHT 376-40091