Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 89

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MISS INTERNATIONAL WEEK
Miss Rekha Mehra, a dark-haired beauty from Calcutta, India was
named Friday as Miss International Week. Miss Mehra, 21, is a history
major at the UF. International Week, which ended Saturday with a
dance at the Reitz Union, was sponsored by the seven clubs of the
Council of International Organizations. See Story, Page 2.

The
Florida Alligator

University of Florida, Gainesville

AAUP Applauds
Education Heads
For Slade Stand
By Alligator Services
Three state education leaders Saturday were praised by a Florida
university teachers union for their stands on the Slade letter
ultimatum.
The Florida Conference of the American Association of University
Professors in Tampa lauded the three officials for their rebuff of the
ultimatum issued Feb. 10 by Sen. Tom Slade, R-Jacksonville, calling
for the immediate dismissal of UF Asst. Prof. Kenneth Megill.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell, Board of Regents Chairman D.
Burke Kibler and University System Chancellor Robert Mautz were
commended in a unanimous resolution by the AAUP at the annual
meeting.
OConnell was cited for his insistence on due process, Kibler for his
stand on academic freedom and Mautz for his no interference
statements.
In his letter to OConnell, Slade demanded that Megill be fired for
his support of radical movements.
OConnell in a response to Slades letter said the matter needed to
be dealt with deliberately and soberly. He said he wouldnt fire
anyone without first adhering to proper proceedings.
Mautz said, It is an impropriety for members of the legislature to
interfere directly with any of the campuses in the state, in a
statement to the press during the crisis.
When he learned of the ultimatum Kibler said, A university
campus is a place for the interchange of ideas and no one should
exercise thought control.
Slade accused Megill of taking a radical stand and supporting black
power. He was referring to Megills statements at a Accent 69
symposium, held in the Plaza of the Americas Feb. 3.
At the dialogue Megill said, Today, people see unjustness and they
are not afraid to use radical means to aid in change. He called black
power the most significant political development of this century.
The resolution was introduced by UF AAUP Chapter President Dr.
Ray Fahien. Other UF delegates were Profs. Seymour S. Block and
Wallace Nelson.
The resolution was written to take a positive stand and praise
those who we felt deserved it rather than attack anyone in particular,
Fahien said.
Fahien said there was no direct mention of Slade on the floor of
the meeting.
There was much concern, however, by the delegates over legislative
infringement into university affairs, he said.

SSOC Still Waiting
For Word On Charter

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Southern Students Organizing Committee
(SSOC) is still waiting for UF President Stephen C.
OConnell to decide whether or not they qualify as
a campus organization and an answer appears
unlikely in the near future.
Busy with legislative matters, OConnell and
Dean Lester Hale, vice-president for student affairs,
hope to look over the charter request this week, but
nothing is definite.
We really havent had a chance to discuss it
yet, said Hale Sunday.
A report was sent to OConnell on Feb. 6 by the
Student Organizations and Social Affairs Committee
whose members are appointed by the university
president. The committee serves as advisor to
OConnell on university policy.
The report stated that the application by SSOC
had been approved by a 5-4 vote.
SSOC wants a charter from the university so it
can use university rooms and facilities.
Rush E. Choate, committee chairman, said that

recognition was based on the assurance by SSOC
leaders that it would function within the rules and
regulations of the University of Florida and refrain
from violence.
SSOC first made its bid for a charter in
November, 1968. It has been an off campus
organization since 1965.
Two weeks before the Presidential election in
November, George Wallace supporters and SSOC
members verbally clashed in the Reitz Union. A
crowd of 250 people were at the SSOC meeting
when Wallace supporters entered, uninvited.
The leader of the Wallace supporting students,
Jimmy Bailey, claimed that SSOC is a
Communist-influenced group.
Bailey said that SSOC, employs open and willful
destruction.
The Wallace supporter applauded a movie
showing police, kicking demonstrators, then left
quietly.
Board of Regents Chairman D. Burke Kibler said
Jan. 18 he would personally oppose recognition of
SSOC or any similar organization at any of
Floridas state universities.

Amarte's
- Number I
Col bye
Daily

Monday, February 24, 1969

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....
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... insistence on due process
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ROBERT MAUTZ
... "no interference"
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D. BURKE KIBLER
... academic freedom



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 24,1969

UF Science Departments
Share $1.6 Million Grant

The National Science Foundation Saturday will
tap seven departments with an ante of $1.6 million,
bringing UFs center of excellence pot up to
almost $6 million.
This latest bonus comes in the form of a two-year
supplemental grant to UFs science development
program.
NSF funds, which now totals $5,928,000, will be
used to support faculty, post-doctoral and graduate
students, staff personnel, equipment purchases and
assistance in construction of research facilities.
The monies are granted to UF under the NSFs
Center of Excellence program originated in 1965.

Talent Show, Crowning
Climax International Week

Rehka Mehra from the India
Club was crowned Miss
International Friday night
before a packed crowd at the
University Auditorium during
the International Talent show.
Miss Mehra, a brunette
dressed in a pink sari, was one of
three finalists including Sheryl
Swan (Persia Club) and Hope
Chen (Chinese Club) to
compete for the title.
The 21-year-old Rathskeller
fraulein and history major came
to the UF after receiving her BA
in India in June of 1968.
She plans to work in the
diplomatic corps and has already
worked for one year in the
American Field Service. She
enjoys swimming, debating, and
dramatics.
In talent competition, the
Latin American Club carried off
first prize for the second straight
year with a six part act showing
the influences of Latin music.
Their act ended with a 12 piece

'Radical Magazine
Due For Publication
The Crocodile, a new off campus magazine is due anytime now
John Sugg, editor of the magazine, said Sunday.
Originally scheduled to appear in January, the magazine was
delayed because of printing problems.
Sugg gave no specific date for publication.
We have more than enough material for the first 48 page issue he
said. Among the first articles will be The Guerrilla and the
University by Dr. Kenneth Megill, UFs radical philosophy
professor whose dismissal was recently demanded by Sen. Tom Slade,
R-Jacksonville.
The magazine may sell for about 50 cents, Sugg said.
It is a sort of radical literary magazine... that you would want to
put on your bookshelf, Sugg added.
Earlier, the publication ran into difficulty when its editors
proposed to sell it on campus without submitting it for approval to
the Office of Student Affairs.
In January, the Committee on Student Affairs passed a resolution
allowing the first issue magazine to be sold, and the editors to be fully
responsible.
The resolution was temporary, subject to change in university
policy.
Not only will the issue put into magazine format what the radicals
say verbally, but it will have a good criticism of radicals, too Sugg
said.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Cost Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

chorus doing latin dances and
songs.
The Arab Club came in
second and the Brazilian Club
placed third. A belly dancer in
vivid green harem outfit was the
highlight of the Arab act, which
offered songs, and OmarKhayam
poetry. With the use of slides
and scenes of cowboys and
fishermen, the Brazilian Club
took the audience on a
sightseeing tour of their country.
Tito Moynes and his Combo
played between acts.
f...
A different twist was added to
Indian music when Dr. Zhivagos
theme song was played on an
Indian tampura.
The talent show climaxed
International Week. Events such
as the International banquet, the
beauty contest, and the showing
of Romeo and Juliet and foreign
documentaries were all aimed at
making the American student
acquainted with the foreign
students.

It is designated for the departments of chemistry,
physics and astronomy in the College of Arts and
Sciences and the chemical, electrical, engineering
science and mechanics, and metallurgical and
materials departments in the College of Engineering.
The grant was announced by U. S. Sen. Spessard
Holland and Edward Gurney and U. S. Rep. Don
Fuqua.
It is a tremendous honor for the University to
receive this recognition, Dr. L. E. Grinter, dean of
the graduate school, said. It recognizes the level of
accomplishment that has been reached in scientific
fields and will provide resources to help the UF
achieve excellence.

The celeb ration of
International Week is the main
event of the year for the Council
of International Organizations.
Ted Plocharski, chairman of
CIO had heard from a number of
professors and administrators
that this week was the best
yet.
But he regretted American
students didnt seem interested
enough. We seem to have
reached more of the older
Americans on this campus, he
said.
The week ended with a dance
in the Reitz Union attended by
nearly 350 persons.
I Mautz Speaks |
! For AAUP Meet|
:
Robert B. Mautz,
v chancellor of the Florida
y v
£ university system, told
y members of the American
y ,>
y Association of University
y Professors at a dinner Friday |j:
i; that he and the Board of x
Regents would try to reduce
$ political influence over X
§ universities. £
Mautz told the professors $
x that he could not predict x
X what salary increases the :j:
>: legislature might pass but it jjj
S would be less than what was : : :
V
:j requested.
v He also said his office and $
the regents were constantly $
$ considering how the limited $
resources passed by the x
x legislature would be allocated
xto the various state
universities. x


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In The Village Square
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NICK ARROYO
'AFTER THE RAIN
"After the Rain" comes the burning sun. Shown under its spell are
Dan Jesse, Claude Pinkston and Duane Ford from the cast of "After
the Rain" opening at 8 tonight in Constans Theatre.
College Is A Riot
By United Press International
The president of Alabamas Stillman College closed down the
predominantly Negro school Sunday and ordered the campus cleared.
Classroom boycott leaders said they would disobey the order.
A sit-in by 200 students from half a dozen colleges went into its
sixth day at the University of Pennsylvania.
The continuing campus rebellion was scheduled to involve two
more schools this week, Princeton and the University of Missouri.
Dr. Harold Stinson shut down the small Presbyterian college at
Tuscaloosa, Ala., after Stillman students rejected his appeal to end
their class boycott and staged a defiant march through a
predominantly Negro section of Tuscaloosa.
University of Pennsylvania protesters voted to support the broader
demands of Philadelphia Negro community leaders who want the
entire 106 acre renewal tract adjoining the university turned over to
the black community.
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) have called for a general
strike Monday at the University of Missouri in protest of the banning
of an underground newspaper. There were reports that the protest
might include a mass march on a scheduled disciplinary hearing and a
sit-in demonstration.
At Princeton University, students were planning a midweek
demonstration in protest of the schools refusal to divest itself of
financial interests in U.S. firms doing business in South Africa.
More than 1,000 students and faculty members of Rice University
staged a protest march Saturday, claiming they had no voice in
selection of the schools new president, William H. Masterdon. They
said they were protesting the method, not the man.



19th Annual
Jazz Concert
Set Tuesday
From Norwegian Wood
done in the style of Buddy Rich
to the rhythmic Emancipation
Blues, from the popular The
Look of Love to the
contemporary Jazz
Suite the sounds will be
many when the Gator Variety
Bands perform at the 19th
Annual Jazz Concert Tuesday
night.
The concert begins at 8:15
p.m. in University Auditorium
and is free of charge.
Featured in addition to the
two variety bands will be a jazz
septet, two vocalists, and several
instrumental soloists.
Selections to be played during
the program include original jazz
works and arrangements of
popular and standard jazz pieces.
Melissa Leifer will be the
vocalist for The Look of Love
and The Joker, and Maureen
Shannon sings Blues in the
Night and I Wish You Love.
The Jazz Septet recently was
a featured group at the West
Florida Jazz Festival in
Pensacola, where Henry
Wolking, the septet leader and
trombone soloist, won a
scholarship to the Stan Kenton
Stage Band Clinic in Los
Angeles.
The Gator Variety Bands,
which serve as the Department
of Musics laboratory jazz
ensembles, are under the
direction of Robert E. Foster.

THE IFC IS OUT FOR BLOOD!
... .. - ... T (j* '
*
'J7:7'v7' f fP' | >'jj ** I
THE BLOODMOBILE WILL ~ WILL SPEND
& I
THE IFC IS HOLDING ITS ANNUAL BLOOD DRIVE
AND
ANYONE MAY DONATE!
SO BRING YOUR BLOOD TO THE BLOODMOBILE ANYTIME
WEEN 8 AM AND 9 PM THIS WEEK, UNTIL FEB. 28.
IT DOESNT HURT

HENRY WOLKING
... trombone soloist
JOHN SAULS
... Gator saxophonist

Shepherd, Glick Adamant
In Support Os SG System

March 5: the jury will return its life or death
verdict on UFs Student Government.
The promise that Clyde Taylor made last year in
his campaign for student body president will be
fulfilled by the referendum next week giving the
students the chance to abolish the present Student
Government.
Some student leaders are dead-set against such a
move.
Marc Glick, adviser to Taylor said much that
Student Government does goes unrecognized by
many students.
Student Government should be evaluated in
terms of its long-range successes rather than year by
year, Glick said. It provides the ability to
accomplish projects which could never be done in
one persons tenure.
Glick cited as examples the book exchange which
was started under the administration of former SG
President Stephen C. OConnell.
He called SG a point of crystallization of

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Monday, February 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

student opinion and a moderating, but
progressive force.
Most students dont recognize the continuing
effort SG has exerted on things like the Rathskeller,
Lake Wauberg, the Code of ConductJSAMPSON, the
Ombudsman, and off-campus housing.
Charles Shepherd, president of the student body
last year, said that as student opinion has swung
recently towards more participation, SG has
provided the channel for the exercise of this
participation.
He said SG had contributed to the lack of
discord on the UF campus because it had been
functioning long before the recent student surge of
unrest.
The only failure of SG, if there is one, Shepherd
said is its failure to involve more students.
Outlining the power of the SG structure, Glick
said $1.2 million in student fees is channeled to
various clubs yearly. If you vote out SG, youre
voting out everything from cheerleaders to Accent.

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Page 3



Page 4

Th Florida Alligator, Monday, February 24.1969

Jaycees Honor UF Prof

The Florida Jaycees Saturday
named Dr. Robert H. Waldman,
assistant professor of medicine
and microbiology at the UFs
College of Medicine, as one of
the Five Outstanding Young
Men in the state for 1968.
The other four were: William
Malloy, Tallahassee businessman;
State Sen. Robert Shevin, Miami
(R-Dade County); Dr. Gary
Sowers, Maitland, optometrist
and president of the Florida
Jaycees, and M.J. Menge,
Pensacola attorney.
The Jaycee Distinguished
Service Awards were presented
to the five young men for
outstanding leadership qualities
and significant contributions to
the development of then thenprofessions,
professions, thenprofessions, their communities
and the nation. Th*

OConnell Sees Few
Going To Pass-Fail

Will the pass-fail grading
system really make a difference
to the average UF student?
Many, including President
Stephen C. OConnell, have their
doubts.
When he said he would
approve the new system,
officially named the
satisfactory-unsatisfactory
grading system, OConnell noted
that a similar system in effect at
Florida State University
attracted only four percent of
the students there.
Most students want
recognition for excellent work,
noted OConnell in his statement
about the proposal developed by
the Action Conferences
Curriculum Task Force headed
by Dr. Roy L. Lassiter, Jr.
The pass-fail grading system
goes into effect in the fall
quarter, according to Lassiter.
The delay is the result of having
to put the information into the
undergraduate catalog before the
program goes into operation.
There are, however, important
limitations on the application of
the pass-fail system which
students should be aware of,
Lassiter warned. First-quarter
lUCs are ineligible. The
program operates at the
discretion of the students
college, which means that
courses required in the students
major, and usually his minor,
probably cannot be taken under
pass-fail.
In fact, students cant take
courses under pass-fad if his
colleges administration rules
otherwise.
This is likely to have the
greatest effect upon students

if*
*rss^S:
L
A NEW PROGRAM
OF INTEREST TO
MEN

K H
mi Bret, Jhh *
DR. ROBERT WALDMAN
... outstanding Floridian

enrolled in the pre-professional
colleges, which might seriously
weaken the programs avowed
intention to encourage students
to broaden their interests and to
wander outside of their majors
and minors.
A final reservation which
students should consider when
they take a course which is a
pre-requisite to another course,
is the colleges right to exclude
students from subsequent
courses if they took the
prerequisite on pass-fail, and
allow those who took the course
under regular grading to fill
available spaces.
Students hoping to take
courses under the pass-fail
system should carefully check
their colleges regulations
concerning the pass-fail program.
This information is not yet
available at most colleges at UF.
Therefore, students should keep
in touch with their colleges on
the matter over the summer.
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If You Didn't Have A
Chance To Take Basic
ROTC, You Can Still Take
Advanced Training
If you still have two years
left at the University, you may
qualify for this new 2-year
Army ROTC Program.
Qualify for an officers
commission in 2 yrs.
Receive SSO per month
while enrolled in the program.
Continue your education
and learn to be a leader.
Fulfill your military
obligation of 2 years active
duty, as an officer.
For Complete Information
Contact Maj. Lawrence, Rm.
111, Military Building or call
392-1395 not later than 7
March.

presentations were made by
William H. Wolfe, administrative
national Director, Florida
Jaycees.
Dr. Waldman is the young
physician credited with
developing a new immunization
technique against
influenza spray as opposed to
injection of flu vaccine. Dr.
Waldman and his colleagues
proved in field studies that the
aerosolized route via the
respiratory tract is more
effective than injection in the
blood stream, simpler to
administer, painless and
produces fewer reactions.
Dr. Waldman, 30, tftus earned
distinction at an early age. He
came to the University of
Florida as a postdoctoral fellow
in microbiology from the
National Institutes of Health in
July, 1967. Last year he was
named assistant professor of
medicine and microbiology. The
appointment made him the
youngest assistant professor of
medicine at the University of
Florida and one of the youngest
in the country.

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The most recent recipient of the "Friendly Gator" award, Mrs.
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Heavy Fighting Develops
In Long Awaited Offensive

SAIGON (UPI) Allied
forces trying to crush the long
expected Viet Cong offensive
reported killing at least 1,000
Communist troops Sunday in
fighting that spread across South
Vietnam. At least 100
Americans were slain and Saigon
was shelled for the second
consecutive night.
We do believe that this is
their offensive, an official
spokesman at US headquarters
said Sunday night almost 24
hours after the first shells
exploded in a wave of attacks
Nixon In
On Peac
BRUSSELS (UPI) President
Nixon arrived for a tour of
Europe Sunday night pledging
peace, but he promptly ran into
demonstrators shouting Nixon
Go Home as he stood listening
to the US national anthem.
Nixon, who had arrived only
moments before from
Washington aboard the
presidential jetliner, stood with a
smile, his hat held over his heart,
as chanting from some of the
500 spectators gathered on the
rooftop of the airport broke out
during the playing of the
anthem.
Belgiums King Boudouin,
standing beside Nixon on the red
dais set aside from the
welcoming speeches, was smiling
until the chanting started and
then turned grim as he heard the
words.
The chanting stopped as the
3 8-year-old King Boudouin
stepped forward to give his
welcoming speech, which praised
Nixon for visiting Europe to
seek peace.
We are delighted at the
initiative you are taking, since it
aims at coordinating for the
joint action in the cause of peace
the views of the United States
of America and those of a
Europe which, despite the
difficulties accumulated by

DUB'S
PRESENTS
THE
DYNAMIC INFERNOS
\ art **A
DUB'S LOUNGE

some inconsequential that hit
more than 100 cities and allied
bases. We do think there will be
more shellings and ground
attacks.
The American spokesman
predicted the offensive will be
a grade A fiasco for the
Communists and will probably
* end before the week is over. He
added, Well have to wait a day
or two and then well know
whether this will be a big thing
or not.
President Nixon, arriving in
Brussels Sunday night on the
Belgium
e Mission
history, is advancing on the road
to unity.
Nixon replied it was the
search for peace that brought
him to Belgium, to begin the
process of consulting with
Americas allies and gathering
their judgments.

Apollo Astronauts Readying
For Historic Friday Flight

CAPE KENNEDY (UPI)
The three Apollo 9 astronauts
skipped the usual pre-flight day
of rest Sunday and spent more
grueling hours training for
Fridays start of the toughest
spaceflight America has yet
attempted.
At the same time, engineers
on two other launch pads
prepared a twin-eyed television
probe for launch Monday night
toward the planet Mars and a
weather satellite for a
Wednesday morning takeoff.
Project officials for all three
missions reported everything was
proceeding smoothly for one of
the busiest weeks ever in the
nations space program. The
object of the 10-day earth
orbital flight of Apollo 9 is to

first leg of his European tour,
ordered a full report on the
Vietnam attacks to determine if
they constitute a pattern that
might interfere with the peace
talks in Paris.
Da Nang, South Vietnams
second largest city, was under a
24-hour curfew and Saigon was
braced for more rocket barrages.
At dusk Sunday three more
rockets thudded into Saigon,
killing at least six persons and
wouding 22 others. Among the
dead were a 21-year-old woman
and a 9-year-old girl. A number
of children were wounded, some
seriously.
Six persons were killed and at
least 10 wounded in the opening
rocket attacks that began about
2 am Sunday.
Just before nightfall Sunday
one rocket landed barely 100
yards behind the US embassy
and only a few blocks from the
residence of US Ambassado
Ellsworth Bunker. It struck a
small building housing an export
firm but none of the 11
employees inside was hurt.

give the ugly moon landing
spacecraft, nicknamed Spider,
its initial manned space test.

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Shaw Conspiracy Trial
Reaches Its Final Week
:j: NEW ORLEANS (UPI) The Clay L. Shaw assassination g
* conspiracy trial begins its sixth and final week Monday, the
* defense saying it expects to rest its case Wednesday. j:j
The all-male jury could begin deliberations and reach a
* decision Thursday, though that would not take into account
i; possible trial delays or prosecution rebuttal witnesses.
Chief Defense Attorney F. Irvin Dymond had planned a
x four-day defense, which would have meant resting Tuesday. But
it was learned that an important witness, Texas Gov. John |:j
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Monday. February 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,.l

Page 5



Page 6

'* The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 24,1969

Registration Probed
By fl-Man Board
An 11-man board three of
whom are students has been
formed to study UFs present
registration system and
recommend improvements.
The policy now under study
recently came under fire because
of flaws in pre-registration. J. R.
Dunkle will chair the committee.

PR MAJORS ALSO DUE BRIEFING
Advertising Day Coming To Campus

By JAN SCHMALENBERGER
Alligator Staff Writer
Advertising and public
relations experts from
across the nation will be in
Gainesville Friday ,to
participate in the College of
Journalism and
Communications
Advertising Public
Relations Day.
Advertising Day is the second
of three days planned annually
to give students in the college an
opportunity to receive a briefing
on their future careers.
Journalism Day was held in
November,, and Broadcasting
Day is scheduled for April 14
W. R. Glafcke, associate
professor of journalism, is
chairman of Advertising Day.
James F. Urbinski, advertising
director for the Tampa Tribune,
will speak on Newspapers
Today.
Design for Discovery is the
title of Julian M. Morris speech.
Morris is from the Office of
Information, Department of
Health, Education and Welfare
in Bethesda, Md.
Robert Cummins, director of
advertising and public relations
of P.R. Mallory and Co., Inc. in
Indianapolis, will speak on
Industrial Advertising and
Public Relations at 11:15 a.m.
The featured address at a
luncheon will be given by Homer
E. Hooks, executive director of
the Florida Phosphate Council
from Lakeland. The luncheon,
sponsored by the Florida Public

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Relations Association, also
features a fashion show by Theta
Sigma Phi, womens journalism
honorary.
John B. Collins, vice president
and senior management
supervisor on the National
Airlines advertising account, will
give a speech entitled National
Turned Florida into an Airline.
Also speaking will be James S.
Ellenburg, Jr., public relations
representative for Aluminum
Company of America.
In previous years, the three
days were scheduled during the
same week. It was changed this
year because it takes three days
out of one quarter, according
to John Paul Jones, dean of the
College of Journalism and
Communications.
When we had them all
together there was much more
of an impact, Jones said.
From a public relations
standpoint, it was probably
better to do it the other way,
but from the standpoint of time
and students education, its
better this way.
Jones said he is perfectly
willing to have the three days
in one week if after this year it is
felt the new schedule is not as
effective.
The winter meeting of the
Florida Public Relations
Association Board of Directors is
scheduled for Feb. 27 in
conjunction with
Advertising Public Relations
Day.

On the agenda for officers and
directors of the FPRA board is
adoption of the 1969 budget,
committee and project reports,
and discussion of the spring
conference planned for May
7-10 at Sarasota.
SG Presents
Ballet March 4
Student Government
Productions will bring Ruth
Pages International Ballet to
campus Tuesday, March 4.
Featuring a company of 50
dancers, the ballet performs Miss
Pages choreographic treatments
of famous opera stories.
Tickets are now on sale at the
Reitz Union Box Office.

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WHATS
HAPPENING
FLORIDA PLAYERS: Will present After the Rain, tonight at 8
in the Constans Theatre.
BASKETBALL: Florida Gators at Ole Miss. Gametime is 8:30 p.m.
on WRUF radio.
ENGINEERING QUEEN: Coeds interested in winning title and
S3OO wardrobe certificate may pick up applications at Retiz Union
activities desk before March 3. Queen will be selected April at
Engineering Ball and will reign over 24th Annual April
18,19 and 20.
GENERAL DAMES: Will hold bridge party Thursday night at 8 in
Reitz Union room 150-C.
BAHAI UNIVERSITY CLUB: Will hold special meeting March 2, 8
p.m. in Guarantee Federal Savings Loan Building. Dr. Leonard
Hippchen, criminology instructor at Florida State will be guest
speaker.
WUFT S PUBLIC AFFAIRS SERIES: Will present a program about
Alachua County governmental issues entitled The State of the
County, today at 5 p.m. County Commission Chairman G.M. Davis,
Commissioner Ed Turlington and High Springs Mayor Wilson 0.
Boozer will participate in panel discussion led by WUFT Program
Manager Mark Damen.
COLLEGE BAND DIRECTORS NATIONAL ASSN.: Has selected
Richard W. Bowles, UFs director of bands, president-elect. Bowles
will serve the 1969-71 biennium as CBDNA vice president, then
automatically become president for the 1971-73 period.
FREEDOMS FOUNDATION: Has named Dr. Roy E. Leilich, UF
physical education professor, a Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge
Award. Leilich will receive SIOO and the George Washington Honor
Medal for his armed forces letter, A Free Ballot A Free
Country.

JM Student One Os
82 National Winners

Alligator Executive Editor
Raul Ramirez has been selected
as the only college student in
Florida to receive a Newspaper
Fund interning scholarship.
Ramirez, a junior majoring in
journalism, is one of 82 students
across the nation who were
selected for the SSOO awards as
the nations most promising
journalism students.
He will receive the scholarship
after successfully completing a
summer internship as a writer
foi the Detroit Bureau of the
Wall Street Journal.
A Cuban refugee whose First
serious writings were anti-Castro
leaflets for the Cuban
underground, Ramirez has
accumulated a hatful of writing
awards.
While at Forest Hill High
School in West Palm Beach,
Ramirez won first place in
Scholastic Magazines national
essay contest in both his junior
and senior years.
He continued to win awards
as editor of the West Palm Beach
Junior College student
newspaper. In the 1968 Florida
Junior College Press Association
state contest, he won first place
in editorial writing, second place
in news writing and third place
in column writing.
While at the University of
Florida, Ramirez has won the
Gannett Newspapers SSOO
scholarship as the outstanding
journalist in the College of
Journalisms junior class.
Good Sorvico Starts
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M
RAUL RAMIREZ
.. wins scholarship
Ramirez has also won a first
place in the national William
Randolph Hearst Foundation
newswriting competition for his
story on the plight oi a
Gainesville Negro woman and
her six children, and fourth
place in the Hearst spot news
contest for his story on the
Firebombing of a local judges
home and was a finalist in the
Hearst National Individual
Writing Championship.

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UF Prof Receives
Brotherhood Honor
A UF English professor, Dr. Herman E. Spivey, is the recipient of
the 1969 Brotherhood Award of the Knoxville, Tenn., Roundtable
of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.
Spivey, considered one of the most distinguished administrators in
the Southeast, flew to Knoxville Thursday to accept the award and to
present the first annual brotherhood address. His speech was titled,
Having, Doing or Being.
In presenting the brotherhood award, Rabbi Max Zucker, said, Dr.
Spiveys stay in Knoxville (as vice president of academic affairs at the

Umversity of Tennessee from
1960-68) was like a breath of
fresh air whose tiny currents
spread out to touch the best
interests of the entire
community. He has been both
teacher and friend in whose
positiveness and individuality
there flowed the milk of human
kindness.
The award was presented to
Spivey, according to Rabbi
Zucker, because of his efforts
to bring about a greater
brotherhood of man in both the
University and in the local
community.
Spivey returned to the UF last
September after a 20-year
absence. He began his teaching
career here in 1930.
Before becoming vice
president at Tennessee in 1960,
he was chairman of the
Department of English
(1948-50) at the University of
Kentucky and dean of
Kentuckys Graduate School
(1950-60).
Spivey is credited by
Frederick W. Conner, UF vice
president for academic affairs,
with doing more than anyone
else to raise the standards and
reputation of the University of
Tennessee to its present level..
He is the author of numerous
articles and books on American
literature and college
administration.
A member of many honorary
and professional societies,
Spivey serves on the policy
committee of the Association of
State Universities and
Land-Grand Colleges, the
advisory panel on federal
student assistance,
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Monday, February 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I
Sfipl
I
JhSw ..
HgJIM
DR. HERMAN SPIVEY
... award winner

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 24,1969

The American Dream

The Right To Live

S NUCLEAR NUCLEAR Jr
yammsKm II *!SSSsnc VA
PACT ls Mssttf fJi
' 1 ''/w||f
Staff Writings
Revise Registration
" By Glenda Cohn
Case 1: It is the middle of June. A UF student returns to
Gainesville. No, he doesnt miss this wonderful place so much that he
cant bear to be away; he is coming back to register for his fall quarter
courses.
He breezes through registration in half an hour, so he decides to
hop on over to Daytona for a few days. After all, theres more action
there than at home all hes been doing there is sleeping late every
morning, sitting around the pool all afternoon, and boozing it up
every night. What a drag.
Case 2: It is the middle of September. A UF student returns to
Gainesville. No, he doesnt love the place so much that he wants to
come back a week early; he is coming to register for his fall quarter
courses.
He Fights his way through hoards of people for endless lists of
closed-out courses, ending up with a lousy schedule and lacking two
courses he needs for his major all in only five and a half hours.
He spent his summer working 40 hours a week. He couldnt take
the time off from his job to make the trip to Gainesville in June.
Many students fall into the category of Case 2. They either work
during the summer, attend summer school away from Gainesville or
live too far away to be able to afford the time and expense of the trip.
Only the minority who attend UF summer school, loaf during the
summer or can make special arrangements to come to Gainesville for a
few days are able to take advantage of privileged registration for fall
quarter.
The majority are penalized for a situation which they cannot avoid
by having to cut their summer vacation a week short, losing their
rightful privilege of registering early and risking not getting their
choice of classes.
Obviously, the current program for fall quarter registration is
unfair.
In previous years, early registration for fall quarter was completed
near the end of spring quarter. There seems to be no reason why this
method cannot be reinstated. Fall registration can take place at the
same time as, or immediately following, summer registration in May.
In this way, the majority of students can benefit from privileged
registration.
Plans for all registration have not yet been made by the Office of
the Registrar. Now is the time for students who feel that the present
system is unfair to voice their objections.

By Uncle Javerneck

It is probably no accident that
of the three major guarantees set
forth in the Preamble to the U.S.
Constitution life, liberty, and
the pursuit of happiness life is
mentioned first.
No credit is due any system of
government, no matter what
other rights it may afford, when
it is able, with impunity, to
abridge the right to life.
And that is the real heart of
the controversy surrounding
growing police reliance on
shoot to kill.
Shoot to kill was a reality
long before it was an issue.
Todays youth have grown up in
a world where men have been
shot in their cars without
specific evidence of any crime
greater than speeding, where
their slayers are cleared on
charges ranging from
manslaughter to poor judgement
and are back on the streets
wielding both authority and
guns.
They are living in a time
where unarmed men suspected
of felonies are shot in the back
as they run down the street.
The nation is filled, in
principle if not in fact, with
shootings of Billy Furr and
Algiers Motel Incidents.
And like the legions of tired,
impoverished, and desperate
men fighting against the weight
of the American Dream, active,
involved youth, too, are looking
down a nations gun barrel.
The increasing tendency of
the radical left to ape the tactics
of the radical right in calling for
violence and threats of violence
is not justified, yet neither is it
surprising.
Americas best political
tradition is that which assures all
men a right to justice. To keep
that promise, we have
established tremendously
sophisticated legal machinery.
We have made provisions for
12-man juries to be
painstakingly selected by both
defense and prosecution. We
have made provisions for their
protection external
tampering.
We have paid much attention
to the character and objectivity
of our judges.
We have defenders who are
willing to work without pay to
assure every man a legal defense.
We have regulations to
prevent the eliciting of a
questionable confession.
We have police who, with a
single bullet can wipe out every
development of justice since
before the star chamber.
It has happened and it will
happen again. Tragically, the
majority of the American public
seems unwilling to oppose it.
The final tragedy is that when
history indicates the point at
which the American trend of
justice was reversed, it will
probably be pointing at us.

The Florida Alligator
#"The price of froodom
is the exercise of roaponsfcHity."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Picskdlvk ave Dou e
Managing Editor
yAff Raul R am i rez Glenn Fake
jK Executive Editor News Editor
EDITORIAL
Coliseum Needs
Fund Campaign
With the departure of two UF planning directors today
to tour other Southeastern Conference activities
complexes, the first phase of an advance planning
schedule for a coliseum gets underway.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has said that if the
funds were available today it would be four and a half
years before a coliseum could be in use at the UF.
This advance planning schedule indicates that
construction of an activities center could begin sometime
in 1971, but a lack of funds could push the construction
further into the future.
While the two planning directors are visiting the other
SEC schools we hope they will be gathering information
on the funding of coliseums in addition to the physical
qualities of the buildings.
The realization of an activities coliseum at the UF will
depend upon the concentrated efforts of several special
interest groups including the Alumni Association, the
Athletic Association, and Student Government.
IFC-sponsored concerts raised several thousand dollars
for the coliseum, but there doesnt appear to be any
outward signs of fund-raising activity by other campus
organizations.
We hope the Alumni Association is working on a
program to seek contributions from UF alumni. There are
enough alumni in the state who could be approached for
donations.
When the Athletic Association mails out its order
forms for season football tickets an appeal for donations
to the coliseum fund would be effective.
Student Government could sponsor several events for
the benefit of the coliseum.
IFC could continue their benefit concert series.
Since the overall plans for a coliseum include some
form of revenue from rentals by the City of Gainesville,
the local Chamber of Commerce could initiate a fund
drive.
The list of organizations that could join in an effective
fund raising group could go on and on.
A university committee to originate and coordinate the
efforts of these interested groups should be formed and
started working immediately.
Money seems to be the main hangup with the
coliseum, and there is plenty of money available, so a
concerted fund raising campaign is in order.
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Buanw, Advertising offices in Room 330. Rote Union. Phono
382-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
"Opinioos expmnd in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not thoee of the Uafcrerdtv of Florida.



Fraternity Philanthropy Functions Foraotten

MR. EDITOR:
In reference to the numerous
recent headlines concerning
fraternity-international student
relations, I feel that the student
body should be presented with
several facts that the Alligator
somehow managed to overlook:
A full six days before
international week was
headlined at the Delta Upsilon
fraternity house (February 5,

OPEN FORUM:
~A(h)Ul ml ViMtMt
There is no hope for the complacent man.
MurrayMockers Mad

MR. EDITOR:
After reading the letter to the
editor page of your Feb. 18,
1969 issue, I feel that I must
write a letter myself.
It seems that many good
people have something against
Miss Madalyn Murray- These

Ayres Assassination Apt
MR. EDITOR:
In response to the letter titled God is Waiting, Miss Murray, by
Ben Ayres:
Is Mr. Ayres perhaps hinting with his statement I would like to
offer a quote that could occur in the very near future that some
good Christian, who has a religion based on do unto others. ..
might assassinate Miss Murray simply because she doesnt believe the
same as he does and says so?
When you think about it, you will see that the above is not at all
unlikely to happen after all, the religious world has practically
annihilated whole races (certain American Indians and Pacific
Islanders, for example) just to spread the good word. It would
'appear that religion will kill what it cant convert.
TOM KEYSER, lUC
Rockaway Rebuff Wrong,
Arouses Readers Wrath
MR. EDITOR:
Dennis Roakway (Letter to the Editor, 2-12-69) raises the old
question of Which Side Are You On in his observation that
President OConnell was ...not...noticed in attendance for any of the
(other) speakers, at last Saturday evenings Accent program. From
this and other observations he implies that our President supports the
Thurmonds and not the Morse-Douglasses.
Since the top administrator of any public institution is often
accused in public for actions which may or may not be, in fact, his
actions at all, may I set the empirical part of the record straight.
After Mr. Thurmond spoke the speakers platform was cleared, and
when the program resumed, some of the persons formerly seated on
the platform returned to those seats for Mr. Morse address. Others,
including President OConnell, took seats on the front row. Mr.
OConnell was seated there for the remainder of the program.
Although the Presidents attendance was not noticed by Mr.
Rockway, it is not true that he was absent. Furthermore, that Mr.
OConnell gave more enthusiastic applause to Mr. Thurmond than the
others remains, I feel, a purely subjective judgement of Mr. Rockway.
RRUCE ERGOOD, 7 AS
Browards Better Batter
MR. EDITOR:
On behalf of the Gator Loan Fund Project, Southeast Broward
would like to thank everyone that came to our pancake breakfast on
Sunday, February 16. Unfortunately, we had to stop serving early
because of a lack of available batter anywhere on campus. We would
also like to apologize for the slight delays in getting everyone fed. This
was due to the limited facilities that we were allowed to use.
As far as Southeast Broward is concerned, it was a big success due
to all the students and their friends and relatives that attended. Thank
you.
JOYCE MILLER
SE Broward President

Florida Alligator), the men of
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity
hosted an international student
dinner at their fraternity
residence. At least twice as many
international students were
present at this function than at
the DU affair. Invited guests
included President Stephen C.
OConnell. The after dinner
address was given by Father
Gannon of the Religion
Department. His comments were

good Christians who condemn
Miss Murray for her beliefs are
really ones to talk.
Our country is founded on
freedom of speech, religion and
the separation of church and
state among other things.
These beliefs have been
practiced by the good

built around the subject of
world peace and brotherhood.
The Sig Eps devised this
project themselves, in a true
effort to promote the
international spirit of
brotherhood, and not because
the IFC, in order to improve its
image, asked them to do so. The
story was presented to the
Alligator time after time. A
photographer and reporter were
invited. But for some reason the

Christians only when they are
themselves benefited from this
practice and they condemn it
when it goes against the grain of
their thoughts.
I do not shout, rant and rave
when a Christian comes to my
campus to talk, or when people
talk about God and go to
church. (I am a member of Miss
Murrays religion, for I call
atheism a religion 1 .)
I am tired of these Good
Christians shouting at me when
I practice my non-belief. These
Good Christians have
controlled the United States
since its beginning and look at
the shape it is in. They wage
wars, murder in the electric
chair, and kill on the battlefield
as well as the riot field, in the
name of God. Well, I dont
buy this. I refuse to see goodness
in this thing they call
Christianity.
I say that it is about time that
Miss Murray and those like her
are given a chance to help the
world without a lot of yelling.
Someone has to correct the
mistakes of these Good
Christians. The Christian way
has failed to make a world of
peace and love, and someone has
to correct it.
I am also tired of paying for
their failures out of my taxes
(and I do pay taxes) and having
my children be forced to listen
to the prayers to their God.
If they want to pray, let
them, but keep it to themselves
and not make me have to listen
to them in publically financed
places, and also make them pay
for their own churches if they
want them.
But let them understand that
this is a free country and that
there are many points of view
and all of these points of view
have a right to be heard, and (in
the words of Lloyd
Garrison, the 19th century
abolitionist editor) I shall be
heard.
C. B. REGAN
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers' names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

information never made it. Why?
The fact that the members of
one fraternity were slighted is
not important. But it is
unfortunate that a worthwhile
program directly related to
earlier Alligator headlines was
slipped under the rug. And its
deplorable that a large group of
truly interested international
students, along with our
University president and Father
Gannon, took second billing (no

Gator Greeks Get
Good Government
MR. EDITOR:
This letter is in reference to Mr. Schleifsteins letter of the 13th. It
might, perhaps have been more meaningful to me if I thought any
freshman could have a good understanding of fraternities. Obviously
Mr. Schleifstein thinks little of the Greek system, however his
complaints are completely unbased.
In the first place, Frolics are planned and presented by the IFC
(Inter-Fraternity Council) as a social event for fraternity men.
Secondly, he implies that the only honest people on campus worthy
of student government positions are GDls. This point is completely
ridiculous. The fraternities manage to govern themselves very well and
can easily contribute competent men to SG.
As far as Homecoming is concerned, I would like to know who
better than fraternity men should get good seats. The fraternities all
work for weeks on floats and decorations. There would be no
Homecoming parade or Gator Growl without the fraternities.
Although I cannot claim that every member of the football team is
in a fraternity, I am sure that the majority of them are. The
fraternities surely take a great interest in all sports at UF and can
assure the teams of large turnouts. As for your opinion of yourself,
you are only as good as you think you are.
RICHARD HERRING, DELTA SIGMA PHI
Capital Cost Curbing
Campus Colonization
MR. EDITOR:
It is unthinkable for anyone to discuss establishing new fraternity
chapters on the University of Florida campus while we are unable to
support the ones already established.
There are currently four fraternities waiting impatiently to be
allowed to colonize. Last week Phi Epsilon Pi was forced to close
because of lack of members, funds, and the inability to compete with
the larger houses.
The University of Florida fraternity system is not a typical one. On
most campuses a house of thirty or forty members is moderately large
while on this campus a house of that size is in trouble because the
competition is too high. Some chapters have over one hundred-fifty
and two hundred brothers. These houses cost between S2OO and S3OO
thousand. It is almost impossible for a small and new fraternity to get
started.
A chapter needs money and members to grow. The rich become
richer and the poor become poorer.
ANDREW KOHAN, 2UC
PHI EPSILON PI
Simplify System
MR. EDITOR:
The presently debated pass-fail option appears to be an
unnecessary addition to an already too complicated system of
academic bookkeeping.
If an honors-pass-fail system were adopted, then this would
simplify the whole matter, and would obviously contain a
built-in pass-fail option. The arithemetic conversion to a 0-4
scale is immediate. Record the three grades at 2,1 and 0
respectively and multiply the average grade by 2.
ALEXANDER DONIPHAN WALLACE
...
P.S. On second thought, the simplicity afforded by an HPF
system is too great to endear it to the academic heart. And,
moreover, its adoption would remove a really interesting bone
of contention presently being picked at jointly by faculty and
students body.

Monday, February 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

billing) to a publicity program
headlines by student speakers, a
lot of noise, and evidently, the
right people.
When the Alligator starts a
controversial issue and series of
stories, it should have the
journalistic courtesy to provide
the campus with all the
information.
CHRISTOPHER URBAN 4BA

Page 9



Page 10

l. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 24,1969

W Campus Crier I DDHIFPT
\ % SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT I 111 | 111
FLORIDA PLAYERS I
Presents I.
/\ I AN ALL FLORIDA PROFESSIONAL
/ I -.1 STUDENT LOBBY IN TALLAHASSEE
/"/ / /£ AS* /r I INTERESTED?
ft M I Applications now being accepted for:
Ift I General Chairman
I Assistant Chairman
m M I Finance Chairman
Opens tonight. <<. Research Chairman
f*"f £ / I Publicity Chairman
February 2h March 1 M ff / I Executive Secretary
CONSTANS THEATRE/ Y' ' V I ESS^ST"
Performances at 8:00 P.M. / | STUDENTS FOR RESPONSIBLE
Saturday matinee at 2:00 P o M<> a Jdhn &6U)Zn I GOVERNMENT: 33 L UNION
392-1669
Tonight! Free Night At The Rathskelle r
No Entertainment Charge SAMSONS 0001 \S
Were Holding Auditions **
Come Watch And Listen One And All Tr . 111/N m/
TEAMWORK
Tue. Brian Page (Great)
Wed. 7th Chord Rick,Kitty & Jamie The SAMSON TEAM
Thur. The Blue Lining
That Fantastic Sound tIGGCIS
Fri. Stephanie Spencer
Dan Flynn &Mike Foley Volunteers Interested In:
(Double Feature)
Sat. Joe Whalen Quintet l Accounting
With Fran /"'N Adult Education
U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc. (ugrvA I Arts Crafts
K.itiiautiiti zf
NOTICES
j
All Junior College Transfers interested in working with the
Department of Junior College Affaris-We want your ideas,
Poll workers are needed for the Special Election to be held on opinions and suggestions in improving the transfer process and in
March 5, 1969. Applications may be picked up this week only in encouraging J.C. students to transfer to the U.F. call
the Student Government office, 305 Reitz Union. 392-1665 or 392-7640.
have a question or a problem ?
The Public Functions Authority announces that applications for I call
the chairman and vice-chairman of Accent 70 are available at the
Student Activities desk of the Reitz Union. Deadline for return of
the applications is Friday Feb. 28, 1969 at 5:00. All applications mv
should be returned to Mrs. McLeod, Room 305 Reitz Union.
392-1650 student gvt.
i L. . ..
be sure to leave name, address & phone no.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
YAMAHA 60cc 1967 in excellent
condition, tool box and helmet
included, $175. Phone 372-8077.
(A-3t-86-P)
Guns gunsgunsInventory over
450 buy sell trade repair.
Reloading supplies, custom reloading
Harry Beckwith, Gun Dealer,
Micanopy 466-3340 (A-ts-69-P)
HONDA 68 S9O Like New 2500
Miles $325. Call 378-3068 after 5.
Must sell 6 mo old Vivitar 35mm to
2'/4 condenser enlarger with two
lenses and carriers. Call 378-4817
after 5 pm. (A-3t-88-P)
ZIG-ZAG sewing machine $25.
Hi-intensity make-up mirror $lO.
Clothes (size 7-8). Shoes (6-7),
Slacks, blouses, sweaters, coats. $.50
& up. 378-7152. (A-3t-87-P)
BMWR 27 Excellent condition. Call
392-3500 8:30-4:00 or see at 2020
N.W. 31st PL. (A-st-86-p)
MUST SELL 10 X 50 mobile home 2
brm very nice come and see washer
included. Front kitchen 2150 or
make offer after 5 o'clock 372-5742.
Arrendondo Estate. (A-st-86-p)
12 x 50 1968 Parkwood fully
carpeted, early American A.C. must
sell! Equity, take over reasonable
pymts. 378-0701 after 5. (A-st-85-P)
Portable TV B & W good reception
$45. Call 3 78-7857 after 6.
(A-st-89-P)
Mobile home Bx3o. Occupancy in the
spring quarter. See at Lot L 3, 3860
Archer Rd. SW Town and Country or
call 392-3082 from 8 to 4. L. Shaw.
(A-st-89-P)
1964 New Moon trailer, 10x50, air
conditioned, screen porch, front
kitchen and 2 bedrooms. 392-1823
day, 372-7976 after 5 p.m. $2500.
(A-2t-89-P)
Yamaha 250 cc. Like new br green
white naga seat new tires, chain
sprocket, brakes. Excellent
condition. $350. Call 376-9271.
George Room 15. (A-3t-89-P)
wSHmvr
7:40 I
9 5 iTheWrecking?
% Crew M
held over%
IE 2nd WEEK
I'sslSl BeIIe;
3:50 j. Ml R
||| WINNER BEST PICTURE
9:40 VENICE FILM FESTIVAL I
: jf!y 1

ALIBI LOUNGE
EVERY MONDAY
29< HIGHBALLS
-V
"It's a good excuse''

FOR SALE |
DO IT UNDER-WATER! Scuba tank,
wts, and reg. only $l4O. A real steal.
Call now 376-5133 ask for Weird
Jaw. Do it now. Its only a Northern
song. (A-3t-89-P)
I-X-NNS-r.-.;-;.;.;.;.:.:.;.:.:...;....,..........,..
FOR RENT
SUBLET LARGE 2 br aircond. new
furn. 2 blocks from campus 120.
Now to Sept. Call Dave 378-0286 or
Carl 378-2128. (B-st-87-P)
--
Modern one-bedroom, air
conditioned apt. for married couple 3
blocks from campus. $96 per month.
Call 376-1803 (B-3t-88-P)
Luxurious living in high rise api.
complex just a few blocks from
campus. Now renting at La Fontana
Apts. Call 378-0372 or see at 207
N.W. 17th St. Apt. 506. (B-st-86-p)
2 bdrm apt, 2 blocks from campus,
must sublet spring and summer qtrs,
$l4O month, washing machine. Call
372-6559 between 5 and 7 p.m. and
after 11 p.m. (B-85-86-p)
Efficiency apartment suitable for
one, two or three. AC pool 1512 NW
5 Ave. Thru third quarter or longer
$75 per month. Call 376-8990.
(B-10t-80-P)
Sublet College Terrace Apt.
Immediate occupancy preferred will
sacrifice rest of quarters rent + util,
or S4O. Call Rick 378-4532 weekend
or before 2 daily. (B-4t-88-P)
Sublet Camelot apt. 2 seniors want 2
coeds to share 2 bedroom 2 bath apt
overlooking pool. Most spacious floor
plan and Spanish decor. Call
378-8458 for further information.
(B-st-88-P)
Sublet furnished 2br apt Summit
House. Central heat & air, wall to
wall carpet. Ist months rent free.
Call 376-4152 between 5 & 6:30.
(B-st-85-P)
Furnished two bedroom 1 bath house
for rent, air conditioned $125 a mo.
Call 392-1575 before 5 or 378-6829
5:30 and weekends. (B-st-89-P)
Furn. 2 br apt. Camelot Sublet or
assume lease, aft. March. Ideal for 2,
3 or 4. 372-7463 aft 5 p.m.
(B-3t-89-P)
Must sub-lease immediately my share
spacious 2-br furn. University
Gardens apt. $42.50 mo. Call Steve
378-9728. (B-st-89-P)
WANTED I
2 female roommates to share 2 bdrm
apt. spring and summer qtrs. 2 blocks
from campus $lO5 qtr. 372-6559
btwn 5 and 7 p.m. and after 11 p.m.
(c-Bt-86-p)
One roommate for French Quarter
Apt. spring quarter. No. 82 on pool.
Call 378-5125. (C-2t-89-P)
1 wannk bicycle, damn it!!!!! Cash
for mens 3 or 5-speed. Get rid of
that piece of junk while you can,
moron! Call 372-6598. (C-2t-89-P)
Need 1 roommate for Ig 2 br apt. AC
carpeted must be seen to be
appreciated have your own bedrm.
Call 376-8312 ask for Bob. Avail for3
quarter. (C-3t-89-P)
2 Roommates for spring quarter,
males. Williamburg apt. Finest living
in Gville. Air cond, pool, dishwasher.
Call Apt. 41, 376-9719. (C-st-89-P)
1 coed roommate for Spring qtr.
Starlight apt 3 blocks from campus
approx $33/month. Call after 4 p.m.
preferred, 378-3449. (C-st-89-P)
LANDMARK Male roommate
needed. Available March 1. March
rent paid. Call 378-3120, apt. 170.
(C-10t-88-P)

Monday, February 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
*x-nvx x*x*xxx<<<*x x*x*x*x*x*!xssm
Male roomate needed in spacious
Gatortown apt. 3 bed 2 bath 52.50
mo. Call Bill after 5 378-6873 open
March and spring quarter. (C-3t-88-P)
Need 1 female roommate March 1.
Good location, own room. Call
anytime 376-5589. (C-2t-88-P)
HELP WANTED
XT-!X!>xyxyx-:*x.:.:.s:xsyxwyx*>X*s
DRAFTSMAN part time fast
neat hand lettering required. Call
W.J. Kessler, Associates Consulting
Engineers, 376-3157. (E-2t-89-P)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1-hr session. Mlist be native
English-speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University Ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5. JE-10t-71-C)
AUTOS |
1967 Rambler Rebel sta wgn low
mileage 4 speed floor shift air cond
power brakes and steering fm radio a
real buy! Call 378-7393 after 5 pm.
(G-st-85-P)
LIKE NEW Beautiful 65 Falcon
Futura 2 door hardtop 6 cyl radio
automatic new wsw. Must sell A real
bargain. Call 392-1473 or 3725703.
(G-7t-86-p)
62 Comet automatic, radio, heater, 4
door, very good condition, S4OO. Call
378-7857 after 6. (G-st-89-P)
1966 MG Midget. Wire wheels and
tonneau. 21,000 miles. Book price
$1125. Phone 376-7947 after 5 and
weekends. (G-st-89-P)
1960 Buick LeSabre, V-8, automatic
transmission, power brakes &
steering. Call Flipper 372-0491. See
at 1125 SW 2nd Avenue. G-4t-89-P)
'63 MG Midget. Well cared for brand
new Pr el I i tires. Best offer. Call
378-7996. (G-st-89-P)
vvX-x-x-y.y.sv.viYX'XX-x-x.v.r.v.svXvX-iv
PERSONAL
£ 8
.vX*x*x-x*ss*xx*X*x*x>x.x*ssvsNsx*>>
CELEBRATION needs you, if you
are interested in planning the largest
exhibition of music, dance, drama,
and visual arts in Florida history.
Pick up an application at the Student
Activities Desk, Reitz Union; the
Office of the Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts; or in
Rifl. 129, Tigert Hall. (J-st-87-P)
Girls, put STYLE into your wardrobe
with a 100% wool ruana or cape from
Columbia. Capes come in several
styles with two types of collar or no
collar, and come in colors to
compliment any wardrobe. The capes
and ruanas are really worth seeing at
the SPANISH MAIN, W.
University Ave. 372-0667. (J-st-85-P)
SiSali
[ W. VV. T3*. Sf. \
4 You cant tC|
fealfj f escape r
Stalking L
\ GREGORY PECK
%^JEVA^ARIE^^
WZ \
jr 4i
m fixer j
it Based on the Pulitzer £
Prize winning novel
by Bernard Malamud
***@U+* ;
[ Powwf OafamHto 1
| Hi W. UrtwnHr 4v I |M|
HI DAZZLING!\
Picture \
Wr > v of the
A Month |
_ Sevenfeen
jgiaa 1

Page 11

frx>X"X*NSNNSYXsxw<*x*x-x*x*x-NVM:.
§ PERSONAL
iv X
i J-x*x-NSfw; ; x*x*xyxy:*>x:-y-y-NS?;%yx X*
Dear LEG: Happy 18th & thanks for
the sth. Best of luck as we start on
the 19th & 6th. B.G. my definition.
Love, ARM. (J-lt-89-P)
Havirtg trouble with a language?
Maybe the Student Tutor Society can
help you. Call 378-6358 for more
information. (J-lt-89-P)
*.%v;y;-xyxyx*:*x<*x-x-:-:-x*x*x-x-x-xv
| LOST & FOUND |
Would the person who stole the tape
recorder from Ridgeway Roof Truss
Co. please return the tape. There is a
SIOO.OO reward. (L-2t-88-P)
:j!*x-x-yiyxyx*x*x*x*xy.v.*x*x*x*xx"xyy
SERVICES
w.%y;yxsxxsy.yxyxx*x*y*y.y.v. xyx x*x*:
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next eye
glasses at University Opticians, 526
SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound Bus
Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-C)
Tennis Racket restringing,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-P)

BREATHTAKING, I recommend
HACBARP Ck*'. VSB
£riIANE m jVj
I STATE 3 E ASTMAN COl OR \'[ |
jf Trapped in the deadly game ITT] CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
Vig||H of murder with the l lv j ,p/kiH| i a orwny
. 1 £Jm?%K women who played the game LAIViIILn oTnnV
THE H/CH COMMISSIONER
MONDAY SPECIAL
Supper only j
Boiled Shrimp
all-you-can-eat
$149 |
, I
TUESDAY SPECIAL
Supper only
Fried Chicken
all-you-can-eat
ja "<
I MORRISON'S 1
j CAFETERIAS
HoFmtFoc<£. ANYWHfREf GAINESVILLE MALL j

SERVICES
v >
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
g 3 HOtKOt SHOWS
01 nnnnmffrl
j > Plum] DKIHttP j



Page 12

!, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, February 24,1f169

I W ~ss| .*3
. "^
£ ' 1
S'
fl;
i \
| ?
2 £..##s%& W ,.
p 4 # # lift
<*/ vr ;; 4, i§^
STEWART SOLOMAN AND JANICE HOBBS
... play two of the survivors in "After the Rain"
'After The Rain
Opens Tonight
j*
Natural selection is responsible for the flood, Mr. Armitage, and
by natural selection certain people will survive it. I shall be one of
them. So will you, as long as you obey me.
An so it is when the curtain goes up for After The Rain in the
Constans Theatre tonight for the first of seven performances. Curtain
time is 8.
The play begins 200 years after the great flood of 1970 in a
university lecture hall. The lecturer, a historian, tells the story of the
flood and the nine people who survived it. To aid him, he has brought
in nine criminals who act out the parts of the original survisors under
a strange hypnotic trance.
After The Rain is a satire about the origin of mans
institutions, said Rick Council who portrays the lecturer.
In the play, the survivors of the catastrophic flood are forced to
build a new society. All they have to guide them the rafts log book
and the Book of Arthur.
Who is Arthur? Arthur is one of the survivors and a most important
character in After The Rain.
Tickets are available at the Union Box Office.
STRAWBERRY PIE
gp&ML
NOW THRU SUNDAY
FRESH STRAWBERRIES IN
f Vy?J?L A VELVETY GLAZE HEAPED
in a tender flaky
JaTiSe r'JN. crust and topped
/fmj hbSl with a creamy
r WHIPPED TOPPING
*
REG. 45c VALUE
2310 S. W. 13th Street 1505 N. W. 13th Street

Rock And Roll Friday

An unusual rock and roll
concert, a fantastic light show,
dancing and a painted go-go girl
contest will take place Friday in
the Reitz Union Ballroom.
Sponsored by the Union
Program Council, the New York
Rock and Roll Ensemble will be
featured at this program.
This group is composed of
five artists. Three have been
trained at the Juilliard School of
Music and two are self-taught
rock musicians.
The New York Rock and Roll
Ensemble has taken the concepts
of the old masters and
interweaved them with
contemporary and avant-garde
music.
The Riff, a popular dance
band, will play for dancing after
the concert. They feature The
most fantastic light show in the

I HOUSE OF TRAVEL I
I complete travel services I
credit cards accepted ] \
I specializing in cruises J J I
I representing all major J I/§ I
airlines 4|/ ,i j JJ
I no service charge / I
I OPEN DAILY: 3415 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
I 8:30 A M.-5:30P.M. GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA 1
I SATURDAY VESTSIDE I
I 9 AAA -NOON SHOPPING CENTER 1
B I

country.
Organizations and individuals
are invited to enter a painted
go-go girl contest.

I BREAKFAST SPECIAL I
I 6AM-11 AM MON. FRI. I
I 2 EXTRA LARGE EGGS I
I GRITS-TO AST Mi%* I
I JELLYCOFFEE I
I R iA I
I 3 NOT CAKES fiT _,A I
I COFFEE I
I 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I

To enter, the girls name and
sponsoring group (if any) should
be turned into room 310 of the
Union.



Frolics Audience Assaulted By Fudge

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
Friday night a crowd of 5,000
was literally assaulted by the
sounds of the Vanilla Fudge
physically, emotionally and
sensually.
For an hour and a half The
Fudge blasted musical
innovations, interpretations and
experimentation to the Winter
Frolics audience with more total
involvement than any
performers this writer has ever
seen.
We want to see just how
much sound we can get out of
four people, one of the Fudge
commented. And, with a set of
drums, electric bass, lead guitar
and organ, and 16 amplifiers (at
least) they get more than
enough.
Their music is most definitely
not the type to be given rave
notices. It is not that simple.
They choose for vocals
well-known tunes so that the
emphasis is on arrangement and
music rather than words.
Emotionalism is the key to
evaluation. The group readily
admits that their aim is to get
the audience involved in their
music. Therefore the amount of
involvement determines the
degree of pleasure.
Mimic and comedian David
Frye opened Frolics to a rather

HIK ilk; '
/sm K j |
Kyi
* m jSL
TOM KENNEDY
THE VANILLA FUDGE
... tried to produce the most sound possible with four people
1 WONOER I
I HOUSE I
I RESTAURANT I
I SPECIALS GOOD ALL WEEK I
I K.C. STEAK I
I W/SALAD, VEGETABLE fT^\|
f & POTATO JV/I
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IW/ SAIAC} VEGETABLE O I
liPOTATO
I BAKED LASAGNA {
fW/MEATBALLS I & SALAD
I 14 SW IST STREET f

lukewarm audience. However,
the mood of the group changed
proportionately to the unfolding
of his if not polished
multiple impressionistic talents.
If one has seen Frye at all on
television he recognized almost
all of his material from those
appearances. Although he tried
his hand at joke-telling, his forte
is truly the mime. And, for this,
the audiences accolades were
well deserved.
With a pliable face and vocal
chords he captured the likes of
Brando, Kirk Douglas,
gravel-voiced Walter Brennan,
John Wayne (even for a short
Jewish boy). William Buckley,
Rod Steiger (an imitator
himself) and the present-day
political figures Johnson,
Humphrey, Wallace, Rockefeller
and President Nixon.
Constantly complimenting the
audience for its ability to
appreciate unsubtle, off-color
jokes and comments, his biting
satire attacked each of the
imitated.
Although not yet truly
polished and comfortable on
stage his craft has improved
since earlier television
performances. Frye exited to an
appreciative audience.
After intermission, the Vanilla
Fudge appeared. Some people
began exiting at the end of the
first number. Others were not as

SOME WALKED OUT

kind and left during numbers.
What was more interesting
however was the fact that as
these people walked out, there
were others coming in to take
their places.
The Fudges music is not
danceable. Neither is it singable.
One must groove to it. To say
that a you like it or even
understand is not really
necessary.
If you could sense as many
did that you were in the
middle of something happening
and you felt the music, then
the reaction was positive.
Although plagued by
numerous mechanical problems
(i.e. feedback from the mikes,
the organ cutting off, a broken
guitar string) they performed
number after number with
enthusiasm and involvement for
an increasingly appreciative
audience.
Perhaps the best number was
Dick H LMEi I
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STAR-SEARCH69
COLLEGE REVUE AUDITIONS FOR SIX FLAGS OVER GEORGIA
If you're a singer, dancer, musician, have an act or a performing specialty
of any sort come try out! This could be your big year ... at Six Flags
Oyer Georgia. This great Atlanta family amusement center needs fresh
new singers, dancers, novelty quartets and trios, individual talent for the
Crystal Pistol, and strolling entertainers. Youll work for a full season at a
minimum salary of $70.00 per week, under topnotch professional direction
a great chance, a great season, great fun. Hundreds of thousands of
people see these shows every year. So whatever your act is show us your
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Piano accompaniment, record players, and tape recorders will be pro provided
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FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 3:30 P.M. / Room 342, Music Building / Florida State
University / Tallahassee, Florida.
Six FLAGS
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the Break Song from their last
album which is really a jam
session featuring each of the
members of the group as
virtuosos.
This terms Frolics was a
success because this Frolics was
truly unique for the UF. Few
pop groups are as atypical or as
controversial when it comes to
reactions as the Vanilla Fudge.
SHANNONS
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Monday, February 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Hopefully this will mark the
first in a series of presentations
of modern-day entertairlment
representing a variety of musical
interpretations.
Miller-Brown I
I
ONE MILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL
376-4552 AUTHORIZED I
dealer I

Page 13



Page 14

LThiFjofjdaAlliflatof. Monday. February 24. 1969

The UF basketball squad will be shooting for its
seventh straight Southeastern Conference win
tonight over the humble Mississippi Rebels in
Oxford on the eve of first round invitations to the
National Invitational Tournament.
The Gators tagged Coach Cob Jarvis boys with
an easy 8866 loss here last month and a win
tonight could boost their hopes for a bid to the
prestigious post season tournament.
Though Tennessee still clings to the second place
spot in conference action, there is speculation that
tournament directors may want a pair of teams
from the SEC.
The NIT selection committee is expected to
announce its first picks tomorrow but continues its
bids right up til the week before play begins.
The hot Gators began the weekend march

Despite Mark McKees record
breaking performance, UF
Saturday was unable to repeat as
champions of the three day
Southern Intercollegiate swim
meet.
Southern Illinois, which led
all the way, toppled the Gators
with 461 team points. FSU
eased by the UF in the final
days competition to place

Gator Golfers Even Season Mark
With 4-Way Victory At Tampa

The UF golf team Saturday emerged victorious
from a four-way match tournament in Tampa
defeating teams from South Florida, Rollins and St.
Leo Universities.
This was the defending NCAA champion Gators
first win in team competition after a close early
season loss to FSU.
With one man from each school in each of six
foursomes, UF racked up total team scores of 15-3
against USF and Rollins and 14 and one half to
three and one half against St. Leo.

Ron Falls To Fourth

It had to end someday.
Thats the way Track Coach
Jimmy Carnes looked at ace high
jumper Ron Jourdans
disappointing showing in the
U.S. Olympics Invitational meet
in Madison Square Garden
Friday night.

Badminton Tourney Slated
To Begin Friday

On Friday and Saturday there
will be a campus-wide
badminton tournament for all
students and faculty members.
It will include mens singles
and doubles, womens singles
and doubles, and mixed doubles.
Trophies will be awarded in each
division.
Equipment will be furnished
by the Intramural Department
and tournament badminton
shuttlecocks will be used.
Participation is encouraged for
all who are interested.
The Norman Gym is reserved
by the Badminton Club for
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Gators Shootina At NIT Berth

McKEE.WILLIAMS BREAK RECORDS
Gators Third In SIC Swim

second with 433*A. The Gators
accumulated 414 Vi points for
third place in the seven-team
field.
McKee snapped his own
record in splashing to first place
in the 200-yard breaststroke
with a 2:15.4 clocking.
In Fridays competition the
Gators tried to make a
comeback getting impressive

Jourdans streak of 11 straight
wins came to a halt Friday with
his fourth place Finish at the
meet with a jump of 6-10.
The Gator star had cleared the
seven foot barrier ten of 11
times this indoor season. He lost
Friday night to Ed Caruthers of

practice every Friday evening
from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Tournament participants are
encouraged to attend.
Please register for your
division in the Intramurals
Office, Rm 229 of the gym.
Players may participate in
more than one division.

*m m i - - --
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GLIDE BY MSU 96-79

through the delta state with a 96-79 televised
trouncing of Mississippi State in Starkville Saturday.
Outrebounded- and well-defensed in first half
action with only seven points, center Neal Walk
finished strong with 29 points to pace the Gators.
The Gators led from the opening tipoff, broke
easily through a full court press by the Rebels and
led all the way.
I was surprised that State took 11 more shots
than us in the first half because they were matching
us off the boards, said Head Coach_ Tommy
Bartlett. But we were able to beat the press pretty
well and force them to the outside so we could get
Neal the ball.
Walk hit 22 points in the second half, mostly
from within the key.
Hot handed Andy Owens contributed 26 points;

Two UF frosh led the Gators and the tourney
with scores of 73. Gators David Barnes and Andy
North hit for the one over par 73s, on the tough
South Florida par 72 course.
No one has ever broken par on this course, said
Golf Coach Buster Bishop. The course is two years
old.
UFs Richard Spears shot a 77 and John Sale hit a
78.
The Gators return to Tampa next weekend for
the Florida Intercollegiate Tournament. Bishop said
he plans to take two teams for the tourney.

wins from Bruce Williams, who
set a pool and meet record in
winning the 200-butterfuly, and
Barry Russo, who took the
200-butterfly.
Bill Dorney, a Gator swimmer
who is competing unattached,
won the 100-backstroke and the
200-backstroke. Dorney is a
transfer from the University of
Michigan and must sit out one

the Pacific Coast Club, who
cleared 7-2. Prior to Caruthers
jump, Jourdan had been the
only U.S. jumper to clear 7-2
this year.
Caruthers was runner up in
the U.S. Olympics last summer.
Jourdan had beat him regularly
in several meetings this season.
Ron has been on such a
rough schedule every weekend,
we knew it would catch up with
him one day and his streak
would be interrupted. But Im
sure he will make a comeback,
Carnes said.

Boyd Welsch had 19. Manual Washington paced the
losers with 18 points while Jim Martin also hit for
18.
The Gators expected more trouble from
Mississippi State than Mississippi on the road trip,
especially after what many consider their easiest win
against the Rebels earlier at home. The win against
Mississippi State left Coach Bartletts crew with a
105 conference mark.
Remaining conference games after tonights
Gator clash away are both at home against Georgia
and Alabama while second place Tennessee must
face Auburn, Vanderbilt and Kentucky all on the
road. After the Vols meet Louisiana State tonight at
Knoxville.
The Baby Gators handed Miami-Dade a 7368
loss Friday night.

year before he can compete for
the Gators.^
The times of McKee, Williams
and Russo were good enough to
qualify them for the NCAA
championship meet to be held
March 27-29 in Bloomington,
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*' in i



Ur May Have A Big 'Jerk In 72 Olympics

BOB FAVREAU
...a Namath of sorts

By CHUCK PARTUSCH l|
Alligator Sports Writer
Would you believe that a guy'
who stands 5-3 and weighs
only 131 could lift 240 lbs.
over his head?
... it is hard to believe, but Bob
Favreau can do it and with
consistency.
Favreau recently broke five
state power-lifting records at an
open meet at Daytona Beach
held Jan. 11.
To set one new state record
Favreau deadlifted which
means bringing the barbells from
the floor to your waist and then
pulling the shoulders back
square in one quick motion
440 lbs!
Fie totaled combined scores
of the bench press, squat and
deadlift 935 lbs. for the
second state record!
The three other records
Favreau broke were broken
again later in the competition
after he was finished.
Eighteen-year-old Favreau
isnt exactly a newcomer to
weightlifting, as he began lifting
at the age of twelve when his
cousin got him interested in the
sport. But he is a newcomer as
far as being in weightlifting
tournaments are concerned, he
didnt enter his first tournament
until last summer.
I was the smallest guy in my
elementary school, Favreau
chuckles now. Thinking back six
years and why he started to lift
weights he said I decided that
strength would be a valuable
asset for a small guy like
myself.
Especially in a fight!
Although Favreau doesnt
look much bigger now, he is
much stronger, in fact hes all
131 lbs. of power. Anyone that
can lift his own weight and more
has to be pretty damned strong!
Not only has weightlifting
been responsible for Favreau's
strength, but it has given him
confidence in himself and not
a cocky confidence either, he
just knows that he can handle
most situations he finds himself
in.
I intend to take the
power-lifting championships in
my class this year at the state
meet, Favreau said. But I have
no intention of becoming a
power-lifter. Im training to be
an Olympic lifter because Im
planning to make the 1972 U. S.
Olympic Weightlifting Team,
he is quick to add.
I'm only going to compete in
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FRESHMAN FAVREAU. NO 'DUMBBELL*

k ¥ I
\V M /
( #
the state power-lifting
championships to help me gain
experience in lifting before
crowds, Favreau explains.
Sometimes Favreau sounds
like the Joe Namath of amateur
weightlifting?
But it is his cool confidence in
himself that makes him know
that he can do well. Last year in
the second meet he had ever
competed in which were the
1968 National AAU Teenage
Championships in Philadelphia
held June 30 lie finished 2nd
-(a
in the 123 lbs. Olympic form
class behind Dane Hussey, top
lifter in the United States in this
weight division.
Olympic style consists of the
press lifting the bells from the
floor to the shoulders in one
motion and then second motion
of lifting the bells overhead
while the feet are in a straight

Get Cage Tickets Tuesday |

Students can pick up tickets
for the Georgia and West
Virginia basketball games
Tuesday between 2:30-8 p.m.
The Georgia game will be
played in Florida Gym March I
and the West Virginia contest
will be played March 3 in the
Jacksonville Coliseum.

The MAN Himself
In His
V-
Most FAMOUS Role
MY
LITTLE
CHICADEE
Where Else

* line with the knees locked the
snatch one motion lift from
the floor to arms length
overhead and finally the clean
and jerk which is the heaviest
lift and most eye catching to the
girls of the three consists of
lifting the bells from the floor to
the area of the clavicles in one
motion and then doing a split to
get under the weight of the bells
at arms length overhead.
Favreaus chief ambition this
year is to break the national
teenage featherweight clean and
jerk record of 280 lbs., set by
Russel Knipp, U.S. Olympic
competitor.
Favreau recently won the
Sunshine State Championships,
held Feb. 1 in Miami, where he
lifted 240 lbs. in the clean and
jerk, so he doesnt have far to go
before he breaks the national
record!
Just as a side note dont let
Favreaus physical strength and
ability lead you to believe that
its all gone to his head. His 3.3
grade point average in his first
quarter at UF dispels any ideas
of his being a dumbbell.
In fact hes a teacher. Well .
not exactly the kind of teacher
one secs in school. He teaches
guys how to lift weights
propeily without straining a gut
unnecessarily. Theres a right
way and a wrong way to lift
weights, and the wrong way is
when you dont know what
youre doing. Favreau tries to
teach and show how to lift the
right way. Whether you are
trying to develop strength or
body si/e to look good.

seating assignments will be
issued at Gate 13 ticket windows
on the eastside of the stadium.
Identification and fee cards
must be presented for the
purpose of identification.
Student date tickets for both
games may be picked up by one
student with his dates
identification cards.

Any interested weightlifters
should contact Favreau as he is
trying to gain support to get the
UF a weightlifting team and
coach Favreau explained that
weightlifting is a NCAA sport
and that All the Northern

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Oysters & Clams on the half shell M
Michelob on draft My
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Reservations accepted Sjfcf
Harry M. Lanton, Manager
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Monday, February 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

schools have teams and
coaches.
Come to the Fla. Gym
weight-room any Monday,
Wednesday or Friday between
the hours of 59, and ask for
Bob Favreau.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 24,1969

Lee Roys Ford
Charges Charlie
DAYTONA BEACH (UPI) Handsome Lee Roy Yarbrough of
Columbia, S.C. swept past Charlie Glotzbach in the final turn Sunday
to win the $208,000 Daytona 500 stock car race by a hair before
101,821 fans. He drove a 1969 Ford.
Yarbrough, who played bridesmaid here twice last year as he
finished second in two big races, swept past Charging Charlie from
Georgetown, Ind. in a 1969 Dodge Charger.
Defending champion Cale Yarborough of Timmonsville, S.C., who
was looking for fourth victory in a row of the high-banked
superspeedway here, slammed into the wall after 260 miles and was
knocked out of the race. He suffered a cut nose and an injured foot.
Its the dream of a lifetime come true, said Yarbrough, who
dueled for the last 60 miles with Glotzbach bumper-to-bumper for the
$37,125 winning purse in the richest stock car race ever.
Glotzbach picked up $15,225 and third place finisher Donnie
Allison of Hueytown, Ala., won $9,625 in his 1969 Ford.
Yarbrough, who made a 22-second pit stop with 60 miles to go and
turned the lead over to Glotzbach, said, I knew I had the power to
catch him I had faith in my car.
A total of only three seconds separated the two cars with seven
miles to go and then Yarbrough swept past Glotzback to win.
The average speed of the race was a record 157.950 miles per hour
but Yarbrough and Glotzbach were sweeping around the track at an
average of 189 mph a lap at the end.
The old race record was 154.334 set by Richard Petty in 1966.
Pole sitter Buddy Baker was making a run at leaders late in the race
but spun around on pit road as he headed for a pit stop and lost
valuable time.
A.J. Foyt of Houston, Tex., was fourth in the race in a 1969 Ford.
Baker was fifth.
Yarborough was in second place behind Donnie Allison at the
halfway point of the race and was challenging for the lead when he
slapped into the wall running off the fourth turn in front of the
grandstand.
He was taken to a hospital but was later released after X-rays
showed his left foot was not broken.
It was a happy day for Yarbrough, who was passed by Yarborough
in the last lap of the 1968 500, the world series of stock car racing,
and lost by only five car lengths.
The largest crowd ever to gather for a sporting event in the South
watched the 500 where stock car driver Don MacTavish of Dover,
Mass, died in a spectacular wreck during a 300-mile race Saturday.

Defending Indianapolis 500
champion A1 Unser of
Albuquerque, N.M. was one of
the early favorites to leave the
race when he smashed his black,
No. 13 Ford into the wall on the
backstretch after 140 miles.
Veteran Paul Goldsmith also
slapped the wall in his Dodge
and was knocked out.
Other favorites who dropped
out were Bobby Allison of
Huey town, Ala., whose Dodge
Charger blew an engine; Pete
Hamilton of Dedham, Mass.,
whose Dodge spun out of the
race and Bobby Isaac of
Catawba, N.C., who slapped the
wall in his Dodge.
Ping Pong
Tourney
At Union
Starting on Monday, there
will be a campus-wide Table
Tennis Tournament for students
and faculty. The divisions will
include mens singles and
doubles, womens singles and
doubles and mixed doubles.
Trophies will be awarded in each
division.
Competition will begin at
4:00 p.m. each day in the Reitz
Union and end at 6:00 p.m. The
matches will be two out of three
for the single elimination
tournament.
Interested participants are
asked to register for their
division at the Intramural Office
Room 229 Florida Gym. Players
may participate in more than
one division.

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McDonalds,
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OMcOoiwM Corp 1968
201 N.W. 13th St.

Two Convenient Locations
Special Prices thru Tues. Feb.2s
| INSTANT COFFEE 79<
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PORK LOIN SLICED PORK CHOPS LB. 59*
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BEEF CHUCK STEAK BONE IN LB. 69*
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HEADLESS GREEN SHRIMP LB. 99i
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PARKAY SOFT OLEO 39
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GRAPE JUICE 6oz.can 5/1.00
ARISTOCRAT
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DAWN FRESH
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DESSERT TOPPING <>,- 39*
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SHAVING CREAM 59*
ANGEL SOFT
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FIRM GOLDEN BANANAS 104
YELLOW ONIONS >->. 194
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