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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
BY WHOPPING MAJORITY
Senate OK's Demonstration Policy


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PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 88

TO CHAMPION FROM FACULTY SENATE
FSU Ultimatum Only Rumor

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The case of Florida State
Universitys mysterious
ultimatum was cleared up
Thursday.
The ultimatum, according to a
Tuesday Orlando Sentinel
article, was supposedly handed
Dr. John E. Champion just
before he quit his post as FSU
president Monday night.
The article said the
ultimatum, which presumably
came from the schools faculty
senate, gave Champion the
choice of resigning or face a
mass faculty walkout.
But, in an Alligator telephone
interview Thursday, the senates
steering committee chairman,
Dr. Paul Piccard, said, The
senate hasnt met since January.
There was no official action.
FSU Student Body President
Canter Brown told the Alligator
Thursday, There were rumors
that a measure censuring
Champion would be introduced
in the senate.
However, they were only
rumors, Brown said. No action
was taken since Champion
resigned.
Champion had been the focus
of controversy since last spring
when he censored a campus
literary magazine for using
four-letter words.
His resignation was preceeded
by several administration
walkouts last week.
He had also been the butt of
complaints after he vetoed
campus recognition of a
Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS) chapter last fall.
Champion cited the elements
of discord with certain portions
of the university not in accord
with me in his resignation
letter.
Piccard agreed that most of
the activities in the
administration are interelated

UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETS IN WALKER AUDITORIUM IN PRIVATE
... picture taken before senate meeting started

The
Florida Alligator

Jjr
i|||H|.J|
JOHN CHAMPION
... an ultimatum?
to Champions departure.
But, an editorial in

Megill, Greenman Outstanding Profs

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Two controversial faculty members have won
landslide victories in the Most Outstanding
Professor Award contest sponsored by the
Interfraternity Council.
Dr. Kenneth A. Megill and Dr. J. R. Greenman
overwhelmed their competitors for the
nomination in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences
and Agriculture respectively.
Megill took first place with more votes than
any two vying nominees, said Project
Coordinator John Mica.
An official ballot count was not available
Thursday. More than 5,000 students voted in
their college for what they thought represented
an outstanding UF professor.
One professor from each of the 10 colleges
was chosen with Megill being the overall winner
in the contest.
At the recent Accent Symposium, Megill
advocated student control of UF and called black
power the most significant political force of this
century.

University of Florida, Gainesville

Wednesdays Sentinel, Piccard
said, Cuts the man (Champion)
up.
He cited an article retracting
the ultimatum charge printed in
the Sentinel the same day but
said, Apparently the editorial
paid no attention to it.
It was not a hard
retraction, he said. The
Sentinel was rather irrational.
The editorial said in part that
Champion was, in short, and
despite the emotion which
surrounded his earlier
resignation, not the man for the
job.
Champion quit last spring
over the literary magazine
obscene words crisis, but later
withdrew his resignation.
Brown said Champion not

LANDSLIDE VICTORIES

Several state legislators have reacted to Megills
statements with demands that he be fired trom
post at UF.
Dr. Harry Sisler, College of Arts and Sciences
dean, is reviewing statements made by Megill for
possible recommendations for action to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
Florida Blue Key has asked three legislators to
come to an open meeting where both sides of the
controversy can be presented.
Dr. J. R. Greenman, author of the Greenman
Resolution, had little competition from
associates in his college, according to Mica.
Greenman has been attacked for his
establishment stand on student
demonstrations.
The whereas points made in his resolution
caused protest from student leaders.
They included: institutions like UF have
become vulnerable to the actions of minorities
who have violated the rights of the large majority
by direct, illegal and violent actions; and that
appeals for proper democratic discussions and
for legal and orderly procedures seem ineffective
(SEE 'MEGILL' PAGE 2)

Friday, February 21, 1969

only lost his communication
with the students and faculty
but lost their respect and trust,
also.
When Champion resigned
Brown called him a frightened
man.
He was no longer effective as
president, Brown said.
Part of the rising tide of
dissention over Champion can be
attributed to, Brown said,
rumors circulated last May that
all three FSU vice presidents
would be gone within a
year and they are.
Brown slapped the Sentinel
saying that it should be
commended for its work in its
field yellow journalism.

TOM KENNEDY

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Disruptive
Demonstration
Prohibited
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Senate passed
by a whopping majority
Thursday a resolution from the
Ad Hoc Committee on
Demonstrations prohibiting
student demonstrations which
disrupt the normal academic
routine at the UF.
Also passed was a resolution
on voluntary class attendance;
the resolution permits voluntary
attendance for everyone but
freshmen, except when the
individual professor requires
attendance.
The idea for the resolution on
demonstrations began as a
proposal introduced in
December by Dr. John
Greenman, agricultural
economics professor. The
so-called Greenman resolution
urged the administration to use
any and all available resources to
quell student disruptions.
Another proposal, calling for
student participation in the
senate, will probably be voted
on at the Feb. 27 senate
meeting, UF President Stephen
C. OConnell said Thursday.
I dont see any reason why it
wont pass, he said. I dont
think theres any question that
most of the senate members
want student members.
The policy statement on
campus demonstrations
emphasizes the rights and
responsibilities of all members
of the UF community:
It is agreed that no one has
the right to disrupt the
operation of the university or to
interfere with the ordinary rights
of other members of the
university community, reads
the statement. It is also agreed
that the legal rights of students
or other members of the
university body... must not be
abridged.
(SEE 'UNIVERSITY' PAGE 4)

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Page 2

The Alligator, Fridw, F#Krery ?1 19f>9

Meaill. Greenman Named Outstanding Profs

t FROM PAGE ONE
in meeting such planned disruption and
violence.
The resolution states that the necessary legal
power may be needed to protect the institution
from unwarranted attacks and seizure.
Outstanding professor second-year winners

k 9 %

International Beauties
Chosen Tuesday Night

Three finalists for Miss
International beauty contest
were chosen Tuesday night in
University Auditorium.
Hope Chen, representing the
Chinese Club, Rekha Mehra
from the India Club, and Sheryl
Swan sponsored by the Persian
Club, were selected from seven
participants.
The queen will be announced
at the International Talent Show
Friday at 8 pjn. in University
Auditorium.
Miss Chen is a botany major
from Taiwan University. She
came to the UF in September
1968 and plans to return to
Taiwan to teach.
Miss Mehra, 21, is a
Rathskeller fraulein who enjoys
tennis, swimming, dramatics,
and debating. Majoring in
history, she plans to enter the
diplomatic corps.
Miss Swan, from St.
Petersburg, enjoys modeling,
singing and water skiing. She is a
member of Delta Delta Delta
sorority.
As one of the events
celebrating International Week,
the contest is an effort to
introduce the habits, customs,
and dances of the foreign

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

THREE FINALISTS IN MISS INTERNATIONAL QUEEN CONTEST
... I to r, Cheryl Swan, Hope Chen, Rekha Mehra

students to Americans, said
Zaher Masri, president of the
Arab club.
We want Americans to know
how we feel and how we think.
Mrs. Sara Smith of UF
Information Services, Donald D.
Mott, assistant dean of men, and
Jeffrey Dunn, graduate student
in art from Tampa, judged the
girls on beauty, personality and
talent.
Miss Mehra performed an
Indian Dance of Lights. On a
dark stage she moved to Indian
Tillman Nixes
Megill Meet
State Rep. James Tillman has
turned down an invitation from
the Reitz Union Program
Council to participate in a
question and answer period
Sunday with Kenneth Megill, UF
professor of philosophy.
Tillman declined to attend the
Sunday night session because of
previous engagements.
Tillman is the legislator that
recently pre-filed a bill in the
Legislature calling for a
legislative subcommittee to
investigate radicalism on Florida
campuses.

include: Professor Harold Kemp, College
Architecture and Fine Arts; Professor Irving
Goffman, College of Business Administration,
Professor Mandell Glicksberg, College of Law,
and Professor John R. OMalley, College o
Engineering.
First-year contest winners include: Dr. Owen
J. Holyoak, College of Physical Education; Dr.
William M. Alexander, College of Education;and

chants with candles in her
upturned hands.
Isabel Rosales, from
Guatemala, did a charcoal sketch
to the music of the marimba,
whose music is originally sad.
But the spirit of our people
make it happy, she said.
International Week is the
main event for the Council of
International Organizations
(CIO). In addition to the talent
show Friday, the CIO will
sponsor a dance Saturday at 9
p.m. in the Reitz Union
Ballroom. Admission is free for
both events.

WE GOT A SALE GOING
A SALE YOU WOULDNT BELIEVE!
BrSw) FRIDAY AND SATURDAY YOU GET
SPECIALS LIKE NEVER BEFORE \ggTVg
IN GAINESVILLE
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TEMPTATIONS AIRPLANE FUDGE HAIR
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SPACE ODYSSEY: 2001 ARETHA FRANKLIN ROD McKUEN
JUDY COLLINS CREAM PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC
Come one/ Come all This is it!
Tell your friends, bring your money
and get your bargains!
GAINESVILLE MALL
RECORDSVILLE
Tapes Accessories stereo Equipment
I

NICK ARROYO

James E. Couch, College of Journalism and
Communications.
Two candidates in the College of Medicine
tied. A run-off election is planned for next week
to determine the winner, Mica said.
IFC Presiyent Steve Zack and Student Body
President Clyde Taylor will present the
Outstanding Professor Awards at IFC Frolics
in the Florida Gym tonight at 8:30.

fop FLA. STATE MUSEUM
Oldest Shovel
Breaks Ground

Floridas oldest shovel will
break ground Saturday for the
Finest museum of history ever
constructed in the state.
A stone spade more than
2,000 years old will turn the
first ground for the $2.4 million
Florida State Museum. The
ceremony is set for 11 a.m. on
the campus site at the corner of
Radio Road and Newell Drive.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, Dr. J. C. Dickinson,
museum director, and Henry S.
Toland, president of the UF
Foundation, will perform the
ritual.
On completion in 1970, the
three-story, 100,000 square-foot
building is expected to rank
among the top 10 public
museums in the nation,
according to Dr. Dickinson.
The new museujn will be the
largest natural history unit south
of Washingtons Smithsonian
Institution, Dickinson said.
Located in the UFs Life
Sciences Complex, the new
attraction will be just two blocks
west of U. S. 441, easily
accessible to the more than
250,000 Florida residents and
visitors expected to view the
museum and its famous
collections each year.
The dramatic new building is
designed around the concept of
the Florida Indian temple

mound, says Dickinson. From
the street, only banked and
sodded earth will be visible.
From the base of the hillside
site, the vista is a modernistic
colonade, three stories high.
William Morgan of Atlantic
Beach is the architect.
Jacksonvilles Auchter
Construction Co. submitted the
low bid of $2,166,000.
Funding for the new facility
includes more than $1,112,000
from the National Science
Foundation; more than
SBOO,OOO in private gifts and the
balance in bond funds and state
appropriations.
A UF department in terms of
administrative control, the
museum has been housed in
makeshift quarters since its
establishment in 1917. For the
last 31 years, it has operated on
parts of five floors of the Seagle
Building here.
Groundbreaking festivities
will include a tour of the Florida
State Museums Traveling
Museum, a 12 by 45-foot trailer
with walk-in exhibits of a
Spanish ship cabin and a pioneer
home. The unit is taking Florida
history to 25,000 school
children in six Florida counties
this year.
A luncheon at the Reitz
Union Ballroom will complete
the groundbreaking program.



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CITRUS QUEEN
Miss Kathy Young, Tri-Delt, was crowned Miss Florida Citrus
Queen Feb, 19, in Winter Haven. Miss Young was Phi Delta Theta
fraternity's contestant at the pageant.
Renaissance-Style Mass
Planned For Latin Services
Mass at the Catholic Student Center St. Augustine Church will
be celebrated in Latin this Sunday and a Renaissance style mass,
Palestrinas Missa Aeterna Christi Munera, will be presented by the
University Collegium Musicum.
The Most Reverend Paul F. Tanner, Bishop of St. Augustine, will
celebrate the ll a.m. mass at the center on West University Avenue,
said Father Michael V. Gannon, pastor.
Sunday evening Bishop Tanner will meet with students at the
center for a dialogue on the problems of the Church in the
contemporary world.
O
BEI V j^
florTda blueTey
FtTll
SPEAKERS BUREAU
bVMs now
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am
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Pick up applications
m>
Fla. Blue Key Office
312 J.W. Reitz Union
Union Info Desk
Ist floor J. W. Reitz Union
Tigert Info. Desk
Ist floor Tigert Hall
Speech dept. Office
325 Arts & Sci. Bldg.
applications due in FBK office
no later than 5:00 Fri. Feb. 21.

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Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Aquanaut Burial Today

Berry L. Cannon, a UF graduate and aquanaut
| who died Monday during a Sealab 111 dive near
: Long Beach, Calif., will be buried today in
; Williston, where he spent most of his youth.
| Cannon, 33, suffered an apparent heart attack
while making a dive to repair a leak in the Sealab
research projects underwater capsule.
The funeral will be at 4 p.m. at the Williston
First Baptist Church, with Rev. M. D. Durrance
officiating. Burial will be at the Wachoota Baptist
Cemetery.
Four of Cannons fellow aquanauts who had
worked with him on the Sealab project will serve
as pallbearers.
Cannon graduated from Williston High School
in 1952 and served in the Navy from 1952-57.

University Senate OKs
Demonstration Policy

The policy includes provisions
for freedom of expression and
due process, and its main points
are the following:
# Demonstrations may be
held anywhere on campus, as
long as they do not interfere
with the normal routine of the
UF or infringe on the rights of
others. No specific areas are set
aside for demonstrations, but
exclusive use of the Plaza of the
Americas may be obtained
through the student affairs
office; sound equipment must be
approved through this office,
too.
Demonstrators are not
allowed to interfere with normal
routine or the rights of others
by, for example, obstructing
traffic; blocking entrances or
exits to buildings or driveways;
interfering with educational
activities; harassing passers-by;
interfering or precluding a
scheduled speaker; interfering
with scheduled ceremonies or
events, and damaging property.
t Disruptive students are to
present their I. D. when asked to
do so by OConnell or his
representative. Non-UF
personnel will be asked to leave,
or be subject to arrest.
IFC WINTER FROLICS: Will
treat six patients from VA
Hospital Friday night at 8 in
Florida Gym. Frolic music will
be furnished by the Vanilla
Fudge and comedian David
Frye.
A LLIGATOR EDITORIAL
STAFF: Will hold short, but
mandatory meeting Sunday
afternoon at 1 in newsroom.
ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN
STUDENTS: Is offering new
service to coeds who want to get
involved in campus activities.
Publicity chairman Kathy
Waldman said AWS is planning
to publish a weekly bulletin to
inform members of openings in
student organizations.
PHI ETA SIGMA: Graduating
senior members who plan to
work for graduate or
professional degrees are eligible
for scholarships from the
national organization.
Applications may be obtained
from Asst. Dean of Men Donald
Mott.

UF GRADUATE

If OConnell or his
representative decide that a
demonstration is disruptive, they
may then identify themselves to
the demonstrators; tell them
they are violating UF policy
and/or the law, and what the
violation is. The campus police
can be called to the scene.
The campus police, if
circumstances warrant, would
ask the demonstrators to stop
what they are doing and leave
the area, or be subject to arrest

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After graduation from the UF in 1962 with a
degree in electrical engineering, he worked with
the Naval Mine Defense Laboratory in Panama
City and was also closely associated with the UF
Communications Science Laboratory.
At the time of his death, Cannon was in charge
of the underwater communications system being
tested by the CSL in conjunction with the Navy s
Sealab project.
All Sealab dives were discontinued until the
cause of Cannons cardiac arrest could be
determined.
Cannon suffered the attack on his second dive
to perform emergency repairs after the Sealab
capsule had developed a leak of 17,000 cubic
feet of gas-air mixture per hour.

and/or disciplinary action. The
police may arrest demonstrators
who are breaking the law, and
call in outside law enforcement
agencies, if necessary.
The senate expressed
confidence and full support of
OConnell in carrying out the
provisions of the resolution.

Celebration Help Sought
Celebration A Festival of the Arts which will bring major
presentations of music, dance, drama and the visual arts to the UF
campus in the spring of 1970, is still in need, of workers.
The arts festival, which will be produced by the UFs Omicron
Delta Kappa, mens national leadership honorary, is seeking student,
faculty, and staff members who are interested in positions in
production, physical planning, clerical work and executive
for Celebration and Mini-Festical positions are
available at the third floor Student Activities Desk of the Reitz Union,
STYLING
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Somehow the more you try w*.
to remember the more you seem
to forget.
So start by remembering one thing.
Remember NoDoz. And NoDoz will ... ;: : ; :js& Jgm&
help you remember the rest. j||||t|
NoDoz has the strongest stimulant you a
can buy without a prescription. And f 3^M|
more from yourmind.

\, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1959

Page 4



GREEK NEWS
_ By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writer
DELTA CHI The Delta Chis have adopted a 9-year-old Korean
orphan boy named Kyong Koo Lee. They are paying for his care
through the Children Incorporated babies home in Taejeon, Korea.
His picture and personal history have been received by the fraternity,
and several of the brothers are corresponding with him.
Fifteen brothers and pledges went to the Gainesville Mall and
collected $285.00 for the Heart Fund. This was done as part of the
Interfraternity Heart Fund Colllection being sponsored by Sigma Phi
Epsilon fraternity.
Recently 24 new Little Sisters were pledged and treated to a
banquet, and brother John Mica was tapped for Order of Omega,
fraternity leadership honorary.
PHI KAPPA TAU Congratulations and responsibilities are in
order for brothers Lamar Swayer and John Cosgrove. Lamar has been
tapped by Kappa Kappa Psi, UF music honorary, and John has been
chosen to head up IFCs Greek Week, an event scheduled for next
quarter.
The Little Sisters of the Laurel welcomed 14 new pledges into their
ranks at a formal pledging ceremony given by the brothers.
The Phi Taus are also helping with the Heart Fund, collecting
$391.00 this past weekend despite the rainy weather.
ALPHA OMICRON PHI A formal reception is being held in
honor of Mother Blackburn this Saturday night, commemorating her
twentieth anniversary as the AOPis housemother. She is the senior
housemother on campus.
Mary Louise Roller, the National Panhellenic Chairman, and past
national president of the AOPi alumni association, will visit the UF
chapter this week.
New Little Sisters are: Elaine Farr, SAE; Becky Rasmus, Delta Chi;
Eileen Mahan, Susan Edwards, and Mary Mullarky, Phi Tau; and Pat
Leith, Kappa Sig.
PHI MU Members of Alpha Nu chapter will join Phi Mus across
the country on March 4th in celebrating the 117th anniversary of the
founding of their sorority. The girls will donate pennies equal to the
sororitys age to the Alpha Memorial Fund, an organization which has
aided Phi Mu collegiate members with over $BO,OOO in scholarships
and educational loans in the past ten years.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON The Sig Eps recently hosted an
International Student Night banquet which brought Father Gannon to
speak on personal significance in the world community. Other guests
included Pres. OConnell.
Sigma Phi Epsilon began their annual Heart Fund Drive with a
kick-off banquet. The goal for this year is $3OOO.
The brothers of Sigma Phi Epsilon have made plans for Little
Sisters of the Golden Heart. Rush is scheduled to begin in about a
week.
ZETA TAU ALPHA Congratulations go to Kathy Maxfield,
tapped for Savant and to Lauren Lucas, as a new member of Angel
Flight.
New Little Sisters are: Charlotte Perkowski, Shirley Muniz, and
Daphne Chellos, Lambda Chi; Kevin Kaputa, Jean Davis and Brenda
Carter, Delta Chi; Alicia Neilson and Cathie Reed, Phi Tau.
celebrated their annual weekend with a formal dinner at
Golden Hills Country Club and a gypsy party at the University Inn.
Kent Withington, Sig Ep, was chosen Zeta Man. Other awards went to
Pat Hutchins, sister of the year; Jean Davis, best pledge; Barbara
Helton, highest pledge average; Sue Fedyshyn, sister with the most
improved average.
The winter pledge class of 11 cooked pancakes for the sisters as a
money making project.
KAPPA SIGMA Two Little Sisters of the Star and Crescent, Susie
Shapiro and Eileen Feinberg, were selected for membership into Angel
Flight.
Jeff Weathers, grand master, was inducted into the Order of Omega,
the fraternity mens honorary.
Congratulations to brother Bob Piccalo and his wife on the birth of
their daughter, Gina Louise.
UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA Bn
111 art dept.
afabldg.c
FEBRUARY 25, 1969
9 am to 5 pm

BUNNY CHARGED

Noted Surgeon Shot

ATLANTA (UPI) A former
Playboy Bunny was charged
1 hursday with fatally shooting a
young, married plastic surgeon
during an argument in her
apartment over a lipstick smudge
on his forehead.
The victim was Dr. Warren
Franklin Brown, 37, regarded as
one of the most brilliant plastic
surgeons in the South. He
finished college and medical
school in five years and had his
medical degree when he was 23.
I swear to you on my life
that I did not knowingly pull the
trigger of that gun, said Mrs.
Jackie Sandra Hendrickson, an
attractive 28-year-old
auburn-haired woman who has
been working for the past two
years as Dr. Browns office
assistant under her maiden name
of Sandra Paul.
She told police that Brown
was shot as they struggled for a
gun which she had picked up
from the foot of her bed with
the intention of placing it back
in the headboard. She said they
had argued after she questioned
him about a report of a lipstick
smudge on his forehead.
She also related how the
doctor made a desperate bid to
save his own life after the
shooting by phoning Georgia
Baptist Hospital for an
ambulance and instructing Mrs.
Hendrickson on how to remove
air and fluid from around his
heart with a syringe.
The shooting occurred about
6 p.m. Wednesday at an
apartment complex owned by
Dr. Brown. Police said two shots
were fired from the death pistol.
One hit Dr. Brown in the chest
and the other missed him.
About a half dozen other guns
were found in the apartment and
Mrs. Hendrickson said she kept

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them because she often was out
late on calls. She also had a
special deputy sheriffs badge
from Fulton County.
As life ebbed from the
physician, Mrs. Hendrickson said
she tried mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation, but when police
arrived they found her sitting in

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the front room on a couch. The
body was in a front bedroom.
Brown, married and the father
of two children, a daughter 4,
and a son 10, was a native of
Dayton, Tenn., and was
valedictorian of his graduating
class at Baylor School for Boys
in Chattanooga.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, Februarv 21 1969

'A' Grades
Most Likely
In Biology
Those looking for an A in
some course have the best
chance percentage-wise in the
Division of Biological Sciences,
according to a recently released
study of grade distributions for
undergraduates during the fall
quarter.
The UF Office of Academic
Services prepared the study
which lists the number and
percentage distribution of each
grade given in the several
colleges of the university. Only
the College of Medicine is not
included because it uses a
different grading system.
The study shows that of the
16 undergraduate colleges, the
Division of Biological Sciences
has the largest percentage of
As 46.67. Os the total of 30
grades it gave out, 14 were As
and 14 were Bs.
Engineering ran close second
with 42.80 percent of its grades
being As. Education and
agriculture are the next two
highest colleges, and law is the
lowest with only 9.34 percent
As out of the 2,654 grades it
gave.
Military science leads in the
number of Bs with 47 percent
of its grades at this level.
Education, health related
professions and biological
science all gave close to 45
percent of their grades as Bs.
University College was the
lowest in this category with 25
percent of its 13,708 grades as
Bs.
University College and law
had nearly half of their grades in
the C range.
The largest number of low
grades, Ds and Es, were given in
the College of Physical
Education and the University
College.

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4

CTiinFMT FEELINGS CHECKED BY RESEARCH
SG Board Probes Liberal Arts Plan

A 10 to 15-member student
committee to study the
likelihood of a four-year liberal
arts college at the UF is
currently being formed by
Student Government.
The group will conduct
research and dialogue, focusing
on some definite proposals for
the idea of an experimental
college.

Greeks Deplete IFC
Sponsored Loan Fund

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Interfraternity Councils
$20,000 plus loan fund is
depleted, and there will be no
more loans until a substantial
portion of the money is repaid.
The IFC offers nearly
interest-free loans to greeks at
UF on a long term basis.
It now appears, however, that
either the money supply is too
short, or users of the loan fund
are abusing their privileges,
according to Bob Zeigler,
executive vice-president of the
IFC.
A large part of the loans we

. w

Discussion will center on the
objectives of a liberal arts
education and the role of such
an education in the individuals
intellectual development, said
Tom Infantino, committee
chairman.
The study group will be made
up of students with varying
grade averages and backgrounds
of study.

have out now are overdue,"
Zeigler said. Until these are
repaid, there is no way we can
issue any further loans.
Were working on a system
right noW where a students
grades can be withheld for not
paying, he said. However, the
biggest problem will be with the
student who has dropped out
since receiving the loan. For
these people, we will notify the
state credit bureau.

BY HOWARD POST

The committee is the student
counterpart of a special faculty
committee conducting a similar
study.
Infantino said the parallel
committees were formed in
insure complete student
independence in the formulation
of ideas.

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Students know more of what
they want than anyone else, he
said. The ideas discussed in our
research should be more in
touch with students feelings.
Students interested in
participating in the committee
can obtain additional
information at the SG office in
the Reitz Union.



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Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1969

Staff Writings

The Truth Is Hard

I read Samuel Clemens
Huckleberry Finn. I read it twice
as matter of fact. But I think Ill
read it again. It seems I missed
the juicy part that has compelled
the United Black Students of the
North Campus of Miami Dade
Junior College to have the
American classic banned from
study there.
The humility of the action is
the gall of the black group to
make such a request. However,
the stupifying blow is the act of
forced diplomacy by the
administration to comply to the
request.
It all seems ugly to me. I fail
to see the real essence of
destroying literature, art, or
music because it embarrasses
Negroes or any other group.
It seems the truth is a hard
pill to swallow when it isnt
sugar-coated. American history
can not be changed by closing
books, as the proverbial closet
door to keep the family skeleton
hidden.
Banning the playing of a song
that commemorates an era of
shame in American histroy does
not banish that era. No racial
feelings are altered one way or
the other. No worthwhile
progress toward a better end is
acquired.
If Clemens had deleted the
aspect of slavery in his novel, he
would have written an outright
lie. If he had pictured Jim, the
Negro slave-companion of Huck
Finn, any other way, he would
have presented a lie.
May I suggest that the novel
has more overtones to admire
than condemn. May I suggest
that such acts of violence against
the humanities certainly cannot
erase any embarrassment for the
said reason alone.
The problem is rooted deeper
than books and songs. To erase
this embarrassment will take a
lot more intense reading into self
and purpose..

Staff Writings

Protecting The Hyacinth

We have got to get them out of the university
system, said the first legislator.
What did you say, said the second legislator.
I said, there used to be a day when everyone
loved America and said good things about our
land.
The second legislator stopped reading a recently
distributed copy of the Constitution of the State
of Florida, as Amended in 1968, and looked at his
companion.
Go on, he said.
1 have a newspaper article stating that a
professor at one of our tax supported universities
advocates the destruction of the water hyacinth.
The companion wrinkled his brow and watched
the speakers fade slowly begin to redden as he
talked.
The professor also said that faculty at the
university should organize into strong unions, and in
cooperation with student radicals, sieze power from
the hyacinth.
What can we do? said the second legislator.
The flushed legislator hesitated for a second,
then said, Irn no dictator type or communist, but

11
The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Pfl/f/hipfrfA/ Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor

By Carolyn Pope

if he were to resign from his position at the
university, this instructor who is complaining about
the hyacinth, the voters in this state would feel less
threatened.
1 doubt if you could get him to resign without
putting up a fight, said the companion.
I would expect him to fight, he retorted.
Those radical types love a fight. The odds are
aginst him winning. Dont forget that the university
president is on our side. We pay his wages dont we?
I would probably be reluctant to give them any
additional funds if they were to destroy a part of
what we have given them.
The associate said, 1 dont know, if you weed
one out, you should weed the rest out. There are so
many of these types on the campus today that we
almost have to accept the fact that the times are
changing. Each time you try to get rid of one its
going to get harder.
Why dont we let this incident slip by? he
concluded.
No sir, not this one, said the legislator as he
picked up a newspaper and began to read only
this time to himself.

By Don Yokel

EDITORIAL
SG At Stake
Twelve months ago, Student Body President Clyde
Taylor made a statement. It was short and to the point:
Put up or shut up.
Its a pretty good philosophy of life. Its also a good way
to run a government composed mostly of people who talk
much but usually do little.
Student Government has since its inception many years
ago been such a group. Student leaders whose only
legitimate claim to their title is that they managed to be
involved in an act of political dealism which worked have
mouthed empty, insincere promises.
Generally, they delivered nothing. A lot of smoke but no
fire.
The cruel reality of campus politics has been that student
leaders were more interested in building a name for
themselves and putting pretty feathers in their caps than in
truly serving the student body. When the majority of
students realized the truth, they lost interest. They stopped
voting, they stopped caring.
Fraternity and sorority members continued to go to the
polls. Freshman and sophomores ..whose torches of idealism
hadnt been extinguished went to the polls.
But the MAJORITY of students the juniors, seniors
and graduate students felt little more than amusement
when election fever hit the campus.
Taylor, running for the highest office, knew this. He
knew that SG was a joke to the majority of students
because it never kepts its promises, it never got really
involved, it never truly cared.
So he said the time had come. He gave himself and his
co-workers an ultimatum: put up or shut up.
His reasoning was right on the money. If Student
Government is indeed a government of, by and for the
students, then it should be relevant to student needs. If, on
the other hand, SG is a playground for future politicos, if its
leaders do not, can not or will not care about the students,
then the facade should end.
In short, Student Government should be abolished if it
cant be a government. It should shut up if it cant put up.
Taylor and his administration, with the dedicated help of
the Student Senate (the Senate rarely ends its meetings
before midnight, after hours of concerned debate), has in
our opinion sincerely tried to bring to fruition everything
they promised in their campaign.
The final measure of success of every program cannot be
adequately judged now. Time alone will give the verdict.
But an honest attempt WAS made. And now, as Taylor
promised, students can judge if the attempt to care, the bid
for relevancy, was enough of a success to make SG
worthwhile keeping.
The students can decide if change, even though it may be
destructive in nature, is needed.
On March 5, they can abolish Student Government.
If they want, they can kill the patient to stop the cancer.
We urge the student body, though, to base its decision on
knowledge and thoughtfulness.
During the next two weeks, the Alligator will publish
articles and editorials on what SG has done AND what it has
failed to do.
We will explain the innate problems SG must deal with,
and we will explore its attempt to deal meaningfully with its
problems.
Our only admonishment is that students read the facts,
think about them and then vote intelligently March 5.'
The question, despite the thoughtless claims of incurable
cynics, is an important and significant one.
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
I Editorial, Busman. Advertising offices in Room 330, Rails Union. Phono
392-1681,392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are thorn of the sdars or of
the miter of the article and not those of the Uaharritv of Florida.



Audience Will Wait At SG Productions

MR. EDITOR:
If there is one thing that I would have to give the
University of Florida credit for, it would have to be
consistency. Consistency in insulting the thousands
of poeple who still try to derive something from
college besides the dubiously comforting thought
that one can now choose e, all of the above, over
a, b, c, or d, and be reasonably certain of a correct
answer with no knowledge of the material. These
are the people who go to Student Government
(formerly Lyceum Council) productions at the
Florida Gym.
Not ONCE in the three years that Ive been
attending such events has one started on time! Not
once! A starting time of 8:15 means that you may
expect to start no sooner than 8:30 (usually later).
This is in spite of the fact that all the tickets state
that all late comers will be seated at the first

Campus Beautiful
Wipe Out Ugly Alligators
MR. EDITOR:
The other day while going to the library I noticed all the
garbage scattered over the Plaza of the Americas. Most of the
trash consisted of various candy wrappers, paper cups, and
above all, quite a few of your Florida Alligators strewn over the
grounds.
Dont you agree that Beautifying America ought to start
right here on campus? Shouldnt the students have more respect
for the universitys beautiful landscape? Why doesnt the SG
scrape up some cash and purchase several trash baskets and
place them strategically along the walkways going through the
Plaza of the Americas?
Im sure most students would participate in keeping the place
clean if trash baskets were made available. Maybe you could
help wipe out the ugliness by printing The Florida Alligator on
green newspaper so it would blend in with the grass. Do you
have any suggestions?
DAVE SCHAFFTER, lUC
Perfect Visions Os Bldg. E
MR. EDITOR:
While wandering across the campus recently I noticed the
large number of temporary buildings scattered throughout the
area. These slum structures are a disgrace to the University of
Florida and are disgusting blots on the landscape of the earth.
A perfect example is the way the magnificent view of
Building E from the Architecture and Fine Arts Complex is
blocked and uglified by Little Hall.
In addition, the desirable view of Building D from the
Graduate Library is spoiled by Anderson Hall.'
The State of Florida must provide monies to immediately
remove such eyesores as the NASA Building, Reitz Union, and
the Engineering and Law Complexes. In place of these tenement
structures I propose such architectural perfections as Building
R, Grove Hall, and Plant Pathology.
ARTUR FREINER
Improving Mother Nature
MR. EDITOR:
I recently heard a rumor that the wooded area between
Tolbert Hall and Flavet 111 is going to be beautified. Since I
do not know the reliability of my source of information I am
not going to march.
However, it never ceases to amaze me how Man thinks he can
beautify Mother Nature.
MRS. FREIDA HARTSFIELD
EX-FLA VET 111 RESIDENT

intermission. What late comers! How can you be
late when the program doesnt start for 15-25
minutes after the announced starting time?
The U of F is supposed to be billing itself as a
cultural as well as academic center of the state. How
can one expect to be cultural when one shows his
over-abundance of ignorance by insulting the
audience. Student Government could learn a
well-needed lesson from the Florida Players who
seldom if ever start more than two or three minutes
late.
Here is a group of students and faculty who are
really intelligent, cultured not red-necked
pretenders like those in Student Government who
are responsible for this needless harassment of
audiences.
808 STANTON, 3AS

Flavet 111 Not Safe
For Small Children

MR. EDITOR:
There is a small tract of land
nestled on the U of F campus
which very few of you know
about: Flavet Village 111, the
Universitys provision for the
married student.
The purpose of this letter is to
bring a matter of great
importance to us, the Flavet
residents, to the attention of the
university at large, hoping (to be
quite frank) that public opinion
can focus more pressure on
housing, and various other
officials, than we, as a small
mmority, have been able to do
so far.
Ti-c response we have received
on the matter Im about to
describe, has been the typical
bureaucratic one: Were sorry,
but... etc., etc.
If any of you have driven
through the village (and many of
you have, and at excessive
speeds!) then you will realize the
acute traffic problem we have
here.
The roads are bad; they are
extremely narrow; and there
isnt enough parking space. No
big thing in itself, but when you
realize that this is in a small area
where almost 500 families live
with 300 to 400 children, then
you begin to understand tne
actual magnitude of the
problem: small children and
thoughtless speeders, who are in
a hurry to get God knows where.
We have gigantic 10 mph signs
posted all over the place, but in
reality we cant ticket a driver
under 15 mnh, and the camnus

O Beautiful for Spacious Skies, for Amber Waves of Grain, for Purple Mountain
Majesties, Above The ...

OPEN FORUM:
AAoiawL ViA&wt
'There is no hops for the complacent man."
Student Money Equally Good
MR. EDITOR:
If it is the excuse for faculty members to buy their tickets
separately in order to reserve an area of choice seats in Florida Gym, I
must suggest that Florida students are also paying customers.
WAYNE J. HANSEN, 4BA

when you realize that this is a small area where
almost 500 families live with 300 to 400 children, then
you begin to understand the actual magnitude of the
problem: small children and thoughtless speeders who
are in a hurry to get God knows where.

police chief asks that our
student policeman stops no one
who is going under 20 mph.
This is, of course, a ridiculous
speed at which to go through a
highly congested area swarming
with small children .. (most are
under five years of age).
We have asked the police for
more enforcement (our one
student cop hasnt the time to
do what needs to be done), but
the now proverbial answer is:
sorry, but we dont have
enough men, though enough to
loiter around on street corners
near the campus entrances
(doing nothing but checking
decals and picking their noses).
The next step we took was to
seek permission from Mr.
Neylands at Housing to install at
least two-inch-high speed-bumps,
hoping that this would reduce
speeding without the need for
constant enforcement. The
answer, of course, was no; the
reason, a state law prohibiting
such devices on state roads.
Ever since our first request
there has been a dogmatic
adherence to a law to which we
think an exception can be made.
The valid question remains,
however: whos to decide when
an exception can or cannot be
made? So we tried the local
office of the State Road
Department: same answer.
The onjy higher rung is the

Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

state legislature ... a rather silly
place to go for just speed-bumps.
Rather than go there (God help
us!), I took it on myself to write
the good old Alligator.
In the meantime, we arent
taking the implication of their
refusal (the hell with your
kids), but instead the Flavet
Village government is going to
try once more for permission to
install the speed-bumps at
strategic spots throughout the
village. (Incidentally, the bumps
are only two inches high ... a
height which wont damage a car
going under 20-25 mph, but high
enough to let you know you just
hit something.
If we are refused again, the
sentiment of the village seems to
warrant our installing them
anyway. We feel Neylands will
have them removed ... in the
name of the Law ... but we still
hope theres enough humanity in
officialdom to supersede
dogmatism. For the sake of our
children do we dare be so
hopeful!
Meanwhile we would ask that
all visitors, passer-throughs, and
indeed, the villagers themselves,
please, observe tjge traffic signs,
watch for small children, and
keep your speed under the
posted 10 mph.
ERNEST JONES Jr., 3 AS
Flavet Village 111

Page 9



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included, $175. Phone 372-8077.
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Hannah's husband Hector hates hard
work so he cleans the rug with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(a-lt-88-C)
Guns guns guns Inventory ovet
450 buy sell trade repair.
Reloading supplies, custom reloading
Harry Beckwith, Gun Dealer,
Micanopy 466-3340 (A-ts-69-P)
HONDA 68 S9O Like New 2500
Miles $325. Call 378-3068 after 5.
Must sell 6 mo old Vivitar 35mm to
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after 5 pm. (A-3t-88-P)
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ZIG-ZAG sewing machine $25.
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Clothes (size 7-8). Shoes (6-7),
Slacks, blouses, sweaters, coats. $.50
& up. 378-7152. (A-3t-87-P)
BMWR 27 Excellent condition. Call
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N.W. 31st PL. (A-st-86-p)
MUST SELL 10 X 50 mobile home 2
brm very nice come and see washer
included. Front kitchen 2150 or
make offer after 5 oclock 372-5742.
Arrendondo Estate. (A-st-86-p)
1 br trailer $995 new refrig, hw htr
drapes, carpeted, tile kitchen & bath,
12*/2 x 22 screened cabana on
concrete patio parked near UF call
468-1241. (A-st-84-P)
12 x 50 1968 Parkwood fully
carpeted, early American A.C. must
sell! Equity, take over reasonable
pymts. 378-0701 after 5. (A-st-85-P)
| FOR RENT
Unique upstairs appartment to
sublease til June for 2, 3 or 4, $lO5
per month, furnished. Call 378-8244
after 5. (B-2t-87-P)
SUBLET APT. Colonial Manor for
3rd qtr. slls a mo. for 1 or 2. l /2
block from campus. Immediate
occupancy if desired. 378-3857,
378-5553 or office. (B-2t-87-P)
SUBLET LARGE 2 br aircond. new
furn. 2 blocks from campus 120.
Now to Sept. Call Dave 378-0286 or
Carl 378-2128. (B-st-87-P)
MUST SUBLET 2 br unfurn ari cond
garage apt spring quarter. Up to 4
persons, water included, SBS a mo. 3
SE 12th Street. 378-9700.
(B-2t-87-P)
McDonalds
Hamburgers
The way you like em best!
...100% BEEF
...GROUND FRESH
... PREPARED WITH CARE
... HOT OFF THE GRILL
...ON TOASTED BUN
...UM-M-M-M GOOD!
Come in any time.
The service is fast
-our prices are right!
McDonalds.
is vour kind of place.
201 N.W. 13th St

FOR RENT |
ftx x*xcc fi xx*xx*xx*sss?WTX x x x x-x*:%s
Modern one-oedioom, air
conditioned apt. foi married couple 3
blocks from campus. $96 per month.
Call 376-1803 (B-3t-88-P)
Luxurious living In high rise api.
complex just a few blocks from
campus. Now renting at La Fontana
Apts. Call 378-0372 or see at 207
N.W. 17th St. Apt. 506. (B-st-86-p)
2 bdrm apt, 2 blocks from campus,
must sublet spring and summer qtrs,
$l4O month, washing machine. Call
372-6559 between 5 and 7 p.rri. and
after 11 p.m. (B-85-86-p)
Efficiency apartment suitable for
one, two or three. AC pool 151 NW
5 Ave. Thru third quarter or lunger
$75 per month. Call 376-8990.
(B-10t-80-P)
Sublet College Terrace Apt.
Immediate occupancy preferred will
sacrifice rest of quarters rent + util,
or S4O. Call Kick 378-4532 weekend
or before 2 daily. (B-4t-88-P)
Sublet Camelot apt. 2 seniors want 2
coeds to share 2 bedroom 2 bath apt
overlooking pool. Most spacious floor
plan and Spanish decor. Call
378-8458 for further information.
(B-st-88-P)
Sublet furnished 2br apt S mmit
House. Central heat & air, wall to
wall carpet. Ist months rent free.
Call 376-4152 between 5 & 6:30.
(B-st-85-P)

ri!yW3!riZyV** ¥ *****************?
l WOULD YOU BELIEVE i
5 -7
t i luf
j MORE M i
] DAYS! W ]
J The Fixer."§ased on the Pulitzer Prize-
* winning novel by Bernard Malamud.
£ the fixer [jjjjl Suggested lor
A I rv l***l MATURE audiences J
* starring AldD DdICS (pa-entol discretion advised J
{Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman, {
San Holm, David Warner, Carol White f
* ********************************
| Kicking Choir
HiSfof 1 UrtHELDOVERI-.
Pom n. w. nth v vly] |PONT MISS IT!J I
J in sheer terror I
GREGORY PECK HEVA MARIE SAINT!
IEC ..color THE stalking moon J

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1969

Page 10

WANTED
ss%vx*x*x.x.x.vffi
The single umveisity crowd over 2I
For the Friday Afternoon Club
Win meet this & every Friday from
5-7;30 at the Lamplighter. Private
rooms pleasant atmosphere. Drinks
$.45, ladies $.20. Come early & bring
your friends. Friday's a great day to
nave fun. (c-3t-86-p)
2 female roommates to share 2 bdrm
apt. spring and summer qtrs. 2 blocks
from campus $lO5 qtr. 372-6559
btwn 5 and 7 p.m. and after 11 p.m.
(c-Bt-86-p)
Need someone to share 3 l h acre,
2-bedioom paradise on Cowpens
Lake. Start now or March. Call
481-1753. (C-2t-87-P)
Female roommates over 21, to share
apt. with character. March 1 or April
1. 42.50 & V? utilities. No lease.
376-7670. (C-3t-86-p)
3 HORROR SHOWS
I UNBELIEVABLE TERROR I
rECHNICOCO* I
I the'BLOODDRINKERTI
I Hi blood-ciiraat | I

I BOX OFFICE OPENS 6 30
v SHOW starts 7 00
T ROD MYUJR CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
u UUJ FALMER CAMILLA SfftV aoo
m £ omiAHUM ONLY
!<#} BARBARA McNAIZr E THBHOH
\ .~,IM ff n< Sptui Shsi Sm COM/MVSS/OA/FP
ARTHUR 0 CONNELL M|w color 'nv^iM.p 1 s.NGroooMT, 0k

"DAZZLING! Once you see it you'll never again
picture 'Romeo & Juliet quite the way you did before!"
nr r
m & "STUNNING! Romeo & Juliet'portrayed by actors
in the proper age bracket lends an exciting dimension
to the play 1 satuboay review
BEAUTIFUL) The entire film is a poem of
youth, love and violence.... played with pure 1968
passion!" playboy
JLpt "BREATHTAKING! It was Franco Zeffirelli s I
iji ; intention to create a 'Romeo & Juliet forihis generation
f * of youth and he has succeeded brilliantly!" mccau s
REFRESHING! .vigorous with two beautiful
adolescents;l v a refreshing reward in the light of the
present gen<£ation gap!" habpebs bazaar
* t
-Jjfc "ARRESTING Fifteen year old Olivia Hussey and
17 year old Leonard Whiting are such stuff as dreams
are made on' cononet
"PICTURE OF THE MONTH! Superbly ||
visualized wedding-night sequence handled with taste and
reserve! seventeen magazine
I'AKAMOI NT IMCiI Kt:S r r*.M.
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Franco Zeffirelli 7
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Use our handy
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form.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I WANTED
? §
Male roomate needed in spacious
Gatortown apt. 3 bed 2 bath 52.50
mo. Call Bill after 5 378-6873 open
March and spring quarter. (C-3t-88-P)
LANDMARK Male roommate
needed. Available March 1. March
rent paid. Call 378-3120, apt. 170
(C-10t-88-P)
Need 1 female roommate March 1.
Good location, own room. Call
anytime 376-5589. (C-2t-88-P)
Male roommate Landmark apt 62,
$45 monthlyFeb. paid for. Good
surroundings with ideal location. Call
Andy, Richard or Paul, 376-3424.
(C-lt-88-P)
X*ssswwK w>twxw; ;v; ; K K
AUTOS |
1967 Rambler Rebel sta wgn low
mileage 4 speed floor shift air cond
power brakes and steering fm radio a
real buy! Call 378-7393 after 5 pm.
(G-st-85-P)
LIKE NEW Beautiful 65 Falcon
Futura 2 door hardtop 6 cyl radio
automatic new wsw. Must sell A real
bargain. Call 392-1473 or 3725703.
(G-7t-86-p)
HELP WANTED ]|
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1-hr session. Must be native
English-speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University Ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5. (E-10t-71-C)
I PERSONAL 1
Monster Man today makes eleven
happy months together. The Monster
Lady wants to wish you the bestest
of birthdays on becoming 21.
LoveU (J-lt-88-P)
To the newest Phi Sigma Sigma
Sisters: Welcome into the Pyramid
for lifetime happiness. Best of luck,
Love, Your Sisters. (J-lt-88-P)
Happy Anniversary, Scharon! We
made it one year and will go for a
100. Remember compatability is our
key. Love you! Y P (J-lt-88-P)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message any time day or night.
Message changes weekly. Let freedom
ring 16 NW 7th Ave. (PAID
POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENT.)
(J-st-84-P)
Glenna M. Jacksonville Beach was
great. So was the beer. And we will
drink again Fri. nite. But dont lose
anymore clothing. Luv, Bobby.
(J-2t-87-P)
CELEBRATION needs you, if you
are interested in planning the largest
exhibition of music, dance, drama,
and visual arts in Florida history.
Pick up an applicaiton at the Student
Activities Desk, Reitz Union; the
Office of the Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts; or in
Rm. 129, Tigert Hall. (J-st-87-P)
RATHSKELLER auditions Mon.
night, Feb. 24 at 8:00. Open to all.
Come do your thing or just come
listen. (J-st-80-c)
FROLICS tickets for sale. Call
376-9198 and ask for Ron Edwards
or Van ONeil. 106 cc Gilera notorcycle, includes
book rack & helmet, $l6O. 376-9217
ask for M.R. Joseph. If not home,
leave your number. (J-2t-87-P)
Girls, put STYLE into your wardrobe
with a 100% wool ruana or cape from
Columbia. Capes come in several
styles with two types of collar or no
collar, and come in colors to
compliment any wardrobe. The capes
and ruanas are really worth seeing at
the SPANISH MAIN, 105 W.
University Ave. 372-0667. (J-st-85-P)
XEROXI
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| Thesis and Dissertations i
| Reductions and
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| Open Til 11 P.M.
§ Highest Quality
| We Guarantee it!
| 7 days
| OUIK-SAVE i
I University Plaza
1620 W. University
378-1001

{*:*:
l

Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

| PERSONAL |
The Friday Afternoon Club for the
university crowd over 21 will meet
this and every Friday from 5-7:30 at
the Lamplighter. Private rooms,
pleasant atmosphere. Drinks $.45,
ladies $.20. Come early & bring your
friends Fridays a great day to have
fun. (J-3t-86-p)
::X*::*w;vw*x*x*x*xx*x*v.v;*;*x<*x*:->.*.
SERVICES
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)

I lost youu Contact? \ I
I Cjatop AOs make Contacts! |
HOWJf shows
Coffee moose 4 CTSenaea+
Da 1826 us. UMiSeRVIT/ AVi£,.(muh!w)
DOUBLE YOUR PLEASURE
ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW
Do your own thing
Bring your instrument and
Swing Along with
BOBBY GRIFFIN o VV. pn c.
0 f one during
cocktail hours
. 4-7 P.M.
Hot & Cold
Hors doeuvres
Vv.'.V-V'' from our salad bar
\ i // /
ji\ /j;?y
v\\\' 4 y > 'f'
University hut motel
, -V- t
' v \ Everythin# Comfnrt Desires
S /"
/ h \
f l U S ROUTE 441 SOUTH
' \ GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
Phone FRanklin 2-6333
Night Club & Lounge

Page 11

' v
SERVICES
£nsss xww*xmmx*x*x*xmvvnvx*x x*xx
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
,;.vX*X*X X X X X*X*X*X*XX*X*XXX*XX*X>
I LOST & FOUND 1
>; >:
Would the person who stold the tape
recorder from Ridgeway Roof Truss
Co. please return the tape. There is a
SIOO.OO reward. (L-2t-88-P)

1:50 |V S *4O 7.41
I N.W. 13th Si. At 23rd RO EjW.-*V /
3:45 I Telephone 37. 2434 [q.^
MATT HELM SWINGS j
with the wildest
* wreckers that
# ;gSL ever did in a
oraiman!
>&
]HK
Dean Martin
"Matt Helm
The Wrecking Crew
CO*Sterring
Elke Sommer Sharonlate I
Nancy Kwan Nigel Green -Tina Louise Louisei
i Louisei m ii
HELD OVER ...
2nd EXCITING WEEK!
Telephone 378-2434 Lmm' | er o >"i v ot
Llhs Bunuels
9 40
ALLIED ARTISTS
BeUe dc Jour
*"f CATHERINE DENEUVE
WINNER BEST PICTURE VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
"A REALLY BEAUTIFUL MOVIE!
New York Times
"YES, BELLE DE JOUR' IS
SENSATIONAL, it does
# -let's be honest about this this__==Zl=Z
__==Zl=Z this__==Zl=Z turn you on!"
Life Magazine



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1969

Pueblo Crew Hoped For U.S. Attack

CORONADO, Calif.
(UPI) The captured crew
of the USS Pueblo wanted
the United States to attack
North Korea even if it
meant their deaths, enlisted
men testified Thursday.
Quartermaster Charles Law
told a Navy Court of Inquiry
Thursday their captors warned
they would be executed
immediately if the United States
struck back for the seizure of
the intelligence ship.

Moore Gets SG
Secretary Post

Bob Moore, director of the
Governors Conference on
Operation Student Concern, has
been appointed Student
Governments secretary of
organizations.
He replaces Bob Buck, who
resigned.
Moore, appointed to the post
by Student Body President
Clyde Taylor, is planning a
leadership conference for next
quarter. Moore said the
conference will be geared to the
smaller organizations on campus
with sessions teaching them how
to function effectively.
The conference, with
workshops and panel
discussions, will be open to old
and new officers of all campus
organizations.
Moore also plans to revitalize
the Inter-Organizational Council,
for more effective
problem-solving for campus
groups. He called the council a
good opportunity for large
and small organizations to get
together to study areas of
mutual concern.
He also plans to publish a
pamphlet of operating ideas and
procedures for campus
organizations. He expressed
concern with showing smaller
Circle K Sets
Racy Test
The UF Circle K Club March
2 will sponsor the first
gymkhana a type of mobile
obstacle course ever held here,
Jerry Hermanson announced
Thursday.
Trophies will be given to the
winners of four different events
in the gymkhana. In general, the
drivers skill in moving
backwards and forwards in a
course will be tested.
In one event cars will be
attached by a rope to a central
pole. The driver who runs the
course in the shortest time
without tipping the pole or
letting the rope touch the
ground is the winner.
The gymkhana will be held in
the parking lot of the Gainesville
Mall. Any UF student may enter
in two divisions, American and
foreign, with six classes of cars.
At 12:30 technical inspection
for the cars entered in the
gymkhana will begin and at 1
p.m. the first event will be
started. j

EVEN IF IT MEANT THEIR LIVES

We waited for the United
States to punish the bunch of
barbarians thev had over there,
but it didn't happen. said Law.
27, of Chealis. Wash.
Radioman 2-C. Lee R. Hayes
of Columbus, Ohio, 27, testified
he was compelled to write a
letter to the governor of Ohio
asking him to use his influence
to get the Pueblo crew released
through an American apology.
Hayes said he tried to slip in
the suggestion that the United
States drop the atom bomb on

groups how to obtain funds
from student government.
808 MOORE
... new SG official

f i i
1 HBaBWIi
Fn. Feb. 21st 6:00 & 9:00 P.M.

-f- REITZ UNION THEATRE

North Korea by saying in Ins
letter I long to behold the great
and glorious light ol our
fatherland.
Hayes said, By this 1 meant
they should drop the atom
bomb on North Korea.
He was asked if he knew what
this would mean for him.
He replied, Id rather be
killed by my own people than
the Communists.
Law said sailors broke three
heavy sticks while beating him in
a fury because some of the
captured sailors made lewd
gestures in propaganda
photographs.
He said he was questioned
continuously for 39 hours and
battered for eight of them when
the North Koreans learned the
meaning of the gestures.
Officers of the Pueblo have
described Law as the most
outstanding of the Pueblos
enlisted men in captivity.

rp your pizza ts 1
l^lramcrHwl
IT'S FROM I
cuxmc i
3510 S.W. 13th Street 1 I
Ca>nesville, Florida
PI XX A PARLOR m
VQUK OBPtR AMD PlC<P...

f W V
/ Climb aboard
h r tfi
i The S.S. Winnjammer w
Luncheons served from 11:00A.M. V)
Dinners to 1 2:00 P.M.
. ((
\ Bernie Sher attheorgan A\
l on f f
Thursday, Friday & Saturday Ml |
Oysters & Clams on the half shell M
Michelob on draft .1^
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (f \
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. \
Reservations accepted
Harry M. Lanton, Manager /
| Closed Sundays

MATT HELM
SHOOTS THE WORKS
I IN HIS FIRST Jffe 1
FILM ff&A
ADVENTURE!
dean if
Martin mL ww
in MATT HELM
STELLA SIEVENS DALIAH LAVE victor buono
ARTHUR O'CONNELL-ROBERT WEBBER-JAMES GREGORY
Sat. Feb. 22 6:00, 8:30, 11:00 PM



UF's BILLY MITCHELL PRILL TEAM
... attends New Orlean's Mardi Gras
ROTC Drill Team
At Mardi Gras
For the 11th year in a row, UFs Billy Mitchell Drill Team
performed in the King Rex Parade of the Mardi Gras in New Orleans
last weekend.
The highly acclaimed drill unit, under the direction of Maj. Jack
Harvey, commander, and C/lst Lt. Robert Stevenson, his executive
officer, was accompanied by Angel Flight sponsors Diane Leach,
Becky Hucks and Patti Donohue and Capt. R. J. Torre and S.Sgt.
G. E. Neal.
The team started this year with over 50 members, the largest group
in the teams history. They participated in the Pre-Growl activities and
the Homecoming Parade during the fall quarter. They also marched in
the Sunshine Christmas Parade in Ocala and the Gainesville Christmas
Parade.
In early February, the team served as honor guard for the Arnold
Air Society Dining-In, which featured Steve Canyon cartoonist Milton
Caniff.
The team will compete in the Florida-FSU Drill Meet in
Tallahassee next quarter. There it will defend its title in the annual
event.
Report Gets f evamping'

The University Report, UFs
unofficial weekly newspaper,
willfirot appear for at least a
week, due to a revamping of
the papers format.
Editor Scott DeGarmo said
the Report is undergoing a
complete facelifting, and
modernizing its equipment.
Were presently bargaining
for a printer, DeGarmo said.
We will have to suspend
publication for a couple of
weeks.
The Report did not appear
last week, but DeGarmo denied
that the reason was for any
other than the restructuring
process.
We have had more than

SHRIMP
SPECIAL
6 jumbo shrimp
ts AO
cole slaw
hush puppies
a*** FREE
PORE-BOY DELIVERY
1029 W. UNIV. AVE DIAL
ACROSS FROM 378-1492

enough copy for the paper both
this week and last, he said. In
fact, were thinking of adding
another full-time reporter to the
staff.
DeGarmo denied any staff
difficulties.
BOWLING
SUNDAY
SPECIAL
35C per game
or 3 games SI.OO
ALL DAY
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

Frats Condemn Slade

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
A resolution supporting
acad e m i c tree d o m and
condemning State Sen. Tom
Slade was passed last week b\
se ve ra 1 academic and
professional fraternities.
The resolution stated. We
recognize the recent demands ot
State Sen. Thomas Slade as a
grave threat to the principles ot
academic freedom and
excellence.
His action is an apparent
attempt to make political capital
at the expense of higher
education in general and of this
university and its president in
particular.
We deplore any attempt b;.
Florida political leaders to seek
direct control over education
and free speech. Such actions
demonstrate a bankruptcy of
political leadership.
The group commended UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
University Chancellor Robert
Mautz, Board of Regents
Chairman D. Burke Kibler and
State Sen. Ralph Turlington for

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I Then WE Invite YOU to Discuss YOUR CAREER |
| with MR. JOSEPH E. COCHRAN or |
| MR. ROBERT M. BANKS, JR. |
I WHO WILL BE ON CAMPUS I
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WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26

Contact your Placement Office for an appointment.
m m
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
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their defense of academic
freedom.
Signing the resolution were
representatives of Sigma Delta
Chi. journalism fraternity: Theta
Sigma Phi. journalism sorority;
Alpha Kappa Delta, sociology
Phi Alpha Theta, history; Phi
Hta Sigma, freshman scholarship
honorary; American Nuclear
Society and Pi Sigma Alpha,
political science.

STCfIK $Hf)K
| Student Special
I (With The Coupon)
Cur Regular 88< Steakburger |
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink I
| $1.03 Value Only 85< plus tax
I 0 Steak ri Shake |
1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville I
j

Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Representatives of Alpfni
Sigma Mu. metallurgical and
materials engineering honorary,
were only empowered to agree
to a resolution commending
OConnell's statement.
Skip Livingston, president of
Pi Sigma Alpha, said that the
meeting of representatives was
called to pass the resolution
because he recognized Slades
action as part of a trend.

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1969

Orange

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHERS EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of College
classification, are required to satisfy
the speech screening requirement
before being admitted into the
Advanced Professional Sequence or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and
elementary block. English and speech
majors do not take the test, as SCH
201 is required in all of their
programs. Appointments now are
being made in Room 124 Norman
Hall.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
CELEBRATION: A festival of
the Arts is now accepting
interview applications from all
students interested in the
program. Students wishing to
participate in this festival,
encompassing all the arts
including music, drama, the
dance and the visual arts, should
complete applications at once.
Such applications are available at
the Student Activities Desk,
Reitz Union; the Office of the
Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts;
Room 129 Tigert Hall, and in
the dean's offices in the other
colleges. CELEBRATION needs
students who want to be part of
the biggest artistic production in
UF history. CELEBRATION
will be presented throughout the
Spring Quarter of 1970.
Students completing
CELEBRATION applications
will be contacted by telephone
shortly.
SCHOLARSHIP/LOANS:
Application for Florida Bankers
Educational Foundation
Scholarship/Loans are now being
accepted by the Department of
Finance and Insurance, Room
204, Matherly Hall. To be
eligible students must be
residents of Florida, intend to
pursue a career in commercial
banking, intend to major in
finance and be classified 3BA by
the of the Spring
quarter. Application blanks and
additional information mav be
obtained from the Department
of Finance and Insurance and
must be completed by February
28.

NEXT CAR
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION O 4* I
sth Avenue at the Houi^g^OOajn^j^^gOpjn^Monday through Friday

SPEAKERS BUREAU: The
Florida Blue Key Speakers
Bureau is accepting applications
for speakers. Applications can be
picked up at the Florida Blue
Key Office, Room 312 Reitz
Union; Information Desk, Reitz
Union; Information Desk, Tigert
Hall; and the Speech
Department Office, Room 335
Arts and Sciences Building.
Applications must be returned
to the Florida Blue Key Office
by 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 21.
PHI ETA SIGMA
SCHOLARSHIPS: Graduating
seniors who plan to work for
graduate or professional degrees
and who are members of Phi Eta
Sigma, Freshman Honor Society,
should get in touch with Dean
Mott, faculty advisor of the local
chapter. Room 129, Tigert Hall.
Local deadline for submitting
applications is Feb. 27, 1969.
Only members of Phi Eta Sigma
are eligible for these gift
scholarships, consisting of at
least nine S3OO scholarships each
year. National deadline for
submitting applications in March
1, 1969.
MURPHREE AREA MOVIE:
Murphree Area Council will
present the movie "Fahrenheit
451" Friday and Saturday, Feb.
2122, at 7 and 9 pm in the
West Wing Main Cafeteria.
Admission is 25c or a Murphree
Activity Card.

BLUB BULLETIN

and

PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement 8( Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
FEB. 21: KOPPERS CO. &
SINCLAIR-KOPPERS Chem,
ChE, EE, ME, MetE.
MONTGOMERY WARD & CO.
- retail trainees, credit mgt,
trainees and controllerships;
some openings in data processing
in corporate offices. CITY OF
LOS ANGELES CE.
SEALTEST FOODS Dairy
Mfg, Acctg. PORT ST. JOE
PAPER CO. usually interviews
for technical and non-technical
majors. CONTAINER CORP.
OF AMERICA usually
interviews for technical majors.
PRENTICE-HALL, INC.
usually interviews for
non-technical majors. BLUE
CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF
FLORIDA non-technical
majors. FLORIDA PUBLIC
SERVICE COMMISSION
both technical and non-technical
majors. U.S. GENERAL
ACCOUNTING OFFICE OFFICE
- OFFICE majors. BOSTON
COLLEGE SCHOOL OF LAW
interviewing for undergraduate
students wishing to attend
Boston College Law School.
FEB. 24: JORDAN
MARSH-FLA any major.
STROMBERG DATA DATAGRAPHICS
GRAPHICS DATAGRAPHICS EE, Computer
Sci, Math, Bus Ad.
HUNT-WESSON FOODS
Mkt, Bus Ad, Lib Arts.
McGILL MANUFACTURING
Co. ME. POTTER, BOWER
& Co. Acctg. CALIFORNIA
STATE GOVERNMENT CE.
FLORIDA STATE LIBRARY
- non-technical majors.
SECURITIES & EXCHANGE
COMMISSION non-technical
majors. PHILIP MORRIS
non-technical majors. KURT
SALMON ASSOCIATES' Inc.
non-technical majors. LOS
ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC
LABORATORY Physics,
Math, Chem, ChE, EE, ME, NE,
MetE. BELL TELEPHONE
LABS physics, chem, math,
metallurgy, electrical engr, engr.
physics. PRATT & WHITNEY
- UNITED AIRCRAFT
technical majors.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF Ilf FORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Friday, February 21
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 am
Hillel Southeastern Institute,
Thunderbird Motel,
Jacksonville, Speaker: Rabbi
Nathan Gaynor.
Rathskellar: Chester's Children,
Folk-Rock Group. Dept, of
Engineering Science &
Mechanics, Speaker: Dr.
Rober Plunkett, "Plastic
Deformation of Plates
under Tramsmerse Impact,"
109 Little Hall, 4:00 pm.
Movie, "Farewell to Arms,"
Union Aud., 6:00, 8:30 &
11:00 pm
Tolbert Area Council Movie,
'The Notorious Landlady,"
7:00 & 9:30 pm; "Revenge of
Frankenstein,'' 12:00
midnight, South Hall Movie
Room. INT'L Council, Talent
Show, University Aud., 8:00
pm.
INT'L Council, Talent Show,
University Aud., 8:00 pm.
IFC: Winter Frolics, "THE
VANILLA FUDGE &
DAVID FRYE," Florida
Gym, 8:00 pm.
Saturday, February 22
Gator Sailing Club, Sailing,
Ground Floor Union, 10:00
am.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Miss. State, away.
Faculty Club Dinner-Dance,
Arredondo Room, Union,
6:00 pm.
Movie, "The Silencers," Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
pm.
Music Dept., Festival of Bands;
T actical Air Force Band
Concert, P. K. Yonge Aud.,
6:45 pm.
Tolbert Area Council Movie,
"The Notorious Landlady,"
7:00 & 9:30 pm; "Revenge of
Frankenstein," 12:00
midnight, South Hall Movie
Room.
INT'L Council, International
Dance, Union Ballroom, 9:00
pm.
Sunday, February 23
Hillel Foundation Lox and Bagel
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 am.
Hillel Foundation Lecture, Hillel
Foundation. Speaker: Dr.
Roy Lambert, 12:00 noon.

Monday, February 24
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 am.
English In Action,
Conversational English
between one American
volunteer and one
International, Baptist Student
Center, 4:00 8:00 pm.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs. Ole
Miss, away.
Christian Scientist Workshop,
361 Union, 6:30 p. m.
Dancing Lessons, 254 & 246
Union, 6:30 pm.
Music Dept.: Gator Variety
Band, 19th Annual Jazz
Concert, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
University Films Committee
Meeting, 150 B Union, 7:00
pm.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 pm.
Florida Players, "AFTER THE
RAIN," Constans Theatre..
8:Q0 pm.
Tuesday, February 25
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 2:45 pm.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 pm.
Supper Club, Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 pm.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 118
Union, 7:30 pm.
Audobon Wildlife Film,
Lecturer: Mary Jane
Dockeray, Union Aud., 8:00
p.m. .>
Florida Players, "AFTER THE
RAIN," Constans Theatre,
UNION BOX OFFICE OFFICE
- OFFICE are now on sale for:
AUDOBON FILM SERIES,
General Public, Faculty &
Staff, $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $75, Children
$.50.
UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES,
10 films. General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $5.00; Univ.
of Fla. Students, $2.50; Univ.
of Fla. Students, 5 films,
$1.50.
FLORIDA PLAYERS: "AFTER
THE RAIN," Univ. of Fla.
Students, $.25, High School
Students, $.75; General
Public, Faculty & Staff
$1.50.
SGP: RUTH PAGE
INTERNATIONAL
BALLET' General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $2.50, $1.50
& $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $2.00, $1.25 &
SI.OO.



UF Recruiters Visit
Poor Tampa Students

By BILL KING
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF high school recruiting program tor
disadvantaged students will visit three Tampa area
high schools today.
John Mica, recruiting program coordinator said
Monday three members of the program will recruit
students from Gibbs Senior High School. St.
Petersburg; Middletown High School, Tampa: and
Blake High School, Tampa.
In the fall of 1%8, by recommendation of the
Action Conference, the committee was formed to
recruit potentially capable disadvantaged high
school students. The program was designed to
attract the culturally, financially, and academically
disadvantaged student to UF.
The purpose of the program is to inform the
disadvantaged student what type of financial
assistance is available and how to apply for it.
Packets are distributed with information on courses,
student regulations, campus housing, and the
volunteers answer specific questions on academic

Foreign Student Center
More Than It Appears

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
On the outside, the Foreign
Student Center is just a
nondescript wooden frame
building across Stadium Road
from Little Hall.
Inside its a colorful
poster-bedecked haven for
international students attending
UF.
Teeming with activity, the
center is a link between the
foreign student and the
administration, community
landlords and the. immigration
office. It is the headquarters for
the six foreign clubs on campus
and the Council of International
Organization (CIO).
During February the flow of
students speaking English in
dozens of different accents
increases, as the CIO presents
International Week Feb. 17-22.
It's our Lxcedrin headache
for the month. jokes Col.
Glenn Farris, center director.
The Chinese. Indian. Arab.
Latin American, Brazilian, and
Persian clubs join to present six
nights of international activities.
A banquet, film show, and
beautx contest have alread\
taken place.
Tonight at 8 in the Universit)
Auditorium an international
talent show will be presented,
featuring entertainment from all
over the world.
Saturday's activities include a
HO LY
TRI I NITY
SUNDAYS
8*9:3011
ALL KINDS OF
PEOPLE ARE
' WELCOME
/ II6NEIST
X EPISCOPAL
A CHURCH

reception for all foreign students
from 2 to 5 p.m. at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Lucas;
and an informal dance in the
Reitz Union at c ) p.m. All
activities are free.
The student center is also the
best place on campus to start a
foreign stamp collection. Farris
receives so many inquiries from
hopeful students all over the
world that replies cost $450 a
month in air mail postage.
Farris answers every letter and
sends out a brochure of
information. Most foreign
students who write dont reply
after finding out the admission
and financial requirements of
the UF.

Whats NEW at the
BOOKSTORE*?
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EVA TROUT BOWEN
A SMALL TOWN IN GERMANY LE CARRE
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ALL YOU KNOW IS THE FACTS MAYER
THE ARMS OF KRUPP MANCHESTER
LYRICAL AND CRITICAL ESSAYS CAMUS
THE FBI IN OUR OPEN SOCIETY OVERSTREET
THE AMERICAN CHALLENGE SERVAN-v
SCHREBER
THE TRAGEDY OF LYNDON GOLDMAN
JOHNSON
Store Naurs 800 A M M.
Saturday" 9:00 A.M.
* Campus Shop & Bookstore

requirements and financial aid.
A counselor from Howard Blake High School in
Tampa told Mica. "As far as she was concerned the
UF was still in the middle ages when it comes to
helping the disadvantaged students.
Mica said he agrees with the statement the
counselor made.
We have an obligation to help these
disadvantaged students enter the university, he
said. As far as helping the students within the
reasonably near area of UF we have failed.
High schools in the Daytona, Orlando, Sanford,
St. Petersburg, Tampa and Tallahassee areas have
been selected for the recruitment program.
The committee members are half black and half
white volunteers.
Mica said. We have found with a mixed group of
black and white the committee workers can
communicate with the disadvantaged students
better.
Committee members arc Emerson Thompson,
Cheri Gill. Helene Rutansky, Harry Lamb, Jim
McGee, Bob Rosenburg, David Horn, Kitty Oliver
and Mica.

Advising present and future
students is just one of the
activities of the center. Farris
also works with the Gainesville
Council for International
Friendship, the Foreign Friends
Committee, the Baptist Student
Center, and other groups
interested in the foreign student.
We consider ourselves the
super ombudsman, Farris said.
When the arrives
in Gainesville, the center sees
that he is met and helped to find
housing and furniture.
Throughout the year, Farris is
available for counseling and
special assistance to the
students.

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Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Fe bruary 21,1969

| Tough Policy Backed

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (UPI) A deluge of letters and
: telegrams hit the office of the president of the University of
: Notre Dame Thursday backing his get tough policy for
disruptive student demonstrations.
: The Rev. Theodore M. Hesburghs office said messages
: poured in after he appeared on NBCs Today television show
: Thursday morning to discuss the order he issued Monday
: threatening suspension, expulsion and arrest for die-hard
: demonstrators.

j Notre Dame said that within 48 hours after the policy
: statement was issued, 269 telegrams and letters were received,
: only two of which were critical or negative.
: The messages came from nearly every state and were signed
: by trustees, parents of students, alumni, individual students and
: groups of students, faculty members at Notre Dame and other
: schools, business leaders, editors and the general pub he, a school
: spokesman said.
: The spokesman said Thursdays mail was among the heaviest
: volumes ever received at a Notre Dame presidents office.
Protest News Blanked

CHICAGO (UPI) The editor
of the Chicago Tribune said
Thursday response was 12-to-l
favorable to the newspapers
protest against student
disorders.
The Tribunes protest
announced in a front page
editorial in Thursday mornings
edition, was to refrain for one
day from printing news of
student protests on campuses
around the country.
For this day we follow the
fashion the editorial said. We
protest the attention, concern
and indulgence that have been

School Closing Requested
On Malcolm X Death Date

DETROIT (UPI) The
Detroit Federation of Teachers
asked the city school board
Thursday to close schools
Friday, the fourth anniversary of
Malcolm Xs death, because of
recent disturbances.
Mary Ellen Riordan, president
of the federation, said the
request is being made in view of
the recent serious disturbances
in the schools and the near-tragic
incident at Butzel Junior High
School Wednesday.
The Board of Education
turned down the request, saying
that all schools would be open
for both students and teaches
Friday. However, those students
with notes from their parents
would be excused from classes

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CHEVROLET
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accorded to student
protesters... We think they have
generated news out of all
proportion to their numbers and
importance.
Clayton Kirkpatrick, editor of
the Tribune, said the newspaper
received a number of telephone
calls and they were 12-to-l
favorable to the one-day
experiment.
Kirkpatrick said the Tribune
would be covering student
rebellions as usual in its Friday
morning editions. We have an
obligation to cover the news, so
were going back to it today, he
said.

to attend special functions
commemorating the day, a
school spokesman said.
A white substitute science
teacher, Marc M. Weglarski, 25,
was stabbed at the junior high
school Wednesday while trying
to remove a group of outsiders
from the hallways. Police
arrested a 16-year-old suspect
earlier Thursday.
Mrs. Riordan said the teachers
fear there are similar dangerous
situations developing in many
schools tomorrow.
The stabbing of Weglarski,
who had been at the nearly
all-black school for only three
days, climaxed a week~ of
disorders at the school.

Public Functions Group
Begins Work In Spring

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
The Public Functions
Authority, which was created by
the Student Senate in September
to coordinate all student studentsponsored
sponsored studentsponsored public functions, will
begin its duties in the spring
quarter.
Alan Howes, chairman of
14-member group, said the
purpose of the group as set forth
in the student body statutes, is
not to censor functions but to
coordinate so no conflicting
events will be scheduled.
Howes said the authority will
provide, for the first time, a
central clearing house and
assure the student body of a
balanced program of activities
that meet the desires of the
students.
The statutes provide that all
organizations sponsoring public
function will present a calendar
of events two weeks prior to the
start of every quarter.
Members of the authority are
representatives from: Blue Key,
Florida Players, IFC, Interhall
Council, ODK, the Rathskeller,
Union Program Council, Student
Senate, student body, University
Religious Association, Accent,
and SG Productions.
Final authority for decisions
concerning which speakers or
programs may appear on campus
rests with the Committee on
Public Functions Policy, and
Lectures of the University
Senate. The 20 member group
contains 4 students. Its last
action was on the planned
appearance of U.S. Rep. Adam
Clayton Powell, Howes said.
We will provide for the
students information on fire
laws, limitations of the various
university buildings and
coordination with the physical
plant department of the
university, Howes said.
Mrs. Eleanor Roberts, public
(Shannon?"
WRECKER
7th St. & SERVIC,jr 372-1379
W. Univ. NIGHT 376-4009

functions manager, who also
serves as secretary ex officio to
the Committee said the SG
Authority will begin to assume
duties concerning solely student
functions.
She also said a policy change

m DUB'S
PRESENTS
THE
DYNAMIC INFERNOS
\* *,v\
DUB S LOUNGE 1
Council of International Organizations
International
Week
Weekend Activities
Friday: Talent Show 8 P.M.
University Aud
Saturday: Reception for
foreign students at
Mr. & Mrs. Charles
Lucas home.
Dance: 9 P.M.
Union Ball Room
o
Ir
\

is now being drafted by the
committee which will absolve
them of the duty of approving
individual speakers but will
retain ultimate authority under
the president for approving
events.



Accent 69s film, Free 1 by
1, will be part of a double
feature presentation of the
University Film Committee
Sunday, March 2, in the Reitz
Union Auditorium.
Greta Garbos film, Anna

Tjgji g
-W* W '" K Hk., V
f <. : Ik
I
W- l||i W: aPMHj
.:*K| %|S r
i§ &!jE||y, j
JAMES JOBB FILMING DURING ACCENT PROGRAM
... for his film* "Free 1 by 1," to be presented March 2
at
tlie
flicks..

PLAZA I Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
The Wrecking Crew with Dean
Martin, Elke Sommer & Sharon
Tate at 1:50, 3:45, 5:40, 7:40 &
9:35.
PLAZA II Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
Belle de Jour with Catherine
Deneuve at 1:55, 3:50, 5:50,
7:40 & 9:40.
CENTER I-Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: The Stalking Moon with
Gregory Peck & Eva Marie Saint
at 1:40, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 &
9:40.
CENTER 11-Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: The Fixer with Alan
Bates at 2:12, 4:34, 6:56 &
9:18.
FLORIDA -Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: If He Hollers, Let Him
Go with Dana Wynter &
Raymond St. Jacques at 7 and
MARTIN AND STEVENS
...in The Silencers
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BY FILMS COMMITTEE
Garbo, Accent Flicks Planned

Karenina will be the feature
film.
Free 1 by 1 presents
individual freedom, the problem
of identity, and the forces
restricting freedom as the major
themes of Accent. Produced by

10:40. Also The High
Commissioner with Rod Taylor
& Christopher Plummer at 9.
GAINESVILLE
DRIVE-IN Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
Blood Fiend at 7:07, Blood
Drinkers at 8:52 & Blood
Creature at 10:25.
STATE Fri. & Sat.:
Revolution at 3,5, 7 & 9.
Sun.: Hagbard and Signe at 3,
5,7 &9.
UNION FILMS
COMMITTEE Fri.: Farewell
to Arms with Rock Hudson
and Jennifer Jones at 6 & 9.
Sat.: The Silencers with Dean
Martin & Stella Stevens at 6,
8:30 & 11.

TOMORROW SATURDAY FEB. 22
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James Jobb, 4JM, the film
maintains a stark mood
counterpointing visual comedy
and a serious sound track
In the planning stages for the
Spring Quarter is an Intergalactic
Film Festival which would
feature mixed media
presentations as well as films.
Experimental film-making as a
combined effort of the film
committee is also being planned.
Students on the production
committee are Donald Tryk,
Jamej Jobb, John Havfland,
Herbert Ellis, Richard West with
Dwight Godwin and Jerry
Uelsman as sponsoring faculty.
The University Film
Committee will have permanent
faculty members form several of
the colleges on campus. R.C.
Craven (University Gallery
Director), Jerry Uelsman (Art
Department), Dr. A.J. Jacobs
(College of Journalism and
Communications) and Dwight
Godwin (Teaching Resources)
are participating.
This assistance from the
faculty will give the film
committee more continuity
from term to term since the
student membership is very
transient.
The University Film
Committee is now selling
subscriptions for the eight
remaining films scheduled from
Marchto June. Presentation dates
Hume Dinner
The Hume Area cafeteria
comes to life Sunday at 5:30
p.mr with a candlelight
atmosphere and live
entertainment from dormitory
residents.
Hume officials have issued an
invitation to any student wishing
to dine with area people at no
extra cost aside from the meal.
Dicr Holme/
Jeweler/
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

for Winter quarter are March 2,
16, and 23; and for Spring
quarter are March 30, April 13,
27, May 11,25, and June 1.
Subscriptions are now
available at the Union Box
Office. The cost of series
admission is $2.50 to UF
students and $5 to all others. A
special price of five admissions
for $1.50 is offered to students.

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Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

ROD TAYLOR stars in
"THE HIGH COMMISSIONER"
as a tough Australian
detective sent to arrest
his nation's toD statesman
for murder. Now playing
at the Suburbia Drive-In Theatre.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1969

The Gainesville Little
Theatres fourth play of the
season, Ira Wallachs The
Absence of a Cello, will open
Thursday.
Directed by Tom Godey, the
comedy revolves around the
problems of Professor Andrew
Pilgrim, played by Ralph
Thompson, who has gone

| FLORIDA PLAYERS PRODUCTION
Eleven Survive Flood
'After The Rain Falls
m
P 1
v ;y£ KStesi* ggr tfSKfi**"
r ;> ** >
g, C/ ;
1et,,.....
."n,£ pr' i*'?
The Florida Players' Winter production, "After the Rain," opens
Monday evening at 8 in Constans Theatre.
The photo above pictures the complete cast posed on a thrust stage,
used for the first time in this performance.
Players include Claude Pinkston, familiar to campus audiences for
his performances over the past four years in the romantic lead of Alan
Armitage; Ray Dage, last seen in "The Knight of the Burning Pestle,"
cast in the part of Arthur Henderson, leader of the Survivors of the
Great Rain of 1970; and Rich Council, Stewart Soloman, Dana
Preisler, Ruth Johns, Jack Farrell and Janice Hobbs.
Duane Ford (top) Captain Hunter who tries to prove that man
can live by "Glub" alone and Dan Jesse (bottom) a churchman
who "drifted into the ministry" are pictured below.

1
Wm
fl ' 99

Professor Has Problems In GLT Play

bankrupt commercially pursuing
an idea after his university
research grant was cut off.
Despite the misgivings of his
authoress wife, Celia, played by
Kathy Dantzler, he decides the
only way out of his predicament
is to seek a high paying position
with a large corporation.
Otis Clifton (Bill Stensgaard)

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is the interviewer Balw in-Nelson,
Inc. sends to see Dr. Pilgrim,
who is coached for the
experience by his Radcliffe
daughter, Joanna (Janice Tesh),
her friend from the Wharton
School of Finance, Perry
Littlewood (Steve Lerman), and
Perry's cleptomaniac lush of a
grandma. Emma (Ellen Lau).

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Despite their poor counsel,
things turn out all right in the
end. thanks to the wiles of Dr.
Pilgrims attractive sister. Marian
(Marie Thesese Welch).
The play will be presented
Feb. 27 and 28 and March 1,6,
7 and 8. Curtain time is 8:30
p.m.

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Reserveions arc now being
accepted by telephone. Theatre
parties for twenty or more
persons should be arranged as far
in advance as possible by calling
Mrs. James R. Milan instead of
the theatre.
The theatre is located at 403
NW 16th Blvd.



AWARDS PRESENTED AT INTERMISSION
Vanilla Fudge To Head
IFC Winter Frolics Bill

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Vanilla Fudge and
comedian-mimic David Frye will
perform tonight at IFC Winter
Frolics in Florida Gym at 8:30
pm.
The Fudge are a nationally
reknowned pop group known
for their musical experimenta experimentation.
tion. experimentation. The group consists of Marie
Stein, organist; Carmine Appice,
drums; Tim Bogert, bass; and
Vinnie Martell, the lead guitarist.
Although not always
applauded for their recording
achievement, they are never met
with an indifferent reaction.
And neither is the group
indifferent about their music.
According to Bogert, I can
express myself much better
through music . that's our
whole thing after all, its our
mode of expression.
As for experimentation,
Were trying to see how much
we can get out of a four-piece
group without any overdubbing
or false sound effects.
David Frye, fast becoming
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mime will arrive on the UF
campus with raves from
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show.
His popularity is enhanced by
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includes the voice and the look
of un theatrical people like
William F. Buckley, Nelson
Rockefeller and Tricky-Dickie
Nixon.
During intermission the IFC
will present the Outstanding
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Friday, February 21,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1969

Alliqator Services
The UF Gators came out of
their recent home stand with
flying colors but now face their
biggest road trip since Tommy
Bartlett took over the Gator
coaching reins in 1966.
In five days, the Gators

pH|Gator Fans
.W The Greatest
Gator fans, youVe the greaVesl. MARC DU N N
The coaches think so, the players think so, the state press thinks so.
I think so, but for some reason Tennessee and Kentucky don't think
so.
But we cant please everyone.
Whats important is that we please ourselves. Im sure that nothing
would please us more right now than wins over Mississippi State and
Mississippi this Saturday and Monday.
A student body that gives its athletic teams the support that we
have given ours is hard to find.
But it isnt time to let up yet. If we are going to get that National
Invitational Tournament bid, we are going to have to beat the
Mississippi twins.
The NIT people are clever. They want to invite teams that will
prove to be a good drawing card, so that Madison Square Garden will
be filled to capacity during the tournament. What really hurts is that
we have lost six of eleven games on the road.
Now if we should win both games this weekend our record on the
road will be better than .500, which is respectable.
Unfortunately it isnt possible for five or ten thousand of us to go
to Mississippi for the games. So lets do the next best thing.
The basketball team leaves from the Four Winds Airport, which is
directly north of the Gainesville City Airport, at 2 p.m. Since we all
cant make the trip lets be at the airport at 1:30 to give the Gators a
big sendoff.
They wont have much crowd support in Starkville or Oxford, but
if we let them know how much their victory means to us Im sure
they wont let us down.
MSU-UF Clash

(EDITORS NOTE: The
following is a Mississippi State
Sports Information Release.)
STATE COLLEGE, Miss.
Red hot UF, fresh from
conquests over the Southeastern
Conference No. 1 and 2 teams,
Kentucky and Tennessee,
invades the Mississippi State
gymnasium for the SEC
Television Game of the Week
Saturday afternoon.
Coach Tommy Bartletts
talented Gators edged State
70 64 in the Florida
gymnasium Jan. 25. Neal Walk,
the Gators 6-10 All-American
center, had 28 points and 18
rebounds in the first meeting of
the teams this season.
Manuel Washington, 6-4
senior forward from Paragould,
Ark., who is the leading State
scorer with a 14.4 average, paced
the Bulldogs with 22 points in
the Gainesville battle.
The Gators upset Kentucky

FLORIDA PLAYERS presents
JOHN BOWELS 1
ttir w f Umbl
THEATRE TO {Z&B j
.EX TEND]THE MIND" J I

UF Hottest Team In SEC

knocked off nationally rank'd
Kentucky, Tennessee and LSU
and now must face Mississippi
State and Ole Miss on the road
this weekend.
Andy Owens has been the gun
in their recent string of victories.
The 6-5. 210-pound forward

on TV last Saturday, 82-81,
handing the powerful Wildcats
their first conference setback.
Boyd Welsch, a 6-1 senior guard,
hit two free throws in the final
nine seconds to bring about the
upset.
Coach Joe Dan Golds
Bulldogs, who whipped
arch-rival Ole Miss, 64-60,
Saturday night in their last
outing, are tied with LSU for
seventh place, each with 5-8
records.
Kentucky is the SEC leader
with a 12-1 record,, with
Tennessee in second place'with a
103 mark. One of the Vol
defeats was at the hands of State
in Tennessees first conference
game.
Center John Guyton led State
with 17 points Saturday night,
with Jim Martin and Chuck
Wade contributing 14 and 12
points respectively. Martin also
had a game high of 15 rebounds.

from Tampa has averaged 18.8
in the last ten Gator games. In
ten games the Gators have won
eight and have dropped two,
The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
SponsEdhor
Sports Editor
*>

Gym Meet
The UF Gymnastic Club,
sponsored by the Intramural
Department has a meet today
against FSU.
Competition will be in both
the mens and womens divisions
with action getting under way at
4 p.m. at the south end of the
gym floor.

World Campus Afloat
is a college that does more
than broaden horizons.
It sails to them and beyond.
Once again, beginning in October of 1969, the
World Campus Afloat program of Chapman
College and Associated Colleges and Universities
will take qualified students, faculty and staff
into the world laboratory.
In-port programs relevant to fully-accredited IK
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both by a one point largin.
The Gators are slowly
breathing down Tennessees
neck for second place honors in
the Southeastern Conference
and victories this weekend
would certainly-help the cause.
We have been playing good
basketball and our boys did a
whale of a job against Kentucky
and Tennessee, but now we face
two tough teams and we will
have to play flawless basketball
to win, Bartlett said.
The Gators will take to
Mississippi a 14-7 overall record
and a 9-5 mark in Conference
play. UF is currently the hottest
team in the league as they have
won their last eight out of nine
games.

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Mayor Proclaims Saturday
Johnnie Lee Samuels Day

PROCLAMATION
WHEREAS, Johnnie Lee
Samuels has continually proven
himself to be an outstanding
athlete of which every
citizen of Gainesville may well
be proud, and
WHEREAS, Johnnie Lee
Samuels has been restricted in
his efforts to enter athletic
competitions due to the fact
that he is deaf, and
WHEREAS, Coach Jim Carnes
in an attempt to make it possible
for Johnnie Lee Samuels to
participate in the Deaf Olympics
to be held in Yugoslavia, has
challenged the fraternity and the
sorority systems to help him
raise sufficient funds to send this
athlete on this courageous
endeavor, and
WHEREAS, the fraternity and
sorority systems answer to
Coach Carnes is the Gator
Olympics which will take place
on February 22nd at Florida
Track, and the proceeds from
which will be used to assist
Johnnie Lee Samuels monetarily
toward his venture to the Deaf
Olympics in Yugoslavia.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, T. E.

Gators Lack Depth
On The Gridiron
The most unique and competitive situation yet to greet a Ray
Graves coached UF football team will begin to unfold March 31 when
the Gators open spring practice, to be concluded with the Orange-Blue
game May 3.
For the first time since Ive been at Florida we will start spring
drills with virtually every starting job wide open, said Graves.
Although we return some starters from last falls team we have few,-
if any, spots locked up. Its a wideopen situation.
The Gators will practice on Monday, Wednesdday, Friday and
Saturday each week to get in the 20 sessions allowed in a 36-day
period, as per NCAA regulations.
Among the problem areas are tight end, the overall kicking game,
depth in the offensive line, backfield and at quarterback, defensive
help at end, tackle, linebacker and in the secondary.
We are badly in need of a starter and depth at tight end, Graves
says. In addition, we need help in the offensive line and have little in
the way of depth at quarterback or running back.
While the Gators return a good portion of last years defensive
team, Graves is not satisfied with this department, either.
We return many starters but we lack depth at almost every
position, Graves said. Also, our defense last year gave up more
points and more yards than many weve had in the past. I don t
expect anybody to be self-satisfied when spring practice opens.
The primary reason for this is we dont have depth in the positions
where we have top front-liners, he said. And we have too many
positions where our first stringer will be only an average football
player.
The Gators will be attempting to replace 21 departing lettcrmen.
including all-Americans Guy Dennis and Larry Smith.

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* MAYOR SIGNS PROCLAMATION
. .. Sykes (I) and Williams in mayor's office

(TED) WILLIAMS,
Mayor-Commissioner of the City
of Gainesville, Florida, do

hereby proclaim February 22,
1969 as
JOHNNIE LEE SAMUELS DAY
in the City of Gainesville,
Florida, and urge all citizens of
our community to give their
support to this worthwhile cause
in the true spirit of our
community-friendship to all our
neighbors.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I
have hereunto set my hand and
caused to be affixed the official
seal of the City of Gainesville,
Florida this 10th day of
February, A.D. 1969.
T. E. WILLIAMS,
MAYOR-COMMISSIONER
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Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

f. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1969

A n |i|)nVV | [ mm-irm
!l |||||4l VII IV fl

Yummy-Yummies Quench Fans Tummies

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Selling food and drinks at
sporting events is a dog gone big
guessing game.
We have to consider
everything from the weather to
the action involved in the sport
to the time of day, says Bill
Squires, director of sports
concessions at the University of
Florida.
For example, coffee is not
even offered for sale during the
Gators football season because
of the hot weather. But an
average of 75,000 cold drinks
and 7,000 hot dogs per game are
sure sellers.
Concession sales are also
influenced by the sporting event
involved, says the gray-haired
food boss.
In basketball games, nobody
wants to get up out of his seat
for fear of missing any of the
action. Consequently as few as
2,000 soft drinks and 250

hotdogs are sold during a
basketball game. But in baseball,
a relatively slow-moving sport,
we have tremendous sales
throughout the entire game with
the many inning breaks.
Squires toughest chore is
predicting just how much of
what food fans will stuff into
their mouths during a game.
If Im over, Im wrong; if Im
under, Im still wrong.
Ice is the most crucial
commodity in concessions here,
says Squires.
When we miscalculate on ice,
theres nothing we can do but let
it melt. We generally order
100,000 pounds ,of ice for a
football game regardless of the
anticipated crowd. When youre
out of ice, youre just no good.
The psychology of ordering
food for any game is not only
influenced by weather and the
speed of the sport but also the
expected course of the game. If
the home team is winning by a
comfortable margin, more fans

MJmL
GATORADE COLA ON THE ROCKS
. . 'disappointing response'

will get out of their seats to buy
concessions. In an extremely
close game food sales suffer,
despite the fact that fans chew

Potter Moulds
1969 NET Hopes
By JEFF FRANK
Alligator Correspondent
Every weekday afternoon since spring practice began in January,
Gator tennis Coach Bill Potter has gazed through the wisps of his pipe
smoke and smiled at the action he views on his six varsity tennis
courts.
In his 17 years as tennis coach at the UF, Potter has had many good
teams, compiling an admirable 24471 record. Yet perhaps none of
those teams has given the affable Potter as much to smile about as this
years squad.
Take for instance the fact that he has all six starters from last years
team returning, a team which compiled a 32-1 record, won the SEC
championship, and finished fifth in the NCAA. Included on this team
are Armistead Neely, winner of the SEC first division doubles and a
1968 All-American; Jamie Pressly, winner of SEC second division
singles and honorable mention All-American; Steve Beeland, winner of
the SEC third division singles and first division doubles and who with
Neely got to the quarter-finals in the NCAA doubles.
Add to these Gregg Hilley, who had a 231 match record, Paul
Lunetta and Will Sherwood who were finalists in fifth and sixth

division singles respectively in
the SEC tournament last year,
and you have an impressive
lineup.
Then there is a freshman
named Charlie Owens who will
probably play within the top
three on this years squad.
Owens, from Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
won the U. S. Interscholastics
last year, and was ranked first in
the South, and seventh in the
nation. Potter has the problem
of where to play Owens, but it is
a problem many coaches wish
they had.
The Gators open the season
Feb. 28, against Rollins in
Winter Park. The first home
match is March 5, against
Jacksonville University.
Neely, Pressly and Owens are
favored to hold down the top
three spots on the basis of play
thus far.
This years 24-match schedule
is even tougher than last years.
In addition to the always strong
Tennessee, Georgia and FSU
teams, the Gators face Miami
and UCLA, both of whom
finished ahead of the UF in the
NCAA.
The UCLA match is part of a
California trip which also
includes matches with Stanford
and Oregon.
Asked about the 1969
outlook, Potter says, Its a
coachs dream to know you have

every player back from a team that won an SEC title and placed fifth
in the NCAA.
Neely and Pressly are truly All-Americans and with the help of
newcomer Charlie Owens, I feel we will be stronger this year than we
were in 1968,

and drink faster during tense
moments. ..
Though the Gators dont have
any night games, at home,

I ft
I I
PAUL LUNETTA
... Miami product
v > *9
, ~.v>-:; ss f'" ; 1 w t V .;, \
CHARLIE OWENS
... frosh netman

Squires finds that sales would
also differ with the time of day.
Chilly night games would mean
coffee and hot chocolate
whereas afternoon games slated
just after a fan may have eaten
lunch are not the best times for
foodstuffs.
The most surprising
concession sales this year, says
Squires, has been popcorn.
Most disappointing response
has come in sale of Gatorade
Cola.
I dont know what it is, but
sports fans would rather stick
with the traditional Coke and
Pepsi, Squires commented. It
just hasnt caught on.
He says he does not foresee
any price increases soon. He
does, however, anticipate the
addition of pizza sales in coming
years.
Are more Italians coming to
the games?
No. Its just that pizza has
caught on in these parts,
especially with the students.



FOR DAYTONAS *208.000 SUNDAY
Ford, Dodge: Who Has A Better Idea?

DAYTONA BEACH, FLA.
(UPI) David Pearson in a Ford
Talladega and Bobby Isaac in a
Dodge Charger swept to victory
Thursday in a pair of 125-mile
races to determine the starting
lineups for Sundays $208,000
Daytona 500.
The two sprint races, marred
by a number of minor mishaps
which kept yellow flags flying,
set up a tight duel between the
Fords and Dodges in the worlds
richest stock car race.
Pearson, of Spartanburg, S.C.,
and defending 500
Cale Yarborough of Charlotte,
N.C., led five Fords across the
finish line in front in the first
race. Isaac led a one-two-three
sweep for Dodge in the second
race.
Pearson, who turned record
laps of more than 190 miles an
hour, will start in the second
position on the inside row
Sunday beside pole-sitter Buddy
Baker in a Dodge. Baker won the
pole two weeks ago with average
of 188.901 miles an hour.
More Fords
Starting behind Baker,
Pearson and Yarborough on the
inside row Sunday will be Ford
drivers Donnie Allison,
Hueytown, Ala., A. J. Foyt,
Houston, and Betty Parsons of
Detroit. It will be Parsons first
appearance in the 500 after he
won last weeks ARCA 300
race here.
Isaac, who already owned the
outside starting position for the
500, was followed in the second
race by Dodge drivers Charlie
Glotzbach, Georgetown, Ind.,

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and Paul Goldsmith of Munster,
Ind. Fourth was Californian
Swede Savage in a 1968
Mercury.
Pearsons winning average was
151.181 mph, Isaacs was
151.668.
Both Bobby Allison of
Hueytown, Ala. and Richard
Petty of Randleman, N.C., ran
into" troubles in the races, but
both will be ready to run
Sunday. Allison had a rear

TostaPPeteMarovich
Delivers Frat Punch

Chi Phi continued on its
merry way toward the Blue
League Presidents Cup Tuesday
night with a 50-26 win over Phi
Gamma Delta. Once again it was
Steve Kaufman who led the way
with 16 points. Bruce Weeks was
not far behind with 13 for the
Chis.
Phi Tau lowered the boom on
Delta Sigma Phi shattering them
56-12. Ken Fowle paced the Phi
Taus with 20 big points. Manny
Carrino added 12 and Jay
Heckler came through with 10
more for the winners.
Alpha Gamma Rho plowed
under Phi Psi in a 49-16
slaughter. Marion Caradine
Riviere, Miller Cause and Pistal
Pete Marovich each scored 10
points for the AGRs.
Delta Chi took a firm grip on
second place in the league with a
46-20 win over the TEKEs. Bob
Peck racked up 23 points for the
Delta Chis.
In Orange competition, TEP

window pop out of his Dodge
Charger while leading the first
race and it slowed him down.
Petty slapped the wall twice in
the second race and finished a
full lap behind the leaders.
Won $1,200 Each
Pearson and Isaac each won
$1,200 for their victories. Isaac
started at the pole in the second
race and Baker at the pole in the
first race, but Baker dropped out
after only three laps to save my

played as though it really wasnt
interested in keeping the league
lead as they dropped a 35-29
decision to the Lambda Chis.
Killian Byme dumped in 13 for
the Lammies and Rick Perillo
scored 15 for the TEPs. The
Lambda Chis missed only one
free throw all night and TEP
played a sloppy disorganized
game.
Sigma Nu, with guard Eddie
Todd and Chuick Schaffer
scoring freely from the outside,
ripped Pi Lam 38-24. Schaffer
scored 15 and Todd scored 11 in
leading the way.

kIB BSm vs m B
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engine for Sunday.
The two short races opened a
weekend of auto competition at
the speedway which will build
up to the rich 500-miler on
Sunday, expected to draw
110,000 stock car buffs from all

i- r'i[Y_ 7 wf REPRESENTATIVES I
: LtLy J Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
Dan Sapp Bill Worsham
Tom Stewart Arlie Wat kin son
George Corl Harold OeVane
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Friday, February 21, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

over the nation.
On Friday, 33 sports cars will
battle over Daytonas 3.81-mile
track and road course in the first
annual Citrus 250 grand
touring race. Total purse is
$25*300.

Page 23



Page 24

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 21, 1969

(j*\ |\ treat your date to a delicious II
: r An Arby's Never Goes To Waist J \ *\ \ dinner at the Rathskeller II
I treat your date to a delicious 11
* ni AW*- % f I I llirr I/ | AND sta v for a 9 reat evening
PLAYER of the WEEK 1 I
Happy Hour(s) | I
Creators of rby's ast Beef Sandwich 1968, rby's
nc> I I j
I every friday I
1405 S.W. 13th Street I IjM U. of F. Faculty Club, I
Just South of the Underpass I | Rathskeller T I
. I A XCheck Our List I
\TllPl Andy Owens For Your Needs I
Ulvl I TEXTBOOKS I
Andy Owens, big No. 45 from Tampa, is this week's Player of the KIF\A/ AKIH USED
Week, for his fantastic play against Kentucky and Tennessee last nCYY
I w k ARCHITECTURAL
* Order Your I Owens, who ripped the buckets and burned the baskets in both EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES!
v M I 9 ames hit for 17 against nationally ranked Kentucky Saturday ADT Cl IPM ICC
m I afternoon and 22 points against Tennessee Monday night. The Ml\l OsJ rrUCj
I Gators won both games, by one point against Kentucky and two
I against Tennessee. STUDY LAMPS
I gym outfits
Seminole I o wens has been hot in the last four games, also hitting 20 against
Vanderbilt and 23 against L.S.U. As a matter of fact, he has hit in C\AIF ATCMIPTC
I double figures in his last 11 games. 3VYCMI3niM3
I COLLEGE PETS
II III I Also in contention were Owen's teammate Neal Walk, high jumper Cf\\ I Cf*C CEAI
wm I I I Ron Jourdan, who leaped 7-feet-2 in Knoxville, and swimmer Jamie vv/LLtVJt OCML
nil II I Murphy, who was the only double winner against East Carolina. MASCOT STATIONERY
I FILM AND DEVELOPING
j SERVICE
(juupuA Sw/a
in my name. Ej I I
M I have enclosed $ ($6.00 par copy) K V
1 I RflflKSTflF
cm You will be notified in the Alligator when the H UUUI \t 1 I LJI ||_
J yearbook! have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole,
mmmSmmSmmmmmm branch stores-medical center, broward,
I TR| SHOp JENN|NGS TOWERS & The UNION