Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Gator coaches and players are convinced that
fantastic crowd support is winning games. Ray

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol 61, No. 81

Reitz Union Schedules
Megill Question Session

Dr. Kenneth Megill will be on
the Firing Line Sunday night
as guest of honor at a question
and answer session sponsored by
the Reitz Union Program
Council.
Megill has been the center of a
controversy that arose when
State Senator Tom Slade, urged
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell to fire him.
Slades ire was aroused when
he read a Tampa Tribune report
of a speech Megill made at an
Accent 69 session, advocating
student control of the UF and
calling black power the most
significant political force of this
century.
Another legislator who
reacted to Megills speech, might
come to the meeting Sunday.
Rep. James Tillman has been
contacted by the program

Shoot To Kill A Tough Decision

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
A suspected felon running
from the scene of a crime in
Florida may be legally
damned if he stops or dead if
he doesnt.
Under Florida law, a police
officer is empowered to use
force necessary to stop a
felony. Homicide is justified
when necessarily committed
by public officers in arresting
felons fleeing justice.
The penalty for
committing a felony in
Florida may be imprisonment
or death according to state
law.

GIVEM HELL, GATORS

University of Florida, Gainesville

council but has not yet
committed himself. He came to
attention recently when he
pre-filed a bill in the Legislature
calling for a legislative
subcommittee to investigate
radicalism on Florida campuses.
The Megill issue has fast
become a rallying-point for UF
students, facultv and

Student Unrest, Visitors
Topics For Senate Meet
University Senate Will meet today at 3:30 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium to discuss control of student unrest on campus and
non-member attendance, of senate meetings. The senate will vote on a
resolution saying UF President Stephen C. OConnell should exercise
his control in cases of student rebellion and give OConnell a vote of
confidence. Also to be considered will be a proposal allowing the
public to attend meetings.
Non-members were asked to leave the last meeting of the senate
when it was noted the bylaws prohibited their presence.

No person takes anothers
life without accounting for it,
irrespective of circumstances
surrounding the incident,
said Virgil Stuart, St.
Augustine Police Chief.
Stuart said police officers
use as much force as is
necessary to make the arrest.
UF police officers have
training sessions on the pistol
range conducted by training
officer Lt. Dudley Goulden.
The police officers use
targets showing a silhouette
of a mans body. The officers
are taught to shoot at the
largest target, which is the
trunk of the body, Goulden
said.

Graves calls this support "the best in the SEC." See
story page 14.

:: ALLIGATOR ANALYSIS

Thursday, February 20, 1969

administrators, who have
condemned Slades action as
legislative meddling.
The question and answer
session will be in rooms 122 and
123 of the Reitz Union, Sunday
at 7:30 p.m. The public is
invited, according to Union
Program Council President Bob
White.

%

$7 MILLION ESTIMATED
Coliseum Plans
Go Into Motion

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
The first phase of a five-phase
advance planning schedule on
the proposed UF $7 million
activites coliseum begins
Monday when planning directors
depart for a tour of other
conference facilities.
The preliminary tour will be
made by Walter Matherly,
director of planning and W. E.
Jones, another university
planner. They will tour facilities
at Georgia, Auburn, Tennessee,
Illinois, Mississippi, North
Carolina, Alabama and Louisiana
State.
This initial tour will cost
$1,340, according to Matherlys
estimates.
Second step is a three month
study that should be completed
June 1 at a cost of $2,800 to
determine expected revenue
sources, funding plans, capital
and operating costs, and
projected method of operation.
This should be conducted by
an on-campus consultant and
will recommend continuation, or
changes in the planning effort,
says Matherly.
Main building features,
qualities of different types of
space to be contained,
preliminary cost estimates and
location plan will be determined
in this report, according to the
director.
Step three: a feasibility study
for joint operation between the
university, city of Gainesville
and Alachua County. If the
second phase shows that
expepted rental from city and
county would be significant, a
careful feasibility study would
be completed by October 1 at a
cost of $6,250, Matherly
projected.
Investigation of the probable
frequency and type of events
and expected revenue therefrom
shottl4jbe made, says Matherly.
Community participation
possibilities should be carefully
defined in this phase.
A fourth phase will give the
go ahead to architects to start
work on building design.
Completed and
detailed costs should be given a
thorough review and final
financing, location and
construction plan drawn up by
June, 1970, Matherly estimates.

A hit in the trunk of the
body more times than not
causes serious injury or
certain death.
Legally a Florida law
officer may not shoot at a
person who is merely fleeing
justice unless he suspects that
person has committed a
felony or is endangering the
lives of others.
The time element involved
is the hardest factor for the
public to digest.
At the scene, the police
officer has only seconds in
which to make the decision
(SEE 'SHOULD', PAGE 2)

Phase four is expected to cost
$78,750.
The final planning step, a
$131,250 production of the
working drawings, will begin in
June, 1970 and be completed by
February, 1971.
Matherly figures that bids on
construction could be taken as
early as June, 1970.
Initial cost estimates of the
construction are speculative but
Matherly sent his estimates to
OConnell February 5. He said
that including planning and
conduction, the entire project
could tentatively cost $7.01
million.
This would include, said
Matherly, somewhere between
10-15,000 fixed seats and
medium-elaborate equipment
and embellishments.
Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllll
ABA Ranks
Neal Walk
Second Best
In the American Basketball
Association draft announced
Wednesday, Floridas Neal Walk
was announced as the No. 2
pick, the first choice, as
expected, being towering Lew
Alcindor of UCLA.
According to United Press
International reports, Walk was
drafted by Houston, after losing
the choice of Alcindor to the
New York Nets on a coin toss.
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CHIEF A. J. SHULER
(
... policeman's dilemma



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 20, 1969

SG Productions
To Lower Rates
Due to the seating conditions of the old Florida gym, the executive
committee of Student Government Productions has worked out a new
organizational budget with lower student prices.
The executive committee is made up of Student Body President
Clyde Taylor, Student Body Vice President Gary Goodrich, President
of the Student Senate Jack Vaughn and SG Productions Chairman Lee
Terry.
At the meeting the executive committee noted problems such as a
lack of student participation, making it impossible to bring top
quality entertainment.
The Concert Series was run on the old Lyceum Council budget this
year, which subsidized many concerts and only two pop shows.
Terry said because of a lack of student participation, there will be
more pop shows next year.
Students will only pay $1.75 per ticket, while this year they are
paying at least $2 each.
Since we dont have a coliseum, we cant improve seating
arrangements, but we can charge prices more in line with the quality
of seating, Terry said.
With the increased student participation expected from the pop
shows, SG productions will be able to bring the shows to campus on
weekend nights.
Terry said they will be able to do this and still charge a lower price
for tickets because of the new budget.
Final Wording Set
For Referendum
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Final wording of the March 5 referendum to decide the future of
Student Government was approved by the Student Senate at Tuesday
nights meeting.
The referendum, promised by Student Body President Clyde
Taylor, in his successful bid for that office, gives students three
alternatives on the ballot: to retain, abolish or restructure student
government.
In order to abolish student government 25 per cent of the student
body must vote with two-thirds of the voting body against the present
system.
Abolishment will dissolve the student body constitution as well as
all laws, statutes and charters.
A public opinion question is also on the ballot asking students
whether or not a task force should research restructuring student
government.
At Tuesday night's meeting, the Alligator equal-space resolution
failed all hough, the resolution's author, Ric Katz termed the Alligator,
"The students own print sheet.
Other senators disagreed with the resolution that called upon the
Alligator tv) give equal space to candidates not editorially endorsed by
the paper.
Bob Blunt said the Alligator should be encouraged in
responsibility, but freedom of the press should remain.
Another controversial issue, the changing of senate constituency,
from living areas tv) colleges was also defeated.
Most senators agreed that campaigning and later, communications,
would he seriously handicapped with college constituency rather than
the present living area.
Several second readings of former bills were presented for final
approval: two of which wax the changing of election day from
Thursday to Wednesday and approving the Student for Responsible
Government (SURGF) charter which will be a lobbying agency for the
University of Florida.
The meeting ended at 12:45 a.m.
FBK Speakers Available §
Friday is the last day for picking up applications for Florida $
Blue Key Speakers' Bureau.
Speakers talk tv) civic dubs throughout Florida, promoting
UF. This yeai speakers will be meeting with clubs between April
; 21 and May T v
Applications can be picked up in the Blue Key Office, room x
312 Reitz Union. Reitz Union information desk- Tigert
information desk, and the speech office, room 335 ASB. :
THF FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is tilt* official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods, editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reit/ Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to reguF'i. tin tv pographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (I) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

WK
Ijj
LEE TERRY
... lowers student rates

Should Police Shoot To Kill?

f* FROM PAGE ONE 'jj
between the use of his gun or
that of a milder force, such as
Mace or night stick.
However, in court the
officers decision may be
challenged by judges and juries
who have months and sometimes
years to evaluate all areas of the
incident.
Last December, a Gainesville
police detective used a 12-guage
shotgun to stop a suspected
felon after a robbery at a local
appliance store. The detective
shot and killed the suspect as he
and a companion ran down an
alley with a TV set in their arms.
An investigation following the
incident ruled the detectives
action as justifiable homicide,
because the suspect was
resisting arrest in the
commission of a felony, as
stated in Florida statute 782.02.
Undersheriff D.K. Brown, of
the Jacksonville police
department, calls this use of
deadly force a difficult policy
for law enforcers to interpret.
The rub is that it involves

HHBH
RETAHINCpS got the actionii
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MONTGOMERY WARD IS LOOKING for graduates sincerely interested in the fabulous
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ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE WIDE OPEN AT WARDS
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RETAIL MANAGEMENT
BUYING
COPORATE SYSTEMS
CREDIT MANAGEMENT
Plan for Your Interview today!!!
Montgomery Ward's Representative will be on campus:
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21,1969
Check the Placement Directors Office for details and interview time": available.

Court Backs Right l
To Expel Students
CINCINNATI (UPI) The right of colleges and universities to
expel students for conduct promoting student unrest was upheld
Wednesday by the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
The court ruled institutions of higher learning could expel students
for conduct which promotes student unrest and disrupts normal
educational activities.
The court upheld the decision of U.S. District Court in Nashville,
Tenn. which ruled that all-Negro Tennessee A&I had the right to
regulate student conduct.
The appeal was made by three former students who were expelled
from the school in October, 1967.
Tennessee A&I said that Frederick Brooks, James M. Booth and
Kenneth R. Jones promoted student unrest by passing out leaflets and
making speeches designed to disrupt normal activities.
The three contended their expulsion violated their constitutional
rights to freedom of speech.

restricting the use of force while
still attempting to provide
proper police service.
University Police Chief A.I.
Shuler said he didnt have a true
answer to the dilemma of when
to use deadly force.
For example, do you shoot
an alleged arsonist because you
see him put the match to the
gasoline? he said. You have to
t ANALYSIS
consider, is the value of the
building worth the use of deadly
force?
The departmental policy for
University Police does not allow
the use of deadly force to stop a
fleeing felon, although it is legal.
The consensus of Florida law
officers does not allow a
policeman to fire his gun as a
warning.
Warning shots can kill
innocent people, said GPD
Capt. Courtnay A. Roberts.
The consensus however, does
net apply to highway patrolmen.
FHP officers are permitted to
use warning shots if there is time
for such action, said FHP
District Lt. S O. Roberts.

Patrolmen do not ordinarily
shoot at moving vehicles. Lt.
Roberts said.
It would have to be under
grave circumstance, he said.
Before we shoot, we have to
know who we are shoot inn at.
For example, if a juvenile
has stolen a car, we dont shoot
at him unless hes shooting at us.
No officer wants to kill anyone
especially a juvenile.
We impress on our
patrolmen that there might be a
juvenile in the car and anytime
you shoot a juvenile you have
public sentiment against you.
Lt. Roberts said that anytime
an officer shoots or injures a
child the public would scream
he was just a child and could
have been overpowered some
other way.
Getting right down to it, the
life and death decision
according to law rests with
officer at the scene.
As long as criminals continue
to carry weapons, so must peace
officers.
And as long as an officer must
carry a gun, so must Florida laws
protect his actions.



Army Delays Goodrich
Draft, SG Starts Another

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich has changed his
tune from Over There to
Happy Days are Here Again.
The 3rd U.S. Army Area
Headquarters notified Goodrich
last week of a change in his
induction date. March 27 was
the original date for Goodrich to
report for army training.
His new orders say it will be
approximately a year before he
will be called up. Goodrich took
Caption Incorrectly
Identified Sugg
The picture on page two ot
Wednesdays Alligator was
incorrectly captioned John
Sugg . campus education.
The person in the picture is
Steve Fahrer not Sugg.
The Alligator regrets the
error.

Mam Bhctfau
GAINESVILLE MALL
IJ yil
y u ldWf -.-. MWV 7 bK*/ X JffitXX a-.
rf&r
Jy- jIJM" Jw Ji^fcW/mlilr^
.. > iMMww&ste
[BD@ CBl(o)W7 = QUP 8
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square ottoman 13.88. All include foot air pump. It isnt for everyone but thats why its fun!
Maas Furniture

the oath for the army reserve in
January, 1968.
Student Government
presidential hopefuls and
politicals are calling Goodrich
on the telephone trying to get
some idea of what my plans
are.
Theyll talk about
anything, he said, just to
determine whether or not I may
upset their plans.
Goodrich said he was up till 2
a.m. Wednesday talking to
students who encouraged him to
run for president and some who
offer no encouragement.
He has no comment as to his
intentions of vying for the
executive post.
Michael T. Callahan, director
of the UF Intercourse Program,
said Wednesday he is sure
Goodrich will run for president.
Callahan started his campaign
for the executive office last
week.
Student Governments
Secretary of Academic Affairs

last year, Callahan says that
Goodrichs entering the race
does not affect his chances for
the presidency.
Charlie Shepherd, Student
Body President 1967-68 and a
possible candidate for a second
term, said that announcements
for the office at this early a date
are premature.
Callahan claims Shepherd
has Florida Blue Key and greek
support all tied up for a bid for
the office.
Shepherd denies this and says
he has not been approached by
Blue Key and has not said
whether or not he will run.
Goodrich said the armys
notification of change in date of
induction means I can do
something I want to do.
Before the end of the term, he
hopes to have the Gainesville
Student Economic Council in
operation.
The council will give the
students a lever to use when
dealing with local merchants.

WHATS
HAPPENING
MENSA: Will hold meeting tonight at 8 in Reitz Union room 150
New officers elected last week are Chuck Kaufman, president: Harris
Samuels, vice president and Karen Paige, secretary.
ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN STUDENTS: Will hold meeting
tonight at 7:30 in Reitz Union room 361.
JOHN MARSHALL BAR ASSOCIATION: Will present guest
speaker James Adkins, supreme court justice, at luncheon Friday
12:30 p.m. in Holiday Inn on 1-75. Public is invited. Members ticket is
$ 1.50 and non-members $1.75.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS:
Will honor guest speaker Robert B. Mautz, university chancellor, at
dinner meeting Friday at 6:30 p.m. in Reitz Union Arrendondo
Room. Tickets for professors and wives is $3.50 per person. A 6 p.m.
reception will precede the dinner.
FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM: Will hold groundbreaking ceremony
11 a.m. Saturday at museum site on corner of Radio and Newall
Roads. UF President Stephen C. OConnell will address a luncheon to
follow in the Reitz Union.
JAZZ AND STAGE BAND FESTIVAL: Will be held at P.K. Yonge
High School Auditorium at 9 a.m. Saturday. The all-day Florida
Invitational features UFs laboratory jazz ensembles. Gator Variety
Bands and others.
STUDENT SENATE: Seven vacancies are currently open. Students
interested in applying to represent engineering, arts and sciences,
nursing, three off-campus seats or Corry Village can come by third
floor of Reitz Union.
KIMBALL WILES MEMORIAL CONFERENCE: Currently being
held through Saturday in Reitz Union. This years topic is The
School of the Future.

Thursday, February 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator. Thursday, February 20, 1969

Drivers Needed
For SAMSON
Drivers are needed for a field
trip to St. Augustine Saturday.
The trip is sponsored by
SAMSON and cars will leave at
8:30 a.m.
The drivers will receive no
pay, but their lunch is provided.
Each car will have to carry two
or three passengers. For further
details contact the SAMSON
office at 392-1665.

OPEN TO PUBLIC
Afro-Humanities Reports
In Student Exhibition

A progress report will be
presented today on the
humantities departments course
in African Humanities, taught by
Prof. Didier Graeffe.
The progress report, open to
the public and particularly
students interested in taking the
course in the future, will be held
at 3:30 p.m. in room 117, Little
Hall.
It will include an exhibition
and demonstration of projects
by students enrolled in the
course this quarter.

Political Autonomy
Demanded By SDX

A resolution condemning
recent investigations into
Alligator news stories and
demanding political autonomy
was passed unanimously Monday
night by Sigma Delta Chi,
honorary journalism fraternity.
The resolution said SDX
deplores the recent
investigation concerning news
stories published in the Florida
Alligator, the UF student
newspaper, condemns
attempted external influences
and pressures on the student
press and requests the
administration of the University
of Florida to do all in its power
to insure the operation of a free
and unfettered campus press.
The recent investigation
refers to the inquiry by the
Board of Student Publications
demanded by Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale last
month.
n
IVEVER Ton LATE
-UNDERSTANDING COMES
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OVER 175 TITLES $1 EACH
AT YOUR BOOKSELLER
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LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68501
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DROPOUTS
COLiiV SINK THIS /
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' h -felt;-: i
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The course will also be
offered next quarter as one
section of CHN 254,
Non-Western Humanities. The
section set aside for African
Humanities will meet Tuesday
and Thursday during the eighth
and ninth periods, with the
code number 0738 D.
Other non-Western
Humanities sections involve
Oriental Humanities.
Students enrolling for
American Humanities must also
register for section code number

Hale had three complaints
aginst the Alligator:
The series on the
availability of birth control pills
to unmarried coeds at the UF
Infirmary,
The quoting of a four-letter
word from the Purdue
University newspaper, and
The hiding of two reporters
in the UF library after hours to
show that the building is
insecure, after a S2OOO theft
from the library.
The SDX resoluation stated
the student press must have the
greatest freedom possible in
reporting and commenting on
significant events.

CAREERS =CHALLENGE]
SEA-LAND SERVICE
Sea-Land is a growing company, and we welcome tal talented
ented talented young men to grow with us.
Twelve years ago, Sea-Land developed a new and dif different
ferent different concept in the door-to-door pickup and delivery of
freight. Today, Sea-Land operates the worlds largest
trailership fleet, supported a highway container fleet of
more than 27,000 computer controlled trailers servicing
30 ports in the United States, Caribbean Islands, Europe,
Okinawa, Philippines and Japan.
The future offers boundless challenging opportunities to
those who select transportation as a career.
To keep pace with our rapid expansion, we are seeking
dynamic college graduates with majors in liberal arts or
business to join our Management Training Program. Oppor Opportunities
tunities Opportunities exist to join us in sales, truck or marine operations
and administration with selected individuals also going into
the areas of accounting, maintenance, traffic (pricing), and
electronic data processing.
Our recruiter will be on campus
Tuesday, Feb. 25th
If unable to attend interview, submit your
resume to PERSONNEL DIRECTOR,
SEA-LAND
SERVICE, INC.
PO. Box 1050, Elizabeth, N. J. 07207
An equal opportunity employer

0735 C, a non-Western
humanities lecture, in order to
receive credit for the course,
Graeffe said.
Students will not, however, be
required to attend the lecture
once they are registered for the
course, he said.
The course as it is set up
includes a study of African
culture as a whole, Graeffe said.
By that, I dont mean
Afro-American culture, Graeffe
said, thats something entirely
different and can be handled by
other departments. I do mean a
look at African heritage not
just the tribal culture but other
parts, such as the Nile Valley
and Egypt.
The course will include a look
at contemporary literature and
music and other products of
civilization, he said.
F
Good Strvict Starts'
at
CRANE IMPORTS

BALD-SEK VICE VICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS VICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
SOC g. Unlv. Aw. I7S-4SW

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TO UF PROFS
Evaluation Results Mailed

Teacher Evaluation has completed the mailing of
evaluation results to approximately 180 UF
professors and is now reappraising according to
David Birk project chairman.
Birk, a member of the UF Circle of Omicron
Delta Kappa (ODK) stated that reappraisal of the
student-directed project was necessary at this time
because of the possibility the university may
establish its own evaluation program.
The Action Conference recommended to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell that teacher
evaluation become mandatory for all professors and
instructors at the UF, Birk said. OConnell
established several committees to submit
recommendations to him on this proposal. One of
these committees, the Presidents Committee on
Teacher Evaluation, chaired by Dr. Corbin Camell,
has already submitted its report to the President.
I assume most of the other committees asked to
submit recommendations on teacher evaluation have
also submitted reports or will do so in the very near
future, he said..
The Presidents Committee on Teacher
Evaluation report suggested that the Institute of
Higher Education help each college develop its

Jazz And Band Festival
Planned For Saturday

The Florida Invitational Jazz and Stage Band Festival will be held
Saturday in the auditorium of P. K. Yonge Laboratory School. It is
sponsored by the UF Department of Music.
A featured appearance will be made by the Tactical Air Command
Stage Band from Langley Air Force Base, Va.
From 9 am until noon, performances by six high school groups will
be given. Following lunch, performance clinics for every instrument
will be conducted by the section leaders and soloists of the TAC Stage
Band, with help from UF instructors.
Floridas laboratory jazz bands the Gator Variety Bands and
representatives from three junior colleges will perform during the
afternoon.
The public is invited to all performances and the clinics are open to
all interested students and teachers. There are no admission fees for
any of these events.
The 6:45 evening concert will be given by the TAC Stage Band led
by Sgt. Tom Watts of Phoenix, Arizona. The 22-member band uses its
own arrangements for most pieces. An updated style of the big dance
bands of the 3os and 4os is combined with contemporary jazz ideas
in its arrangements.
The music presented by the TAC band will vary from the Beatles
Norwegian Wood to the Oscar-winning The Shadow of Your
Smile and Everythings Coming Up Roses from Gypsy.
Sgt. Robert E. Ranson Jr. is the trumpet soloist for the TAC band.
He began his musical training at the age of 13 and while in high school
he represented the Eastern District of North Carolina in a regional
talent hunt.
Ransom attended Howard University School of Music, Washington,
D.D. After entering the Air Force in 1954, he performed with many
musical entertainers including Mel Torme.

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teacher evaluation program should the university
develop its own evaluation program.
We arent going to be sitting around making
assumptions, Birk said. Right now were busy
working on improving our present teacher
evaluation procedures at the same time were
designing what most of us think will be the bright
new objective of the teacher evaluation program.
Birk plans the publication of a course outline
booklet which would contain information about
both professors and courses to help students select
their academic schedules.
Information about instructors would include
educational background, teaching philosophy and
current research. Course information would
probably include the number of tests, outside
assignments, use of pop quizzes, how the final grade
is determined and the books used.
Birk said it would be necessary to secure
additional funds to produce the booklet. The
possibility of using part or all of a grant made to the
university by the Esse Corp. is presently being
examined. If funding is secured, Birk said the course
outline booklet would probably be available to
students by the middle of the next quarter.

ROBERT RANSON JR.
...trumpet soloist
II SHANNONS I
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| 7 th St. gSERVJCh 372 1379 I

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applications due in FBK office
no later than 5:00 Fri. Feb. 21.

Thursday, February 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida Alligator. Thursday, February 20, 1969

EDITORIAL
Full Fare Unfair

Civil Aeronautics Board examiner Arthur
Present has ruled that airline youth-fare
discounts should be discontinued because
they discriminate on other passengers.
Presents decision is subject to review by
the CAB, which has upheld youth fares in
the past as away to promote airline traffic.
The board has refused to hear discrimination
complaints in the past, but bus companies
won a court order last year requiring the
board to investigate the fares.
Perhaps the bus companies think that if
the youth fare discounts are discontinued
their business will increase because the
younger people many of them college
students on limited budgets would not be
able to afford thq, full price of airline tickets
and would travel ort the bus lines.
Present has said airline passengers having
the same characteristics as youths except for
their age are injured by being required to
pay a regular fare.
If giving discounts to youths is
discriminating against other passengers,
discounts to families traveling together and
servicemen should also be discontinued
because they fit into the discriminated
groups described by Present.
The youth fares are in effect only when
there are empty seats on the plane.
Permitting a student to fly half fare in a seat
that would go empty does not discriminate
against regular passengers.
Youth fares are a form of aid to education
and when the government is spending
millions of dollars yearly on education the
discontinuing of youth fares would be a step
backwards. Most of the college students who
use the youth fares to travel would be forced
to resume the illegal practice of hitchhiking
or make long automobile trips, often in
unsafe vehicles, or pay higher airline fees.
Also, traveling for travelings sake is a form
of education and the loss of youth fares
would be extremely curtailed.
Discriminating because of age exists but
the idea of eliminating all age discrimination
is impossible. Persons under 21 cannot vote;
persons under 25 cannot serve in Congress;
persons under 35 cannot be President of the
U.S.; persons over 21 cannot enter our
military academies; and persons over 18
cannot serve as pages in the U.S. Congress
and so on.
All these regulations cannot and should

Raving

Bringing In Commies

I woke up this morning,
thanked Heraclitus for the new
day, and then read the Alligator
and wondered for lh e
sixty-ninth time what in the
world is happening. Then I read
a letter addressed to Sen.
Spessard 1.. Holland that was
written by Mr. & Mrs. Russell
Sage. And I realized at last that
there IS a move under way to
bring in all the rest of the
Communists that they want to.
You see, the doing away with
loyalty oaths has set off a
fantastic chain of events that is
certain to culminate in the
deliverance of this country into
the hands of the Commies.
Within a week after the -loyalty
oath the Saties referred tv) (I
have not and will not lend my
aid . was omitted.
4,865,327 people joined the
Florida Communist Party.
Today there are over

10,000,000 people intheFlorida
Communist Party, and there
arent even that many people in
the state of Florida. Think of it!
The number of Reds around us
is staggering. No wonder this
country is going to pot!
It is 10O# correct that
William O. Douglas has voted
every time in favor of a
Communist victory. On March
10, 1967, the Supreme Court (I
don't have to tell you about
THEM!) voted 6-1. with 2
abstaining, in favor of a
Communist victory. Douglas
wrote iho majority opinion. In
fact, Douglas' perfect voting
record in favor of a Communist
yietory is the reason-that- he. not
Black or Fortas. spoke at
Accent. Wake up. America! The
Communist victory is close at
hand.
You see. there is a 'plot
brewing that, if fulls revealed.

not be changed, but there is equal reason for
adding youth fares to this list of areas where
age discrimination is enforced.
This elimination of youth fares will hurt
college students primarily. If college
students do not make their opinion known
to the Civil Aeronautics Board soon, youth
fares will be a thing of the past.
Write the Civil Aeronautics Board and
urge them to continue the youth fare
program. Mountains of letters are the only
thing that will keep youth fares.
Their address is 1825 Conn. Ave.,
Washington, D.C. 20009.
Who Cares
There is something missing on campus this
year. Or perhaps there is something here that
was never here before. But the atmosphere is
different. Some call it sophistication, others
blame it on the war in Vietnam, others shrug
their shoulders and ignore it. That may be
the problem.
Everyone has problems. Students.
Administrators. Professors. Maintenance
men. A university is full of problems and
people who care only about their own
problems. That is the game of jungle
existence we have learned to play. Survival
of the fittest. Games people pl^y.
It should never be too dangerous to risk a
smile, to listen and hear when someone
talks, to care instead of throwing out a
practiced Hi, how are ya? and then
walking on before the face in the crowd has
time to respond.
The university, that shadowy, amorphous
body hiding somewhere between the
registrars office and the student body,
recognized the problem. The university built
the Friendship Walk. Its a start. But it seems
a shame there has to be just one sidewalk set
aside for people to pretend to care. A Hi
from the rule book instead of from the
heart.
Its time people come out from their glass
cages and take the time to know others. A
lot can be learned that way. A lot can be
given and received just by reaching out with
a word or a smile.
This is what is supposed to be the love
generation. Thats what is missing. Action
instead of talk.

By David Miller

would truly boggle the mind.
Paul Robeson, W.E.B. Dubois,
and William Z. Foster are alive
and funding out in Argentina,
waiting for a chance to sell
America to the Commies. And
we have given their chance by
supporting revolutionary
forces.
How can we support
revolutionary forces? After all,
our nation won its independence
by appeasing the Tories. Wake
up, America; destroy the
awesone enemy! As 1 write this
column, though, it seems that it
is too late to avert the takeover.
But perhaps we CAN do
something. We can write to our
..Sti.vkHii Ed C< m i lev. and ask
that the Charley Johns
(ommittec be given new life,
that Gestapo tactics be used to
weed out all disruptive elements.
You see. quite a lev- citizens
. still want to icmain free.

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
h the exercise of responsibility/'
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Pau/kdu/v Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
All
z' Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
yAUIAIUM Executive Editor News Editor
.-The American Dream
* 1:
Mexican
Execution
By Uncle Javerneck
The street in front of the main entrance to the Edison Hotel in
Mexico City runs only one way. You have to take two rights and drive
a block to get on Insurgentes. After four or five miles of smokey
industry and slum, you turn left on a secondary street and three
blocks later youre there.
Within; a mile in any direction live not less than 50,000 people
housed in multi-storied pastel painted condominiums. Here three of
the condominiums and a University of Mexico classroom building face
inward to a barren courtyard paved with hexagonal slabs of colored
concrete.
The yellow metallic sides of two condominiums are spotted at odd
intervals with finger to fist-sized holes. Signs in many of the windows
bear the words Se vende. People want to sell out, move away. They
are afraid. This is where nearly 200 men, women, and children were
shot to death last fall by police.
In the states the newspapers had declared that in widespread riots,
about 30 or 40 people had been killed. It caused no great exictement
and in a few days it died away or lingered as a sidebar to the
impending Olympics.
Police armed with rifles still guard the metal canyon where they
had once stood, their backs against a blank wall, spraying bullets
indiscriminately over the face of the two massive buildings as high up
as the fourth and fifth floors.
Seeds of the tragedy were sown when police interjected themselves
into a feud between two secondary schools. University students took
advantage of the publicity to make certain grievances agianst the
Mexican government, among which was a demand to be allowed to
protest government action.
Anti-government protest was then and is now considered
insurrection, a federal crime.
The students chose these condominiums because of the
concentrated population. They stood on an open landing between the
two buildings and spoke to the gathering crowds above and below
them. The police were called in.
The police were shocked and amazed at the vastness of the human
sea that bobbed and rose before them. They gave orders to disperse
but the crowds only grew. Panic stricken, they opened fire.
Human beings dropped like flies.
The mob surged to shelter beyond condominium doors. Some of
them made for apartment windows, sniping police with small arms.
The police were driven to cover but not before they managed to cut
a swath to the second landing where student leaders stood trapped
by their own audience. Machine-gunners killed them, every one.
After law and order had been restored, the bodies of the student
leaders were cremated almost immediately.
Their ashes may be scattered by the wind from the Baja Penninsula
to the Guatemalan jungles before the United States ever issues so
much as a formal protest.
It is unfortunate but true that Americans dozing in the American
Dream seek not justice but cooperation from the nations whose
governments they embrace.
They condone the worst of atrocities committed within the Free
World so that the harsh and dictatorial rule of easily pliable men may
never be overthrown.
i
And beyond the stalls of the trinket-sellers, America enjoys the
kind of reputation she deserves.
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
"Opinions expressed in the Florida Ail%tor are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.**



Silly Season
Has Arrived

MR. EDITOR:
The Gainesville Sun is indeed
correct: Silly season has
arrived. It was ushered in by
the editorial of February 16th,
with its thoughtless and
offensive attempt to paint Ken
Megill and Senator Slade with
the same brush.
The author of this piece
reflects: It is indeed a wonder
that no one previously
questioned Dr. Megills
philosophical competence, since
his ideas are so stale. They are
stale, we learn, because similar
thoughts were uttered three
years ago by the boys from the
ghetto, as well as by the
Marxist movement, and skipping
a revolution or two, by the
zealots who conspired to throw
the Romans out of Jerusalem
while yet another Man was
dragging his cross to Golgotha.
Now Ken Megill is, I am
proud to say, a colleague of
mine, and although I disagree
with a good deal of what he
says, just as most philosophers
generally disagree with one
another, I cannot simply let pass

OConnell Investigation Just As Bad As Slades

MR. EDITOR:
The Gainesville Sun editorial
Silly Season, reprinted by the
Alligator, completely misses the
significance of last weeks
events.
Senator Slades attempt to
interfere with our University has
temporarily been thwarted. But
President OConnell has not
defended academic freedom on
this campus; nor has he
defended the right of free speech
generally. He has only promised
due process for Dr. Kenneth
Megill. While objecting to an
investigation of the campus
initiated by Senator Slade, Pres.
OConnell has promised an
investigation of his own.
What will be investigated? Dr.
Megill has not been charged with
anything. He has merely been
threatened for teaching political
philosophy (which he was hired
to teach) and ironically, for

Sun Editorial Play: 'Can You Top This ?

MR. EDITOR:
Sundays editorial in the SUN was a beautiful play in
the game of Can you top this? Not only does the SUN
show it is just as irresponsible as is Sen. Slade, but also it
proves it can far outdo him in the area of calumny and
insult. If the SUN had bothered to apprise itself of the
facts, it would have discovered that Prof. Megill is
indeed in the process of carving his niche.. .by patient
labor.
The SUN need not even have relied on the word of his
colleagues here to establish this; Megills publications in
the national and international journals, his papers read at
state, national, and international conferences of scholars,
his winning last year of a National Endowment for the
Humanities grant, the high rating by his students of his
teaching ability all this evidence was available to the
SUN had it chosen to exercise journalistic responsibility.
The SUN may stop wondering why Prof. Megills
philosophic competence has never been questioned. It

such a thoroughly incompetent
and unjustified attack on his
competence. It is not necessary
to defend his academic record.
One only wishes that the
university had more people of
his proven ability.
Nor will I defend him from
the personal aspersion that his
statements, which are the
product of long and disciplined
thought, are really expressions
of political opportunism.
Philosopher Kenneth Megill
wants to be king and is willing to
take shortcuts. This is simply
the childish comment of
someone who has never met the
man, and can be dismissed as
such.
But to say that a philosopher
is incompetent because his ideas
are stale, and that they are stale
because he stands within an
intellectual tradition with a long
history, really this is a bit much!
This tradition, after all, which
the author seems to find so
repugnant, also contains
subversive types like Thomas
Jefferson. Right or wrong, Ken
Megills ideas are anything but
stale.

making political statements as an
official university speaker in the
Accent Symposium, a forum
whose expressed purpose is to
feature divergent points of view.
What has been threatened is thus
Megills conduct in his Held of
professional competence; i.e., his
academic freedom.
An investigation
culminating in the denial of
tenure to Dr. Marshall Jones
shows that the phrase due
process at the UF means that
the University President can
make certain unilateral
decisions, like who may remain
on this campus. An internal
investigation of the University
by President OConnell is no less
a threat to academic freedom
than an external one by the
Legislature or Sen. Slade.
In important University
matters the faculty and the
student body are only called
upon (if indeed they are called
upon at all) to ratify decisions

Above and beyond its
childishness, however, and
without pressing the point that
the editorial totally misses the
real issue, which is not whether
President OConnell or Senator
Slade has the authority to fire
Megill (due process!), but
whether the State of Florida is
ready to have a university, I
should like to express my
profound distaste for the tone of
the editorial This tone is both
racist and anti-Semitic.
I am far from agreeing with
the views of Stokely Carmichael
and H. Rap Brown, but to
dismiss them as boys from the
ghetto is to be guilty of
precisely that kind of
supercilious racism which is one
of the chief causes of the trouble
in our society. Finally, I should
like to point out that there are
those for whom the zealots
who conspired to defend their
homeland against Rome, are not
to be condemned in the name of
He who died on the cross.
HENRY E. ALLISON
Dept, of Philosophy
University of Florida

already made by the
administration. Since Sen.
Slades letter appeared, neither
faculty, students nor their
representatives the
University Senate and the
Student Senate have been
consulted by those declaring the
Universitys official position.
The UF administrators have
huddled and Pres. OConnell has
issued statements. By a similar
democratic process, the new
parking plan was recently
declared University policy.
What suggestions ARE made
by students or faculty are
typically disregarded. Tenure for
Dr. Jones was denied after his
colleagues and department
chairman had recommended it
unanimously. Lavon Gentry was
brought to trial AFTER the
faculty of the College of Arts
and Sciences voted 125 to 30 to
ask the University to drop the
charges. It is characteristic of
our university community that

has never been questioned because it is impossible to
question it; Megills credentials as a scholar and a
philosopher are unimpeachable.
What must be questioned, however, is the SUNs
competence to judge a mans worth as a philosopher.
You offer no proof that you know anything at all about
philosophy; indeed, it could be argued that you present
us with ample evidence of your incompetence in
philosophy, vix., your incredibly naive and inaccurate
attempt to characterize and trace the history of Prof.
Megills ideas.
And in addition to failing to show why you have the
right to make such serious charges, you present not a
shred of evidence for your assertions that his ideas are
tired or stale or that he desires to be king. Even
if the evidence were in existence, it is unlikely that you
would have uncovered it, for you have not even had the
common courtesy to ask Prof. Megill for a statement on
this matter.
We, colleagues of Prof. Megill, are individually and

Ken Megill is, I am
proud to say, a colleague of
mine ... I cannot simply let
pass such a thoroughly
incompetent and unjustified
attack on his competence.

mjF^
V -*.
j&lm f
jHF r 1 _-
Jf
mMIBK Vw
i&fr #/
- t^KW #J
£/
A f KENNETH
v MEGILL
i

self-determination ends with
making recommendations to
the President.
Political interference in
University affairs will continue
as long as students and faculty
permit it. Sen. Slade warned,
To avoid legislative interference
the presidents of the various
state universities must have an
atmosphere which would not
make necessary legislative
concern.
At the UF our administration
has consistently maintained the
proper atmosphere for the
legislature. This is not surprising
since the administration is
composed not of our elected
representatives but of political
appointees.
Let us not fall into the trap
of directing our disapproval only
toward gross OUTSIDE political
interference.
Let us avoid the fallacy of
praising Pres. OConnell for
delivering us from Slade while

corporately insulted by your editorial: individually,
because Megill is a respected professional associate and
we feel deeply the injustice of the charges brought by
you, and corporately, for your irresponsible attack is
upon the Philosophy department, the College of Arts
and Sciences, and the University itself as well as upon
Megill. After all, if he is as bad as you say he is, our
standards must be pretty low to let him stay around.
We submit that an apology to Prof. Megill and to our
department, college, and university is highly in order.
, DAVID R. KURTZMAN
ASST. PROF.
RICHARD P. HAYNES
ASSOC. PROF.
J. JAY ZEMAN
ASST. PROF.
DEPT. OF PHILOSOPHY

Thursday, February 20,1969, The Florida Alligator,

we forget that Pres. OConnell is
largely defending his own
reputation and has promised
Megill merely due process.
Let the students and faculty
of the University of Florida
make it clear that the crucial
issues of the past week are
ACADEMIC FREEDOM and
STUDENT AND FACULTY
VOICE IN UNIVERSITY
POLICY.
The Ad Hoc Committee on
Academic Freedom urges that
President Stephen C. OConnell
make a public statement
endorsing academic freedom
the freedom for Dr. Megill and
any student or faculty member
to teach, speak or write what he
wishes without restriction or
threat of investigation, however
political, controversial or
unpopular his views may be.
NORMA MUNN
Ad Hoc Committee
on Academic Freedom

Page 7



Page 8

.The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 20,1969

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igjjr \fmm JSliS*.. I O !oQ J/ Duz Detergent . 91 Lava Soap 2129*
filf T££= i Cat^ ood detergent .. *1 Liquid Soap ...69*
mtW #T 0000 THRO r 2# :mm # GOOD RU 26 1 D Ul r | S J 39 *^^ GiQn, Sile 87 Ki "9 Size LIOUID 2oz. 35* . 22-oz 63< King Size
r 7 Ivory Detergent 85*
-..'.i V *"
' /. .' . . t 1 )



on Tlwse^Specials
SKKS -4l Jt JL Round Steak'. 1"
USDA CHOICE BRAND CORN FED BONERS STEAKS
USDA -D FED
lA HM JJ USDA CORN FED
Emm !%mw *C shld. Roast.. 89*
T*r IP Sirloin Steak.. T
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED USDA CHOICE W-D CORN FED CHUCK
0 T-BONE STEAK 71 QA IfT CQ
OR. BEEF.... 3 r KUAjI 1. JO
1(5-02. BORDEN'S Sliced White 4 Yellow Processed American OLD FASHION WISCONSIN 2-Lf* KRAFT'S VELVEETA 2'A-Lbs. (20-Steaks) W-D BRAND FROZEN
Cheese Food 85* Daisy Cheese... 79* Cheese $1.09 Beef Burgers...sl.69
BORDEN'S BIG TEN ARMOUR STAR ALL MEAT 5-Count CRACKIN' GOOD FRESH QUARTER PORK LOIN SLICED INTO
Can Biscuits 2/39* Franks 65* Can Biscuits...3/19* Pork Chops 68*
8-02. BREAKSTONE TEMPTEE WHIPPED SWIFTS TRU TENDER 1%-Lb. SWIFTS PREMIUM CORNISH TALMADGE FARM COUNTRY (Half or Whole)
Cream Cheese 39* Beef Liver 69* Game Hens 2/$ 1.39 Cured Hams 89*
12-02. SUPERBRAND INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED AMERICAN 1-Lb. TARNOW ALL MEAT 12-oz. SUNNYLAND SMOKED l 2 oz TASTE ' SEA
Cheese Food ..59* Sliced 8010gna..59* Link Sausage....69* Fishcakes 3/99*
SUPERBRAND COTTAGE 1 Lb. Bag COPELAND FRESH ARMOURS MIRA CURE 2'A-Lbs. FRENCH FRIED HEAT 4 SERVE
Cheese 2 59* Pork Sausage....s9* Sliced 8ac0n.... 69* Fish Sticks. 99*
Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Thursday thru Wednesday, Feb. 20-26
FRESH DELICIOUS
ll
~Bananas frozen food specials
1A J SHRIMP :...$1.99 POTATOIS ....3/sl.
lB IU 0 JUICE 6/51.19 COFFEE RICH 4/sl.
HARVEST FRESH PRODUCE I w |__l ~.M E>tl o SMi
4 oo< nin M c *o< Taste 0 Sea COOL WHIP 2/$ I.
Cabbage 2 zv unions....d ov ess;* niFr A <
'OUNG TENDER POLE O. N. .,<,NO |.611t611 SpBCMMS PIZZA PllS J 7
Beans i oiQioes iW BAG #jr tiirnip apefnc o/ti
FANCY GOLDEN BANTAM WASH. STATE Extra Fancy Golden or Red Delicious 4b IAA I 1% E E IV V/ I O
Com 5 49' Apples 29' tets .39 fordHOOKS 4/sl.
, ad(~c rncfu heads JUMBOSTALKS IkIMMAUf o|l< I wnriiwwiUFM T
Lettuce... 2 39' Celery 2/39' APPLE PllS 59
Potatoes 4 69< Fruit 5 49* Plqtteri/>l I HONEY BUNS... 29*
Comet Cleanser 19* Oxydol Detergent 87*
c Q . .. ST- 1 imm-tSefr WeShelb HHs Ground Bef
Regular Size
Top Job Cleaner 99* Detergent Tablets 2 JBBL I
Slze r->. X. Ant l- ->-> ilUlif topvaluTstamm ipjl# top
Trend Detergent 49 Cascade Detergent // :||pjf ,m -%^r mourH
1 -Lb MRS. FILBERTS SOFT GOLDEN or SOFT WHIPPED 16-oz. DOWNY 2* soorTH? \ #3 COOD wu *
Margarine . 2/79* Fabric Softener . 47*

Thursday, February 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

>yWC*X?X X X"X*x*xsnsv;n*;s k x x*i
FOR SALE
y S
!v!^N!*''^ ivlvX\X%X XvNSSSviv,v|vX*.v.y..S'!
Honda 350 perf. cond., still in
warranty $625. Call 372-7942 after
6. (A-2t-87-P)
ZIG-ZAG sewing machine $25.
Hi-intensity make-up mirror $lO.
Clothes (size 7-8). Shoes (6-7),
Slacks, blouses, sweaters, coats. $.50
& up. 378-7152. (A-3t-87-P)
Honda 68 590 like new 2500 miles
$325. Call 378-3068 after 5.
(A-2t-8 7-P)
SAVE BIG! Do your own rug and
upholstery cleaning with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-87-P)
BMWR 27 Excellent condition. Call
392-3500 8:30-4:00 or see at 2020
N.W. 31st PL. (A-st-86-p)
MUST SELL 10 X 50 mobile home 2
brm very nice come and see washer
included. Front kitchen 2150 or
make offer after 5 oclock 372-5742.
Arrendondo Estate. (A-st-86-p)
22 target handgun, heathkit amp.
Garrard changer 2-8 in. coax-speaker.
Call 376-2344. (A-2t-86-p)
1967 Honda 305 Hawk excellent
shape extra parts, tires mufflers. Call
Jeff at Lake Butler 496-3631 days,
496-6278 evenings. All for S4OO.
(A-4t-84-P)
TV new portable Magnavox won in
contest. SBO value yours for SSO.
Never used; full warranty. Call
376-8958 after 5:30. A real bargain l
(A-ts-69-P)
1 br trailer $995 new refrig, hw htr
drapes, carpeted, tile kitchen & bath,
12 1 /? x 22 screened cabana on
concrete patio parked near UF call
468-1241. (A-st-84-P)
12 x 50 1968 Parkwood fully
carpeted, early American A.C. must
sell! Equity, take over reasonable
pymts. 378-0701 after 5. (A-st-85-P)
FOR RENT
Luxurious living in nse apt.
complex just a few blocks from
campus. Now renting at La Fontana
Apts. Call 378-0372 or see at 207
N.W. 17th St. Apt. 506. (B-st-86-p)
2 bdrm apt, 2 blocks from campus,
must sublet spring and summer qtrs,
$l4O month, washing machine. Call
372-6559 between 5 and 7 p.m. and
after 11 p.m. (B-85-86-p)
Unique upstairs appartment to
sublease til June for 2, 3 or 4, $lO5
per month, furnished. Call 378-8244
after 5. (B-2t-87-P)
SUBLET APT. Colonial Manor for
3rd qtr. slls a mo. for 1 or 2. >/;
block from campus. Immediate
occupancy if desired. 378-3857,
378-5553 or office. (B-2t-87-P)
SUBLET LARGE 2 br aircond. new
furn. 2 blocks from campus 120.
Now to Sept. Call Dave 378-0286 or
Carl 378-2128. (B-st-87-P)
MUST SUBLET 2 br unfurn an cond
garage apt spring quarter. Up to 4
persons, water included, SBS a mo. 3
SE 12th Street. 378-9700.
(B-2t-8 7-P)
Sublet turn ished 2br apt Summit
House. Central heat & air, wall to
wall caipet. Ist months rent free.
Call 376-4152 between 5 & 6:30.
(B-st-8 5-P)
Furnished two bedroom 1 bath house
for rent air conditioned $125 a mo.
Call 392-1575 before 5 or 378-6829
5:30 and weekends.(B-st-83-P)
Blow Yourself
Up TO POSTER SIZE
2 Ft. x 3 Ft.
Send any Black and White or Color
Photo. Also any newspaper or maga magazine
zine magazine photo. We will send you a 2 ft.
x 3 ft. perfect pop art poster.
A $25.00 jo 50
Value lor J
Frame for 2x3 ft. Poster only $3.50
3 x 4 Ft. BLO-UP *7 50
Poster rolled and mailed in sturdy
tube. Original returned undamaged.
Add 50c for postage and handling
for EACH item ordered. Add local
Sales Tax. No C.O.D.
SEND CHECK, CASH or M.O. to
PHOTO POSTER
210 E. 23rd St., Dept.l66A
New York, N. Y. 10010
College Rtpt wanted-write lor detaih

FOR RENT I
£x*x*x^x*x-x-x-xxx.:.v;:.n:w*x*x*x-x-x-:C?
Sublet College Terrace Apt. For 3rd.
Qtr. 1/2 block from campus. For 1 or
2 persons. 376-9889. (B-st-83-P)
Efficiency apartment suitable for
one, two or three. AC pool 151.'' NW
5 Ave. Thru third quarter or longer
$75 per month. Call 376-8990.
(B-10t-80-P)
WANTED
Female roommates over 21, to share
apt. with character. March 1 or April
1. 42.50 & */? utilities. No lease.
376-7670. (C-3t-86-p)
Need someone to share 3 1 /? acre,
2-bedroom paradise on Cowpens
Lake. Start now or March. Call
481-1753. (C-2t-87-P)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
ar 1-hr session. Must be native
English-speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University Ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5. (E-10t-71-C)
I / NO ONf
UNDER
16 YEARS
IE Will BE
P^SBVVC
I ENDS SATURDAY

Jimmy Vee |
& I
The Scamps Thors. & Fri. I
Cocktail hour 5-7 I
Doubles for the price of singles I
Lamplights: Lounge, l^ |
ALIBI LOUNGE |
Now has entertainment 6 nights a I
week. Featuring I
The Swing Bichard Parker 4 I
Thur., Fri., Sat., I
And for your Listening Pleasure I
Chuck Conlon I
Sings and plays the Gibson I
Mon., Tues., Wed. I

I __________ Center Cut Ham Steak |
I HAWAIIAN " ADC I
IlnVinilnll Tossed Salad and
I || mm French Fries.
I HAM REGULAR $135 _j
I nmurn diningroom nY)Trfw i
/ IIINNtK cu B s?; 001 kmtw \
# 13th St. 1

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 20, 1969

r
;:-x.x.x*xgiftH |,| t i QBQflij;
| WANTED I
fox-Fx-we {is ;; t;:;::: x.x.:.wwk*s
The single univeisity crowd over 21
For the Friday Afternoon Club
Will meet this & every Friday from
5-7;30 at the Lamplighter. Private
rooms pleasant atmosphere. Drinks
$.45, ladies $.20. Come early & bring
your friends. Fridays a great day to
have fun. (c-3t-86-p)
2 female roommates to share 2 bdrm
apt. spring and summer qtrs. 2 blocks
from campus $lO5 qtr. 372-6559
btwn 5 and 7 p.m. and after 11 p.m.
(c-Bt-86-p)
;.v-xx-xxxxx.x;x;sTWWxxxxxxx I HELP WANTED |
IvX-i'XX'XvXvX'XX'X'I'X'VXvXXvX'I'X'SXi 5
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. National Parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
SI.OO to Arnold Agency, 206 East
Main, Rexburg, Idaho 83440.
Moneyback guarantee.(E-st-83-P)
W 3 HQRtOK SHOWS
IRLMB wend!
atUUII UNBELIEVABLE TERROR I
rrCHNICOEM
I I

k t 1 fv'" *V
weve nm . ur
P'es
Martha's Specials
Originally NOW
Skirts 13.00-23.00 4.99-9.99
Sweaters 13.00-22.00 4.99-9.99
Dresses 14.00-42.00 5.99-18.99
Slacks 12.00-23.00 2.99-8.99
Shirts 5.00-7.50 1.99
Blouses 10.00-14.00 6.99
Suits 27.00-62.00 19.99-38.99
Shoes
(loafers) 16.00 8.99-9.99
George's Specials
Originally NOW
Shirts 600-800 1.99-3.49
Ties 3.00-5.00 1.99
Jeans 6.00-8.00 3.99-5.49
Sports
Coats 45.00-50.00 3 5.99
Suits 80.00-100.00 29.99-59.99
lime the tm
University Plaza

Use our handy
mall in order
form.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS |
v >'
1967 Rambler Rebel sta wgn low
mileage 4 speed floor shift air cond
power brakes and steering fm radio a
real buy! Call 378-7393 after 5 pm.
(G-st-85-P)
'63 TR4 needs some transmission
work, otherwise in excellent cond.
Best offer takes it. Call 372-0222
after 9 p.m. (G-lt-87-P)
LIKE NEW Beautiful 65 Falcon
Futura 2 door hardtop 6 cyl radio
automatic new wsw. Must sell A real
bargain. Call 392-1473 or 3725703.
(G-7t-86-p)
anawml ii iwwc a >
| PERSONAL
;iwxx-x-x.xw wfrx 106 cc Gilera notorcycle, includes
book rack & helmet, $l6O. 376-9217
ask for M.R. Joseph. If not home,
leave your number. (J-2t-87-P)
Student needs ride to Maine or
intermediate point. Share cost,
driving Feb. 21. 378-8462.
(J-lt-87-P)
The Friday Afternoon Club for the
university crowd over 21 will meet
this and every Friday from 5-7:30 at
the Lamplighter. Private rooms,
pleasant atmosphere. Drinks $.45,
ladies $.20. Come early & bring your
friends Friday's a great day to have
fun. (J-3t-86-p)

| HATE YOU HEARD? [
Jr Sk,
I 1
I IHI %
I THE FLORIDA QUARTERLY
i IS COMING SOON! I
-*

| Not Going to Frolics?
i Boy, are you going to be thirsty
I in that hot gym.
I or
-
) Instead of Frolics
1 Great Entertainment, great refreshments at such
I a low price and we welcome everyone.
tap #
Chesters Children /K
U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc.
R qthskelfer

| PERSONAL I
*' )<(
RATHSKELLER auditions Mon.
night, Feb. 24 at 8:00. Open to all.
Come do your thing or just come
isten. (J-st-80-c)
"CELEBRATION needs you, if you
are interested in planning the largest
exhibition of music, dance, drama,
and visual arts in Florida history.
Pick up an applicaiton at the Student
Activities Desk, Reitz Union; the
Office of the Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts; or in
Rm. 129, Tigert Hall. (J-st-87-P)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message any time day or night.
Message changes weekly. Let freedom
ring 16 NW 7th Ave. (PAID
POLITICAL ANNC'NCEMENT.)
(J-st-84-P)
Glenna M. Jacksonville Beach was
great. So was the beer. And we will
drink again Fri. nite. But dont lose
anymore clothing. Luv, Bobby.
(J-2t-87-P)
Girls, put STYLE into your wardrobe
with a 100% wool ruana or cape from
Columbia. Capes come in several
styles with two types of collar or no
collar, and come in colors to
compliment any wardrobe. The capes
and ruanas are really worth seeing at
the SPANISH MAIN, 105 W.
University Ave. 372-0667. (J-st-85-P)

(j~x*x*xx.:.w.v.v.*.%*;vsTO:*x*>xv.w.w.*
PERSONAL
Xw;rx-x?:-vx'x*:*>x:-x*x*x"xx.x.:.wvx*w
Time is running out to reserve*your
seat for EUROPE this summer. $315
lO weeks. NYLondonNY or go
for credit. 392-1655 or 310
Union.(J-st-82-C)
FROLICS tickets for sale. Call
376-9198 and ask for Ron Edwards
or Van ONeil. (J-2t-87-P)
.y*x*xxsx:s x*x*;*:*:-x:<*:-x*xw :<*j*ss
SERVICES ?!

Fourteen, were watching you as we
aatched your friends to the south.
Remember, Heavy fine for walking
on the grass. Last warning buster.
(M-2t-86-p)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST
Quality' Volks, Phohe
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 -SW Second Street. 378-7330,
(M-ts-54-c)
TENNIS RACKET restringing,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call Mand R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-19-P)
STARTSTODAY!
HHIH £5"' 7:00
QANAio-.40
I mm
IJffl/Ajil RAYMOND
ST. JACQUES
MIR,,.
m S*tul test Sill
ARTHUR
BIG DOUBLE FEATUBE^

gsm baarti
1 iotiw w. im \ I yid .rfgSh
yjmm escape Yt** the
Rfe. The \ \fflk fixer
t ',f
aSBISIII MOOfl. £ based on Pulitzer
\ GREGORY PECK £ V PKze- winning novel*
EVA MARIE % by Bernard Malamud.
**.&**'
rflMneleiHs
yywwn>w |
pQQQQQIJyB
Uaivtniif Av*^|
: 'BEAUTIFUL! The entire film is a poem of youth,
J love and violence, reeled off at so headstrong a pace that ?
young audiences may take Shakespeares classic for a
S Renaissance recapitulation qf West Side Story. Beautiful,
lyrical, impetuous and irrepressively romantic played with J
pure 1968 passion! IRLM PLAYBOY J
jFranco Zeffirelli :
Production of J
JNo ordinary lovcs^^S^
..#** / A PARAMOUNT JM| J
|j|
f iELM SWINGS i
he rpost
r\ mm Columbia pictures
aas JjHR presents
L/ean n AN IRVING ALLEN
production
Mart'" The
co-stdfiing 2 ommer shdronldte
Nancy Kwan Nigel Green Tna Guise
Music composed and conducted by Hugo Montenegro Screenplay by William McGivern
Based on the novel bv Donald Hamilton Produced by Irving Allen Directed by Phil Karlson
Isis -_ I)l) |, L |,|" i A Meadway Claude Picture TECHNICOLOR'
! MATURE aud | (pf*ntl'discretion edv.sed) |
SO MUCH T 0 SEE ...
pGlrl MAKES "BELLE" A MUST SEE
c unueJs £Masterpiece ofTZrotica! |
r jpk BeUe d Jour
mfl: 1 511:55 3:50 5:50 7:40 9:40

Thursday, February 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 20, 1969

WITH VANILLA FUDGE AND DAVID FRYE
Frolic At Fridays Fudge Frye

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Staff Writer
Winter Frolics will present the
scintillating, psychedelic sounds
of the Vanilla Fudge and the
masterful mime of political
satirist David Frye Friday in
Florida Gym.
The Vanilla Fudge began in
the latter part of 1966 as The
Pigeons. After a few
well-received concerts they
signed with Atlantic Records
and changed their name.
Their first album Vanilla
Fudge soared into the top 20
followed by bookings on the
Joey Bishop Show, the Smothers
Brothers and the Ed Sullivan
show.
The second album The Beat
Goes On was a mixture of such
diverse elements as rock
improvisation of Beethovens
Moonlight Sonata, the voices
of Thomas Edison and Neville
Chamberlain and contained,
overall, their appraisal of the
world around them.
Renaissance and Near the
Beginning, their third and
fourth albums, demonstrate the
Fudges muscianship and
versatility.
The group consists of 22
year-old Tim Bogert the bass
player who works in the
technical engineering
department of album
production; Vince Martell, lead
guitarist, who should be fairly
familiar with the Florida area
having attended Broward Jr.
College in Fort Lauderdale;
Mark Stein, the organist, whose
voice is heard on the Fudges
first hit single You Keep Me
Hanging On; and Carmine
Appice the drummer.
Appice is the only one in the
group with formal training in
music and livens up the act with
acrobatic displays.
David Frye came out of
Greenwich Village where his
comedic talent was first noticed.
McDonalds
Cheeseburgers
As you like em!
... Cheddar goodness
... nippy n tangy
<0
... grilled to taste
...with 100% beef
... served piping hot
... on toasted bun
... mmmmm good!
McDonalds
is your kind of place.
OMcOonald s Corp i 960
201 N.W. 13th St

Although he can impersonate
performers like Gregory Peck,
Kirk Douglas and others, he is
most unique satirizing the
political figures of our time.

#i r Aa
ONLY FUDGE WITH FORMAL MUSIC TRAINING
... Carmin Appice Will Play Drums at Winter Frolics
20% OFF
ALL POLAROIDS
irtkiHk 1232 W. UNIV.
ellrfUL? 376-7657
T SHW |
- i

Are you a thinker? \
If so, do yourself a favor and take advantage of the f
ROTC program |
Engineers and all other 5-year students do yourself a favor and find out the fart, ah., admv \
ROTC. Earn $50.00 per month and become an officer when you gluate L^in ke : and join j

According to Frye, They get
more laughs than actors because
they are real live people, instead
of ones just playing roles.
This terms frolics presentation

by IFC is a sellout. Due to space,
frolics tickets for independents
was limited to 200 which went
quickly the first day.
I Miller-Brown I
I iSbh I
I I
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL Mfl
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
I DEALER 8

I BREAKFAST SPECIAL I
I 6AM-11 AM MON. FRI. I
I 2 EXTRA LARGE EGOS I
I 3 ROT CAKES I
I with I
I GRITS k JU, I
IMm *%nW I
I COFFEE I
| 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I

I I COMPLETE XEROX I
OFFSET FACILITES |
Specializing in S
Thesis and Dissertations J
Reductions and
Enlargements
Open Til 11 P.M.
Highest Quality
We Guarantee it!
7 days
QUIK-SAVE jl
Univarsity Plaza
1620 W. University
278-1001
GATOR ADS I
GREAT VALUES I! I



anranf Thereis something you want in the /Uffl/hi ideabitok
JS3! peal K-nw id ll
plMj#
!/)nm (dJXoduce cS&me \\ \\
Weather permitting, we also feature such salad items as Cp B F
Endive, Escarole, and Leaf, Bib, Boston and Romaine Lettuce (->y
Firm Salad Perfect /JefoofftSen O/mUSI/ A Ty Kitchen-fresh ! e I i I f lj, (H/Afe/ IjftWCUW
Tomatoes .. b o 39 c coiesiaw >39= HiUtiM .i
Flavorful Old Fashion Sliced Bacon pkj 69'
A**ll#A *% OAc Baked Beans .. 39 c Swift's Premium Assorted Sliced
Jk hd. Jir 'XiJ'c* l r half ._ m>g w Cold Cuts X 49 c
Fresh Sweet UIQ iQSnlOn LOOT , pound 49 C (Pickle A Pimento, Olive A Pimento, Beef Bologna)
m M ........ Fresh Shoulder-Cut Boneless Rotisserie-Beady
Carrots .. 2i£ 1 9 e £om Hntrstnnr VA lb f|| t WairyWpecud Smoked Dainties .. >b. 89 c
K OTCIIOvS IV bag llb llb rtc
Margarine . 49 c Armour Franks ... P k,. 59 c
Margarine I.'-: 43 c |£ a,ood Treo,! Quit p: r ,Y en Red Bag Sausage aea a a pkg. 69
Cheese lllTS Jrw Herman's Orange
Velveeta X' 99 c seafood Tr^ at< * "'f Sliced Bologna o e e o pkg. 59'
< Clearfield Tasty SpCIIHSII AAQCICGrGI e O#
Corn Meal Mush 29= ., Mo Copeland Wieners '£ 39*
Muenster Cheese ... ib. 93 c Tomato CCItSUp 5 bats. 1 Ham or Turkey ... .X 35'
6 t Del Monte Early Garden Oscar Mayer Brand Smoki. IJoi
mTVfI 47 Sweet Peas 5? *1 Link Sousage * * 69 \
K V isl Medium Blunt ... ....-STg* ~~ Q
ASSORTED FLAVORS PARK LANE KOI Sill S A**
ICO Cream Keebler Light Cmpy |4#|i 'Q^CUI/S
gallon
Jk Turkey Pies pll> 49
59 Chi P S Ahoy 49 Chicken Chow Mein '5? 69=
/i .o I \ Argo Whole or
Vll ITT !T L pIGOSG/ 9 # &303 <£ rn Hanscom's Almond Crunch
cff C A J..& , Split Figs ...... 4 t... *1 Butter Cake ........ ST 69=
Comstock Cherry Bi.h-.Non-D.inr
Oral Antiseptic AiJ v #2 COTTeeRICh ctn. 29
PIlj Micrin LV' 89 c VIIX x cans I Southland Frozen
/ : Halo Reg. or Extra-Hold Planter's Tasty Cut Rhubarb X 9 43 c
KH I Hair Spray 49 Cocktail Peanuts
P /?7 (F\f / lye Baby or
Wpecud Fordhook Limas X* 33 c
Brownie Mix 'pkg 0 46' Fish Sticks X' 39'
Delicious Froxon
BisquiVk:::: r 49* aHSE-EH fm5..^..^....^
instant Breakfast S 69= bSM^MM
The Premium Shortening, Swift's Premium Boneless |
Swiftn'ing 49= R | canned h.,., 1
Del Monte Chunk Style Light Meat (limit Can <|
Chunk Tuna 4 6 r," $ l condensed Milk..."v37= h b f
Del Monte Healthful Carnation Enriched Ell 111 f /f\ Ml FimiivT
Tomato Juice -*l Evaporated Milk 6r. 98= llll lJ^WGreen StampsP l j
m m AJmOabad WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCHASI OP Hhfefenifld
Del Monte Pineapple-Grapefruit .. 6c-off lobe', Sta'ey i mi. | Treasure Isle P& D f
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Thursday, February 20,1969, The Florida Alligator.

Page 13



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 20, 1969

Page 14

Fans Give Gators The Critical Edge

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
The UFs recent upsets of
fourth-ranked Kentucky and
second place SEC power
Tennessee can be greatly
attributed to the howling
support of the Gators by the
near capacity crowds
expecially in critical situations,
according to UF players and
coaches.
Fan and students support
here at the UF has been the best
in the SEC over the last few
years, said Director of Athletics
and Head Football Coach Ray
Graves. The other SEC coaches
and teams consistently talk
about our great student and fan
support.
With the crowd chanting Giv
em Hell Gators in the
Kentucky game the Gators at
one point held a lead of 11
points. The constant roar of the
Gator fans psychologically
dominated the vain efforts of
UF Splashes
Into SIC
Coach Bill Harlans swimmers
departed Wednesday to swim in
the Southern Intercollegiate
Invitational at the University of
Georgia Thursday through
Saturday.
The UF will take a complete
squad to the prestigious meet in
Athens. Preliminaries are
scheduled for today with
semi-finals and finals the
following two days.
Considered favorites to bring
home honors for the Gators will
be freestyler Bruce Williams,
currently rated'No. 1 nationally
in the 200-freestyle and his
roommate Mark McKee, another
sophomore who has been shining
in the individual medley.
Several strong Gator relay
teams with McKee and Williams
participating should place high.
This is the first multi-team
meet the Gators have been in
this season. Harlans crew
returns home March 1 to face
the toughest team on their
schedule, rival Tennessee.

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The Florida Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

the Wildcats to win the game.
Thanks to the fans
enthusiastic support the Gators
psychological advantage was one
point in the 81-80 win.
The Tennessee game Monday
night was filled with unusual
tricks as Tennessee Coach Ray
Mears tried to confuse the
Gators both on the court and in
the stands with his technical
foul strategy.
But the Gators home court
advantage psychologically
drowned out Mears huddle plans
and Tennessees hopes of
winning by thundereously
chanting Go to Hell
Tennessee.
We like the home court
advantage, said Basketball
Coach Tommy Bartlett. Its
just marvelous!
It sometimes takes the
interest of the ball club to
generate the fans support, but
its an infectious thing. The
support we get in return from
the fans keeps us going, bartlett
said.
After the game one of the
Tennessee sports writers
mentioned to Bartlett that our
Gator fans certainly gave
Tennessee grief with then thenconstant
constant thenconstant noisy cheers, to say the
least, in the Gator Pit.
Bartlett replied that its no
worse than what the Gators
experience when they are on the
road, including the game at
Knoxville where earlier in the
season the Gators lost by one
point.
The Tennessee reporter said
that the crowds yelling and
screaming wasnt that bad at
Tennessee, but before he could
finish the statement Bartlett let
him know that with 11,000
people in their gymnasium that
the noise was about the same as

COACHES AND PLAYERS AGREE

5,500 Gator fans.
The bigger places dont
affect us as much as the smaller
ones do, said Mike McGinnis,
Gator forward. Crowd factor is
more important in the smaller
gyms.
UFs All-American Neal Walk
said that when we are on the
road and the fans razz me it
just makes me play better.
They wouldnt razz me or
the team if we werent good,
Walk said.
Walk said he feels that Gator
fans support affects the other
teams more by causing them to
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make mental mistakes than it
does to help us.
Our fans give us the feeling
of having the oth man on the
basketball court and the 12th
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The Florida Alligator

Gator Ticket Gripes
MR. EDITOR:
Thirty minutes before game time the reserved east side of the gym
had hardly begun to fill. For thirty minutes I sat there peering at the
empty east side from my vantage point high in the rafters of Florida
Gym. I reminisced on my fifteen minute struggle for my choice seat
as I watched some elderly faculty members plop down on the first
seats they came to.
Fifteen minutes later as I sat concealed behind the TV cameras, a
few mid-court faculty seats could still be had. However, by game time
the reserved area spectators had moseyed on in and managed to spread
out enough to fill this area.
Its no wonder that the faculty isnt pushing a new gym. Theyve
got their seats.
THOMAS DELTA, 2UC
MR. EDITOR: f
I would like to point out a few observations that I made at the
L.S.U. Maravich basketball game:
1) arrived at 7 p.m. to find only comer and end seats available,
whereas the faculty section was almost empty at that time.
2) Later, there were many young children in the faculty section,
but I guess Florida students arent allowed.
3) The east side doesnt cheer as much as the west, and I suppose
thats because many spectators in the reserved area are fair-weather
Gator fans who only came to see Maravich play.
4) If I have to go pick up my paid for tickets as a student, why
cant I sit in the reserved section like other paying customers?
Sincerely,
JANINE KINGSLEY, 3BA
(EDITORS NOTE: Except for 800 seats reserved for the faculty
and Tipoff Club, all the seats in the gym are open to students. Ticket
Manager Ray Dorman has an open-door policy and invites all students
to come to him with their problems.)
Gator Olympics: YAll Come
To the University community,
I would like to take this opportunity to invite you, the students,
faculty, administrators, and citizens of Gainesville to attend the Gator
Olympics on February 22. This track meet has as its sole purpose the
raising of funds to send Johnnie Lee Samuels to the Deaf Olympics in
Yugoslavia. A part member of our University community, Johnnie
Lee is representing the USA in the shotput event.
Beginning at 1:30 on Saturday the Gator Olympics will feature
competition in the dormitory, faculty, fraternity and sorority
divisions. We should be proud of Johnnie Lee, and his athletic
accomplishments. And so I ask you, the people who make up our
university complex to attend this worthwhile event.
If you will be unable to attend you may participate by sending
donations to the Johnnie Lee Samuels Fund, C/O IFC Headquarters,
128 Tigert Hall. Thank you!
Stephen A. Sykes
Chairman of Gator Olympics Committee
Tennis, Bowling Signups
Deadline Set For Today
Today is the last day for teams to sign up for Independent League
tennis and Dorm League bowling. This may be done by dropping by
room 229 Florida Gym or by calling 392-0591.
Four men are required for tennis, (all equipment will be furnished)
and five men are needed for bowling (tournament games will be paid
for by the Intramural Department).
Til* Pi4iHT J

SPORTS LETTERS

RAY DORMAN

Ticket Manager Named

UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves today confirmed the
appointment of Ray Dorman as
Athletic Ticket Manager.
Dorman, who joined the
Gator staff last July as assistant
to Graves, will work in the
Athletic Business Office headed
by Business Manager of Athletics
Percy Beard.
This is a new position
designed to provide the
S§ u
mm V
: Jm
RAY DORMAN
... UF Athletic Ticket Manager
Students Win
Region Honors
Twenty-six of the high
winners from the UF campus
games tournament traveled to
Tallahassee last weekend for the
Region VI ACU-I Games
Tournament. About 16 colleges
and universities from around the
Southeastern United States were
represented.
UF students garnered five first
places and two second places.
Andrew Beckenback took
first place in mens table tennis
after come from behind victories
in a thirteen game, series with the
runner-up.
Also earning honors were
Krista Hartman, George
Carswell, Richard Olsher, Mary
Jane Noll, Peggy Morrissey and
Thomas Graham.
IF YOU'RE NOT SURE
about your career... j
Talk to Mrs. Judy Pillans
February 24 about a paid
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No library science courses
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Contact PLACEMENT
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additional help needed to keep
up with our expanding
attendance, Beard said. In five
years the average attendance at
our six home games, including
Georgia, has increased from
38,871 to 57,185.
The problems involved in
ticket distribution have
increased in the same ratio,
Beard continued, and I am glad

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Thursday, February 20,1969. The Florida Alligator,

to have Rays help in assuming
these duties.
Dorman, formerly Director of
Development and Athletic
Director at Bolles School in
Jacksonville, will continue to
supervise gatemen and ushers at
all athletic contests in addition
to handling tickets for UF
students, alumni, faculty and the
general public.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 20, 1969

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