Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Sick Hospital Budget Gets A Boost

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs Shands Teaching Hospital plagued since
last June with money problems was given a
booster shot Monday by the State Budget
Commission.
The commission, meeting in ex-officio session,
passed on all but $105,541 of the original $784,714
request made in January by the Board of Regents.
Budget commission staff officials said they knew
the hospital was funded inadequately when the
budget appropriation for the current fiscal was
approved last June.
To remedy this situation hospital officials were
told they would have to submit a supplemental
request.
Originally the hospital had asked for $901,000
through the regents in November. Health Center
Provost Samuel P. Martin said when the request was

PRESS
x Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 86

Ik jtjjjttjt 1
| J& II
ARE FLORIDA MEN FAST?
Or should we say 'who's faster, SG Vice President Gary Goodrich
or Alligator Managing Editor Dave Doucette. Doucette (I.) is challenged
by Goodrich (r.) to a tricycle race.

OConnell Silent Until
Megill Properly Processed

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell Tuesday pledged
silence until facts surrounding
the Dr. Kenneth Megill
controversy are investigated
through proper channels.
Sen. Tom Slade last week
ordered OConnell to dismiss
Megill, UF philosophy professor,
for statements he made in an
Accent 69 speech advocating
student control of the UF and
calling black power the most
significant political force of this
century.
Slades action caused a
state-wide uproar, partly because
his letter to OConnell reached
the press before it reached
OConnell. UF students, faculty,
and administrators have
condemned Slades action as
legislative meddling.
OConnell, in a press
conference Tuesday, said he has
referred Slade's conplaint to
Dean Harry Sisler of the College
of Arts and Sciences.
Some six years ago, the
faculty senate set up a procedure
for dealing with complaints
against students, faculty and
administrators, OConnell said.
That is what were going to
follow.

The
Florida Alligator

The senates policy manual
directs the president to refer
complaints to the dean of the
faculty members college, who,
in turn, refers the complaint to
the professors department
chairman.
The chairman studies the
complaint and submits To the
dean a written opinion of the
charge against the faculty
member. Then the dean
reviews the matter and gives an
opinion on it, and this is
submitted to the president.
If the dean asserts that the
complaint is valid, and if the
president agrees, charges are
formulated and the faculty
member appears before the
Senate Committee on Academic
Freedom.
Asked about a bill pending in
he State Legislature to expell
disruptive students, OConnell
said, I wouldnt hesitate to
suspend such a student after a
hearing. He would take this
f-y /v J| MM 4*. v M 4 M.x Ji 1 *- 1 e
i-vuiov. piuicwi me iignis oi
the majority of the students
and to prevent a situation which
could lead to physical combat
between the two groups of
students.
On the resignation of Florida
State University President John
Champion, OConnell said he
knows nothing of the reasons for
his resignation.

made that the original amount would Tiave carried
us through.
Hospital Director Stuart A. Wesbury told the
Alligator recently that the money is needed
primarily to plan expenses for the fiscal years
fourth quarter, April through June.
The money slated for this period was chopped
off the appropriation for the hospital last June. The
hospital was told to operate the full year on funds
originally destined for the first three
quarters unless an additional budget request was
made.
The request includes:
$264,173 for salaries in jobs with new
reclassifications, new positions and promotions.
$30,000 for new personnel.
$282,000 for operating expenses.
SIOO,OOO in operating capital outlay for an
intensive care unit and a small outpatient clinic.
i $3,000 in retirement and social security
benefits.

University of Florida, Gainesville

PERSONAL REBUTTAL INVITED
Blue Key Condemns
Legislators Attacks

By DON YOKEL
Assistant Assignments Editor
Florida Blue Key members at
a special meeting Monday
condemned several state
legislators for irresponsible,
politically-motivated attacks
against the university
community.
Sen. Tom Slade, Rep. Jim K.

But his reasons, to him at
least, must have been
compelling, he said. I will miss
him as a friend and as a fellow
president.
In the press conference,
OConnell also denied rumors he
plans to run for governor in
1970. St. Petersburg Times
columnist Stan Witwer said
Monday OConnell had been
approached by leading
Democrats urging him to run.
I have not discussed the
matter with any group, he said.
I am riot running for
governor.

| Profs: Parking Fee
Is A Cut In Salary j
j: In a letter protesting the new faculty parking fees, 17 Political jj
jj: Science professors Sunday said a charge for parking amounts to >
nothing more than a cut in salary. j:
j The UF cant afford to make this kind of pay cut for its ji
jj: employes, the professors said in the letter addressed to Tom N. jj
jj: Wells, UF business manager. :
v Parking heretofore has been our only real fringe benefit and £
jj; now even it is being taken away, they said. j:
jjj There have been enough occurances over the past several $
jj; years to discourage and alienate the faculty, they said, so that j:
jj: this is perceived by many as taking on considerable symbolic jj:
jjj meaning. j:
jjj Few issues have so polarized the faculty against the jj:
j:j administration. j:

''fgsf*
SHANDS TEACHING HOSPITAL
... operation a little easier now

Tillman and Rep. David Lindsey
have been invited by Blue : Key
members to the next regular
meeting to exchange views on
questions raised concerning the
operation of the university.
The honorary leadership
fraternity, in a letter to the
Florida Senate, the Florida
House of Representatives and
UF President Sephen C.
OConnell, attacked legislators
who demand that UF
philosophy professor Kenneth
Megill be fired.
The -chapter deplores
K
jgk
STEPHEN O'CONNELL
... no gubernatorial plans

Wednesday, Februaryl969

interference with the normal
academic processes of the
univeristy by unqualified or
uninformed persons in positions
of leadership.
Charges of using the
university as a toil of political
expediency and for the
futherance of personal
ambitions were leveled at the
legislators.
A proposal in the letter
requests that OConnell
guarantee the Constitutional
rights of free expression to all
members of the university
community.
Manny James, Blue Key
president, said Tuesday he
thinks the legislators owe it to
the university to come and
, explain their basis for demands.

a
Slade Retreats
As Legislator
Reed Attacks
By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer
As Sea. Tom Slade slowly
retreated from his attacks on the
UF Tuesday, another state
legislator began attacks of his
own from another flank.
At a press conference in
Tallahassee Tuesday, Slade said,
While I do not intend to alter
my vigorous objections to the
employment, by a state
supported institution of higher
learning, of anyone who is an
advocate 'of take-over or
over-throw, I do not feel I
should place President OConnell
in a position of having to react
to any further statements
until ... he has afforded to Dr.
Kenneth Megill the opportunity
IS EE 'SLADE', PAGE 2)

America's
Number I
College
Daily
n



Page 2

. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 19. 1969

SSOC Plans
To Educate
UF Campus
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Feeling the use of violent
means to protest the actions of
Senator Tom Slade would only
inflame Florida conservatives,
SSOC has launched a campus
education campaign.
We feel the news media, and
thus, the entire campus, has
missed the point of the Megill
incident, said John Sugg, SSOC
member.
This is not a rehash of the
Marshal] Jones tenure case, he
said. Jones was charged with
expressing philosophical and
moral views in the classroom.
This is what Dr. Megill was
hired to do. He is teaching in the
philosophy department, not in
psychology, as was Jones.
SSOCs goal will be to present
this viewpoint to the campus on
a person-to-person basis.
This weekend, we will be
canvassing dormitories and
off-campus living areas with
Megills case, Sugg said.
At Monday nights SSOC
meeting, the idea of a
demonstration or other violent
means of protest was discarded
for the time being.
Im sure this would be very
much to the liking of Sen.
Slade, Sugg said. Such an
action would give him an excuse
to say I told you so. We dont
want to give him the
satisfaction.
Rather, if we can swing
public opinion on campus over
to our side, by presenting the
true facts in the Megill incident,
we will have a greater base on
which to decide further
actions, he said.
OConnell has not defended
Megills right to teach as he
wants, but rather, Megills right
to due process, Sugg siad. This
is the same as admitting Megill
has done something wrong, and
it is now only a matter of time
before he goes.)
OConnell has also done
nothing to stop an
investigation, he said. If a bill
gets introduced into the Florida
legislature, there is no doubt but
that it would pass. To vote
against a bill to investigate the
state universities would be
political suicide in this state,
Sugg said.

*.
FBK Speakers Available
: Today is the last day for picking up applications for Florida £
: Blue Key Speakers Bureau. £
v Speakers talk to civic clubs throughout Florida, promoting
£ UF. This year speakers will be meeting with clubs between April £
£ 21 and May 9.
£ Applications can be picked up in the Blue Key Office, room >
£ 312 Reitz Union, Reitz Union information desk, Tigert
£ information desk, and the speech office, room 335 ASB.
£ Applications are due today by 5 p.m. in the Blue Key office.
THE FLORII7A ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reit/ Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
aii advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

JOHN SUGG
... campus education.

See The World While
Draft Dodging Legally

If youre not yet 18-years-old
and have an urge to travel, there
is a legal loophole for you to slip
by the draft.
The Washington Post reports
that many young Americans
who are out of the U.S. on their
18th birthday and register
abroad at a U.S. consulate, are
safe as long as they stay abroad.
Men who register abroad
within five days of their 18th
birthday are assigned to Draft
Board 100 in Washington, D.C.
This board informs the registrant
that you will not be subject to
induction unless for any reason
or length of time you enter the
U.S. or any of its territories.
A spokesman for Draft Board
100 said she believes the vast
majority of young men are not
abusing the law that they are
studying abroad or living with
parents working or serving

Legislative Leaders Urge
I Hands-Off FSU, Marshall

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
Dr. J. Stanley Marshall took
office as acting president of
Florida State University Tuesday
and legislative leaders urged a
hands-off attitude following
the resignation of President John
Champion.
Marshall, 46, said he expected
to provide strong leadership
while the Board of Regents
searches for Champions
permanent successor.
Champion, a native of Pine
Mountain, Ga., resigned Monday
night with the comment that
new leadership would have a
better chance of overcoming
elements of discord from
within certain parts of the
university.
Student body president
Canter Brown of Fort Meade
said he had serious reservations
concerning Dr. Marshalls
appointment. His actions and
attitudes during the May 1968
censorship controversy have
given rise to my present doubts
regarding his philosophy and
approach to university
problems.
An FSU faculty member
since 1958, Marshall became
dean of the education college in
1967. He has a bachelors degree

abroad.
She said, however, that she
had no way of knowing how
many men have left the U.S. to
escape the draft by this mea~s.
The Post reports that one
young American living in Paris
for five years returned home for
a visit of several months but did
not inform his draft board.
Do you think Im crazy? he
said.

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from Slippery Rock State
Teachers College and received
his masters and doctoral degrees
from Syracuse University.
Marshall was named by
Champion last week to become
executive vice president for the
university on July 1. He had
supported Champion's position
in the censorship dispute.
Students and faculty members
had protested the banning of an
article in the student literary
magazine containing obscene
words.

Slade Backs Down

FROM PAGE ONE
for due process under
administration rules.
Slade said he regretted his
letter to OConnell demanding
dismissal of Megill for his radical
views and admitted he was not
aware of the procedures for
dismissal at the UF.
I certainly have not backed
off from anything other than
immediate dismissal, he said.
House minority leader Don
Reed, R-Boca Raton, said he
would pre-file a bill Tuesday to
provide immediate expulsion or
non-admission to students who
participate in activities which
disrupt the administration of
state universities.
I dont think Florida should
be caught in the position of
other states in being unprepared
to handle this subversive threat
to our system, Reed said.
He said, These kids can
either get an education at our
taxpaidinstitutions or get out. In
my opinion, there is no middle
ground.
Reeds action falls in line
with statements made Sunday
by Rep. David Lindsey,
R-Orlando, who said he would
not vote for budget
appropriations for the UF if

Champions ban ultimately
was upheld, bt the students won
changes in the universitys
policies on student publications.
Champion resigned during the
dispute but returned to work
when the regents refused to
accept the resignation.
The latest campus
controversy this winter was over
the administrations refusal to
recognize a local chapter of the
Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS).

Megill were not dismissed.
Phil Ashler, vice president for
administrative affairs at the
board of regents said Tuesday
that Lindseys threat may be
hard to back up.
Lindsey would make no
comment except for a prepared
statement which he released to
the press Tuesday.
In the statement he said he
was not in favor of closing the
state universities and he felt
President OConnell would
exercise considered and
impartial justice to the alleged
revolutionaries.
President OConnell told
Slade in a letter sent Monday he
is treating his letter as a
complaint and has referred it to
the Dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences.
Slade would not say what he
would do if OConnells final
action did not meet with his
approval.
He said it makes no
difference whether he (Megill)
has translated his ideas into
action, because its almost as
dangerous.
Slade said the catalyst for
the on campuses
comes from segments of
faculties.



IN IFC BLOOD DRIVE
Donors Have Two Weeks

Would-be donors to the blood drive should give
this week particularly during the daytime, to avoid
the mad rush the last few days, Russ Bobo,
Interfraternity Council (IFC) publicity chairman
said Tuesday.
There are only two weeks left in the annual IFC
blood drive which ends Feb. 28, and long lines
and four hour waits will be faced by donors
during the last three days, he said.
This is the first year the drive is open to
non-fraternity members. Donors can give one pint
under a freternitys name, or independently.
Under the blood bank system, any donor will

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receive free blood if he needs it in the future, no
matter where he is, Bobo said.
The fraternities are all competing for trophies for
the largest number of donations, and for the
greatest percentage of donors.
It is possible for a fraternity to have over 100 per
cent participation since others may donate under its
name.
A bloodmobile is scheduled to park at Various
fraternities for donations also. Donors under 21
must present a slip of paper indicating they have
their parents permission.

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Wednesday, February 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 19, 1969

Grade Appeals Board Proposed For Students

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The creation of grade appeals
boards in various colleges on the
UF campus has been proposed
by SGs secretary of academic
affairs for cases in which
students feel they have been
unfairly evaluated and graded by
their professors.
The proposals have been
taken, under consideration in
three upper division colleges and
the University College, according
to Howard Rosenblatt.
Rosenblatt said he contacted
Dr. Bert L. Sharpe, dean of the
College of Education; Dr. Harry
H. Sisler, dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences; and Dr.
Franklin A. Doty of the
University College as well as
speaking before several
committees.
In addition, Cliff Dropkin, a
member of the academic affairs
staff, met with the dean of the
College of Business
Administration, where the
proposal has been sent to a
committee.
Several department
chairmen in the College of
Education acted very positively
towards the proposal and
suggested going before the entire
committee of department heads
on Feb. 3, Rosenblatt said. So
we did.
He also said Sisler had

j.y/.v.VAV.v/y.y.v.ssv.v.v.y^y.v.v.v.y.v/.y.y.y.v.svv.v.y.y.v.v.v.v..V.v.v.vv
Student Conservatives!
v
I Forming New Club j
X In opposition to UFs SSOC, a new campus club for £
£ conservatives is being formed. £
X The club will hold its initial meeting Thursday night at 7 £
£ p.m. in room 123 of the Reitz Union. £
£ Conducting the meeting will be Jimmey Bailey, outspoken £
£ campus conservative.
£ Bailey said he and a small group of friends are starting the £
£ club to give the average, conservative student on campus a £
£ voice in the university. £
£ Were holding this first meeting to see how many students £
£ will go along with us at the beginning, Bailey said. Im sure £
£ that as time goes on, we will grow. £
£ Our first goal is to get recognized as an official university £
£ organization, he said. :
£ Asked about methods, Bailey said his group would not be £
£ looking for publicity, but if there was a call for action, the :
: conservatives would be there. £
* #
£ Mostly, Bailey said, we will work through press releases. £
£ However, we will also use petitions, and perhaps even a £
£ demonstration, although I doubt it would come to that. :
£ Well act as ?. watchdog on the left-wing liberal groups, he £
£ said. Our organization will be along the lines of the Young £
£ Americans for Freedom, only the campus will know where we £
£ stand. £
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I DEPTH REPORT

mixed emotions about the
proposed grade appeals boards
but recommended taking it to
the full committee of the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Rosenblatt appeared before
the committe last Monday with
undersecretary David McGriff,
who will work with the college
to study the feasibility of setting
up boards within the college.
Rosenblatt now said he needs
someone interested in working
in the Colleges of Journalism
and Communication, Physical
Education and Health, and
Engineering to set up appeals
boards in these colleges.
These persons should
preferably be in the college or
entering the college in the
future. f\
A grade appeals board is an
easy way for people to get
together and work out any
problems, he said. We hope
to get it implemented in at least
three or four colleges by next
quarter.
The proposed boards would
be set up in the departments
within the collges where it has
been approved. The boards will
probably consist of an odd
number of professors in the

TO WORK OUT PROBLEMS

department with possibly one of
these professors having recently
taught the course in question.
No student or administrators
would serve on the boards if the
proposed guidelines are
followed.
The boards would have
jurisdiction over cases in which
the student feels he has either
been evaluated unfairly, had an
instructor who was predisposed
against him, or had an instructor
who has allowed extraneous
information to be a factor in his
grading.
The boards would have the
power to recommend to the
professor that a grade be
re-evaluated but would not have
the power to arbitrarily change a
grade, in order to maintain the
autonomy and integrity of the
instructor in the classroom.
Before the student could
resort to the board he would
first have to discuss the grade
with the professor and then
submit a request for a hearing
with his department head or
dean.
All he has to put down on
the request form is
unreasonable, Rosenblatt
said.
The board would then hear
the student and, if desired the
professor. Within a week the
board would inform the student
of what action had been taken
on the review and the reasons
for the grade that was given.
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SIGMA PHI EPSILON FRATERNITY
of Florida's Alpha Chapter
cordially invite you to attend
the First Open Rush
for the Charter Members of
THE SISTERS OF THE GOLDEN HEART
on the evening of February 19, 1969
at 8:00 p.m.
CHURCH DRESS FOR TRANSPORTATION
CALL 372-9303
) >

We feel a board of this
nature would give the student
assurance that the university is
designed for him. Rosenblatt
said. We feel the student may
leave with the feeling hes been
slighted, although this is the case
in only a few courses.
Rosenblatt said the existence
of a grade appeals board could
serve in preventative nature
since the existence of a board
would be an influence on the
professor should he want to use
his own feeling to override his
knowledge.
Another effect would be
judicial, he said.
It will give the student a
second hearing in the few cases
when a professor might be in
error.
We advise the student to
use the methods of appeal
presently in existence in his
college until such a time as a
board is actually set up and
then use that, Rosenblatt said.
Presently the student goes to
the head of the department and
then to the dean of the college if
he wishes to fill an appeal. Most
students hesitate to go above
their own professor, Rosenblatt

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said, even though deans and
department heads are more than
willing to discuss grades if
students would come to them.
The existence of appeals
boards in the manner proposed
would allow for a judgment by
the professors peers no
judgement coming from above
and no advice coming from
below the professor.
The professor is the key,
Rosenblatt said. Dont try to
go over the head of the professor
without trying to contact him.
Persons interested in working
on setting up grade appeals
boards in the various colleges
should contact Rosenblatt in the
SG offices, third floor of the
Reitz Union.
IF YOU'RE NOT SURE
about your career...
Talk to Mrs. Judy Pillans
February 24 about a paid
summer internship program
in one of Florida's Public
Libraries. Any Major.
No library science courses
necessary.
Contact PLACEMENT
OFFICE for appointment and
further details.



Honorary Sponsors
Health Center Tours
Alpha Epsilon Delta, national
pre-med honorary, is sponsoring
tours of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center on Friday and
again on Feb. 28.
The tours begin at 3:30 p.m.
and reservations may be made
by calling 392-3701.
A member of the honorary
said the tours are for anyone
interested in learning about the
health center, not just pre-med
students.

Outstanding Profs
Cited At Frolics
The outstanding professor in each of ten colleges at UF will be
announced Friday night at IFC Winter _____
For the past week students have been casting their ballots for the
outstanding Professor award, a project sponsored by the
Interfraternity Council and Student Government.
An extension of the teacher evaluation program, the competition
gives students a chance to voice their opinion about their favorite
faculty members.
Colleges participating in the competition are Arts and Sciences,
Agriculture, Architecture and Fine Arts, Business Administration,
Education, English, Physical Education, Journalism, Law and
Medicine.
Last years winners were: Professors Ernest R. Bartley, Arts and
Sciences; H.G. Davis, Journalism; Mandell Glicksberg, Law; Associate
professors John R. OMalley Engineering; Irving J. Goffman, Business
Administration; Harold W. Kemp, Architecture and Assistant
professor William W. Purkey, Education.

Speakers Directory
Available To Groups

Campus and community
organizations interested in the
17th Century antiques, camping
in Turkey, or the pros and cons
of the playboy philosophy now
have a guide for finding
speakers.
The Student Governments
department of public relations
has published The 1969
Speakers Directory which lists
topics that 250 members of the
community and university
professors and administrators are
willing to discuss before groups.
Directory editor Jerry
Schechter says the handbook
was published to gain better
understanding in the university
community by increasing
informal contact between the
faculty, administrators and
community leaders.
The directory committee
contacted individuals about the
project, and asked those
interested to list topics they
would enjoy discussing. The
result was a handbook of over
250 people and many more

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topics.
The available speakers and
their phone numbers are listed in
the first section of the directory
and topics each will discuss are
classified in the second section.
Copies of the directory have
been mailed to all campus
organizations, fraternities and
sororities, and churches in the
area. Any group which has not
received one may pick up a copy
at the activities desk on the third
floor of the J. Wayne Reitz
Union.
A wide variety of topics is
available to the group which
needs a speaker. One professor
says that he is available for
humorous Lftcr dinner addresses
and another will speak on
communication by sound in
insects.
Some, speakers come equiped
with props. One professor who
lectures on artificial respiration
will demonstrate
mou t h-to-mouth resuscitation
with the use of a life size
dummy.

Student Number
Academic Classification
Outstanding Professor
Qualities you should lo*>k for:
1) Ability to communicate ideas 2) Quality of Idem expressed 3) Fulfillment of
course goals U) Fairness to students 5) Expressed Concern for the UniT. Ccununlty
HONOR SISTER ~
One Vote Per Student
No lie...
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When you T&H
Visit the &
Colonel f/F E >
Feb 19 l hru Feb ;. 22 £ S
This is no Pie in the Sky 11 y or
offer. Its real home-style Vd
(flavor) pie and its free. N
Buy a bucket or barrel of ~ *9* 4 j fr
Colonel Sanders finger *4ek|| / F 1
lickin good Kentucky jf
Fried Chicken and well l/lll£Kll
give you a luscious pie
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ments of the Colonel. gravy.
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376-6472 372-3649 J
* S v '

BY HOWARD POST
W'h/ ,rf"'
(I &Qs £fc
4te. )~E jSt" J^9^s
OFFICIAL BALLOT

Wednesday, February 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 19. 1969

The Florida Alligator
"Th price of freedom
/ * the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Putfotlw Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
"Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of'
the writer of the article and not those of the UfUverritv of Florida.*

Another View

Slade Cant Even Observe The Law

It seems that Representative Jim
Tillman and Tom Slade have more than
a passing interest in affairs at our
university. Through Tillmans bill to set
up an investigative committee into
student and faculty unrest, and Slades
attempt to have Professor Ken Megill
fired, these men have shown that they
think they know enough about whats
happening in our school to tell our
administration what to do.
But when reading their recent
comments I was struck by their lack of
knowledge of the basic situation here
and at universities in general.
In an interview in last Mondays
Tampa Tribune, Tillman made soir
amazing observations. He stated that he
thinks whats bugging students is an
attitude of too much permissiveness on
the part of the older generation. They
dont have confidence in us because
they can get anything they want. This
has been prevalent in the Black Power
movement and the student radical
movement.
As anyone who has intelligently

observed the situation knows, this is
exactly the opposite of why students
are upset. -We are upset because there
are too many restrictions placed on us.
not because we have too much freedom.
We are upset because professors are
fired because of their outspoken
political radicalism.
We are upset because we have so
little voice in university affairs.
We are upset because a
politically-appointed group of
non-educate-s, the Board of Regents,
can dictate university policies over the
faculty and even the administrators.
The radical groups would not be
protesting if their demands were being
met. They protest because they are
ignored, they are not given even a small
piece of the action.
Tillman also said that the job of
professors is to prepare students to go
into the world and earn 2 living
This is not the purpose of a
university. Ideally it shouldnt be a
factory that turns out conforming,
trained technicians to be channeled into

ESmOEIAL
' i
Three Alternatives

The date will be March 5.
Mark it down on your calendar. On that
day, Student Government will be laid
squarely on the line, spread-eagled and
vulnerable.
Twelve months ago Student Body
President Clyde Taylor, running hard for the
office he almost lost to Bill Mcride,
promised that under his leadership, SG
would put up or shut up.
UF students loaned him the time he
requested. The note on the loan has now
come due.
After considerable internal arguing and
jockeying about when to put SGs future to
the vote, the Student Senate, which has the
constitutional responsibility to call special
elections, decided last week to hold the
election this quarter. March 5, to be exact.
The wording the alternatives on the ballot
also drew heavy debate. The senate made the
final decision.
The main reason the election will be held
this quarter rather than next is that
conducting it this term somewhat removes it
from the hurly-burly of the presidential
campaign next term.
One proposal was to hold the special
election coincidentally with the regular
election. As the senate correctly surmised,
that would have been a poor choice for a
number of reasons.
Gut reactions of the students to the
campaign surrounding them would likely
have clouded their judgements, either pro or
con.
Also, the candidates and their parties
would have wasted several thousand dollars
if SG were abolished. Money is too precious
a commodity to college students to be
needlessly poured down the drain.
Another suggested date was April 10, ten
days after the opening of classes for the
spring quarter. April 10, though, was not
much better than April 24, date of the
regular election, for the same reasons. By
April 10 the campaign, if there is to be one,
will be in full swing.
March 5 has some drawbacks, too. It is
just before finals, and it may be too late in
the game now to generate any serious

a career. It should be a place where
were taught how to think, and where
we can begin a life dealing with ideas
and a search for our true identities. We
should get a true liberal education,
instead of mere vocational training.
Tom Slade thinks that a university
should be operated in the mainstream
of acceptable standards. He believes
there is no place on our campuses for
filthy literature or for radically oriented
organizations or speakers.
Who can say what is the mainstream
of acceptable standards? Surely Tom
Slade can t, for he cant even observe
the law stating how professors may be
fired. And if he cant even understand
of follow the law, 1 dont see how he
can determine the extremely intangible
thing called acceptable standards. Even
the Supreme Court, in its obscenity
cases, finds it very difficult to determine
AiU.a4. S-O Tflt J 1. . -v~- .
wiiui u iimiy dnu wiiat is not.
Since Rep. Slade doesnt even check
university law before mouthing off, it is
little wonder that he doesnt even
understand the Constitution. The First

discussion of the deeply-significant, basic
issues involved in the question of abolishing
or keeping Student Government.
But of the reasonable choices available,
March 5 was the best.
Now, the election itself:
There will be three alternatives on the
ballot. The first will be an amendment to the
Student Body Constitution which declares
the consitution null and void. Maybe
somewhat like throwing the baby out the
window with the dirty bath water, when the
constitution goes, so does Student
Government.
The second alternative will be a
constitutional amendment that does nothin"
more than reaffirm the constitution, thus
reaffirming SG. Nothing changes at least
not formally.
The third alternative will be a public
opinion poll, calling upon the next president
of the student body to create a
campus-wide, non-partisan committee of
students to study SG for several months and
suggest desired or needed changes in SG as it
presently exists on the October ballot.
Then students can vote for specific
methods for improving SG.
Possible choices the study commission
could present to the student body include
restructuring SG, changing the election
procedures to electing only college
representatives, increasing SGs power to
accomplish goals without seeking the
administrations approval and the
reallocation of original jurisdiction from the
University Senate to SG in areas like student
conduct and student organizations.
So in the March 5 election students can
wipe the slate clean by abolishing Student
Government and letting the administration
take over SGs present duties. Or students
may allow SG to continue unchanged, beset
with many problems.
Or students can vote to ask for specific
recommendations from a study commission
to be on the October ballot for their
consideration.
The loan is due. Now its the students
turn to put up or shut up.
The date will be March 5.

By Mike Hittleman

Amendment guarantees freedom of
speech. Yet Slade wants to deny
freedom of speech to radicals, because
he is in disagreement with their views. Is
this kind of man, who doesnt even
respect our Constitution, the one to
dictate actions to the university
presidents?
j 1
Both Slade and Tillman seem to
show a clear lack of objectivity. They
have not looked at whats really
happening. They have distorted things
so that anyone that disagrees with their
views is a dangerous radical who should
not be allowed on state university
campuses.
Whether be it for their own political
advantage, or out of their avowed desire
to improve our universities, both men
display an unhappy attempt at internal
intervention in our affairs.
But I suggest both of them really
study facts, for their gap with the
reality of the situation completely
discredits any hope that they sincerely
want to improve our universities.



Some Obvious Truths About Thurmond

MR. EDITOR:
Although I agreed with
relatively few of the premises of
Senator Thurmonds harangue
Saturday night, I must take
exception to Mike Hittlemans
blind disregard for some rather
obvious truths.
Senator Thurmonds main
point was not that China and the
Soviet Union are working
together in Viet Nam, but
rather that they are the major
suppliers of essential logistics
and weaponry to the North
Vietnamese, and are thus vital to
its continued pursuit of the war.
This point is indisputable.
Without Chinese automatic
rifles the Viet Cong and North
Vietnamese would be helpless,
without Soviet SAMs they
would be defenseless, and
without Soviet MiGs and
technicians they would have a
virtually non-existant air power.
The absence of any great
concentration of eithers armed
forces gives no license to sit back
and assume their assistance is
negligible.
Although Vietnams domestic
affairs lie at the root of the
conflict, no great harm would be
inflicted by pressuring the Soviet
Union to discontinue aid, and
thereby diminish the scope of
the conflict. Peace in Vietnam
will never be achieved with
bullets: its only chance lies in
mutual understanding.
Hittlemans allegation that
Thurmond suggested that only
through military might can we
ever find peace in the world is a
blatant if not intentional
distortion. Sen. Thurmonds
over-concern for nuclear
superiority in no way implied
that it was a unique tool for
effectuating peace, but rather a
secure defense for preventing
war. If Mr. Hittleman deplored
anything, why* not the

Nuclear Stand-Off: "A Balance Os Terror

MR. EDITOR:
In the February 11 Alligator a
letter from Dr. A. A. Broyles
appeared in support of nuclear
Americanism Is ..
MR. EDITOR:
Americanism . Defined
IF
you want your father to take
care
of your, thats Paternalism.
you want your mother to take
care
of you, thats Maternalism.
you want Uncle Sam to take
care
of you, thats Socialism.
you want your comrades to
take care
of you, thats Communism.
BUT
.r ~, i/v -taUp ratA of
11 y kju warn
yourself,
thats AMERICANISM.
JIMMEY BAILEY

consequences of a senseless arms
race?
Sen. Thurmonds implication,
despite its ill-sounding

Denouncing Iraq Hangings
MR. EDITOR:
The Hebrews of Iraq are bing destroyed. Not for crimes which they
didnt commit. Not for treason against their government. But because
they are, and because they exist, and because their beliefs are
different.
I denounce their murders, as I denounce every murder committed
out of bigotry and hatred, because every time a person is killed in
such away, the dignity of man is lowered a little bit.
I congratulate Miss Leslie Picker, for making use of her talents and
energy to think enough to be concerned, and for taking the time to
try and raise not only the dignity of man, but our individual
consciences as well, in organizing the protest rally in the Plaza of the
Americas.
MARC A.ZACKHEIM, lUC

superiority. I believe that
several of the essential
considerations of modern
nuclear strategy were not
applied to this discussion and
that significantly different
conclusions might result from a
re-thinking of this question.
First, one must understand
that the term nuclear
sufficiency is defined as that
deliverable megatonnage which
would annihilate ones enemys
society in any conceivable total
war situation.
By the most optimistic
statistics which an aggressor
might believe as defined by
Herman Kahn in On
Thermonuclear War the
currently possessed capabilities
of both the Soviet Union and
the United States are completely
sufficient.
Second, one must understand
that the only real bar to the use
of one of these systems by their
group of leaders is the belief of
their leaders that our side would
retaliate.
At a time of severe
international' crisis, if their

connotation, that welfare
recipients are parasites on
society is entirely accurate.
What would Mr. Hittleman call

leaders should come to believe
that our leaders did not
adequately fear their retaliatory
capacity, they would have to
weight the risks of war against
the risks of peace the latter
including the chance of receiving
the first blow in a thermonuclear
holocaust. In such situations
and these do seem to be the
dominant case defensive
systems seem only to unsettle
the balance of terror.
And finally, the balance of
these weapons systems comes via
matching offenses against
defenses, and then measuring the
superiorities. The lags in
deploying defensive systems
being much greater than those of
offensive systems, the existance
of a fledgling S.U. ABM system
should not overly frighten us.
Also, the S2OO billion
ABM-shelter system now up for
consideration seems an absurd
over-reaction to the SSO billion
Russian missile offense, if not an
invitation to war.
; 4
SAM GREENLAW, 4AS
Economics

them, wealth producers?
There is nothing intrinsically
wrong with society supporting
its dependent elements, but to
hear such ridicuious
hair-splitting as above, one
would think that some members
of the left have huge guilt
complexes.
The head-over-heels effort to
heap praise upon Senator Morse
is a friendly gesture to a
courageous crusader, but of
course what is one to expect
from Wayne Morse? It certainly
did stand to reason that he
would have something of
interest to say about Vietnam,
considering the fact that he has
done very little else but
investigate, attack, and
otherwise comment on the war
since its inception in the Gulf of
Tonkin

Liberal Scrutiny,
I Foible Myopia!

MR. EDITOR:
I was greatly intrigued by Alan Jacobsons assertion in the Feb. 11
Alligator that the pro-government speakers for Accent failed to
present a strong argument for their positions on foreign policy and
drug control. Mr. Jacobson has once again, I fear, demonstrated a
regretable myopia in his interpretation of events happening around
him.
His thesis seems to be that since the Establishment speakers failed
to convince him of the validity of their arguments, the government of
this country is necessarily pursuing the wrong policies in the areas
represented by Messrs. Flott and Finlator.
Even disregarding Mr. Jacobsons demonstrated inability to follow
any line of reasoning not corresponding closely to his own personal
bigotry, this would seem to be a prodigious feat of logical athletics.
To those who, giving way to the Pavlovian liberal response, would
brand me as just another conservative apologist, I ask this: Cound
perhaps a little less scrutiny be given to the foibles of an overly
extended government and a little more to the misrepresentations and
circuitous reasoning of imcompetent journalists?
GLENN T. FEW lUC

Ikv
I ;
f M:
* v TM:'3^|ym^Ma|g^m^g^gMgpt^w^B!&. .--I*r.''
-Sk j/JL
fr^ffCyjwl% m

Wednesday, February 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Mike Hittlemans comment
that it is an American tragedy
that this man [Thurmond]
seems to have a pipeline to the
President almost has
totalitarian overtones. I would
hope that proponents of all
divergent views would have
access to the President. It is
certainly hard to discern how
the Senator from South Carolina
could have a greater influence
than Henry Kissinger, one of
President Nixons top aides, and
a liberal.
Mr. Hittleman obviously has
an aversion to facing hard
realities, but, of course, one
simplification is worth a
thousand coherent words.
No, Mike, I dont want your
applause.
BRENT COX, lUC

Page 7



Page 8

l. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 19, 1969

fashionable, gorgeous, striking,

jSBbB
*** jhf* %. I
g| v aSlii&WfisF '%
1£-
H
" .. 'W"- 1 *., %%
': v-; ... ?3F 1 1
HI
THU UNIVERSITY SHOP
STUNNING navy and while play dress with its own
short shorts made of 100% cotton featured in
various Spring colors. Modeled hy Sally.
x;f
> .£
STAG AND DRAG
BREATHTAKING is the word for this one-piece
bikini in a wild nouveau print perfect for
approaching warm weather. Modeled by C'hervl.

stunning, wild, eyecatching,

COLONY SHOP
WILD is the word tor this exciting black and white
jumpsuit by Bobbie Brooks. The outfit features long
bell Haired legs and a built in bra. Modeled by Patty.
mm.
HjK^
**' ~~ > r *
SUSAN SCOTT
C APTIVATINGLY Grecian is this tunic dress that
captures the soft, shaped, look of Spring. The tunic
can double up with bell bottoms tor a great look or
step out on its own as a mini dress. In sizes 5-13.
about $25.



captivating, chic, breathtaking,

tantal-eye-zing, nice, vivacious
V Fashion layout by. . Photography by. .

wH^ggpij g M]T
x:v ghg| p *p. :
** VHHiH Ip
waste- BKSNfe37^ys%^aofes^^4l
~.. :;-gp:..,v -H' >?W
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''iWlEfwfniTff ?;
Bf"*
m Kilted 1
Sm l^tfC
9ps|gL
DONIGANS
FASHIONABLE navy blue introduces this casual
dress by Darra in 100% cotton. Red and white cuffs
and belt accentuate this outfit. Modeled by Penny.
HflLk Mt^
MAAS BROTHERS
CHIC. Winter Frolics 1969! The glamorous era of
the forties brings us the Harlow look. An elegant
black crepe pantgown has its very own gold chain
belt. It is found in our Junior Terrace Department.
Modeled by Linda.

X awp
Kdft
* x' : &&* w v y iK wSH ./ jagg- .;*<
JgF 'skhl'' sv
TWIG
TANTAL-EYE-ZING is this silver-beaded evening
gown of pink moire. An alluring dress for Winter
Frolics. Modeled by Marti.
If
B 'jMU
Ik Ms&<
Wm : H
-i, v gL |sf jKHm.
sjsM V
\ T Kass
Bllltilliliil
4&^^^to- 9 &sf l .'Li .., ->sa : xv>w J .':%%5&.-<->;
BSfry "< / I K* BHra sggg g wra& &,
SILVERMANS
STRIKINGLY different is this pantsuit with a great
contrast combination ol jet black and stark white.
The pockets help break the plain front and the
polka-dot tie sets it off. The outfit features a long,
tunic-dress style top over full Haired legs in a
linen-like material which has enough body to hold
its shape well. Modeled by Star.

Wednesday, February 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

C'?K£*X*X£ X X XXXiXiXWSSXW X ;N*X*X JiJ
FOR SALE
Sv:xs<*K<<<^xiis!s
BMWR 27 Excellent condition. Call
392-3500 8:30-4:00 or see at 2020
N.W. 31st PL. (A-st-86-p)
MUST SELL 10 X 50 mobile home 2
brm very nice come and see washer
included. Front kitchen 2150 or
make offer after 5 oclock 372-5742.
Arrendondo Estate. (A-st-86-p)
22 target handgun, heathkit amp.
Garrard changer 2-8 in. coax-speaker.
Call 376-2344. (A-2t-86-p)
Mobile home 8-28 1 br. Furnished
AC. 378-7436 eve 5 till 9.
(A-3t-82-p)
YAMAHA 60cc 1961 in excellent
condition. Tool box and helmet
included $175 Phone 372-8077.
(A-3t-86-p)
1967 Honda 305 Hawk excellent
shape extra parts, tires mufflers. Call
Jeff at Lake Butler 496-3631 days,
496-6278 evenings. All for S4OO.
(A-4t-84-P)
TV new portable Magnavox won in
contest. SBO value yours for SSO.
Never used; full warranty. Call
376-8958 after 5:30. A real bargain!
(A-ts-69-P)
1968 Honda S-90, incl helmet, rack,
mirrors, tarp cover, 4400 miles. Must
sells23s. Call 376-8668. Ask for
Greg. (A-3t-84-P)
1 br trailer $995 new refrig, hw htr
drapes, carpeted, tile kitchen & bath,
12 1 /? x 22 screened cabana on
concrete patio parked near UF call
468-1241. (A-st-84-P)
Camping and fishing special 16 ft
fiberglass canoe, carrier, paddles just
8 months old, unsinkable need
money for medical bills, call
376-9919 5129.00. (A-3t-84-P)
12 x 50 1968 Parkwood fully
carpeted, early American A.C. must
sell! Equity, take over reasonable
pymts. 378-0701 after 5. (A-st-85-P)
FOR RENT
Must sublet 2 bdrm. Landmark Apt.
spring & summer quarters, keep our
security deposit. 378-8594.
(B-st-82-p)
Sublet College Terrace Apt. For 3rd.
Qtr. 1/2 block from campus. For 1 or
2 persons. 376-9889. (B-st-83-P)
Furnished two bedroom 1 bath house
for rent air conditioned $125 a mo.
Call 392-1575 before 5 or 378-6829
5:30 and weekends.(B-st-83-P)

o
Sh
1
lyKn,
FLORIDA BLUE KEY
iire?wi
SPEAKERS BUREAU
AVIs now accepting^
IK// vvSl!
I Speaker applications! I
aft
W*-)
Pick up applications
mi
Fla. Blue Key Office
312 J.W. Reitz Union
Union Info Desk
Ist floor J. W. Reitz Union
Tigert Info. Desk
Ist floor Tigert Hall
Speech dept. Office
335 Arts & Sci. Bldg.
* applications due in FBK office
no later than 5:00 Fri. Feb. 21.

| FOR RENT
&x*wccox<*x*xx-x*x:sxw*:-x*x*X'-.v
Efficiency apartment suitable for
one, two or three. AC pool 1513 NW
5 Ave. Thru third quarter or longer
$75 per month. Call 376-8990.
(B-10t-80-P)
Sublet furnished 2br apt Summit
House. Central heat & air, wall to
wall carpet. Ist months rent free.
Call 376-4152 between 5 & 6:30.
(B-st-8 5-P)
Luxurious living in high rise api.
complex just a few blocks from
campus. Now renting at La Fontana
Apts. Call 378-0372 or see at 207
N.W. 17th St. Apt. 506. (B-st-86-p)
2 bdrm apt, 2 blocks from campus,
must sublet spring and summer qtrs,
$l4O month, washing machine. Call
372-6559 between 5 and 7 p.m. and
after 11 p.m. (B-85-86-p)
>;Yvrtv.wKvKvw.w7Aw;vv?;v/jj)
WANTED
CHATEAU LIVING for
$ 3 7.2 5/m onth. Take command:
pool, air, carpet, cable. Call Watt at
Summit House, 372-2607 after 6.
(C-3t-84-P)
The single university crowd over 21
For the Friday Afternoon Club
Will meet this & every Friday from
5-7;30 at the Lamplighter. Private
rooms pleasant atmosphere. Drinks
$.45, ladies $.20. Come early & bring
your friends. Fridays a great day to
have fun. (c-3t-86-p)
2 female roommates to share 2 bdrm
apt. spring and summer qtrs. 2 blocks
from campus $lO5 qtr. 372-6559
btwn 5 and 7 p.m. and after 11 p.m.
(c-Bt-86-p)
Female roommates over 21, to share
apt. with character. March 1 or April
1. 42.50 & Vz utilities. No lease.
376-7670. (C-3t-86-p)
1, 2 or 3 roommates female
Landmark, Spring Quarter.
378-8594. (C-st-82-p)
Baby sitter for infant in my house
Mon Wed morning. 372-7946.
(C-3t-84-P)
.vYxc-x-x-x-x.y.y.s-.svxc-xvx-xYX-x-xc-x
| HELP WANTED
fexx*x*x<<*x*xxix;s*x*x*xx-x;xw*
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. National Parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
SI.OO to Arnold Agency, 206 East
Main, Rexburg, Idaho 83440.
Moneyback guarantee (E-st-83-P)

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 19, 1969

Page 10

HELP WANTED
: :xxw*x->xw-x*>xx:ww*x:<*:'X*2'
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1-hr session. Must be native
English-speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University Ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5. (E-10t-71-C)
AUTOS |
LIKE NEW Beautiful 65 Falcon
Futura 2 door hardtop 6 cyl radio
automatic new wsw. Must sell A real
bargain. Call 392-1473 or 3725703.
(G-7t-86-p)
1967 Rambler Rebel sta wgn low
mileage 4 speed floor shift air cond
power brakes and steering fm radio a
real buy! Call 378-7393 after 5 pm.
(G-st-85-P)
59 MGA 1500 good cond. must sell,
going into service, S4OO. Call
378-0286 or 372-3572. (G-st-81-p)
KXXX.?MX X-XXXXXiXXXXrW*X*X*X*XX
I PERSONAL
#xxx*:*x<<"W<*x*xx.x;xw x*xx*x*x*x*ii
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next eye
glasses at University Opticians 526
SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound Bus
Station 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message any time day or night.
Message changes weekly. Let freedom
ring 16 NW 7th Ave. (PAID
POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENT.)
(J-st-84-P)
The Friday Afternoon Club for the
university crowd over 21 will meet
this and every Friday from 5-7:30 at
the Lamplighter. Private rooms,
pleasant atmosphere. Drinks $.45,
ladies $.20. Come early & bring your
friends Fridays a great day to have
fun. (J-3t-86-p)
Congratulations to 29 new brothers
of AEPi Little Sisters of the Golden
Lion. (J-lt-86-p)
Fr. Roy We Love You! signed The
Hair. (J-lt-86-p)
Lost lrish Setter male IV2 yrs. Red
White spot on chest. Gainesville tag
initials WES in right ear call wade
376-9776. (L-lt-86-p)
Fourteen, were watching you as we
aatched your friends to the south.
Remember, Heavy fine for walking
on the grass. Last warning buster.
(M-2t-86-p)
Time is running out to reserve your
seat for EUROPE this summer. $315
lO weeks. NYLondonNY or go
for credit. 392-1655 or 310
Union. (J-st-82-C)
Girls, put STYLE into your wardrobe
with a 100% wool ruana or cape from
Columbia. Capes come in several
styles with two types of collar or no
collar, and come in colors to
compliment any wardrobe. The capes
and ruanas are really worth seeing at
the SPANISH MAIN, 105 W.
University Ave, 372-0667. (J-st-85-P)
RATHSKELLER auditions Mon.
night, Feb. 24 at 8:00. Open to all.
Come do your thing or just come
listen. (J-st-80-c)
LOST & FOUND \
x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x.xxv.x.x.nv.v.v.
Lost: motorola Pageboy paging
beeper in University handball courts.
Reward. 376-7655. (L-st-82-p)
hurry ..
I:.""TLn LAST 2 DAYS!
5:50 7:40
sa Bait
Pis Jov*
WINNER BEST PICTURE
Venice film festival
Nik IKt rnmmmm
At K 2
'olfiMr-.' -*>yWw

. ,-.v.V.V.V.V.%V.SVA\%VivXv>X' /
r~ SERVICES
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks. repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. A'lain St.
(M-7t-74-p)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
W 3 HORROR SHOWS
B [i bli I

ttilisiiisisFii L - : n
"Frankenstein created woman"
I pm
I GET HAPPY
( Tonight all your favorite drinks
8 will be double for the price of
a single. We have free
t entertainment to soothe your pain.
Bring your buddy, wife, date,
I fraternity, or sorority along
I to the
r n s
I^FREEM
EAT-IN
| Chicken-Cold Cuts |
I FOOD
| (tree, that is) f
X 4:30 7: 00 j
THIRSTY
| 633 N.W. 13th St. j

Use our handy
mall In order
form.

I STRAIGHT FROM I
j HAIGHT-ASHBURY j
i 'REVOLUTION!
| THRU 3,5, |
|__ STATE 7,9 I



Community Service Highlights SG Role

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs much cussed and
discussed Student Government is
feverishly working both in front
and behind the scenes of five
community service projects.
The lesser half of these think
pieces Project SAMSON and
Ombudsman are already
commonplace to most UF
students.
Its the other three which SG
figures to have trouble getting
across. Problems or no, SG plans
to forge ahead, for the UF
governing body is within 15 days
of either getting a vote of
confidence or dying a natural
death.
The special referendum on
the future of SG, which was
promised to students last year
by Clyde Taylor, is scheduled
for March 5.
The five community service
projects are:
t Project SAMSON
(Socio-Economic Opportunities
Network), established to
develop close interpersonal
relationships between interested
university students and
community young people.
f The Ombudsman program,
an individualized approach to
personal student problems,
including those with the
Gainesville business community.
t The Gainesville Student
Economic Council, still in the
planning stages. Its purpose is to
gain discounts from certain
Gainesville merchants in return
for advertisement.
A program to recruit Negro
students for the UF.
Blood Drive
Closes Feb. 28
The interfraternity blood
drive ending Feb. 28 is coming
to a close with increasing
competition.
Latest figures show Delta
Sigma Phi leading with 61 pints
followed by Phi Delta Theta'
with 52 pints.
This could be the best drive
ever held, Dale Malloy, staff
member of the Blood Bank said.
Last year, Sigma Phi Epsilon
won the trophy for the most
pints donated. They are running
third place with 33 pints
according to the latest figures.
There is also a trophy given
to the fraternity with the most
participation from its members.
XEROX!
5 I
$ OFFSET FACILITES $
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3j Thesis and Dissertations :
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s Enlargements
| Open Til 11 P.M.
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| University Plaza
6
11620 W. University
| 378-1001

11 imiltl J vvvy'
} BACKGROUND REPORT 1

t Recruitment of better
junior college students.
Under the chairmanship of
John OShea, Samson began the
Fall quarter with a full-scale
tutoring program. Student
volunteers give about one hour
once or twice weekly to tutor in
a childs home.
Approximately 400 students
have volunteered to provide
Samson with manpower.
Several Samson projects are
currently under consideration. A
friendship program between UF
males and area teen-age boys, in
coordination with the Alachua
County Sheriffs Department,
will be operated in much the
same way as Big Brothers, Inc.
A special film series will bring
youngsters films by request.
Homework centers may be set
up to provide children with a
quiet, supervised place to study.
The Ombudsman office,
instituted last spring by Student
Body Vice President Gary
Goodrich, has solved many
disputes between UF students
and Gainesville merchants.
One fstudent had a
disagreement with a local rug
shampoo merchant over rental
of a shampooer. Another coed
couldnt reach an agreement
with a laundry over the value of
a ruined sweater.
Both cases were solved to the
satisfaction of the student and

Study Abroad In
Florence, Italy
Academic Program:
Acquire two consecutive quarters of credit in courses from the
following fields: Art; Classical Languages, Literature and
Civilization; English; History; Humanities; Italian Language and
Literature; Philosophy; Religion. Credit transferable to any
university or college. Courses taught by Florida State University
instructors.
;\<
Extra Class Program:
Live in picturesque 15th century Italian Villa. Enjoy field
trips to Florentine galleries, museums, churches. Participate in
Center-sponsored tours to cities such as Rome, Naples, Pompeii,
Siena. Travel on your own during long weekends and between
quarter breaks.
Requirements:
A minimum of 2 point grade average. Sophomore standing or
above. One quarter of Elementary Italian or its equivalent.
Approval of your academic advisor. r-
Costs:
Fees two quarters: in state student $1,625.00; out-of-state
student $2,025.00. Fees cover tuition; round trip transportation
to and from New York via charter plane; room; board; insurance;
and excursions sponsored by the Center. (Other travel at your
own expense.)
Information and applications:
For applications and information write to:
T. .
Dr. Wayne C Mmnick
Associate Dean, Arts and Sciences
212 Williams Building
Florida Statp University
Tallahassee. Florida 32306
\

PROJECTS FORGING AHEAD

the merchant, Goodrich said.
Students can call the
Ombudsman office, Room 232
of the Reitz Union, at any hour
and their complaint will be
recorded. The next day the
Ombudsman replays the tape
and contacts the students who
called. He then goes to work
solving the problem.
The Gainesville Student
Economic Council is a
cooperative project among
student governments of
Gainesville High School, P.K.
Yonge, Lincoln High School,
Santa Fe Junior College and the
UF.
In thier efforts to gain
student discounts from
Gainesville merchants, the
council has created a gentle,
but not yet audible rumble,
said Goodrich, a council
member.
The Plaza Theater has begun
a 25 per cent student discount
partially because of the efforts
of the council.
Goodrich said they have a list
of about 40 merchants whom
they plan to contact. Once an
agreement on discounts has been
reached, a merchants name can
be dropped from the list if the
ombudsmans office receives too
many complaints about the
merchant.
A program to recruit a larger
number of Negro students for
the UF began in November with

visits to Jacksonville area high
schools.
Headed by John Mica, the
program will be extended
throughout the state. SG leaders
and volunteers will go to high
schools througthout the state to
tell Negroes what UF has to
offer them.
An attempt is also being
made to recruit junior collegb
students active in drama, student
government, journalism and
athletics.
Goodrich said Florida State
University already has a program
similar to this.
Their program has been so
successful, weve been losing

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Wednesday. February 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

many transfer students to
them, Goodrich said.
The junior college
recruitment will be similar to the
Negro recruitment program and
to a speakers bureau which
other universities and colleges
have.
Dick Holme/
Jeweler/
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Va BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 19, 1969

|- = ENTERTAINMENT SERIES i
Flicks And 'Eat-In
At Thirsty Gator

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first in a series of
articles by the Alligator Entertainment Editor
concerning local establishments that cater to the
over-21 college crowd.)
By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
In his fifth week of business, owner Ernie Cramer
is still trying to think of ways to give the students
what they want at the Thirsty Gator on North 13th
St.
With students interest in mind, Cramer has
initiated three special nights a week at his
establishment.
W.C. Fields and Laurel and Hardy live again each

AT RATHSKELLER
Strange Show Offered
By Chesters Children

By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Chesters Children -a female
vocalist with a strong, unusual
voice (Alix Dobkin Hood), a
country rock singer who
slaughters folk tunes (Gary
Septon) and an adequate
drummer (Bob Ulius) have a
strange show to offer that
indicates their short four months
experience together.
Hood has a beautiful voice
and carries the group. Her
compositions are full of
philosophy and her voice is clear
enough to carry the words to the
audience even when it is
inattentive.
She has performed her
folksinging in leading clubs
across the nation and in Carnegie
Hall and is a prolific songwriter
in favor of the new idiom.
Septon has played in a
country rock group, the Sugar
Beets, for several seasons. He
writes songs and also
occasionally rides in rodeos.
Septon should return to the
country western field that he
started in. His rendition of Mr.
Beau Jingles was very good but
a folksinging cowboy will never
make it.
The drummer, Bob Ulius, has
recently returned from a
European tour, and adds his
jazz-oriented background to the

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend
10% discount
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N. Main St. Phone 376-7581

group.
Completing their Florida tour
with this Rathskeller

HAVE YOU HEARS?
A I B Iw l
THE FLORIDA QUARTERLY
IS COMING SOON!

Monday evening in three shows screened at the
darkened Thirsty Gator. Directors chairs are
provided for the overflow audiences.
A weekly eat-in will begin this Wednesday
from 5 to 7 p.m. During these hours, fired chicken
and cold cuts will be served at a free buffet table.
Thursday is ladies night at the Thirsty Gator and
lasts from 7 p.m. until closing. All ladies drinks are
25 cents.
To keep the students musical appetite appeased,
Ernie changes the selections on his juke box once a
week. Taking Radio Station WGGGs top forty as
a guideline, these songs are always featured.
The Thirsty Gator has a variety of sandwiches
that are served at any time. Ernie opens at 11 a.m.
for lunch and closes at 2 a.m. Monday through
Saturday.

performance, Chesters Children
plan to record in New York in
the near future.

t j fIL Jn
vW ; MjQgjgj _, gK.
.' *H -% -" v'i'fe^ 1 i ff s v
'"' T > '- *"s }
GARY SEPTON, ALIX HOOD AND 808 ULIUS (RECLINING)
... a folk-rock group now singing at the Rathskeller
wp%t M en,Hi^sTl
SHAMPOOING RAZOR CUTTING
U|: SIMS BARBER SHOP I
r 817 W. UNIVERSITY AVE^^g
w mmm mam
| Student Special
I (With The Coupon) J
I Our Regular 88$ Steakburger I
Luncheon And Any 15$ Drink
I *|
| $1.03 Value Only 85< plus tax j
| Steak n Shake |
1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville I
p_
. .JM v J .- wSPM^^^^IHTIIMfWBr
K>- yyi iffn i wm
ngK^fl^K
-Av--a.
Chesters Children
HHpBKF JoM .ww>. J yi t| | irwM | i |
f. ** ILI * Wm
-
m MB 'JMg§m WF% fiilii i- i : -£ t'.-:^H^H^^E; Vy g'BSwjShfcyj'y- 2s |? aSf ," 'I^nSBBSMH.^;>: yflMllllllill
Chesters Children
Twice Nice All This Week at the I
p .1 U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc.
Joe Whalen
ai the piano Rathskeller r(f



K sagjj M'
r %jso&
pPF i|fprt J
4B B
; y
1| . lllb
CAROL NURENBURG AND CLAUDE PINKSTON
... in the summer's production of "An Italian Straw Hat." Pinkson
will play in "After the Rain."
'After The Rain
Features Wet Plot

Ideas flash on and off this
week around the Constans
Theatre where the Florida
Players are readying John
Bowens After the Rain for its
Monday night opening. Bowens
play extends the mind not too
far but just far enough to feel
the stretch.
Playwright Bowen deals with
the aftermath of a great flood of
1970 as it is viewed two hundred
hears later. The play centers on a
kind of Noah of the future who
by some accident ended up in
the middle of the flood in a raft
built by the makers of a
breakfast food called Glub.
The captain, retired from the
Army, was originally
commissioned by the makers of
the breakfast food for a voyage
around the world to prove that
man could live by Glub alone.
Two centuries after the
second deluge, a New Society
founded by the survivors of the
flood probes into what
happened back in 1970 after the
rains came and covered the
earth. To guide them, they have
only fragmentary documents of
the period: a sort of log book
called The Book of Arthur
and the diary of one of the
survivors.
To weld the fragments into a
whole, Bowen has adapted the
techniques of the flashback and
the play-within-a-play in a novel
fashion which serves to bring

W" 1 H
/ Climb aboard (
S.S. Winnjammer
*4 Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. Wj
J Dinners to 12:00 P.M. //
\ Bernie Sher attheOrgan Ay
* on \ l\
Thursday, Friday & Saturday V V
Oysters & Clams on the half shell 4*
Michelob on draft 1/
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (>A
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. V
Reservations accepted Hip'
. Harry M. Lanton, Manager /
Closed Sundays
&

each scene to its peak but no
further.
For the Florida Players
production of After the Rain
scene designer Michael Gillette
has made new use of the
Constans Theatres flexible
stage. For the first time in their
new theatre the Players will
perform on a thrust stage. The
set literally thrusts the actors
out into the auditorium with the
audience seated on three sides of
the stage action.
Monday night, February 24,
marks the opening of After the
Rain for a weeks run at the
Constans Theatre. Performances
are nightly, Monday through
Saturday at 8, with a Saturday
matinee at 2.
To see at leasi one mans
comic fantasy version of what
the future may hold, as well as a
comment on what the past
might have held, call or go by
the Union Box Office for
reservations to After the Rain.
Good Sorvice Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
(v§S
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

HOSTED BY ENGINEERS

Kodak Official To Speak

Engineering Week here will
get the picture treatment. this
evening when an Eastman Kodak
Co. official addresses UF
students.
Harold A. Mosher, Director
of Engineering for Eastmans
Kodak Park Division, presents a
public lecture at 7:30 in the
Reitz Union Auditorium.
His talk is being sponsored by
the Student Chapter of the
Florida Engineering Society,
which also is hosting a week-long
exhibit in the Gainesville Mall.
Mosher, past president of the
National Society of Professional
Engineers, formerly was
associated with Bell Telephone
Laboratories and Consolidated
Film Industries in New Jersey.
Another Engineering Week
speaker will be State Rep. Fred
Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL AU
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
DEALER

I STAR-SEARCH 69 I
COLLEGE REVUE AUDITIONS FOR SIX FLAGS OVER GEORGIA
If you're a singer, dancer, musician, have an act of a performing specialty
of any sort come try out! This could be your big year ... at Six Flags
Over Georgia. This great Atlanta family amusement center needs fresh
new singers, dancers, novelty quartets and trios, individual talent for the
Crystal Pistol, and strolling entertainers. Youll work for a full season at a
minimum salary of $70.00 per week, under topnotch professional direction
a great chance, a great season, great fun. Hundreds of thousands of
people see these shows every year. So whatever your act is show us your
ability. Who knows, when the next star is born, it might be you. Sorry
no instrumental groups needed this season.
Piano accompaniment, record players, and tape recorders will be pro provided
vided provided at each audition session. Auditions for persons 16 years and older.
FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 3:30 P.M. / Room 342, Music Building / Florida State
University / Tallahassee, Florida.
SIX FLAGS
- ~ 1 ' 11 111 11 l i

Schultz of Jacksonville at 7 pm
Friday at the Ramada Inn during
the annual banquet of the North
Central Chapter of the Florida
Engineering Society.
Additional Engineering Week
activities include: a special
supplement in the Gainesville
Sun on Sunday; engineering
films at the mall and area high

I BREAKFAST SPECIAL j
I 6AM-11 AM MON. FRI. I
| 2 EXTRA lAR6E £668 |
I * ja |
I 3 NOT CAKES AQt I
I with I
GRITS f I
fa
I ftftFFFF I
vvrrw 1225 w UN|V AVE B

Wednesday, February 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

schools; and speakers being
made available to regional clubs
and schools.
Handling activities are Ed
McGinnis, President of UFs FES
student chapter, and Larry
Smith, engineer of research with
the local office of the Florida
State Road Department. Smith
is Engineering Week chairman.

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 19, 1969

FOUR-YEAR APPOINTMENT UNPRECEDENTED
Bartlett Signs Contract Extension

Alligator Services
Tommy Bartlett has signed an
unprecedented four-year
extension of his appointment as
Head Basketball Coach at UF,
Gator Director of Athletics Ray
Graves announced Tuesday.
This is something we have
never done before, Graves said.
It is an expression of the high
regard I have for Coach Bartlett
and his staff and, frankly, to
keep a man on our staff whose
reputation as a coach has spread
all over the country.
Bartletts first Gator team,
1966-67, compiled the finest
single-season mark in Gator
history, 22-4. Last season his
club finished 15-10 and was in
the thick of the SEC race until
the final two weeks of the
season. His current team is 14-7,

UF Takes Another Step
Towards Activities Center

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
UF President Stephen C. OConnell said Tuesday
that the initial step in the five-phase progress
towards an activities center will begin Monday when
physical planning directors depart for a tour of
Southeastern Conference activities complexes.
The preliminary tour will be made by UF
physical planning directors Walter Matherly an W.
Ellis Jones beginning Monday. The study will be
made of the structures at Georgia, Auburn,
Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana
State.
Ellis and Matherly will see the first two
together then split up to view the balance. Tehy
will extend their tour to visits to the coliseums at
out-of-conference schools North Carolina and
Illinois.

McAshan A f amblin Wreck 1

With a tear in his eye, high
school All America quarterback
Eddie McAshan of Gainesville
High School signed a full athletic
grant in aid to Georgia Tech
Tuesday saying I hope 1 do
good; Ill be representing
Gainesville.
Wooed by more than 100
colleges, McAshan was a high
school All-American, the states
top prep gridder and the No. 1
blue chip prospect for Georgia
Tech, the UF, and Florida State
Universities as well as dozens of

DIAMONDS
andiSMitr
w 50

including a 65-63 victory over
Tennessee.
Coach Bartlett and his
assistants, Dick Davis and Jim
COACH TOMMY BARTLETT
... pleased to sign

smaller colleges.
Tech Head Coach Bud Carson
told a crowded assembly at the
schools teaching auditorium
that he welcomed Eddie into the
pack of ramblin wrecks.
McAshan was the third GHS
player to sign with Tech this
year. Signed previously were
offensive back Jim Roundtree
and defensive back Jim
McCombs.
The 6-foot-2, 180 pound all
stater passed for a career total of
more than 6,000 yards, 2,400 of

OConnell said that if the funds were available
today it would be four and a half years before an
activities coliseum could be in use at the UF.
The president also said that he thought the best
way to build a much-needed swimming pool would
not be to include it in the coliseum package but as a
complex adjacent to it.
Three sites were mentioned by the president, as
he spoke with a late afternoon press conference in
Tigert Hall.
O'Connell said that the two large fields near the
stadium were being considered. One site is the area
adjacent to the campus handball courts; the other is
the present military drill field.
A third site; the southeast campus area, currently
serving agricultural needs, was also mentioned.
Matherly said he would try to have completed his
tour of facilties by March l.

McCachren, have done an
outstanding job of coaching and
recruiting, Graves said.
Considering everything I
believe the coaching job being
done this season is the finest
weve had at Florida.
The Gators have lost starter
Todd Lalich for the season due
to knee surgery, had Mike
McGinnis out for 10 games with
a leg operation and have still
come up with a good record. In
six of the losses the Gators were
either tied or within one basket
with 40 seconds remaining and
the average margin of defeat in
these games was less than three
points.
I appreciated this very much
and was pleased to sign it,
Bartlett said. Gainesville and
the University of Florida have

it this season as the Canes
compiled a 9-0-1 record.
McAshan said that he made
up his mind last Thursday but
kept it a secret, claiming that he
felt much better since he had
made the decision; his basketball
average had improved seven
points.

dpg|) World Campus Afloat
Chapman College
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Why not spend next Semester with us?
Sail around the world while while attending class!
INTERESTED?
Informational meeting
Room 349
Reitz Union
Feb. 20 r
7:30 pm __
ii MM 111 I.l.t- '*'-*** ~ y

The Florida Alligator
\ OCX vXX^.
'vXy ^ v )QPK^xSo^V
yCy' x \ xv* XT*

MARC DUNN
Sports Editor

been wonderful and we're
approaching the future of
basketball here with optimism. 1
think we are on the right track
toward national prominance in
pasketball and I want to be part
of helping this arrive.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell ratified the contract
extension, noting that Coach
Bartlett not only has produced
exciting and winning basketball,
he has proven himself as a leader
of young men and a gentleman
who represents the University in
the proper manner.

WEDNESDAY
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ON YOUR MARK
This scene is from last years Sebring Endurance Race, which was
won by the Ford GT 40. A film will be shown tonight at 7, 8 and 9 of
last years race. It will be shown in Little Hall, room 101. Four free
tickets to this years race will be given away.
[Skirting The
Florida Gym 1949 j
By Beth Graves^J

Conversation is at its peak
concerning the definite need for
a new coliseum at the UF. Not
only would it fulfill the demands
of the students, but it would
supply the athletic department
with swimming, gymnastic and
facilities that would
surpass those of other SEC
schools.
It would be interesting to see
the results if the basketball team
could practice without the music
of the gymnastic team ringing in
their ears, and if the swimmers
had priority to an inside pool of
their own.
It is a poor showing to have
to invite an, as of late, number 4
team in the nation to compete in
a gym such as the UFs, where
the heat on the floor is not far
from 85-90 degrees.
When the president of the UF
has to remove his coat during
halftime, and one tends to
notice a steam rising from the
floor, the need of a new set-up
filters through the minds of all.
At one time the UFs gym
was recognized as the number
one gym in the SEC, but that
Gators Sign
All-American
UF has signed Richard
Yeargle, a first-string juniqr
college all-America football
player from lowa Central JC, to
a grant-in-aid scholarship, Gator
Director of Athletics Ray Graves
announced Saturday.
Yeargle, a 6-2, 192-pound
native of East Moline, Illinois,
played offense and defense for
lowa Central this past season,
earning first-team all-American
honors on defense while
intercepting 17 passes in 10
games and making honorable
mention all-American honors on
offense while rushing for 1421
yards.
t
, Hava
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was in 1949 when it held 7,000
people. Now its 1969, and the
UF enrollment is at a capacity of
20,000 and the gym seats 5,646,
because of fire regulations.
Upon viewing the frosh game
last Wednesday night, it proved
to be more of a production to
music, as the Baby Gators
proceeded to warm up and play
to the music of the gymnastic
team on the far side of the gym.
Among the flaws involved in
the present set-up is the lack of
priority the athletes have for
practice. Any independents
wishing to shoot for a while have
to be run out for the varsity to
work out. Prior to any events
such as Frolics, or theatrical
presentations, the players resort
to high school gyms for their
daily practice.
At one time a survey was
made to see it the students
would be willing to raise their
fee in order to set up a fund for
the building of a new gym. IFC
also undertook the task of
raising money for the fund, but
to date it is merely a drop in the
bucket.
The pinnacle of the
conversation has been reached,
and the time for action and
results is" next on the agenda.
The enthusiasm shown by the
coachesf players and fans
Saturday against Kentucky and
Monday against Tennessee is still
another mark to spur on the
results. Only with agression and
desire will the results fill the
mold of a new coliseum
.. .. There is no hope for the
complacent man.

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FLORIDA GYM FACILITIES BLAMED
UF Cage Attendance Down

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
Attendance at the UF
basketball games is down! But
not because the Gators are
dominating their opposition -a
la UCLA.
Giant Lew Alcindor and his
UCLA mates are just so much
better than the rest of the teams
that there is little excitement
left when the Bruins play.
No team has lost by less than
10 points to the Bruins, and
consequently the expected
crowds the promoters predict
never come true. Evidence of
this fact was the recent Chicago
doubleheader festival where the
Bruins only drew 13,831 out of
the 19,000 expected to see
them play.
Prior to the games with LSU,
Kentucky and Tennessee, the
Gators attendance average had
been 4,531 per game. 1,115
below the seating capacity of
Florida Gym, which according
to state fire safety regulations
will accommodate 5,646 fans.
Roughly 1,000 people below
the seating capacity of one of
the smaller gymnasiums in the
South.
The reasons for this drop can
be partly explained by the fact
that the new state fire safety
regulation restricts the seating
capacity from 7,200 last year to
only 5,646 this year.
We cant really encourage
Golf Coach
Named Pro
UF golf coach Buster Bishop
will become professional at the
schools golf club August 1,
ac c o rding to a joint
announcement Tuesday by Dean
Dennis K. Stanley of the College
of Physical Education and
Health and Gator Director of
Athletics Ray Graves.
Bishop will continue to coach
the Gator golf team, which he
directed to the NCAA title last
spring, and will also continue as
an Assistant Professor of
Physical Education.
Im pleased we were able to
work out Bishops teaching
assignments so that he could
take on these added duties, said
Stanley. We are fortunate to
have a man of his ability to take
over as professional at the
University of Florida Golf
Club.

Wednesday, February 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

the students to come out to the
games when we have such
limited seating, said Ray
Dorman, assistant to the athletic
director.
Not only limited seating from
a total attendance capacity but
also from the standpoint of
limited good seating. No one
wants a poor view to see the
game from such as those at
either end of the court in the
bleachers.
We cant build an adult
following until we get a place big
enough to seat them all, said
Basketball Coach Tommy
Bartlett.
Another reason for the early
season attendance drop was the
fact that the Gator opponents
were not nationally or SEC
prominent as LSU, Kentucky or
Tennessee. Also five of the
Gator games were played just
before, during or just after the
Christmas break when a majority
of students were home for the
holiday.
During the UFs fantastic
victory surge against LSU and
Piston Pete Maravich,
nationally 4th ranked Kentucky
and 2nd place SEC power
Tennessee the respective
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Council of International Organizations
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Beauty Contest
University Auditorium 7:30 P.M.
Free and Open to the Public

turnouts were LSU 5,646,
Kentucky 5,583. and
Tennessee 5,430. The Gators
average attendance for these
three games was 5,553 per game.
When you play good
basketball your going to draw
good crowds despite anything
else, said Bartlett.
Despite limited seating
capacity, a small and out-dated
gymnasium and hard
un-attractive bleacher type seats
the Gators drew well against
LSU, Kentucky and Tennessee.
But how can one team
continuously be expected to
play nationally ranked teams
and strong conference foes all
the time at home?
Last year the Gators had
basically the same team only a
fair 15-10 on the season and
played the same SEC schedule at
home. Yet they drew an average
crowd of 6,442 per game when
Florida Gym could seat 7,200
people. The smallest attendance
was 5,490.
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Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 19, 1969

Ur Tennessee Highlights

THE LOSER

. . UT Coach Ray Mears . UF Guard Mike Leatherwood
Bartlett Thanks Students

TO THE STUDENT BODY
I would like to thank the student body on behalf
of our basketball team and myself for the great
support given us this season and in particular, these
past two games against Kentucky and Tennessee. 1
sincerely believe that had we not had the interest
and enthusiasm that was generated by you students
we possibly would not have won either game,
despite the fact that the players played excellent
basketball. 1 wish 1 could afford to give each one of
you a plaque of thanks, but maybe you will let
this letter suffice at least you know where mv
heart is. 1 can't always promise you we can win
ever> game, but with your continued support you
can be assured of a maximum effort to bring our
school winning and championship basketball teams.
The total program and especially our recruiting

OConnell Urges:
Support UF Olympics
TO: Gator Olympics Committee
Announcement of the Gator Olympics and the purpose foi which
they are planned ts an inspiration to all of us on this campus.
1 have watched with great interest the efforts of Coach Carnes to
finance Johnnie Lee Samuels participation in the Deaf Olympics.
1 extend to all of you and those who participate in the Gator
Olympics my sincere best wishes and a pledge of my support in this
very worthwhile undertaking. 1 urge all on this campus to lend then thensupport
support thensupport to your efforts.
Sincerely yours.
Stephen C. O'Connell
President
FLORIDA PLAYERS presents
JOHN BOWENS -/ \
"THEATRE TO | JnQUWfesiV
EXTEND THE MIND" J j ST
N v. Times

BABY GATOR WADDELL
. . Gary scores two of 22
Tbe Florida Alligator
l^sifffESS

should get better when prospects learn of the
support given by President OConnell, our faculty
and you students. A special thank you goes to the
band and cheerleaders.
The goodnatured heckling afforded to the
visitors was a highlight and added to the game. It
was not unsportsmanlike as some of our guests
thought had they won, they would still be
rubbing salt in our wound over the same matter.
Keep up the good work. I ask only that we be good
sports at all times. Again, let me say I have never
seen anything like this kind of support anywhere
in my coaching or playing career. It was a great
Orange(Tennessee) and Blue(Kentucky) weekend.
Tommy Bartlett
Head Basketball Coach

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