Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
-
Gators Stun
#4 Kentucky
i9||||9 BSlw
99 9 9
8991
RANDY BASSETT
...AND TOM/MY BARTLETTS HAPPY
The Gator mentor was jubilant after his team squeeked
by fourth-ranked Kentucky 82-81 Saturday night.

March 5: SGs Future
Laid On The Line

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
\
The future of Student
Government will he bid on the
line in a special election slated
for Wednesday, March 5."
The date and wording of the
much-discussed referendum was
decided Thursday night at a
special meeting of the Student
Senate.
The meeting was called
originally for debate on a
freedom of expression
resolution. drawn up as a result
of the controversy surrounding
Sen. Tom Slades ultimatum to
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell that philosophy
professor Kenneth Megill be
fired.
The senate unanimously
passed the resolution, which
labeled Slade's ultimatum
malicious political meddling in
the internal affairs of the
university.'
The referendum on SGs
future, promised by Student
Bod\ President Clyde Taylor in

|S| FRIENDSHIP WALK *>
Students Get OConnell Hi!
*

~ vjjj| < fIHLr jM MM fcjjjjj
j£
in H
* '2 ,V' -'--
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: TOM KENNEDY
j! LAVING THE FIRST BRICK
: ...UF's President O'Connell beams after his masonry is
: completed
! 1
ivA%V.V.V.VAV/AV.V.V.V.%V.V/. .V.V.V.V.V.V.V.y.y,;,;.v.;,v.x.:.;./Vv;v.V.V. .V. .V.V.V

his successful bid for office, will
give students the chance to
abolish SG or keep it as it is.
Both choices will be
constitutional amendments.
The special March 5 ballot
will also contain a public
opinion referendum for students
who do not want tv) abolish SG
but are not satisfied with it as it
presently exists.
SG ON THE
WAY OUT?
The opinion poll will call for
the creation of a non-partisan,
campus-wide commission to
studey SG and recommend
possible changes to be placed on
the October regular election
ballot.
Possible changes might
i ncl u d e struct nra I
reorganization, such as a
co mmis s i o n Io r m o

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol. 61, No. 84

FIRE MEGILL EXPELL SUPPORTERS
Legislator Adds Fuel
To Slade Controversy

By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer
An Orlando legislator has
picked up the Tom Slade
bomb and apparently decided
to run UF into the ground with
it.
Rep. David Lindsey,
R-Orlando, sent a telegram to
UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell Saturday saying he
.would vote against any budget
appropriations for UF if
philosophy professor Kenneth

government, and original
jurisdiction changes, such as
control over student conduct
regulations and student
organizations.
/
According tv) the Student
Body Constitution, 25 per cent
of the student body must vote in
the March 5 election or it will be
invalid. For cither of the
constitutional amendments to
pass, two-tbirds of the students
voting must approve it.
The Slade resolution,
introduced by Majority Floor
L.eader Charles Harris, charged
that Slade had political motives
in calling for Megills removal.
Ihe senate also approved a
charter for Students for
Responsible Government, an
organization often nicknamed
SURGF
The group will voice student
opinion to national, state and
local government officials.

By KATHIE KEIM jj
Alligator Staff Writer I;
!

UF President Stephen C. OConnell laid a brick for friendship :
Friday, helping to dedicate UFs new Friendship Walk on the ::
Pla/a of the Americas. ::

Tins can be a friendly campus, OConnell said in his ::
introductory remarks. :
Some would criticize this idea, but its their choice. Its a ::

poor choice but it's their choice to make. £
"I hope this walk will extend to other parts of the campus ;
and not just be confined to this end of the campus, he said.
O'Connell then laid the first brick for the walkway, scooping ;
the diit aside, pushing the brick into place, and looking up to
ask jokinulv Anv criticism? : : :
X
Also participating in the dedication were representatives of 20
campus organizations that had purchased friendship bricks for :
MO each, including the first group. Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity, :
contributing $25 for a brick. $
L V
Othei organizations contributing money for friendship bricks :
include Sigma Chi. Delta Gamma. Beta Theta Pi, Phi Sigma :
Sigma. Delta Phi Epsilon, Studetn Government, Florida
Cicerones. Union Program Council, and Southeast Broward Hall. :
(SEE FRIENDSHIP'PAGE 2) $

University of Florida, Gainesville

Megill was not fired.
In a strongly worded message
Lindsey said he backed Slade
all the way and if Megill
couldnt follow the curriculum,
then get him out of there.
Lindsey said UF was in dire
need of vacancies for deserving
students to attend UF, which is
provided for by the taxpayers in
Florida. He said the students
who back Megill should be
expelled.
CLYDE TAYLOR
...will he be replaced?
Frolics Tickets
Available
Students holding tickets to
this Friday nights IFT Frolics
should note that due tv) a
printing error, the time marked
for the performance is incorrect.
Frolics will begin at 8:30
p.m., rather than the earlier time
printed. Also, doors will not
open until 7:45.
Tickets go on sale to the
general public Tuesday morning'
at the Reitz Union box office.
There are expected to be only
about 100 couple tickets for
sale

Monday February 17, 1969

Lindsey said Sunday he
thought Slade shot from the
hip but I still feel as strongly as
he does and will back him all the
way.
The telegram is the latest
development in a controversy
that started last week when
Slade demanded that OConnell
dismiss Dr. Kenneth Megill,
assistant professor of
phil o sophy, who advocated
takeover of the UF by a faculty
union and students.
Lindsey said students were at
the UF for an education and
what Mcgill was teaching was
irrelevant to a good education.
Lindsey said he did not want
another Berkeley at the UF.
Lindsey said he knew there
would be problems with
students but he didnt think a
faculty member should be
stirring them up.
The representative said he had
not given any thought to what
action, other than not voting for
appropriations, he would take if
OConnell did not dismiss Mcgill.
He said OConnell should
have a chance to make his move
before we (the legislature) do
anything.
OConnell said Sunday, 1 am
not prepared now to say when 1
will respond to Sen. Slades
letter.
He did not say if he had
received Lindseys telegram.
Lindsey said he was not
familiar with a bill on campus
disorder to be introduced by
Rep. Jim K. Tillman of Sarasota.
Tillmans bill provides for the
legislature to appoint a
(SEE 'ORLANDO' PAGE 2)

OConnells
Skunk Not
Sen Slade
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell sent Sen. Tom Slade a
telegram Saturday denying he
was referring to the legislator
when he told students Friday
you dont get into a squirting
contest with a skunk.
OConnell said Sunday he was
not referring to any one when he
made the statement. He said the
statement was part of an old
story he tells about getting into
an argument with anyone.
Asked by students Friday
why he didnt denounce Slade,
OConnell replied, You dont
get into a squirting contest with
a skunk.
In the telegram sent Saturday,
OConnell said, A story in the
morning press indicates that, by
inference, I alluded to you as a
skunk. I made no such reference
and no such inference was
intended or warranted... You
have my apologies.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 17,1969

CHAMPION HIT
FSU Administration Badly
Shaken By Resignations

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
While the UF campus was ringing with debate
concerning legislative intervention last week, the
Florida State University campus was undergoing
what has been called a major administrative
shakeup.
Three vice-presidents and the university chaplain
resigned late last week, while rumors circulated that
the deans of ihen and women would follow in their
footsteps.
To say weve had a major administrative
shakeup would be blunt, Sam Miller, editor of the
campus newspaper, the Flambeau, said Sunday.
Fridays Flambeau carried a story concerning the
resignations, in which an un-named administrator
said the whole damn university is falling apart.
The administrator said the reason for the

Proposed UF Vet School
Dropped From New Budget

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
It looks like UFs proposed
College of Veterinary Medicine
is going to the dogs.
Apparently, the Florida

Carol Thomas Jailed

Carol Thomas, wife of a UF
professor, was arrested Saturday
afternoon after she refused to
leave a coin laundry when the
Orlando Rep.
Aids Slade
FROM mi ONE "j
committee to investigate
activities of groups that cause
disorders on campuses of state
universities.
State Rep. Ralph Turlington,
D-Gainesville, said, It is
unlikely that any new
committees will be formed.
He said the legislature has
several permanent committees
and he didnt think any new
ones would be formed.
Tillman said he had asked that
the bill be held up for two weeks
but definitely will push the bill
in the legislature.
Good Service Starts
at
CRAl^rt^ ORTS
SAL ES-SER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Unlv. Ave 372-4373

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Budding, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Legislature was barking up the
wrong tree when it issued a
mandate for a veterinary school
in 1965, because the budget will
not permit construction at the
present time.
UF administrators, presenting

owner ordered her and another
woman out.
Mrs. Thomas and Doris
Bradshaw were arrested after Ed
Anderson, owner of Andys
Koin-Kleen Laundry and Dry
Cleaning, signed a warrant for
trespassing after a warning.
They were arrested by
Gainesville police, and taken to
Alachua County Jail. Bond was
set at SIOO.
Mrs. Thomas, active in the
civil rights and black power
movements, was arrested last
year for resisting a police officer.
Although more than a dozen
members of the black militant
group JOMO (Junta Os Military
Organizations) were outside the
laundry at the time of the arrest,
officers said neither they nor the
women offered any resistance.
Mrs. Thomas was bailed out
Sunday, but Miss Bradshaw
remained in jail.
Haw
y Your Generator X
ff OVERHAULED Sotcial %
SASO I
. INC LABOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
50 NW aril AVt. GAINESVILLE
MON.-nti. a am-mu sat. m a m
378-4011

resignations was the lack of leadership from FSU
President John Champion.
John Carey, vice president of student affairs; E.
Lawrence Chalmers, vice president of academic
affairs; Odell Waldby, vice president of
administration and Charles Wellborn, FSU chaplain
all resigned last week.
The four opposed Champion when the university
erupted over the publication of a four letter word in
a campus magazine. At that time Champion
resigned, but later withdrew his resignation.
All but Chalmers will remain in the university as
full time teachers. Chalmers accepted a job as
chancellor of the University of Kansas.
Champion named John Arnold, one of the few
administrators who backed him, to Careys vacated
post.
Earlier in the week, the newspaper published a
rumor that Champion himself would resign to
accept a federal post, but he denied it.

budget requests Thursday to the
House of Representatives
subcommittee on appropriations
for higher education, eliminated
their requests for money for
planning a veterinary school,
because of lean budgeting.
I asked that the university
withdraw budget requests until
an investigation is completed,
Chancellor Robert B. Mautz
said.
He removed the veterinary
school from the Board of
Regents list of priorities, so it
may be several years before the
school finally becomes a reality.
After an investigation, the
legislature will decide whether to
authorize a veterinary school at
the UF.
The legislature asked us in
1965 to develop a projected
budget for a veterinary school,
said UF President Stephen C.
OConnell. We have done that,
so its up to the legislature and
regents to decide when to get it
moving.

this week
lIH I I IK ... ******* .*##* >'y&*** if
11 1 i: I
Moil.-Sot. U.ofF. Faculty Club. JUG, J
Dont miss them Rathskeller

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%> Mb
" : &f**
k ft Hft ftft B ft
- : "" t.."
' fr l^ft^^M 1 1 1 :
TOM KENNEDY
WANNA BE MY FRIEND?
Some of UF's local color view Friday's dedication of the
Friendship Walk/' They and other friends" stayed for an
informal love-in on the Plaza later in the afternoon.
Friendship Walk
ll from page one J|
Also, the Association of Women Students, Alpha Delta Pi, Pi
Beta Phi colony, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Alpha Epsilon Phi, the
collegiate chapter of the Future Farmers of America, the
Catholic Student Center, Alpha Omega Society on behalf of Phi
Kappa Theta, Sigma Kappa and Delta Chi.
A subdued love-in, working around the dedication, filled a
part of the plaza by the Research Library, as clusters of students
sat around talking and munching on cake provided for the
dedication.
Backers of the boycott in support of the striking California
grapepickers set up a stand by a pine tree, displaying a pan for
contributions and literature held in place by rocks and one
cluster of artificial grapes.



*F £%Jg§ >
' r llPllilllll/'- v s .|W
J :^. JH& V x.^|v
;:5J .-.*!£ - ~
"<^T- H <
HARD DAYS KNIGHT RANDYBASSETT
Delta Phi Epsilon members are still trying to figure out
whether Rodney Max, Pi Lam, was dressed as Mr. Clean, Sir
Galahad or Don Quixote or all three. No matter. For on
Friday Valentine's Day Rodney galloped his trusty
steed over to see his lady fair, Laurie Gilbert (left) and tell
her of his what shall we call it? Affection? Maybe he was
telling her to wear heavy clothes for their date that evening.
Surreys can be awful breezy.
CampWauburg Plans
Considered By SG

A $250,000 to $300,000 plan
for improvements at Camp
Wauburg is being considered by
student government, Mike
Davidson, SG secretary of
recreational activities, said last
Wednesday.
We dont want to change the
atmosphere, he said, outlining
the improvement plans, we
want to keep the relaxed feeling
that exists at Wauburg now.
Wauburg lands are to be
expanded, including a large
paved parking area. Old
buildings are to be torn down,
with new and modern
bathhouses and a recreation hall
built south of the present
facilities, Davidson said.
There will be ping-pong
tables, billiard tables and a large

/.,y.v.>y.>Xi>Vv>X*XW.y.v > y.;.y.v.;vjy.v.;.v.>v.v.vv>;>;v.v.v,v//.v. .v. , .VMVt
I Valentine Assailant Tackles |
| Four Students At Jennings |
j*j Four persons were treated for minor injuries after being :j:
§ attacked by an unidentified white male assailant Friday night :j:
after they left a Valentines Day dance at Jennings Hall. :j|
Treated were David William Spicer, the only UF student;
Gary A. Schreiber and Darrell P. Schreiber, of Largo; and Steven
P. McCormack, an Auburn student. :j:
!: The four said they encountered a tall male in a 69 Corvette :
* racing his engine after they left the dance. They challenged the >:
iji driver, after which he got out of his car and attacked them.
The assailant was described as wearing a yellow pullover
:j: sports shirt, white slacks, glasses, and had a beard.

FEATURING:
Italian Foods
Specialty Sandwiches
Delicious Salads
Domestis
Domestic and
Imported
Wine and Beer
CONGENIAL
CONTINENTAL
A'pMOSPH ERE
Serving Continuously
11 am to 8:30 pm
CLOSED SUNDAYS

area to hold group activities in
the proposed recreation hall.
New enlarged docks are
included in the proposed
renovation, Davidson said.
The UF ski club will be based
at the new Wauburg site.
Also included in the plans
outlined by Davidson are tennis
courts, volleyball courts and
hardball courts.
Davidson said a regular social
calendar for Wauburg is being
planned by SG.
We feel the area isnt being
used to its potential and want to
create something for the
students and staff of the UF that
they will enjoy using.
The improvements will begin
as soon as plans are finalized,
Davidson said.

IN THE MALL

4 (EarmittrUaa 5
Qaitd c oj £nling jj

TRIAL SET FOR TODAY

Motion Filed To Dismiss
Flag- Burning Law Suit

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
A motion to dismiss the case
of John R. Claxton, a former UF
student arrested last quarter for
burning a small American flag,
has been filed in Eight Judicial
Circuit Court in Gainesville.
Claxtons trial is set for this
morning at 9:30, Alachua
County Courthouse, 2nd floor.
He was arrested Nov. 12 by
city police at a Students for a
Democratic Society meeting in
the Reitz Union. Later, the city
charges were dropped when the
Alachua County Sheriffs
Department arrested him under
a similar state statute.
He allegedly burned a
dime-store American flag
following an apolitical election
night rally in the Plaza of the
Americas Nov. 5.
The motion to dismiss the
case was filed early last week by
Claxtons court-appointed
attorney, Benjamin M. Trench.
The grounds for dismissal rest
on four points of law. They are:
9 Florida Statute
779.21(1967) is unconstitutio unconstitutional
nal unconstitutional on its face because it is so
vague and imprecise as to fail to
apprise the public of the scope
of is proscription and therefore
violates the 14th Amendment of
the U.S. Constitution.
9 Florida Statute
779.21(1967) violates the Ist
Amendment of the U.S.
Constitution as applied to the
states by the 14th Amendment
thereto, and by Sec. 4 of the
Declaration of Rights of the
1968 Florida Constitution.
9 If a flag was burned, it was
destroyed pursuant to the Joint
Resolution of Congress of June
22, 1942.
9 The sphere of flag burning
has been pre-empted by 4 U.S.
Code Sec. 3(1917), thereby
precluding state enforcement of
legislation in this field.
Claxton was arrested under
Florida Statute 779.21 which is
included in the section on
Treason and Offense against
the Government. It reads:
Public mutilation of
es? DELICIOUS
jj STEAKS
jj FINE FOOD
j student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

OUR SHOPPERS SPECIALS
Spaghetti with meat bails 1.50
Spaghetti with meat sauce 1.50
(only above two in child's portion) 1.00
Spaghitti with mushrooms 1.75
with meat balls 2.25
Spaghetti oven baked in casserole
with cheese 1.75
k with meat sauce and cheese 2.25
with shredded chichen and cheese 2.50
B All Spaghetti orders served with
y Italian Tossed Salad, roll and butter
HOME BAKED LASAGNE Tio
with meat balls 2.00
HOME STYLE CHEESE RAVIOLI
with meat balls 2.00
Above served with Italian Salad,
Roll and Butter

flag .--Whoever publicly
mutilates, defaces, or tramples
upon or bums with intent to
insult any flag, standard, colors
or ensign of the United States or
of Florida shall be punished by
imprisonment in the state
prison or the county jail not
more than one year and a fine of
not more than $ 1,000.
The First Amendment of the
Constitution says Congress shall
make no law abridging the
freedom of speech, press,
assembly and religion. The 14th
Amendment says no state shall

| SHANNONS
24-hour
WRECKER
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|W. Univ. NIGHT 376-4009

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FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
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Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
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Mon. Feb. 17 Tues. Feb. 18 Wed. Feb. 19
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204 N.W. 13th Street 130 N.W. 10th Avenue
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Monday, February 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

abridge these rights without due
process of law. Sec. four of the
Florida Constitution Declaration
of Rights guarantees each person
the freedom of speech and press.
All three laws are essentially
negative because they restrict
the federal government or the
states from impinging on these
rights.
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
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Motors 9
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Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 17, 1969

Workshop Will Listen
To JC Transfer Gripes

If youre a junior college transfer and youve got
a gripe or suggestion for change in the way UFs
been treating you, Dr. Ralph E. Page, assistant dean
of academic affairs, is ready to listen.
Page is in charge of two junior colleg workshops
to be held Feb. 17, 18, 24 and 25 in the Reitz
Union. Guidance counselors from 19 state junior
colleges will be here to meet with former students
and discuss their reactions to UF.
Anybody who has transferred here from a junior
college may come by calling 392-1308 or stopping
by room 341 Tigert Hall to find out when and
where he may meet with a representative.
Monday interviews will be for transfers from
Brevard, Broward, Daytona Beach, Jacksonville,
Manatee, Miami-Dade, Palm Beach, Polk and St.
Petersburg junior colleges.
Feb. 24 will be the day for transfers from

STOP, LOOK AND LISTEN
Traffic lights appeared for the first time on the UF
campus this weekend.
Installation is expected to be completed by early next
week,and operation will begin soon. Florida Field Stadium
is in the background of the light above located at the corner
of Stadium Road and North-South Drive. Other lights are
on Radio Road at the corners of Newell Drive and
North-South Drive
l mondaTspeoaTH
Supper only
I Boiled Shrimp I
all-you-can-eat
I $149 I
I TUESDAY SPECIAL I
H I
Supper only I
I Fried Chicken I
I all-you-can-eat I
9
I IN THE GAINESVILLE MALL|
I Norwood Aummf I

Chipola, Central Florida, Gulf Coast, Hillsborough,
Lake City, Lake-Sumter, North Florida. St. Johns
River, Santa Fe and Valencia.
4 The workshop has a dual purpose. It will assist
the JC guidance counselors in preparing future
transfers for meeting the requirements of upper
division and the personal adjustments to student life
at UF. It will also provide a list of specific
recommendations for changes in UF policy.
Representatives of all the degree-granting colleges
will work on the recommendations provided by the
JC students, hoping to compile as complete a list as
possible. Page said We know that problems exist,
but unless we know what they are, we cant come to
grips with them.
Currently junior college transfers comprise over
half the enrollment in seven upper division colleges.
Fall quarter 1247 JC transfers entered UF.

UF Engineers
Looking For
A 69 Queen
Queen contestant applications
for the 24th Annual Engineers
Fair will be available Feb. 19 at
the Reitz Union Student
Activities Desk.
Sponsoring organizations will
select girls to represent them
from the applicants and. three
finalists will be chosen by vote
of students in the College of
Engineering.
After judges select the queen,
she will reign over the Fair on
April 17, 18, and 19. The
crowning will take place April
18 at the Engineering Ball.
Last years queen, Patty
Bohannon, received a trophy, a
trip to Nassau and a $250 gift
certificate from Mass Bros,
among other prizes. This year
the engineers plan to increase
the money spent on prizes.
The deadline for submitting
applications is March 3.

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Regents Studying Quarter Problems

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
While state universities in
Florida have criod out for
change in the quarter system
structure, a nine-man board of
Regents study' commission has
quietly started work on exactly
that problem.
On Oct. 25, a committee on
nine administrators, students
and faculty members
representing Floridas seven state
universities met in Tallahassee.
At the first meeting, the
major complaints concerning the
quarter system were aired and it
was decided to draft a reaction
document to get opinions of all
members of the university
community.
The document was printed in
Tallahassee, and will be sent to
the various state universities by
the middle, of this month.
There will be a questionnaire for
every student, faculty member,
and administrator in the state.
Distribution of the
questionnaires at UF will be
handled by student government.
When compiled, the
commission will develop a set of
recommendations to the Board
of Regents. Final action will
rest with the faculty senates of
the state universities.
Representing UF are Arts and
Sciences Dean Harry Sisler and
Ed Rolle, 4JM, in Student
Government and on the Board
of Student Publications.
Chairing the meeting was Vice
Chancellor Allan tucker.
Tolle cautioned against early
celebrations over changes in the
quarter system.
Anything this committee
does will not be implemented
until the beginning of the
1970-71 term, he said. The
University Record, as well as
other state university catalogs,
have already been drawn up or
have gone to press.
Tolle sees the main problem
in course credits, which he feels
are not sufficient.
There should be fewer
courses each quarter carrying
more credit, he said.
However, the key to change
is in the hands of the faculties of
the universities.
AT UF that is the Faculty
Senate and the Faculty
Curriculum Committee. The
steering committee of the
Faculty Senate has had a chance
to review the recommendations
of the Action Conference
relating to the quarter system.
However, these have been placed
at the bottom of the calendar.
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Apparently, the steering
committee doesnt feel that the
AC proposals are as important as
other things on the agenda,
Tolle said.
Any changes in the quarter
system will have to come
through the Faculty Curriculum
Committee. This body will in
turn recommend changes to the
Board of Regents. The final say
will be with the Faculty
Senate.
12 specific problem areas have
been singled out by the
committee, ranging from longer
breaks between quarters, to
more credits for courses.
The proposals include:
9 Lowering the number of
courses necessary to complete a
full load.
9 Lengthening the amount of
time between quarters to
provide better transition for
students and faculty.
9 Reduction of material loads
within courses to better suit the
limited time available under the
quarter system.

* Clearance
Bottom ?

9 Adequate time and
orientation for counselors, so
that they can serve as a true aid
to students.
9 A new final exam
scheduling system to replace the
present finals week.
9 Abolishment of mandatoiy
class attendance.
9 A re-evaluation of the one
classroom hour one credit
hour rule to envelop
independent study and field
experiences.
9 More comprehensive syllabi
to aid students in courses.
9 Changes in the rigidity of
the quarter system calendar.
9 Redistribution of course
offerings to make the summer
quarter more attractive.
9 Re-evaluation of costs
under the quarter system to
students, especially in terms of
tuition.
9 A revamping of the co-op
program to suit the quarter
system.
Each proposal is made in the

form of a statement to which
the reader is to react with
agree, disagree or have no
opinion. A space is provided
below each question for
comments.
Original plans called for the
documents to be distributed at
the beginning of the quarter, but
delays in the wording of the
questionnaire held up printing
until last week.
Tucker, in charge of the
printing of the forms said it will
be several months before they
are ready for processing.
There are over 75,000 of
these reaction documents, he
said. Processing of them will be

twmmo" IWiiih UF 9 $ representatives I
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l/laStf' I Dan Sapp Bill Worsham
n~ g? Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
vpsj George Corl Harold DeVane
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 \y # Univ. Ave. I
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^DEFERREDPREMIUMPAyMENTSJ

Monday, February 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

done on the university level. We
are now working on getting
computer time to correlate the
responses we will get.
From there, the work will
revert back to the Quarter
System Study Commission.
They will determine what
recommendations should be
made to the Board of Regents.
RAKE IN THE ~SEI
PROFITS WITH
GATOR ADS

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 17, 1969

Art Editor
Presents
Happening
Artist and writer Margaret
Rigg will lecture at UF tonight
at 8 in Walker Auditorium.
Miss Rigg, assistant professor
of art at Florida Presbyterian
College, served as art editor and
managing editor of motive
Magazine and recently was
named art editor of ARC,
magazine for the Foundation for
the Arts, Religion and Culture.
Her mixed-media
lecture featuring photographs,
music and commentary is part
of the Religion-In-Life series and
is open to the public admission
free. She presented this same
material at an international
meeting in Finland last summer.
Recipient of many national
awards, Miss Rigg has had more
than 30 one-man exhibitions of
paintings and prints. Her
graphics were included in United
States Information Agency
traveling exhibits in Spain,
Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia.
While on campus, Miss Rigg
also will coordinate a
happening called SIGNS
which she wrote especially for
the UF religion course The-
ology Theology and the Arts Since 1940.
According to Dr. Corbin
Carnell, course instructor, the
class has been considering some
of the differences between the
art work and the happening.
Miss Riggs happening uses
pictures, mirrors and
handwriting.
Kidnap Trial
Begins Today
The trial of Charles Smith,
charged with kidnapping a UF
student, aggravated assault, and
escape, begins today in Alachua
County Circuit Court.
Smith is charged with
kidnapping UF student Roger
Dennis Sykes last September
after escaping from the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center, where he
was a patient.
He had been brought to the
Health Center from the state
prison in Raiford.
Judge George L. Patton will
preside at the trial in Circuit
Court.
Sykes telephone number is
unlisted and he could not be
reached for comment.
R. A. Green Jr., public
defender, is Smiths defense
attorney.

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Experimental College
May Begin In Fall

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
A simple beginning might
come in September for a
four-year, liberal arts,
experimental college within the
UF academic structure, Dr.
Solon T. Kimball, professor of
anthropology, said Sunday.
Kimball is chairman of a
committee studying the college.
The committee was appointed
by Vice President for Academic
Affairs Frederick Conner at the
end of the fall quarter with
instructions to: (1) formulate
the objectives of a liberal
education; (2) place emphasis on
learning rather than teaching;
and (3) concentrate on student
development in education rather
than course credit and grades.
Conner said he had not
submitted narrow proposals of
his own to the committee so
that they would be free to
formulate their own plan. 1
understand there is a pretty wide
divergence of opinion on the
committee, Conner said.
Dr. Kimball said the initial
meetings of the committee this
quarter had been mainly an
exchange of views about what a
liberal education should be. We
consider this definition of our
objective to be an essential step
before we can proceed any
further.
It is quite clear at this time
that we shall present several
alternative plans for a small
liberal arts college within the
UF, he said.
Dr. Kimball noted that any
No Survey Conducted
The Alligator has received
reports that an anonymous
person claiming to be an
Alligator reporter has been
calling UF coeds asking personal
questions about their sex lives.
This is not true. The Alligator
has no knowledge of such a
caller.

proposals of his committee
would have to go through the
University Senate and that the
college would be established in
several stages, the first of which
might possibly be in September,
1969.
Though there are no students
on the committee, Dr. Kimball
said he had asked Student Body
President Clyde Taylor to
request students to contribute
their experience and suggestions
concerning the college.
Dr. Kimball said this would
enable the student group to act
freely and not have their views
influenced by the faculty.
Th is proposed four-year
experimental liberal arts college
would be within the UF
academic structure and would
grant credit towards a degree.
Discussions of the faculty
committee are not related to the
Florida Experimental College,
(FEC) which was established at
the beginning of the winter
quarter and is now offering 12
non-credit courses to
approximately 200 students.
Douglas Tedards, chairman of
the FEC executive board praised
the idea of a credit-granting
experimental college and said it
would help to correct the mass
conglomeration of conformity
now present at UF.
IF YOU'RE NOT SURE
about your career. ..
Talk to Mrs. Judy Pillans
February 24 about a paid
summer internship program
in one of Florida's Public
Libraries. Any Major.
No library science courses
necessary.
Contact PLACEMENT
OFFICE for appointment and
further details.

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Join the Inn Crowd at the
Pizza Inn
Pitcher of SchlitZ (light or dark)
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Offer good Feb. 17, 18 24, 25
Ph. 376-4521 3165 W. 16th Ave.
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applications due in FBK office
no later than 5:00 Fri. Feb. 21.



1968 IDEA SPREAD ROOTS
Project SAMSON Impact
Has Become Statewide

(Editors Note: This is the
second of two parts explaining
the conception, development
and goals of UFs Project
SAMSON.)
Bom early in 1968, Project
SAMSON was geared to
coordinate the help of
concerned Americans toward
their fellow underpriveleged
citizens regardless of race or
creed.
It was the brainchild of Mike
Wittman, then a section adviser
in Buckman Hall.
The summer of 1968 brought
SAMSONs first real challenge in
terms of maintaining consistent
operation in spite of the mass
exodus of students from
campus.
Wittman, who remained
SAMSONs Executive Chairman
through the summer months,
and the six-member Executive
Board along with approximately
30 student volunteer workers
initiated SAMSONs first activity
in community projects.
About the middle of the
summer, Wittman said, the
Governors Operation Student
Concern chose Gainesville as a
model community in which to
offer help for the
underprivileged. The city had
experienced some racial unrest
at that time, and many citizens
were concerned about the
problem.
Operation Student Concern
needed manpower, and
SAMSON was there to provide
it.
In conjunction with the City
Recreation Department and
under the sponsorship of OSC,
SAMSON conducted a Lake
Wauburg Day Camp for six
weeks. Two hundred
disadvantaged youths from eight
to fourteen years of age
attended this summer camp.
SAMSON also placed student
volunteers in Summer Head
Start as well as other summer
community projects.
It was during the 1968 fall
quarter under the guidance of

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Interim Chairman John Kelso
that SAMSONs tutoring
program began.
According to Kelso, Alachua
County teachers were asked to
submit names of students in the
community whose basic
deficiencies were likely to cause
them to drop out of school.
About 300 names were received.
Marsha Kaufman was
SAMSONs representative in
charge of coordinating and
g Gov. Kirk On SAMSON f
SAMSON is an example of;:;
|:|what can be done with student
concern, cooperation and-:*
£ the poverty-stricken people of>*
$ the state, we must start with the:*
V *,
tfyoung. ft
placing student tutors with
deficient students. Miss
Kaufman estimates,
approximately 200 students
were tutored by 175 volunteer
UF students that quarter.
Periodically SAMSON asked
for progress reports from
student tutors, says Miss
Kaufman, in order to measure
the success of the project. Most
reports were favorable and
almost all the tutors remained in
the project. The successes in
some instances were small, but
they were there, and real, and
both tutors and students were
learning.
In October of 1968 Gov.
Claude Kirks Little Cabinet
approached SAMSON about
working with a statewide
Operation Student Concern.
John Kelson was appointed as
SAMSONs student coordinator
with OSC. SAMSON was used as
a model for setting up other
student help groups under OSC
throughout the state.
The SAMSON Junior
Olympics, a day-long
recreational event at Florida
Field in November drew over
300 underprivileged elementary
, and junior high school children
in the county.
Nearby fraternities served as
coaches, timers and judges and

financed refreshments and
medals for winners. Student
Association for Health, Physical
Education and Recreation, the
physical education club,
volunteered members to
demonstrate sports skills.
SAMSON was officially
approved by the Student Senate
as an organization separate from
student government at the
beginning of this quarter.
Under the leadership of
current Executive Chairman
John OShea, SAMSON now has
its own budget, and through the
help of Assistant Union Director,
Bill Cross and Assistant Dean of
Student Affairs James
Hennessey it has office space on
the third floor of the Reitz
Union.
SAMSON workers are
currently involved in researching
the need for projects not already
in existence in the county.
Our first concern, OShea
says, is still to provide
man-power for already existing
programs.
The impact of SAMSON has
gone far beyond the boundaries
of Alachua County.
SAMSON hosted a statewide
conference this weekend for
developing student help groups
throughout the state.
The conference, sponsored by
Operation Student Concern,
used SAMSON as a model
for helping other
groups to organize, plan and
initiate concern projects.

Did you like
beer the first time
you tasted it?
A lot of people say no. They say beer is Beech wood Aged; it's
beer is one of those good things a costly way to brew beer, and
you cultivate a taste for . like it takes more time. But it
olives, or scotch, or works.)
kumquats. [k So whether youre
Maybe. But we f^ isec j one of the few who
think it makes a dis- V has never tried beer,
ference which brand of or a beer drinker who
TTT
beer were talking suddenly feels the
about. urge to find out why
We think Budweiser so many people enjoy
is an exception to this youve Budweiser, we think youll
gotta get used to it rule. Its like it.
so smooth. (You see, no other From the very first taste.
Budweiser. is the King of Beers.
(But you know that.)
ANHEUSER-BUSCH, INC. ST. LOUIS NEWARK LOS ANGELES TAMPA HOUSTON COLUMBUS

WHATSHAPPENING
FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: Needs students and faculty members
who wish to become a part of this music, dance, drama and graphic
arts expression. Applications may be obtained at the third floor
student activities desk of the Reitz Union.
GARGOYLE HONORARY SOCIETY: Recently initiated 15 new
members: John Crosby, Sally Curtis, Gregory Ebert, Janis Egart,
James Gleeson, Stanley Harris, Oscar Larrauri, Dianne Lopez, James
Loyd, David Ogram, Tino Paredes, Carmen Rodriguez, Linda Searl,
Gary Schaffel and Daniel Whiteman.
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION MEMORIAL CONFERENCE: Will be
held Thursday through Saturday in the Reitz Union in memory of the
late College of Education Dean, Kimball Wiles. Speakers include Dr.
Franklin Patterson, president of Hampshire College; Jack Frymier,
curriculum faculty head at Ohio State; and Fred Wilhelms, executive
secretary of Assn, of Supervision and Curriculum Development.
DEPT. OF PHYSICAL THERAPY: Holding open house Tuesday,
7:309:30 p.m. at J. Hillis Miller Health Center. Physical therapy
students will present demonstrations of the various treatment
techniques in patient rehabilitation.
SIGMA XI HONORARY SCIENCE FRATERNITY: Is sponsoring a
lecture tonight at 8 in McCarty Hall on Proteins: Paradox and
Potential. Dr. Max Milner, senior food technologist with UNICEF is
guest speaker. Milner will also direct a seminar for Institute of Food
and Agricultural Science faculty members at 4:40 p.m. Tuesday in
McCarty Hall room 37.
UF CHAPTER OF SSOC: Will hold a strategy meeting tonight at 8
in Reitz Union room C 4. SSOC member John Sugg said tonights
meeting has been called to discuss the Slade-Megill controversy. Sugg
has indicated that there is a good chance Megill will attend the
meeting.
DEPTS. OF MECHANICAL AND NUCLEAR ENGINEERING:
Are sponsoring a public lecture today at 4 by Dr. F. Bosnjakovic, one
of the foremost authorities in thermodynamics. Bosnjakovic will talk
in the Mechanical Engineering Building on Gas-like Properties of
Black-Body Radiation.
PHI MU SORORITY: Will celebrate its founders day March 4.
Members of Phi Mu throughout the country will be contributing that
day to Alpha Memorial Scholarship Fund, part of the Phi Mu national
educational program.
UF CHAPTER OF ANGEL FLIGHT: Recently observed National
Service Week by seeking additional aid for Project Angel School.
Angels visited dorms and Greek houses asking for donations for an
elementary school in Nha Trang, Vietnam.
STUDENT AND CITY CHAPTERS OF ACLU: Both elected new
presidents at a joint meeting last week. Norma Munn, 4AS, will serve
as president of the parent organization, and Steve Johnson, 3LW, will
head the UF chapter.

Monday, February 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 17, 1969

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
it the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
PkmuJw/ Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor
Get Hickel On The Phone
The American Dream
Get Rid
Os Death
*
By Uncle Javerneck
Before the tragic deaths of Martin Luther King and Robert F.
Kennedy, there was a good reason to oppose the death penalty.
And there still is.
Between these two men, may have hung the fate of the rapidly
deteriorating socio-political condition of the United States. Sirhan and
Ray may have taken something from us that nothing can ever repay.
But what of their actions have they taken from us? Both simply
thought their victim to have been a monsterous man. It was their right
to hold that opinion.
The wrong lay in the fact that they believed killing was deserved or
justifiable, just as do those who desperately want them to die.
Shall we sanction a philosophy that allows each to kill his neighbor,
pausing only thereafter to determine which of them has exersized
good judgement and punishing the rest by killing them?
Such is the philosophy of capital punishment. Likewise the
philosophies of war and violent revolution. Such ideas ought to
disgust us for their useless destructiveness.
When Sirhan and Ray are killed, as very likely they will be, they
will not be better men, but merely corpses.
Their killers will not be better men, but simply the same kind of
men with a different criterion for killing.
We might say that society cannot endure the living presence of the
killer, but as surely as we hope for the death of these or any other
capital offenders, the killer lives on within us.
To quote a statement attributed to Heraclitus 2,500 years ago:
They purify themselves by defiling themselves with blood as
if one who had stepped into the mud were to wash it off with
mud.

ediiqrial
Os Puppets And Heroes

Reprinted with permission from
The Gainesville Sun
Silly season has arrived.
Comes first a philosophy professor,
Kenneth Megill, who at age 29 is
commencing to feel the throbbing power of
his Ph.D. His idea of contemporary
relevancy is to use a University of Florida
function to expound his radicalism, urge
takeover of the university, and laud black
power.
Dr. Megill, of course, is old-fashioned. He
utters tired old cliches the rhetoric of
dissent voiced so raucously three years ago
by the boys from the ghetto Stokely
Carmichael and Rap Brown.
Beyond that, the revolt dates to the
turn-of-the-century labor movement, and
beyond that to Marxism, and on through the
dim paths of history to the zealots who
conspired to throw the Romans out of
Jerusalem while yet another Man was
dragging his cross to Golgotha.
It is indeed a wonder that no one
previously questioned Dr. Megills
philosophic competence, since his ideas are
so stale. Certainly it is not new that men
without power always aspire to be king.
That explains Dr. Megills technique.
Educated and frustrated, he can carve his
niche only by patient labor or by
confrontation with authority. He chooses
confrontation. So he makes his mark by
standing straight and tall in the Plaza of the
Americas and flinging his radicalism at the
establishment.
So be it.
There is always a fool handy to accept
such challenges. This time it was State
Senator Tom Slade of Jacksonville. Senator
Slade aspires to be comptroller or treasurer
of the State of Florida. These are dull and
colorless posts usually sought by dull and
colorless men. Indeed, election is most
difficult without an issue.
Senator Slade has picked university
radicalism as the issue. So he writes a
letter in which he seeks to blackjack the
university into firing philosopher Megill.
Comes the magic hour, says Senator Slade,
and he will loosen the legislative hounds on
the University of Florida unless philosopher
Megill is packing his bags.
This is a great buzzing, shifting, coalescing
and separating field of action where
common sense tangles with righteousness
and wrath contends with erudition. But
from the bewilderment emerges one obvious
truth.
There is, of course, a critical issue and
one well worth fighting. This is direct
political meddling in higher education.

Staff Writings

People: Always And Everywhere

People. Always and
everywhere there are people.
And there is the tree that
stands there. And the moon that
hides. And the wind that blows.
And people. And the tree.
And the wind must blow
sometimes, to make leaves fall,
and sometimes people have to
make the wind blow. Some
people. And when it doesnt
blow they ask why and then
they ask why they are asking
why. The rest dont care.
Some people ask where they
are going and others ask where
they have been. And then there
are those who ask why they have
to know and why they
dont and why they never will
and why.
And they cry. Not with tears

but they cry, and they know
because they cry they are what
they are and they are different
but they dont know why or
why they do not and they cry.
They sit in the sun and hide.
Behind a smile sometimes
because society says people
should smile at other people.
And they talk because thats
what they are supposed to do.
But they doift smile or talk
and they watch those that do
and ask why . why they are
different. But no one knows
they are asking and they wonder
why.' ",
Why, God, why must I know
why and live not knowing?
And then: why God?
And they look- at the night

Senator lom Made nas a duty and a
sphere in lawmaking. He was elected in
Duval County for this purpose. In the
passage of law and the enactment of
appropriations, he has a role in shaping
higher education policies. And this is proper.
But Senator Slade has neither the
qualifications not the mandate of an
educational administrator. And he is apt to
forget that the University of Florida has an
existence of its very own, especially since
the State of Florida provides only half of the
Universitys revenue.
It should be spelled out in no uncertain
terms. Tom Slade is not the master of
University President Stephen C. OConnell.
And that is what the real shootin match is
about.
Two heroes emerge.
The first is Board of Regents Chairman D.
Burke Kibler, who went to bat for academic
freedom: I will stand firm on the position
of defending any professors in their rights to
have a position that may be unpopular or
that I disagree with as long as they have not
exceeded the bounds of their profession.
A university campus is a place for the
interchange of ideas and no one should
exercise thought control. If legislators tried
to go directly to the administrations, they
would find they own only buildings not
people.
The second hero is University President
Stephen C. OConnell.
There have been crises when OConnell
was slow on the draw, relying excessively on
committee referral and Tigert Hall
bureaucracy on gut issues that demand quick
decisions. The result has been the birthing of
erudite tomes long after the crisis is over.
But President OConnell gave Senator
Slade no such respite. The words are not
poetry, but they have zing:
It is inconceivable that any member of
the legislature, or any other state official,
should after reflection dictate that I, or any
other university president, fire any
individual, faculty or staff, or dismiss any
student, without first determining in proper
proceedings which comply with due process
that there is cause for such action under
existing rules and regulations,. I will never do
SO.
But more. They also served the entire
citizenry of Florida. If the eudcational
system loses its autonomy, if a single
politician can dictate ideas which are and are
not acceptable, then the university is a mere
ideological puppet.
What is that, but the first dangerous fleck
of cancerous tyranny primed to infect the
whole body politic?

By Carol Sanger

and ask why things are not the
same as during the day and why
the wind will only blow in the
dark and why it must when it
will only stop again and
everything will be just the same
and the tree will be just a tree.
One man can make a
difference and every man should
try. The wind must blow and
the tree must blow and the
moon must watch and they
must. But they cant and dont
know why, because it must be.
Why the tree is more than a
tree and why some cant see it is.
Why some never look and few
ever see.
And why I am writing this
because it wont matter. And
why.



Campus Echoes Slade Dilemma

Speaking Out

Attack Condones Civil Disobedience

(EDITORS NOTE: Robert Sherman is president
of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT),
local No. 1880, which has formed and organized on
the UF campus.)
The University, Dr. Megiil, and the Action
Conference ought not to be left to defend
themselves alone against the irresponsible, but
politically powerful, attack of Sen. Slade. Because
of this, your readers should be interested in a letter
that the Executive Council of the American
Federation of Teachers at the University of Florida
asked me to post to Sen. Slade and to release to the
public.
Dear Sen. Slade:
The organization which I represent views with
dismay your recent attack on the University of
Florida. We have issued to the press a statement
about your attack and take the courtesy to enclose
a copy of that statement for your notice.
We are concerned also with your indicated, even

Overreaction To Megills Mutterings

The season of overraction is upon us, not only
here at Gainesville but also at Tallahassee. State
Senator Tom Slade has overacted to the rather
idiotic mutterings of a befuddled U of F professor.
Student radicals are insanely overacting to Sen.
Slade.
In fact the only person who is apparently keeping
his cool and not becoming emotional about all
this is President OConnell. As a man of the law, our
president knows that he can not Fire a professor
every time a state senator dissagrees with what the
professor says.
Senator Slade commented that there is no place
on our campuses for radically oriented speakers.
With all due respect to the senator, I must disagree.

When one takes into account the reactions of
Slade and Tillman, not to mention the perpetual
meddling of the Board of Regents, one gets sick to
ones stomach over the role that petty politics plays
in the operation of this institution.
Being a Philosophy major, the type of kid easily
corrupted by radical teachers, I would like to relate
some Seventeenth Century remarks of Spinoza: In
fact, the real disturbers of the peace are those who,
in a free state, seek' to curtail the liberty of
judgment which they are unable to tyrannize over.
No, the object of government is not to change
men from rational beings into beasts or puppets, but
to enable them to develop their minds and bodies in

What is this being said by that esteemed and
enlightened individual, Senator Tom Slade? Is the
Florida Legislature, dominated as it is by
intellectuals and scholars, going to once again purify
the hallowed halls of the JJF?
Surely we must do all that we can to make sure
the proposed legislative committee does not fail in
this noble effort. Listen to your professors closely.
Take accurate notes so that you are able to turn
them over to the investigative committee. Perhaps

Distrust The Impulse To Punish

Hallowed Halls To Be Purified ?

By Robert Sherman =

if indirect, disapproval of a teachers union at the
University. You must have noticed there is such a
union in existence and that it thrives on attacks
against University autonomy and personal freedom,
such as yours.
You must know, too, that the right of public
employees to organize into unions and bargain
collectively with their employers is guaranteed by
the recent amendments to the state constitution,
Your evaluation of unions, then, can be considered
only as an attempt to intimidate teacher union
members.
We suggest that you cease your attacks on the
University, its personnel, and its ideas, and allow the
proper authorities to determine the course of its
affairs. It has been said numerous times, so you
must be aware of it: if there are charges to be made
they should be made in the proper form, and due
process must be followed in determining the validity
of any charges. To suggest, as you do, that some
outside force intervene where it has no authority is
to condone the worst kind of civil disobedience, a
theory which we thought you had opposed
vigorously in the past.

By Jim Hollis

This is just the place tor students to hear this type
of prattle. The U.S. Navy Petty Officer Leadership
Academy spends the better part of a month
teaching men how to recognize front-organizations.
They feel that young petty officers are able to
distinguish between what is right and what is wrong,
the same conclusion can be made about the vast
majority of the students here at this university, I
submit that we are mature enough to give Dr.
Megills statements all due regard that they deserve.
If the senator feels that Dr.Megills actions warrant
looking into, then, as a representative of the people
of this state, he has the duty to do so, but in the
correct manner without resorting to the deplorable
tatics of blackmail and witch hunting.

By David Miller

security, and to employ their reason unshackled;
neither showing hatred, anger or deceit, norwatched
with the eyes of jealousy and injustice. In fact, the
true aim of government is justice.
But the government people and the university
people dont agree with Spinoza, so they instead use
injustice and indoctrination. Nietzsche called the
state the coldest of all cold monsters; the uproar
over the teachings of Ken Megill Marshall
JonesGeorge MurrayEldridge Cleaver seems to
reinforce this judgment. We would all do well to
remember a line from Thus Spake Zarathustra:
DISTRUST ALL IN WHOM THE IMPULSE TO
PUNISH IS POWERFUL.

By R. Dana Swan

we should picket the Philosophy Department!
(Down with Megill! Down with this leftist inspired
plot called academic freedom!)
Let us all, good liberals that we are, rally round
our beloved president, Steve OConnell, and the
other noble fighters for freedom (Dean Hale, VP.
Connor, Prof. Greenman) and make the UF a truly
first-rate institution first in the south, second to
none in the nation. (If we try, maybe we can obtain
the status of William Carey College!)

Addia mi VlMmt
if/ 'r liy \\ / /
0
vi
Slades Dismissal Ultimatum
Violates Guaranteed Rights
MR. EDITOR:
Senator Tom Slade, in demanding the dismissal of Professor
Kenneth Megill, has apparently attempted to violate rights guaranteed
by the Florida and United States Constitutional provisions regarding
freedom of speech and due process, the nationally recognized
standards of academic freedom essential to a university worthy of the
name, and the right to employment under a contract protected by the
Florida and federal law.
It is ironic that the proponents of law and order at times find it
convenient to advocate a form of civil disobedience.
- ~i..- -I aD AZ-L. -Z ftniKATflL ftniKATflLiJVtwj
iJVtwj ftniKATflLiJVtwj ms. jjumwiu
Assistant Professor of Law
Fletcher N. Baldwin, Jr.
Professor of Law

Monday, February 17,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
V r
Mobile Home 8 x 30 occupancy in
the spring quarter. See at Lot L 3
3860 Archer Road SW, Town and
Country or call 392-3261 from 8 to
4. L. Shaw. (A-st-80-p)
EKO Guitar hollow body Ranger Vt.
Almost new, electric pick up peace
baby 90 dollars buys guitar and case.
378-5293. (A-st-80-P)
EXCLUSIVE 4 bedroom, 2 baths,
plus study and large screen porch
with cypress ceiling on acre plus
walking distance of Little Westwood.
Call Helen Balyeat 372-0328;
Wiltshires 3 78-6160. (A-ts-79-c)
BASENJI puppies, barkless, clean,
AKC. Excellent with children. Show
or pet. Call 376-2630. (A-st-80-P)
12x47 Rembrant, air conditioned,
carpets, unique decor, bookshelves,
large tree shaded lot $3900.
376-0554. (A-st-80-P)
DIAMOND solitare engagement ring;
Call Terry at Rm 45 Buckman Hall,
372-9319. Leave message if out. $65.
Brand nesv, never worn. (A-st-80-P)
1968 New Moon 44x12 central heat,
air conditioned, washer, carpeting,
and furnished. Set up close to
campus. Just like new. 376-1886.
(A-st-80-P)
Gibson 845-12 String new with life
warranty & case, $250 or offer. Save
over SIOO off list. Call John after 11
p.m. 372-1233. (A-st-81-p)
Red Doberman puppies champion
lines, excellent temperment, male
100, females 125, wormed and
puppy shots. 378-4665 after 5.
(A-st-81-p)
1968 48x12 Mobile Home central afr
washer carpeted living room 1 bdrm.
just like new. Browns Trailer Park,
Lot 14. Call 376-9005. (A-st-81-p)
TV new portable Magnavox won in
contest. SBO value yours for SSO.
Never used; full warranty. Call
376-8958 after 5:30. A real bargain!
(A-ts-69-P)
Guns-Guns-Guns- Inventory over
450-Buy- S e 11-Trade-Repair.
Reloading supplies, custom,
reloading- Harry Beckwith, Gun
Dealer, Micanopy 466-3340
(A-ts-69-P)
1 br trailer $995 new refrig, hw htr
drapes, carpeted, tile kitchen & bath,
12>/2 x 22 screened cabana on
concrete patio parked near UF call
468-1241. (A-st-84-P)
12-string guitar with case: S6O or
make offer. 392-9555. (A-lt-84-P)
1967 Honda 305 Hawk excellent
shape extra parts, tires mufflers. Call
Jeff at Lake Butler 496-3631 days,
496-6278 evenings. All for S4OO.
(A-4t-84-P)
1968 Honda S-90, incl helmet, rack,
mirrors, tarp cover, 4400 miles. Must
sells23s. Call 376-8668. Ask for
Greg. (A-3t-84-P)
TENOR BANJO, fun instrument,
easy to play, only $35. 378-0328
303 NW 17 St, Apt 27. (A-lt-84-P)
Camping and fishing special 16 ft
fiberglass canoe, carrier, paddles just
8 months old, unsinkable need
money for medical bills, call
376-9919 5129.00. (A-3t-84-P)
1969 Honda 90cc $250 atso full race
cam for Honda 160 S4O. 392-8775
evenings ask for Steve. (A-2t-84-P)
1969 HONDA CB 350 very few miles
must sacrifice $695. 392-8775
evenings. (A-2t-84-P)
NOW SHOWING
EXCLUSIVE FIRST RUN!
how far can a policeman go?
UPfi
//*%, 7:00 & 10:40 g ,+A
TECHMCOUW* m S
ALSO AT 9:00 "FRANKENSTEIN
STARRING CREATED WOMAN"
PETER CUSHING

V^*X-Vrtvx-XvX*X*X\-XX*X-V- -'.'.VX\vX*:-v
FOR RENT
Sublet College Terrace Apt. For 3rd.
Qtr. 1/2 block from campus. For 1 or
2 persons. 376-9889. (B-st-83-P)
Furnished two bedroom 1 bath house
for rent air conditioned $125 a mo.
Call 392-1575 before 5 or 378-6829
5:30 and weekends.(B-st-83-P)
Efficiency apartment suitable for
one, two or three. AC pool 1512 NW
5 Ave. Thru third quarter or longer
$75 per month. Call 376-8990.
(B-10t-80-P)
Furn 2 br apt 105 NE 4 St SBS Mth
MBR 15th Occ. 378-0124.
(B-2t-84-P)
Must sublet 2 bdrm. Landmark Apt.
spring & summer quarters, keep our
security deposit. 378-8594.
(B-st-82-p)
ywnwnnn
I WANTED
!vx*x*x*x<*x*:*;*.*x*x*x*:*x*xv.-.-.v.
1, 2 or 3 roommates female
Landmark, Spring Quarter.
378-8594. (C-st-82-p)
Coed needs to move to your place by
March 1, prefer Landmark. Call Sue
376-2755 by 10 AM or dinner time,
leave message.(C-3t-83-P)
CHATEAU LIVING for
$ 3 7.2 5/month. Take command:
pool, air, carpet, cable. Call Watt at
Summit House, 372-2607 after 6.
(C-3t-84-P)
WETNURSE for 3-day-old kitten
without mother. Call Mike after 6 at
376-7489. (C-lt-84-P)
Baby sitter for infant in my house
Mon Wed morning. 372-7946.
(C-3t-84-P)
WANTED! MANS ENGLISH
BICYCLE, 3,5, or 10-speed English
racer. CASH NOW! Call 372-6598
after 6.(C-2t-83-P)
Wanted: two male roommates to
share 2-Br. Landmark Apt. Phase
Two starting third quarter. Call
378-8982.(C-3t-83-P)
HELP WANTED
RATHSKELLER auditions Mon.
night, Feb. 24 at 8:00. Open to all.
Come do your thing or just come
listen. (E-st-80-C)
Impuesto sobre ingresos lncome
tax Llame 376-8605 por la manana
y despues de las 5 pm sabado todo el
dia. Se Habla Espanol. (M-7t-78-p)
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. National Parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
SI.OO to Arnold Agency, 206 East
Main, Rexburg, Idaho 83440.
Morteyback guarantee.(E-st-83-P)
WAITRESS OR CURB HOSTESS
convenient for students full or part
time. Above average pay plus tips.
Uniforms furnished, experience not
necessary, will pay while training.
For interview call 378-2481 or come
by Jerrys Restaurant, 1505 NW 13th
St. (E-st-80-P)
Savages Camp Mountain Lake,
Hendersonville, N.C. Boys and girls
6-16: for counselors job, call
378-0285 any evening; interviews
Sunday, February 16, 14 p.m. at
University Inn (E-st-80-P)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1-hr session. Must be native
English-speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University Ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5. (E-10t-71-C)
£NS X-X-X*XX-X-X"X*SSNS*X X*X*X X*X X*Xv,
AUTOS
59 MG A 1500 good cond. must sell,
going into service, S4OO. Call
378-0286 or 372-3572. (G-st-81-p)
Mustang 65, low mileage, excellent
condition, state inspected. Must see
and drive to appreciate. $995, 26 SW
24 St., 376-7456 after 5. (G-3t-82-p)
62 Ply. 6 cyl, radio & heater, 4 good
ww tires. A little body work & a seat
cover would make it a great car
runs well. S2OO. 3 76-994 1.
(G-3t-82-p)
iSipl
| j j m j
I THE MAIM WHO
MAKES IMO MISTAKES! I
I JAMES COBURN LEE J COBB GILA GOLAN
ALSO AT 9:14
A GUIDE FOR THE MARRIED MAN" I
PANAVISIONT COLOR bv DELUXE H

Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 17, 1969

AUTOS |
Porsche, 1963. Super red-black
interior, air conditioning, AM-FM
radio, Pirelli radials. $2900.
376-0554. (G-st-80-P)
:*xwsvxw':w><*>x'xx*x>x*x-:*x-.v-x-xsf
1 PERSONAL
X >
'WIWW'XsX'X-SWiSWXsX'XWiSKWW!
A free university in a Democratic
nation. SSOC needs dorm and
off-campus housing contacts for
campus canvassing on issues that
effect your life. Write SSOC, Box
13636, Univ. Sta. or call 376-5044.
(J-st-81-P)
CELEBRATION needs you, if you
are interested in planning the largest
exhibition of music, dance, drama,
and visual arts in Florida history.
Pick up an application at the Studait
Activities Desk, Reitz Union; the
Office of the Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts; or in
Rm. 129, Tigert Hall. (J-lt-84-P)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message any time day or night.
Message changes weekly. Let freedom
ring 16 SW 7th Ave. (J-st-84-P)
Time is running out to reserve your
seat for EUROPE this summer. $315
lO weeks. NY LondonNY or go
for credit. 392-1655 or 310
Union.(J-st-82-C)
: : >^WW.V.X.XXVX*X*X*X*X*X-X-X.X.*X*Xvl.,.
LOST & FOUND |
Lost: motorola Pageboy paging
beeper in University handball courts.
Reward. 376-7655. (L-st-82-p)
Cream colored male short haired
puppy with flea collar lost Monday
near the Krystal. Shall the circle be
unbroken? E Pluribus Unim.
378-1131. (L-3t-82-p)
;..-.vX'X*x*x.x.x.vxx>x*xx-x-x.x.x.v;v.s^.
SERVICES
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)

SWTII ORSON WELLS |
THRU TUES. "u DCTU ,r I
fThe wise & intelligent \ I
are coming belatedly
to realize that
si e . Xv.'vXvXXv 'x-X&Xv
alcohol, and not the
dog, is man's best O
MOVIE TIME: 9:00-11:00-12:30
ALIBI LOUNGE
EVERY MONDAY
29< HIGHBALLS
<
"/f's a good excuse

SERVICES |
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave, next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-C)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Tennis racket restringing, satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call M and R
Tennis Services. 378-2489.
(M-l Bt-59-P)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
AVON calling for men and women.
New campaign with many new
specials begins today! Call Linda,
392-9357, pref. late in eve. or early
morn. (M-lt-84-P)
r mm^ro
OVER!
5:30. 7:30
1 NOW AT. .1:557-1
jjljrflyJ 3:50, 5:50, 7:45,
r*.' r 'l=3 9:40
221 Belle I
Jour I
\ MM WINNER BEST PICTURE B
m. VENICE FILM FESTIVAL S

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

The following people
may pick up their Hall of
Fame certificates at the
Seminole Office, 337 Reitz
Union, between 2-5 P.M.:
Ric Katz
Larry Smith
Phil Burnett
John Ritch
*'
Manny James,
Martin Edwards
Sharyn Hackney
Mary Jo Holland
Roddy Grubbs
Gary Goodrich
Jean Johnson
John Morton
Clyde Taylor
Pete Zinober
John Dodson
John McPhail
Rene Millard
Jack Vaughn
Harold Aldrich
Joan Schaffel
Bill Zewadski
John Toppe
Irene Minkoff
Sue Eden Winkle
Marti Cochran
James Moody
The above named plus
the following people may
pick up their Who's Who
certificates:
Gary Christiansen
Roger Brown
Tom Thoman
Bill Wack
Phil Lazzara
Doug Lamb
Greg Johnson
Joe Hilliard
Debbie Fien
Dave Doucette
Janet Dippenworth
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rT .. ... t - -? '
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To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
U CO to * n
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Monday, Febrrary 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 17, 1969

Campus Crier
j -Ln u A SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT J j

SPECIAL STUDENT COMMITTEENEEDED
TO HELP SET UP AN
EXPERIMENTAL LIBERAL EDUCATION
UNIV. AT U. of F.
S.G. Has been asked by Vice-Pres. Conner & the chairman of the Ad-Hoc Faculty
Committee for an Experimental University to form a special student committee to do
parallel study & research on the feasibility of such a learning concept here at the U. of F.
u
You are to investigate & research the issue of What this experimental university should
provide in relation to an unstructured educational environment free of the course-credit
syndrome, with an emphasis on learning rather than teaching. .and conceived with an idea
toward in-residence living.
This project has tremendous potential & could be a major break-through in educational
progress in this section oj the country. It is the hope of S.G. that student interest will be
great & effort excellent.
All interested students are urged to contact S.G. at 392-1665 for information &
application forms. This committee will do extensive research thru June 15, 1969.
ATTENTION GRADUATING SENIORS I WANTED!!!!!
Ideas for the roof of the third floor
of the Reitz Union. Student
Government is seeking to convert
Graduation announcements for the March I the roof of the third floor into an
activity area. Students having any
S* I .. - A I suggestions regarding the type of
Graduation are now on sale at the Campus Shop activity they would iike to see are
urged to send their suggestions to
A Boole store I the Vice P resident of the Student
I Government's office.
PROJECT
The council oj International Organizations and Student Government cordially invite the H flj
University community to celebrate with the foreign students International week. There are 111 II | I
extensive and varied activities which are open to everyone. ItV hope that you will participate H H H
anil find these activities most interesting. I M H H II
Mon. Feb. 17 Banquet (by invitation only)
TueS. Feb. 18 IFC-CIO Dinners for Foreign Students... I ALL FLORIDA PROFESSIONAL
Romeo & Juliet and Foreign Documentaries/ I STUDENT LOBBY IN TALI AMACCFP
8:30 P.M. Williamson Hall, Physics Dept. I iMLLMnMMCE
Wed. Feb. 19 Beauty Contest, University Aud. 7:30 P.M. I INTERESTED?
Applications now being accepted for:
Thur. Feb. 20 'Romeo & Joliet 1 and 'Foreign Documentaries, I Ass"ltemChaman
6:30 P.M. & 9:30 Medical Center Auditorium I Finance Chairman
2nd floor I Research Chairman
Publicity Chairman
p|>j Feb 21 Talent Show 8 P.M. I Executive Secretary
University Auditorium I Inter-University Chairman
Publications Chairman
j _ , n ~ ii *i 1 mm
Sat. Feb 22 Reception for Foreign Students at / I CTIinCKITC cad Dre
the Mr. &Mrs. Charles Lucas Home. I STUD ENTS FOR RESPONSIBLE
-v- Dance: 9 P.M.Union Ballroom Band I GOVERNMENT: 331 3^ E1 1^9 UNION

SUPPORHATOR
LOAN FUND



Basketball is a long way from
being over for UFs Gators.
UF has beaten the No. 1 SEC
team, Kentucky, and moved
back into contention for a
National Invitational
Tournament bid.
The Gators got double-figure
scoring performances from five
of the six players, Neal Walk 19,
Andy Owens 17, Ed Lucko, 15,
Mike McGinnis 14 and Boyd
Welsch 13.
With nine seconds left Welsch
was fouled by UKs Phil
Argento. Welsch, who must have
nerves of steal, stood at the foul
line and put in two free throws
to ice the game for the Gators.
The Gators fine shooting,
field goal average of .516, and
excellent ball handling,
point-man Mike Leatherwood
moved the ball inside to set up
numerous Gator scores, made
the difference Saturday
afternoon.
Tonight Coach Ray Mears
Tennessee Volunteers come to
Florida Gym with a 10-2 SEC
record and a one-point win over
the Gators earlier in the season
at Stokely Athletic Center.
The Vols also have their eyes

ZJ Mm
GIVE E'VI HELL GATORS
... unidentified spectator cheers UF

, ,!; .',v)V-V, ' v.^iiVV'^j "-' ? i r
&*tO jg -^'A'i,'''
THE WINNER
... Coach Tommy Bartlett
Dennis Signs
Bengals Pact
CINCINNATI Fifth round
draft choice Guy Dennis, a 6-2,
258-pound All-American guard
from the UF signed with the
Cincinnati Bengals.
We are pleased to announce
that Guy Dennis has signed
with us, said Paul Brown,
Bengals coach and general
JL_ JL* -.. % 1_ *V *Vmanager,
manager, *Vmanager, we ueixeve xie s one ox
the best guards to come out of
the college draft.
The 21-year-old Dennis was
named to several All-American
teams last season.

Gators Rupp-ture Kentucky,
seek Justus Toniqht

on a NIT berth and currently
hold the favored position.
The Gators task; to upset
Tennessee.
When UF visited Knoxville in
January the Vols fans subjected
wfj j
HEft WStl
v wm j
BP : Sf 9
SgiSi V
neal walk, dan issel
... "I'm bushed, what about you"

Cage Tickets
Tickets to tonights
UF-Tennessee basketball game
are still available.
There are over 2,000 seats
that can be claimed at the
athletic office ticket windows
from 8:30 to 12:30 in the
morning and 1:30 to 4 in the
aftemnon, today.
Game time is 7:45.

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them to the worst razzing a team
could get.
The fans have a good system,
they pick out a top opposing
player and start applauding
every time he makes a shot in
practice warm-ups. It doesnt
take long for him to catch on.
Then when the game starts
the fans start egging him on to
shoot and when he misses they
let him have it. This kind of
psychology makes the player so
fan-conscious his playing syffers.
Now the object isnt to ignore
the rest of the team, they should

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get some comment too. Like
watching them closely and
letting them know what you
think anytime they foul, fall,
miss a shot or get scored on.
Now the pride of Tennessee is
an All-SEC guard they call the
Adrenalin Kid, Bill Justus. Bill
wears number 42, so you cant
miss him, hes the one who
walks two-feet off the floor.
Lets let him have it. The
Gators held him to two points in
the last meeting between the
two teams. Those two points
came in the Final seconds and

Monday, February 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

*By Marc Dunn:

cost us the game, 64-63.
Its time to get Justus.
If the Gators ever needed fan
support, they need it tonight.
There are over 2,000 tickets
still available to the game. They
can be picked up at the athletic
ticket window on the west side,
inside, from 8:30 to 12:30 and
1:30 to 4 in the afternoon.
If there is one empty seat in
the stands tonight we have let
the Gators down.
If they think we Rupp-tured
Kentucky Saturday, lets show
them how a Gator SMears
Volunteers.

Page 13



Page 14

. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 17,1969

UF Mermen Drown East Carolina

UF splashed past East
Carolina Saturday 72-41 in a
meet that began in a downpour.
The Gators are now 7-1 for the
year.
Sophomore Jamie Murphy
took two events for the Gators,
the 50 yard free-style and the
100 yard free-style. Murphy was
the only double winner of the
afternoon.
Again the Gators took 10 of
13 events from their opponents.
The next meet for the
swimmers is the Southern
Intercollegiate Invitational in
Athens, Ga. Thursday.
400 Medley relay Fla. 3:39.8

UF In Headlines
Here are the leads from the states dailies after the Gators tumbled
Kentucky Saturday:
GAINESVILLE Well, the Southeastern Conference isnt going to
have an undefeated champion after all, and you can thank (or blame)
die Florida Gators for that.
Coach Tommy Bartletts squad, still fighting for a berth in the
National Invitational Tournament to be held in Madison Square
Garden, nipped Coach Adolph Rupps Kentucky Wildcats 82-81 in
one of the most pulsating, heart-stopping basketball games ever seen
here in quaint Florida Gym.
TAMPA TRIBUNE
GAINESVILLE Boyd Welsh has the good looks of a television
star, the poise of Johnny Carson under the ad lib gun and the faith of
a fellow who asked for and received a second chance.
The 6-foot-l senior from Gainsville High School showed the daring
of a Mississippi gambler, the courage of a GI in Vietnam, and skill of
an All-American in directing the University of Florida to a pulsating
82-81 Southeastern Conference basketball victory over Kentucky.
ORLANDO SENTINEL
Boyd Welsh stepped out of the pressure cooker namely Florida
Gym with nine seconds to go against Kentucky Saturday afternoon.
The spirited Gainesville wing player had just made the first free
throw on a one-and-one situation to give Florida an 81-79 lead in a
southeastern regional televised game.
Welsh strained the nets for the second time, giving the Gators a n
82-79 lead with three precious seconds to play.
GAINESVILLE SUN
GAINESVILLE Some day after a little more
experience Tommy Bartlett may be able to write a book, How I
Learned To Stop Worrying About Adolph Rupp.
Bartlett, basketball coach at the University of Florida the last three
seasons, has beaten the legendary Kentuck coach four times in six
encounters. The most recent victory came yesterday before a regional
television audience as the Gators beat the nationally fourth-ranked
Wildcats 82-81.
St. PETERSBURG TIMES
GAINESVILLE The University of Florida basketball brochure
states that senior guard Boyd Welsch stands 6-foot-l.
Yesterday afternoon, however, Welsch proved that you cant
believe everything you read. He stood at least 10 feet tall as the
Gators beat Knentucky 82-81.
St. PETERSBURG TIMES
UFs Golf Champs
Holed Out By FSU

TALLAHASSEE Bob
Huber and Bob Neiberding
downed All-American golfer
John Darr and Mike Estridge by
twin 3-to-0 scores Saturday as
Florida State upset defending
national champion Florida
16-11.
Huber and Neiberding teamed
to give FSU nine of the 14
points needed to lock up the
match play contest.
Ron Philo of Florida State
and Floridas Steve Melnyk tied
for medalist honors with
one-under par 71s and split their
points \ Vi-\Vi.
Mike Cheek beat David
Barnes, who won the Gasparilla
Tournament for Florida last
week, Vh-Vi.
Philo and Cheek teamed to
defeat Melnyk and Barnes 2-1.
It was the first dual match for
both teams, While Florida won

1000 Freestyle Appleget, Bob
(F)11:02.8; Frederick, Gary
(EC)-1 1:l 1.3; Sheehe, Phil
(F) 11:23.2; Kruzel, Tom
(EC)-l 1:40.6.
200 Free Griffin, Jim
(RC)1:55.2; French, Fred
(F)1:55.6; Hairston, Steve
(F)1:56.7; Manchester, Jim
(EC)1:58.9.
50 Free Murphy, Jamie
(F) :23.0;; Weissman, Steve
(EC)-:23.3; Oreel, Eric (EC)- :23.9.
200 Individual Medley Strate,
BUI (F)2:13.4; Ahrens, Richard
(F) 2:13.7; Moynihan, Bob
(EC) 2:14.3; Maltby, Jay
(EC)2:17.0.
1 Meter Diving Hoffman, Glenn
(F) 2 38.00 points; Link, Bob
(F) 2 34.75 points; Baird, Bob
(EC)197.15 points; Emerson, Doug
(EC)192.95 points.
200 Butterfly Hartmen, Doug
(EC) 2:11.8; Appleget, Bob
(F) 2:13.0; Hungate, Ken

the national championship last
year, FSU was ranked 10th by
the NCAA.
Results:
Philo and Melnyk tied, 1 Vi-1 Vi;
Cheek beat Barnes, lVi-Vi-,
PhUo-Cheek beat Melnyk-Barnes, 2-1.
Huber beat Darr, 3-0; Neiberding
beat Estridge, 3-0. Huber-Neiberding
beat Darr-Estridge, 3-0.
Andy North beat Jim Keedy,
2Vi-Vi\ John Sale beat Dick Stephens,
3-0. North-Sale beat Keedy-Stephens,
3-0.
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(EC)2:17.9.
100 Free Murphy, Jamie
(F):50.1; Bridges, Bob (F):51.4;
Frederick, Gary (EC) :52.9;
Moynihan, Bob (EC):55.2
200 Back Stroke WUliams, Bruce
(F) 2:11.6; Sultan, John
(EC) 2:16.8; Downey, Andy

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COUNTRY
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(EC)2:19.5.
500 Free Hough, Hank
(F)- 5:1 5.4; Griffin, Jim
(EC) 5:2 6.3; Maltby, Jay
(EC)5:38.4.
200 Breast Stroke Mcpherson,
Andy (F)2:31.0; Weissman, Steve
(EC)-2:32.1; Allman, Larry

(EC)2:37.7.
3 Meter Diving Link, Bob
(F)251.95 points; Smith, Ray,
(F) 2 31.30 points; Baird, Bob
(EC)220.95 points; Emerson, Doug
(EC)-172.80 points.
400 Free Relay EAST
CAROLINA, 3:32.0.



r 1
HOME
... Gators Jourdan likes it here
Ron Soars 7-foot-2,
But UF Trails Vo Is

Ron Jourdan reached new
heights Friday night when he
cleared the high jump bar at T
2 in a triangular meet with
Tennessee and Georgia Tech at
Knoxville.
It was the eighth time this
year that Jourdan has cleared
the seven-foot barrier, his best
ever.
Nevertheless, the Gators
placed second to powerful
Tennessee in a meet in which
football player Richmond
Flowers sprinted to an easy win
in the 60-yard high hurdles. It
was the first competition for
Flowers since he injured his knee
in the Cotton Bowl football
game.
Tennessee tallied 77 points to
the. UFs 53 while the Yellow
Jackets trailed with 21 points.
On Saturday night, Jourdan
topped the seven foot marie in
the Mason Dixon Games in
Louisville with a jump of seven
feet even.
The Gator two-mile relay
team Finished third to Villanova
which set a new world record of
7:22.8.
Jourdan will participate in the
U. S. Olympic Invitational track
meet at Madison Square Garden
Friday night/
Fridays results:
BROAD JUMP: Ken Nash, Ga.
Tech, 2 3-3. 2, Tim Fisher, Tenn.
23-V2. 3, Bill Bondy, Ga. Tech-23-Vi.
4, Stan Trott, Tenn. 22-1 I V*.
SHOT-PUT: I, Chip Kell, Tenn.

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S 5-7 1 /. 2. John Morton, Fla. S 3-7. 3,
Drew Baron, Tenn. 5 1-10. 4. George
Jenson, Tenn. 5 1-6'/2.
MILF RUN: 1, John Parker, Fla.
4:17.3. 2, Dickey Kieier, Tenn.
4:18.2. 3, Sam Rutherford, Tenn.
4:21.0. 4, Chris Purvis, Ga. Tech,
4:23.1.
POUF VAULT: I, lioh Sprung,
Tenn. 16-0, 2, Joel Sarrett, Fla. 14-6,
3, David Mason, Tenn, 14-6, 4, Sam
Ftheridge, Ga. Tech, 14-0.
HIGH JUMP: Ron Jourdan, Fla.
7-2, 2, Lonnie Hance, Tenn, 6-10, 3,
Karl Kremser, Tenn. 6-6, 4, Jim
York. Fla. 6-2.
TRIPLE JUMP: I, Jeff Gable,
Tenn, 47-7, 2, Ronald Coleman, Fla.
47-0, 3, Grover Howard, Fla. 46-5'A,
4, Mike Porvett, Tenn. 44-9.
440-YARD DASH: 1, Jerry
Fannin, Fla. 49.6, 2, Gary Womble,
Tenn. 50.0, 3, Rick Bowers, Tenn.
52-0, 4, Art Hoffman, Ga. Tech,
52.1.
60-YARI) DASH: 1, Gary Wagner,
Tenn, 6.2, 2, Kenny Scherer, Ga.
Tech, 6.4, 3, Ken Nash, Ga. Tech,
6.5, 4, Andy Bennett, Tenn, 6.6.
600-YARD DASH: I, Audry
Hardy, Tenn. 1:10.6, 2, Bill
Ballinger, Fla. 1:14.4, 3, Jake
Schickle, Fla. 1:16.1, 4, Jack
Ransbothan, Ga. Tech. 1:16.4.
60-YARD HIGH HURDLFS: I,
Richmond Flowers, Tenn. 7.2, 2,
Bobby Ball, 7.3, 3, Steve Keltner,
Tenn. 7.4, 4, Joe Schiller, Fla. 7.5.
880-YARD RUN: I, Larry Kelly,
Tenn, 1:52.7, 2, lamonn OKeefe,
Fla. 1:53.3, 3, David Whitner, Ga.
Tech. 1:59.3, 4, Steve Keller, Fla.
2:00.0.
1000-YARD RUN: 1, Bob Lang,
Fla. 2:12.4, 2, Ken Burnsed, Fla.
2:15.4, 3, James Craig, Tenn.
2*415.4, 4, Butch Stewart, Tenn.
2:15.4.
TWO-MILF RUN: I, Owen Self,
Tenn. 9:06.1, 2, Steve Nelson, Tenn.
9:23.8, 3, Roy Benjamin. Ida.
9:44.5,4, Jack Nason, Ida. 9:50.4.
MILF RELAY: I, Ida. (Gary
Fannin, James Dyson, William
Ballinger, Jack Schickel 3:26.5) 2,
Ga. Tech 3:31.8.

Ch icks Prep ForUF Olympics

The Gator Olympics will be
held this Saturday and the
sororities are working out in full
force all confident of their
Houses athletic abilities.
This is really tremendous
how the sororities have turned
out for this benefit track meet,
said Steve Sykes, chairman of
the Gator .Olympic Committee,
which is attempting to raise
money to send Gainesvilles
Johnnie Lee Samuels to the
1969 Deaf Olympics v in
Yugoslavia.
Sykes adds, So far 150 girls
have signed up and if everyone
else supports the meet like the
sororities, it will be an
outstanding success.
The girls races include such
events as the 60 yard dash, 440
yard relay, football throw,
scuttle relay, one-half mile
walk-run, and kite flying.
Typical of the opinions
expressed by the various
sororities is that of Phi Mu
President Janelle Heck. Were
going to win of course. Were
really enthusiasic and its going
to be ? an overall house effort.
But the DGs arent getting
outdone, according to Kaye
Blanton. Our girls are known
for being real jocks around
campus. Were really excited
about the Gator Olympics and
we have invited over some guys
from the football team to help
us train.
The D Phi Es are pinning
most of their hopes around
Marcia Bondy an outstanding
member of the girls tennis team.
Were hoping shell win the
football throw, said president
Laurie Gilbert.
Dick Hcimij
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Laurie also admits that she
doesnt know her left foot
from her right when it come to
track but she is looking forward
to racing Saturday.
Patty Bohannon is
representing the Tri Delts in the
60 yard race ancUhe plans to get
into condition tfiis week.
Another Tri Delt, Suzanne
Rogers, doesnt admit to much
ability but she says, I plan to

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Monday, February 17,1969, The Florida Alligator,

start training this week so I
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Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 17,1969

CLIPBOARD
* PW?
mwr Love Letters;
y Bill Dunn ' ::
Valentines Day is passed and this writer got only two cards.. .not
that I deserve more.
One was personal in nature; the other to share with you. It came
from Lou Bello, Southeastern Conference basketball referee who we
featured earlier this month in a full page spread.
Bill, Thanks! it said. Many, many thanks. You are making me
glamorous. Happy Valentines Day. Greatefully, Lou Bello.
* *
What difference a home court makes!
The Gators both on the court and in the stands rattled the
hell out of the cool Kentucky Wildcats Saturday afternoon and it was
really sweet.
Even the freshman, who lost to the Wildcat frosh 76-67 picked up
the tempo considerably since, the two teams met in Lexington last
month.
The Baby Gators lost that one 95-56.
More of the same spirit tonight.
* *
Ray Graves thinks it wouldnt be a bad idea to expand football
seasons to 11 games. But rather than play the extra game at the end of
the fall season, hed like to see one official game played at the end of
spring practice.
Id like to play some nearby team like Florida State as a climax to
our spring drills, says Graves. It would help our athletic program
tremendously. Gate receipts could finance our entire springs sports
program.
The Bull Gator favors an eleventh game over other often mentioned
alternatives for cutting the increasing costs of intercollegiate
athletics cutting size of squads, staffs, scholarships, etc., and
increasing cost of football admissions.
* *
Latest Gator high school signees include all-staters John Cliffords, a
defensive back from Coral Gables, John Tucker, offensive guard from
Miami Norland and Walter Hutchinson, defensive tackle from Tampa
Hillsborough. The Gator list has reached 31.
* *
Don Chandler, a senior high hurdler for the Georgia track team has
been chosen captain of the 1969 Bulldog thinclads. Chandler is a
product of Englewood High School, Jacksonville. The 6-3,
180-pounder has been high point man on Georgias track teams the
past two years. How did Carnes miss this guy?
* *
You remember Tommy Lyons, the Georgia Bulldogs outstanding
205-pound football center this past season?
As a sophomore, he seems headed toward a second straight
undefeated wrestling campaign. He is 10-0 in dual competition this
season as a heavyweight. Incidentally, two of five Bulldog matmen are
Florida boys freshman Joe Parker, 145-pounds, of Miami and
sophomore Leon Hall, 160, of Miami.

Riflers Shoot
UF ROTC rifle team will
participate in the NRA Sectional
Match, Friday and Saturday,
which will determine the
National Champion. The Florida
Riflers will also host the State
Championship Match in March.
The team is 15-4 on the
season. They have won the
Florida Southern College
Handicap.

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PEANUT BUTTER 43<

Special Prices Good only Thru Feb. 18. |

Bi-pack 42 oz. CAN 89$
Bi-pack 42 oz. CAN 89$
Bi-pack 42 oz. CAN 89$
5Yz oz. CAN 25$
5 oz. BOTTLE 23$

DEL MONTE LIGHT CHUNK
TUNA 6 A Z 3/SI.OO
NABISCO CHIPS AHOY
COOKIES I z 45$
NABISCO OREO Iln
COOKIES PKG. 45$
ARMOUR W/ BEANS
CHILI 15% OZ. CAN
ARISTOCRAT
SALTINES 1 LB. BOX 25$
SOPHIE MAE 10 OZ BOX
SUGAR TOASTED ~ Q
PEANUTS
DAILY
CAT FOOD wozcan 10/1.00
AT ONCE
SHAMPOO 1% OZ BOTTLE 10d
A & P INSTANT NON-DAIRY
COFFEE CREAMER R oz 75<
JIFFY CORN
MUFFIN MIX 8* oz box ]o{