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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
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Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
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Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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Spatial Coverage:
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Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Meqilh Freedom Nonexistent At UF

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
I came here because I was
promised freedom and because I
could participate in building a
department, said the slim, brisk
philosophy professor. He smiled.
Dr. Kenneth Megill, the
outspoken instructor whose
ouster has been demanded by
State Sen. Tom Slade, leaned
back in his chair and glanced
around his rectangular office.
I have found that freedom
does not exist in this

ft

Explosive UF Amazes Sen. Slade

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ELEVEN STUDENTS CONFER WITH PRESIDENT O'CONNELL
. . "don't give Slade any more wood for his fire"
OConnell Tells Students
Demonstrations No Help


By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Slade letter dispute isn't going to he
settled by demonstrations or play in newspapers.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell told a group
of concerned students Thursday.
He was referring to the controversy developing
over the ultimatum issued Wednesday by Sen.
Tom Slade, R-Jacksonville, calling for the
immediate dismissal of philosophy Assistant
Prof. Kenneth Megill.
The group of 11 students met with 0 Connell
in his office Thursday afternoon to ask him to
attend an ultimatum reaction rally that night in
the Plaza of the Americas.
OConnell said he could not attend bemuse he

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university, lie said. "Students
in particular are conditioned
from the very beginning not to
make demands from ihe 3
faculty.
He paused and pulled on his
pipe. Then he spoke about
"freedom":
"freedom lor me means the

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

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MO EMBARRASSMENT INTENDED

The
Florida, Alligator

had another meeting.
I appreciate your concern, he said. But
demonstrations aren't going to help us.'
O'Connell said the problem over the Slade
Letter arose because there arc people who dont j
understand the workings of a university.
Don't give Slade any more wood for his fire,
he told the students seated in a half circle around
him.
"UF is a public institution, he said, this
won't be the last time this will happen.
When asked what he will do about the
ultimatum by a member of the group, OConnell j
said, we have procedures I am going to stand
by them.
OConnell said the demonstration should go
on as scheduled even though he couldnt be
(SEE 'O'CONNELL' PAGE 2)

possibihtx tv) wo.rk with a group
of people who are activek
engaged as professionals and as
human beings in the world
around them. he said.
freedom onl\ exists in
certain kinds of communities."
Megill said.
lie said he had onl\ found

University of Florida Gainesville

freedom in the philosophv
department and among radical
students and professors.
I've found lots of
friends most of whom are
radicals, he explains.
Megill was interrupted by a
telephone call. He listened for an
instant and then asked tor the
identity of the caller. He
slammed down the telephone.
It was the first call in a
morning when the news ol
Slade's ultimatum tv) UF
President Stephen ('. O'Connell
(SEE 'MOST' PAGE 2)

Will Take Action
Toward Dismissal
(See Editorial /age S)
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
Ama/.ed at the explosiveness" of the 111 campus. Sen.
Tom Slade said Thursday he plans to take a positive action
in the legislature to secure the dismissal ol Asst. Prof. ol
Philosophy Kenneth A. Megill.

Slade said there is no
quest ion" that lie will take
further action, regardless of
student protests at the
university.
I will most definitely have
something for the legislature to
consider at the beginning of the
week," Slade said.
He refused to say whether his
actions would take the form of a
Senate resolution
He-was. unaware ot the UF
reaction to his letter to UF'
President Stephen C. OConnell
and said lie w-as disappointed"
that campus groups would be
in support of an action to take
over the university."
(SEE 'LEGISLATOR' PAGE 2)
Slade To
Back Out?
JACKSONVILLE (UPI)
Florida Senate Republican whip
Tom Slade withdrew his threat
Thursday to call on the
legislature for action if a
University of Florida philosophy
professor is not dealt with
immediately, but said he is not
dropping the matter.
Slade issued a statement from
his office here saying that
events of today have made me
aware that any action that I
might take or that the Senate
might take on Monday would
have the effect of denying the
opportunity for President
OConnell to afford due process
to Dr. MegilL

DR. KENNETH MEGILL
. . ouster demanded

Eridiiy, I'cbrnary 14, IV 6v

-
Robert Mautz:
Intervention
Destructive
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
State University Chancellor
Robert Maut/. said Thursday
state universities would not
survive" if they were subjected
to intervention in internal
matters by legislators.
Mautz said a letter by State
Sen. Tom Slade, R-Jacksonvillc,
which demanded the ouster of a
philosophy professor at the UF
is potentially destructive of the
universities."
It puts the legislature as
individuals in the position of
running the universities, he
said, and the universities
wouldnt survive that kind of
activity.
Mautz said discipline of
Megill, if any, was solely his
(OConnells) problem, but when
there is intervention by the
legislature into the affairs of the
university, its my problem.
The chancellor called Slades
letter an ultimatum and said
there were established
procedures for handling internal
matters at the institution.
It may be that Sen. Slade in
a moment of exasperation
perhaps provocation,
considering his views wrote
the letter, Mautz added.

America's
Number I
College
Daily



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14,1969

Most Os My Friends Are Radicals -Megill

non pwl m
glared at the readers of every
state newspaper.
It was someone who wanted
to discuss the meaning of
treason with me, Megill
explained. But he wouldnt say
his name.
He glanced past the
bookshelves replete with
philosophy and political science
books and looked at the brightly
colored poster depicting Josef
Lenin amid waving red banners.
The saddest thing which has
happened to me is to see so
many of my good friends leave,
he finally said.
Marshall Jones, David Noble
and others have left because of
the lack of freedom, he added.
Jones is the psychology
professor who left the UF last
June after his appeal for tenure
developed into a full-scale
controversy.
Noble headed the
now-defunct Board of Student
Investigation which last spring
called for the resignation of UF
Vice-President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale. He has since
transferred to a northern school.
They were people who have
taught me a lot and now they
have left, he said, all of them
subject to pressures from both
inside and outside the
university.
I knew of academic
suppression before I arrived
here, Megill said, but I was
promised freedom if I came to
Florida.
The 29-year-old Megill, who
obtained his B.A. at the
University of Kansas and both
his M.A. and Ph.D. at Yale
University, came to the UF in
1966 as an assistant professor of
philosophy. He teaches social
and political philosophy.
I like Florida, he said, but
1 have no desire to stay if I must
slave myself the worst kind of
slavery to do so.
I knew Florida had a bad

A&S Resolution Supports
OConnell Unanimously
A resolution by the faculty of the College of Arts and Scienc'
supporting UF President Stephen C. OConnell and Arts and Scienc.
Dean Harry Sisler passed unanimously Thursday afternoon.
The resolution, introduced by Dr. Manning Dauer, chairman of the
political science department, called for the orderly procedures of UF
to remain in effect.
We call on all to recognize that freedom of expression is a
necessity for the university. Therefore, as the procedures of the
university are well-established, we call on all to follow the orderly
procedure as set up in the university constitution.

there. I will gladly speak publicly when I have
the time.
He said he had been tied up with visiting
legislatures all day.
One member of the group asked him about
MegUls tenure status.
I dont know enough about him, OConnell
said, or about what statements he has made.
Im not going to rely on newspaper comment
like Slade has, he said.
Megill does not have tenure, as he is in the
middle of his third year at UF. Three years are

OConnell Waiting
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history, he charged, but I also
thought that Florida had the
potential of being a great
university.
The UF can become a great
university, Megill said, if a
strong teachers union is
founded and if students are able
to exercise control over their
lives.
A 1961 Woodrow Wilson
Fellow, Megill received a
National Endowment for the
Humanities Fellowship in 1968
for research in Budapest,
Hungary which he completed
last August.
His Ph.D. dissertation at Yale
was on The Community as a
Democratic Principle in Marxs
Philosophy, and he is the
author of numerous treatises on
Marxist philosophy.
He is a member of the
executive committee of the UF
chapter of the American
Federation of Teachers.
Despite the controversy
ignited by Slades letter, Megill
says he doesnt contemplate
leaving the UF.
As long as people whom I
enjoy being around are still
here, he said, Im not going to
leave.
It is fun to be at Florida, he
smiled. There are real issues to
be brought forth and a certain
kind of community presence.

"I KNEW OF ACADEMIC SUPPRESSION," MUSED DR. MEGILL
. . "but I was promised freedom if I came to Florida"

required for tenure.
Slade accused Megill of making statements
advocating overt governmental overthrow and
adhering to radical thought.
The group also presented O'Connell with a
petition signed by more than 250 names.
The petition reads: We, the undersigned
members of the university community, demand
that President OConnell pledge, publicly, to
forbid any internal or external investigation of
any member of the university community for
his political views or affiliations.

? Jr... .-.v
. f**'"

What I said on the Plaza of
the Americas last Monday is not
new, he said. In class I talk
about the same problems and in
my research I am currently
concerned with the possibility
for developing a democratic
society where men can control
the institutions where they live

Megill Supporters March
For OConnells Backing

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Nearly 150 sh ivering
supporters of Prof. Kenneth
Megill marched to UF President
Stephen C. OConnells house
Thursday night after a rally at a
chilly Plaza of the Americas in
protest of State Sen. Tom
Slades letter asking for the
philosophy instructors ouster.
OConnell, in shirt sleeves,
met the crowd outside his home
and told them he was not going
to make any more statements.
I appreciate your concern,
he said, and I share the concern
of all of you. I expect all of you
to conduct yourselves just as I
am conducting myself.
1 am not going to rely on
newspaper reports as others
have, he said.
The group silently walked the
half-mile from the Plaza of the
Americas and as they neared
OConnells home chanted:
OConnell, back Megill.
More than 400 persons had
gathered at the plaza earlier for
the second consecutive night
rally in support of Megill.
Megill reiterated to the jovial
crowd the statements he made at
a teach-in last week and which
prompted Slades actions:
1 do think that in the proper
time it will be necessary for

s' .....
Jm

and work.
I am saddened, but not
surprised by the continued
political meddling in university
affairs, he declared.
I expect to continue to teach
and to write about what a
democracy is and to say that
radicals and blacks are the only

students to unite with militant
teacher unions to take control of
the university, he said.
And I do think that the
Black Power movement is the
most significant social
movement of our times, he
added.
The problem is to realize
that we dont live in a

Legislator Surprised
By Campus Reaction

When informed of student
demonstrations taking place at
UF, Slade said he expected
them. He could not explain
OConnells failure to receive his
letter.
It & is not my intention to
leave President OConnell in the
dark or to embarrass him, Slade
said.
He blamed the UF mail
delivery tor the press releasing
the letter before OConnell
received it.
I have no desire for the
legislature to interfere with the
business of the university, but
the legislature has a
responsibility to the taxpayers
not to allow an advocate of
radicalism like Megill on the
university campus, Slade said.
It was the legislatures
responsibility to the people of
the state to see that no one is
teaching the overthrow of the
university, according to Slade.
Megills statements advocated
the formation of a strong
teachers union which would in
time join with the student
radicals to bring about the
overthrow of the university.
Megill made his remarks at
Accent last week.
Slade said he has received 20
to 30 telephone calls in support
of his actions from different
legislatures and officials in the
executive branch of the state
government.
He said he had not spoken to
Gov. Claude Kirk about his

ones who make sense, he said.
And I may be wrong but I
think it is true, he added.
My obligation is not to any
state legislator or to the Board
of Regents, but to say and do
what I think is true and to live
and do it in an institution of
learning, he added.
Megill said he had not
discussed Slades ultimatum with
any members of the UF
administration.
That is typical of how things
are run here, he said. No one
in the administration in any
capacity has spoken to me.
These cases around here are
handled completely at
administrative level, he
remarked. This is the whole
point.
In any important issue the
faculty and students have
nothing to say, he said.
And until everyone can
participate, Megill said, we
will have neither a free
university or a great university.

democratic university, Megill
added. If we are to have a
democratic university, it has to
be made by our efforts. .. our
flesh and blood.
To create a good a great
university, Megill said, we are
going to have to have a
democratic university.

demand to fire Megill, and had
no idea how the governor felt
about the matter.
There isnt anything that will
have an effect on my stand
against Megill, Slade said.
I dont think the state
should employ someone who
advocates the overthrow of a
state university, he said. If it
were someplace like Rawlings or
Miami where the taxpayers are
not supporting the institution,
then the legislature would not
have any business telling the
university who it may employ.
Slade reiterated his belief that
if Megill didnt like it in
Gainesville he should leave.
He did not feel the situation
would erupt into Berkeley or
Chicago proportions unless the
students want to make it that
way.
Frankly, I am amazed at the
reaction so far to a single letter
from a single legislator, Slade
said.
I dont know why the
students or the legislature would
want to stand by and watch
someone like Megill take over
the university, he said.
Slade said he did not think
the proposed Tillman committee
to investigate subversive activity
at UF would turn into a witch
hunt, but he could understand
how students would feel that
way.
The university simply does
not have room for an advocate
of overthrow, Slade said.



FROM AC. OTHER GROUPS
Meg ill Receives
Moral Support

The Action Conference lashed
out at State Sen. Tom Slades
ultimatum demanding the
dismissal of UF professor
Kenneth Megill in a three-point
resolution sent to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell Thursday.
Political inquisitions and
interference are greatly to be
deplored at the UF the
unanimous resolution said.
The three points were:
9 Senator Slades ultimatum
is unwarranted.
9 President OConnell should
adhere to the regulations of due
process incorporated in the UF
AFT Backs
McGills Rights
The UF chapter of the
American Federation of
Teachers (AFT) Thursday passed
a resolution deploring the
actions of Sen. Tom Slade of
Jacksonville, and backed the
rights of Asst. Prof. Kenneth
Megill.
In a statement from that
groups executive council, the
AFT said:
It is incredible that in a free
society, and in a supposedly
enlightened time, it is necessary
to defend the exercise of rights
that are constitutionally and
legally protected. The intrusion
of these rights, such as made by
Sen. Slade, must be resisted.

Speakers 1 Bureau
Forms Available

Applications for the Florida
Blue Key Speakers Bureau will
be available Monday through
Friday at the Florida Blue Key
office in room 312 of the Reitz
Union, at the Reitz Union
Information Desk and at the
speech office in room 335 of the
Arts and Sciences Building.
Carnival
To Be Held
The Brazilian--Portuguese
Club will sponsor a Brazilian
Carnival Dance Saturday.
Dancing will begin at 9 p.m. at
the UF Faculty Club on SW 2nd
Ave.
The carnival will feature
authentic Brazilian carnival
music and Brazilian costumes.
Refreshments include fruit
punch, soda, ice 'set-ups, and
salgados, but the
Brazilian-Portuguese Club has
advised all persons to bring their
own beverage.
Tickets arc $1.50 and are
available from Marilyn Wojth,
406 NW 14th St., 378-7498;
David Fleischer, 530 NE 9th St.,
376-9514; and on campus from
Paulo Pinhiero in the Metallurgy
Dept., 392-1451 or members of
the BrazilianPortuguese Club.
Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
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constitution and the Board of
Regents Policy Manual.
9 Political interference with
the academic processes of the
UF and political inquisitions
infringing on the expression of
differing philosophical points of
view are to be greatly deplored.
Franklin A. Doty, chairman
of the AC steering committee
declined further comment on
the resolution.
Young Demos
Condemn Slade
Calling Sen. Tom Slades
actions, unwarranted legislative
interference, the UF Young
Democrats (UFYD) drew up a
resolution backing President
Stephen C. OConnell and
delivered it to his office
Thursday afternoon.
UFYD, headed by Bruce A.
Smathers, son of former senator
George Smathers, termed the
resolution, in keeping with the
liberal and democratic principles
of higher education.
We deplore Sen. Slades lack
of professional courtesy in
releasing a letter to the press
before OConnell received it.
We further implore the
implied blackmail, (and)
intolerant attitude concerning
the views and opinions of
university personnel.

The Speakers Bureau sends
out speakers every year to civic
groups in the state to promote
UF and to show that there is a
responsible student body at UF.
This year speakers will talk
between April 21 and May 9.
Anyone is eligible to apply for
a position as a speaker.
Interviews will be held the week
after the applications are due to
make the final selection of
speakers.
Applications arc due in the
Blue Key office by 5 p.m. next
Friday.
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Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14, 1969

MAY CAMPAIGN FOR ANOTHER
Shepherds Hat Not In Ring

Former Student Body
President Charles Shepherd has
declared himself definitely not
a candidate" for re-election in
next Springs Student
Government elections.
1 have considered the
possibility very carefully a->d have
rejected it for personal reasons,"
Shepherd said in a letter to
Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich.
Shepherd had be cn
consistently rumored in campus

Non-Violence, Civil Rights
Discussed For Black Week

The non-violent civil rights
movement should have died at
the beginning.
This comment was made at
the panel discussion sponsored
by the Afro-American Student
Association (AASA) Wednesday
night. The program was part of
the observance of Black History
Week.
It should have died at
childbirth, former AASA
Press-Secretary Larry Jordan
said. Jordan and Robert Canney,
instructor in the College of
Education and member of the
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU), agreed the movement
was dead.
David Horne, graduate
student and AASA member, and
Dr. Augustus Burns, UF
professor of social science and
history, spoke for the non-violent
movement.
The funeral of non-violent
civil rights movement came with
Martin Luther Kings funeral,
Canney said.
Marches and boycotts are
things of the past, because they
assume America has a
conscience, he said.
Im our for whatever my
people want the fastest they can
get it, Jordan said.
Non-violence has resulted in
tokenistic acts and slow
legislation, he said.
Horne contended America
has a soul and a conscience, but
it just doesnt know it. The
purpose of the civil rights
movement is to make America
realize it, Horne said.
Burns, stating he was not a
starry-eyed idealist, claimed the
movement has not died, but
gone underground and is
flourishing.

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political circles as a possible
candidate for the SG presidency.
This public statement is
necessary because many people
(notably politicians) believe that
I may still be persuaded,
Shepherd stated.
Let me say emphatically that
I will not seek any campus-wide
elective office, he said.
But Shepherd left the door
open for possible work in
another candidates campaign.

He cited the number of local
community programs which
have made headway in civil
rights. They have received no
national publicity and there are
about 7500 such groups in this
country now. he said.
This is not hat-in-hand Uncle
Tomism, the local groups are
using militant demands by 1950
standards, Burns said.
Canney distinguished between
private violence and institutional
violence. Private, physical
violence is apparent on the
streets, but the institutional kind
is much more insidious. It is
the lack of governmental
response to injustices, he stated.
The basic hang-up in this
country is that property rights
are valued over human rights,
Canney continued. The heart of
the matter now is to secure
economic independence. Only
then will civil rights gains have
any meaning, he said.
Both sides agreed that the
black mans identity and pride
was most important first.
Integration is irrelevant
because the blacks need identity
and power first, Canney said.
The black man needs pride
so that the racial slurs mean
nothing, but will turn into the
cries of cranks like anti-semitism
and Polish jokes, Burns stated.
One member of the audience
said that neither movement will
have full potential until pride,
unity, and leadership are
accomplished first.

This does not mean that I
will not take a part in the
upcoming election, he said.
The extent and role ol m>
involvement will depent upon
the candidates.
Shepherd, who held the
highest SG oil ice in 198/-88.
said he had been asked by
students, lae ull y an d
administrators to considei
seekimi re-election.

When Burns reminded the
panel that other minority groups
had to struggle to gain
acceptance also, the moderator.
Fred Reddy, said they came over
voluntarily and they liad to
drag us over.
Friday night at Norman Hall
auditorium the AASA will
present a satirical play, A Day
of Absence at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 3 p.m. Black
Journal, a recent NET Journal
program, will be shown through
WULT facilities in McCarty
Halls TV classroom.
BOWLING
SUNDAY
SPECIAL
35< per game
or 3 games SI.OO
ALL DAY
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

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Militants
Barricade
Duke U.
DURHAM, N.C. (UPI)
Rebellious black students
seized the main floor of the
Duke University
Administration Building
early Thursday, barricaded
themselves inside and
threatened to burn school
records if police were sent
in.
The students, estimated in
number at between 35 and 75,
were demanding a special
educational program without a
grading system.
Furniture was piled against
doors to barricade the main
entrance to the gray granite
structure and the building was
renamed the Malcolm X
Liberation School by the
Negroes.
On the upper two floors of
the besieged building, students
attended classes.
The takeover was the first
such display of student power
on a major primarily-white
Deep-South college campus.
There have been scattered
instances of college buildings
being seized at several Southern
Negro institutions in the past
year.

IRISH QUINTET FURIOUS
Riots Explode
At NYC, Berkeley

By United Press international
In Berkeley, New York City,
and South Bend, Ind., student
unrest continued to erupt
Thursday.
At Berk e4c y, X SO
club-weilding police arrested at
least three dozen dissidents in a
series of minor scuffles and
broke up pickett lines trying to
block the main campus
thoroughfare.
About 1,000 students tossed
books and firecrackers at
taunted officers with chants,
catcalls and obscenities. Student
lines reformed as quickly as
police marched through them.
More than 75 Negro and
Puerto Rican students took over
a City College administration
building in New York City to
enforce demands for
recognitions of the needs of
minority groups.
The students left voluntarily
about four hours later. Police
were on the scene. There were
no incidents.
Five Negro players on the
Notre Dame basketball team

* the FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is sio.oo per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
b Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
aHvertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
then ?ohe Advertoing Manage, within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be givgn before next insertion.

Coast To Coast: Student Unrest

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The sudden takeover came
without warning at 8 a.m. and
by midday hundreds of white
students were holding a forum
outside the building in support
of the rebels. There are over 100

threatened to quit Thursday
unless they receive a public
apology from students for
booing Thursday night when
they were all in the Michigan
State game at the same time.
The team members issued a
statement saying:
We demand a public apology
from the student body of the
University of Notre Dame for
their booing when there were
five black players in the game
against Michigan State. If we
dont get this apology we will no
longer practice or play with the
university.
Students around the campus,
when they learned of the
statement, said they believed the
booing was not because the five
blacks made up the entire Notre
Dame team at one point in the
game, but because they were not
playing well. Notre Dame lost to
Michigan State.
Campus observers believed
apology petitions might be
circulated on campus Thursday
afternoon before the next
scheduled practice sesssion of
the Irish.

Negroes in the Duke student
body of 8,000.
Uniformed men of Duke's
campus police force stood
outside the east door of the
building and directed students to
the west entrance. Students
entering the west door had free
access to classes underway on
the second and third floor.
The administration building is
located near the Gothic Duke
Chapel, which soars over the
wooded campus where President
Richard Nixon graduated from
law school.
The rebels disclosed their
demands in a statement through
the Duke student newspaper.

rofflS
RETAILINGS GOT THE ACTION!!
WARDS IS RETAILING
Become part of the people to people Business!
MONTGOMERY WARD IS LOOKING for graduates sincerely interested in the fabulous
industry of Retailing. PLAN A CAREER with the progressive pioneer and innovation of
Retailing.
ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE WIDE OPEN AT WARDS
RETAIL CONTROLLERSHIP
RETAIL MANAGEMENT
BUYING
COPORATE SYSTEMS
CREDIT MANAGEMENT
Plan for Your Interview today!!!
Montgomery Ward's Representative will be on campus:
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1969
A '
Check the Placement Director's Office for details and interview times available.

National Guard
Fights Badgers
MADISON. \\ is. (UPI) National Ciuardsmen tossing tear gas
grenades and carrying fixed bayonets clashed with student strikers
Tlnirsdax in the fifth da\ of disorders on the University of Wisconsin
campus.
Wisconsin National (iiiardsnien, part of a contingent of 2.100
ordered out b\ (>ov. Warren P. Knowles to quell disruption of school
activities, moved into action to disperse strikers when they blocked
traffic on bus\ D.S. 12 which cuts through the heart of the universitv
campus.
Student strikers, an estimated 400 strong, were bested and
scattered m a series of scuffles with bayonet-packing guardsmen and
police wielding nightsticks.
Guardsmen laid two tear gas grenades along the curb a few hours
later w hen strikers made hit-and-run rushes to stop cars on University
Avenue, the highway and main campus thoroughfare.
At least nine persons were arrested, three in the first eon frontal ion.
The head of one striker was bloodied in the melee.
I.xcept for the street scuffles, the troops and police forced student
strikers to keep moving and tv) largely abandon their obstructionist
tact ics
Some 200 soldiers stood guard at at least six campus buildings tv)
enlorce the right of nonstriking students the vast majority ol the
school's 22.000 enrollment tv) attend classes in peace. The othei
000 guardsmen were standing by in the university f ield house.
Student strikers were instructed at a rally to avoid confrontations
with guardsmen and police and go where the police are not.
Strike leaders said a group of commandoes" had been formed tv)
deal with the Hayakawas where they find them.
The Hayakawas arc nonstliking students, including some white
members of the Badger' varsity football team and fraternities, who
have struggled with the strikers in frequent square-offs.
Si. Havakawa is the acting president of another disorder-plagued
institution. San Francisco State College.
As the guard patrolled the campus, the Wisconsin Assembly in the
capitol a mile away passed by an 89-11 vote a bipartisan resolution
requesting the school to expel striking students who interfere with
others wanting to attend classes.
Knowles sent a special message to the legislature asking law-s tv)
force expulsion of students and firing of faculty members convicted
of crimes in connection with university disorders.
NEED ZIPPY RESULTS? a
CLASSIFIEDS
1

Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14, 1969

UF: All You
Need Is Heart
Today Valentines
Day is the date of a love-in
from 1-5 p.m. in the Plaza of the
Americas.
Students are invited to
participate and vocalists and
guitarists are asked to come and
do their own thing.

Mystery Gators Select
?
Nurse As Friendliest

The first Friendly Gator
award for friendliness among UF
staff members was awarded
Tuesday to Mrs. Mary L. Lamee.
Mrs. Lamee, appointments
nurse at the Infirmary, was
chosen by the Student
Government Friendly Gator
Committee for being the most
student-oriented staff member
on campus. She will soon be
joined by other Friendly Gators,
one named each week.
I appreciate it.that anybody
thought I deserved the award I
just enjoy doing my job, Mrs.
Lamee said. Im very much
surprised and grateful.
Mrs. Lamee, a registered
practical nurse, has been
working at the infirmary for two
years. Previously she was a nurse
at the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center and for a doctor in
private practice.
The Friendly Gator award is a
new project of Student
Decoupage
your way into
someone's heart!
Select a photograph, news
clipping, design or scene that
means only "you" or "us" to
a loved one. Transform it into
an impressively beautiful
permanent heirloom piece by
Decoupage.
You can produce a
professional quality creation
on almost any material. Let us
show you how with Old
Masters A ntiq-O-Page. We have
all the materials.
surprise someone with a
personalized keepsake.
Also art materials, antiquing
supplies, picture framing.
'il
tfwsn
Iwrd
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DROPOUTS
J gkS IPEA
. / eoOFIN'OFF?
% abr- J
, /~U 'd l*ov* S"dcT, Ins

Government designed to give
recognition to outstandingly
friendly and helpful UF staff
members. A group of 20
mystery students has been
checking on staff members by
observing them as they interact
with students. The award will
hopefully promote better
relations between students and
employes.

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Anyone with a nomination
for the award is asked to call the
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the Friendly Gator committee,
at the SG desk, third floor of the
Reitz Union.

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AFTER 30 YEARS
Mitchell To Retire Feb. 28

After 30 years of military
service, ROTCs military
coordinator Col. Arlo W.
Mitchell will retire Feb. 28,
leaving UF for Fort Lauderdale.
Mitchell, a professor of
military science, came to the UF
in July, 1965. He had been
stationed at Headquarters
CONARC in Fr. Monroe, Va.,
for four years before coming
here.
Ive been all over the world,
Mitchell said. Ive been assigned
overseas four times; three of the
tours were in Asia and the other
in Vienna.
He received his commission
through ROTC at Wichita
University in Kansas.
Mitchell said his replacement,
Col. Robert Atkins, is currently
stationed in Vietnam. Atkins
graduated from the UF in 1940
from the College of Pharmacy.
He wont be here until
sometime aroung the middle of
March, Mitchell said.
When questioned about what
he will remember most about
the UF, Mitchell immediately
answered, The Gator football
team.
I came here when Steve
Spurrier was at his height, and
Ill never forget those stirring
games, he said.
1 also enjoyed the
association with fine faculty
members, he continued, and
the support the ROTC got from
President Reitz and then
President OConnell.
Mitchell explained when a
vacancy occurs in a position like
his, the army nominates men to
Fill it, but the president of the
university actually makes the
final decision.
Omega Taps
New Members
The Order of Omega, designed
to honor outstanding men in the
fraternity system recently
gapped 16 new members. The
order is a national honorary for
fraternity men who have
distinguished themselves in
leadership roles in their houses
and on campus.
The organization is separate
from the Interfraternity
Council a functional entity in
itself. We compliment each
other in our functions, said Jim
DeVaney, past president of IFC
and member of the Order of
Omega.
In existence since March, the
Order of Omega is just now
coming into its own, DeVaney
said.
e
He said the goals of the
fraternity are helping the
different fraternities on campus,
giving opinions representative
of the fraternity system on
campus issues and hopefully,
spending some time researching
problems on campus.
Wed like to serve as a true
honorary, which many of the
honoraries on campus dont do.
The Order of Omega is really
pushing for the coliseum,
DeVaney said. It is handling the
building fund and has already in
the process o7 drawing
architectural plans.

UK:
COL. ARLO MITCHELL
. . retires after 30 years.

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Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14,1969

VWKO>K X >>SK XWX y*VV.%VV.%ViVv.Vt%%%v.vvvt;v-/,>;>;i; 1 //// 1 v/AV.V/ < VAV 1 VAVAV.%Vi .V.VWi iW.V V.V? Vi ,, V i i
I i
| A Poorly Veiled Threat
/ have no desire for the legislature to interfere with 'fc JH|B
business of the university, but the legislature has a J |:|
responsibility to the taxpayers not to allow an flk ipKF
advocate of radicalism like Megill on the university *S
$ Sen. Tom Slade, Feb. 13, 1969 |j|
i I

EDITORIAL
UF In The Sunshine

The flurry of resentment and concern that
has followed Sen. Tom Slades poorly-veiled
threat of legislative investigation into UF
academic attitudes is clearly over-defensive.
Siades ultimatum calling for philosophy
professor Dr. Kenneth Megills removal has
been characterized variously as extortion
and insult. While it was undoubtedly meant
to be both, it ought to be treated as neither.
It should be welcomed, rather, as a unique
opportunity for the university community
to step forward and frankly admit that it is a
haven for a wide latitude of opinion.
If we are willing to trust our legislators
with the truth, if we have confidence in their
desire to seek the truth, and every
interpretation of democracy tells us that we
should, then we have nothing to fear.
Education, like legislation, must not and
cannot operate effectively in darkness. Our
classrooms are legitimate institutions and
should be open to the public eye. In this, we
can serve as an example to those who
represent us.
At the same time, we must demand that
any such investigation be handled with
openness and objectivity.

The Fifth Column

Before the Florida Bar decides
to disbar me, let me say that I
am not advocating the violent
overthrow of the country, the
state, the administration
building or anything else.
Not yet. (Although a student
takeover of the student union
does not strike me as either
illogical or immoral.)
But a whole hell of a lot of
things have happened in the past
week that have at least made me
see things in a different Hght
than previously.
As an intro I was reading a
background report on why
President Johnson decided not
to run again this year. The
report said that the night before
the New Hampshire. primary
Johnsons aides and professional

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the Unh*rf*ity of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.'
Editorial, ITudnrar Adwrtiwig offioS in Room 330, Raiti Union. Phan*
392*1681,362*1662 or 392-1683.
r Vv 1 .1 ; l OT" H 4 -
Opinion! expo the writer of the atidt and not thoaa of the Uahrardtv of Florida.*

The Other Great Silence

pollsters assured him that
McCarthy would be lucky to get
more than 15% of the vote; they
believed that and so did Johnson
and one wonders about the
President of the United States
being that out of touch.
(McCarthy got 42%).
And then I went to Accent
last week. 1 was one of no more
than 60 or 70 students that
heard MegilPs revolutionary
statements. They struck me as
being so bland at the time that 1
didnt even remember them until
Mr. Slade had a mass-media
hernia over them.
And two nights later I heard
the syntax that passed for
language thrown at us by Mr.
Finlator, the Worlds Number
One Narc. Now I dont mind &

We cannot allow a man like Sen. Tom
Slade to lead a wolf pack thirsting for blood.
We cannot trust a man who openly admits
to ignorance of due process.
Slade has already exhibited his low
intentions in the questionable methods he
used to introduce his ultimatum.
In his publicity-conscious attack, Slade
has prejudiced the issue, marring the chances
of a fair investigation.
Anyone familiar with the tactics of the
now-infamous Johns Committee in a darker
age of Florida politics cannot doubt that
similar tactics used today would extinguish
every remaining spark of communication
between the rapidly polarizing elements of
modern society.
Only when our motives are hidden from
one another can fear and mistrust threaten
democracy, blanket our institutions with a
haze of suspicion that turns us from mutual
respect to mutual tyranny.
Once we are thus blinded, all our good
intentions cannot save us and all the radical
ideas in the world cannot hurt us more.
We have nothing to hide.

man disagreeing with me, but its
really a bite in the yum-yum
when a man who is totally and
nonchalantly oblivious to a
point of view shared by millions
of young people is nevertheless
in a position of power where he
could possibly arrest all of these
young people.
Finally I go to my law
seminar this past Tuesday night.
1 know that Im starting to get
bugged and I recall a time last
year when 1 was talking to one
of UFs long-haired bushy-tailed
hippy radicals who very calmly
spoke of after the revolution.
I remember smirking at his
incredible naivete. And so Im at
this seminar and here are 15
young law students (one black)
who are supposedly more liberal
than the rest of the law school
student body. And were all
sitting around objectively
discussing civil disobedience and
how its O.K. from a legal and
academic standpoint SO LONG
as its Martin Luther King
non-violent.
Now I dont doubt that for a
minute. It would be just super if
all the disaffected,
disenfranchised, disgruntled
minorities of this country went
out and disobeyed non-violently,
got arrested and non-violently

The Florida Alligator
"Th price of freedom
'* th exercis of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
PoUrtwJtlto Dave Doucette
. Managing Editor
AM
jT Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor
The American Dream
Robby
McGrobber
By Uncle Javerneck

Robby McGrobber was a terrible person.
Peoples sensitivity could be measured by how much they hated
McGrobber. He had some of the most admirable enemies in the world.
His mother thought that his life had been ruined by drugs, but that
wasnt true because McGrobber had never taken drugs. The reason
that he sometimes came staggering home a babbling idiot was that he
had a remarkable capacity for getting drunk without passing out.
McGrobber had an obnoxious personality. He spoke in a bellow
without speaking directly to anyone. When no one was around he
never spoke at all.
He smelled like a wet dog all the time and it seemed like he never
took his clothes off, not even when he slept which was any time and
anywhere.
He ate mostly with his fingers, he ate too much, and he always
belched a lot after he ate. He used obscenities freely. No one even
wanted to get close enough to hit him.
McGrobber didnt like people either, not even his family. His
favorite pastime was buying a case of beer and going into the woods
with it. He sat in a polluted creek with water up to his chest and
drank until he was thrashing around like a drowning chicken.
He would practically crawl home late at night but more often he
would fall asleep on the bank only halfway out of the water.
He wasnt smart and he certainly wasnt educated. In fact he never
even seemed to be thinking about anything. He wasnt retarded but he
only used his head for the most necessary functions.
He never asked for anything from people and certainly never gave
anything to them but trouble.
He was probably the most hated person in the world, but I liked
McGrobber because he was kind to animals.
And for that, there exists no reward.

marched off to jail and
non-violently served their terms
and waited for Mr. Nixons
great silent majority to rally
to their cause out of the
goodness of their great silent
hearts.
But thats just not the way it
works anymore. And probably
the main reason it doesnt is
because none of these
disgruntled minorities really
have too much faith in the
goodness of those great silent
hearts anymore.
And if you wonder why then
you should have listened to
Finlator. -
If you wonder why, then look
at Tillman and Slades incredible
political fumbling.
And if you still wonder why,
then listen to what the one black
member in our seminar said, in a
voice that was nothing if not
both exasperated and resigned:
What youre asking us blacks
to be are Jesus Christs. Turn the
other cheek, youre making
progress, boy.
But just what in the hell do
you think the black attitude in
gonna be when we see this great
Congress of the United States,
these great representatives of
the people, pass, IN ONE
WEEK, a bill making it a federal

By Jason Straight

crime to cross state lines to
incite a riot. IN ONE WEEK
they can pass a bill aimed at just
two men, Rap and Stokely, but
these great men have yet to get
together and pass a bill to get
the rats out of the ghettoes.
So what Im thinking is that
maybe Im as out of touch as the
rest of the white power
structure; and maybe there is an
awful lot of people (an awful lot
of great silent people) who have
long since given up hope for any
significant change from within
the system; and maybe its
already too late and the
polarization is complete.
I hope not, because I really
love this country, emotionally
and intellectually. Its still the
greatest experience and the
greatest experiment in the
history of mankind. But to
continue to be so, we have to
continually experiment.
So Messers Slade, Tillman, et
al, please dont worry about our
young tender minds becoming
poisoned; somehow well
survive. And if you really want
to do something worthwhile and
if you still insist on protecting
young tender minds, why dont
you pack off to Tallahassee and
pass a bill to get the rats out of
Jacksonvilles ghetto.



Financial Burdens Shackle UF: OConnell

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
UF administrators pointing
to critical needs for proper
financing presented budget
requests for the 1969-70
biennium to members of the
Florida Ho use of
Representatives subcommittee
on appropriations for higher
education Thursday.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell told the legislators the
UF has great Financial problems
along with an enhanced
opportunity for distinguished
service to Florida. He listed 10
critical areas of concern:
The computer situation is
critical.
§ The engineering research
operation of some $3 million
each year requires a revolving
fund of $250,000 to cover
delays in collection.
The operating and capital
outlay fund is critical, partly
because the Legislature in 1967
withheld 3 per cent of this fund,
and only one third has been paid
back.
Funds are needed to
correct space deficiencies in the

A REVERSE MINSTREL SHOW
Satirical Play To Be Presented

A Day of Absence, a satirical play on the
prejudices of a small Southern town, will be
presented by the Afro-American Students
Association (AASA) tonight at 8:15 in Norman Hall
Auditorium.
The play was selected for Black History Week
because it makes a humorous and significant
comment on racial attitudes, David Horne, AASA
member, said.
The plot centers on the reactions and responses

Honoraries To Meet Today
On Megill Controversy

Two presidents of UF
academic honoraries have called
for a meeting today of all
honorary officers to discuss
courses of action in the
controversy involving Dr.
Kenneth Megill.
A memorandum from Ralph
Giannini, president of Phi Alpha
Theta history honorary, and
Skip Livingston, president of Pi
Sigma Alpha political science
honorary, called for the meeting
in room 201 of Peabody Hall
this morning at 10.
Livingston was moderator at
the Accent panel discussion

20 % Discount on ROOMS
I We cooperate NOW
[Private, Comfortable & Peaceful
I Discounts for Students use Only
I Must present ID card
I Inn motel
V. trryllmmt 1.-mfurl Dim
y' |r y 101 Rooms

Health Center, open the College
of Dentistry and enlarge the
medical school.
Construction of new
buildings will come to a grinding
halt in about two years with the
completion of current projects,
due to a shortage of capital
funds.
Office space is lacking;
since 1962, office space has
increased by 44 per cent while
academic positions have
increased by 92 per cent.
The School of Forestry,
with extremely poor facilities,
faces loss of accreditation in the
early 19705.
The Florida State Museum,
now under construction on
campus, will need increased
funds for staff, exhibits and
research.
9 The University Library
needs increased financial
support; it rates unfavorably
with comparably institutions.
9 Expense funds for
instruction and research in terms
of dollars per faculty members
have not been increased in
serveral years.

where Megills comments were
recorded by state newspapers.
The memorandum justified
the intervention of student
honoraries in political matters
by saying that the issue
required political
involvement.
.We feel that it is up to us,
the leaders of academic
honoraries, to take the
leadership in this issue which
affects us so directly.

of a small Southern town population when it wakes
up one morning to find that all the Negro town
members have disappeared.
It is a reverse minstrel show where the actors, all
AASA members, have been made up with white
make-up.
There is no specific time period for the play since
the behavior of the characters has long permeated
society, Horne said.
Admission price is 50 cents.

We have problems in the
Legislature, too, said State Sen.
Wilbur Boyd, and this will be a
lean session, budget-wise.
The committee will study the
budget requests and make
recommendations to the
Legislatures Appropriations
Committee.
A 91 per cent increase in the
general revenue fund, for staff
and administrative salaries, is
foremost among the budget
requests. Vice-President for
Buisness Affairs William Elmore,
explaining the request, said the
increase is needed to bring
salaries to a competitive level.
Administrators salaries are
too low, he said. This is
shown every time we have an
administrative vacancy and try
to fill it from the outside.
Then too the UF is sometimes
forced to hire staff employes
who have undesirable work
records. he said, and an
extremely high turnover rate
makes the UF an excellent
training ground for employes in
this area.

I WO VALUABLE
I fe&ntucfajTrid I
ly eMm 1
I 214 N.W. 13th St. 114 372 3649 H5t I
COUPON SPEClAL%#^o%o^#^o^#^#A
f py I SHRIMP DINNER!
I $1.50 $1.09 I
m I with coupon m
8 JUMBO SHRIMP FRENCH M
FRIDAY COUPON SPEClALfc^fc^^^^^^^kd^M
COUPON SPECIAL^^^^^P^P^P^PSI
m *. r; ; m
1 Chicken Check 1
V Good Sat. Feb. 15 only M
iidit mi HikLil in It.iiiil SI .00

i /
fried \cktn y ' y
GAINESVILLE ONLY
- S >r\
COUPON special

The Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences requested a
24 per cent increase in its
budget, to maintain the present
level with modest
improvements, according /to
Provost E. T. York.
Stating that agriculture in
Florida is increasing faster than
in any other state, York named
as priorities the completion of
the last wing of McCarty Hall,
and the improving of the School
of Forestry.
The financial ills of the J 4
Hillis Miller Health Center can
be attributed partially to
Floridas rapidly increasing
population of oldsters, Provost
Samuel B. Martin said. Twelve
per cent of all people over 65
live in Florida, and people of
that age bracket require much
more medical attention than
others.
That fact, coupled with the
rapidly rising costs of hospital
care the hospital care price
index rose 16 per cent last
year make it imperative for
the state to finance more than
33 per cent of the health
centers needs, Martin said.
He requested an increase to
50 per cent, so that the medical
school can accomodate 100
students, the dental school can

N.Y. to
LONDON
N.Y.
- $315 10 Week
Rm 310 Reitz Union 392-1655

Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

be opened and the nursing
school can admit more qualified
applicants.
The engineering college asked
for increased funds for growth
and the graduate program,
because, according to Dean
Robert Uhrig, for the last five
years, our state-appropriated
funds have remained constant.
GENESYS, the engineering
extension program with
television networks around the
state, neeeds additional funds to
finance hookups to newly
participating cities.
The financing of construction
projects is in serious danger, as
Director of Physical Planning
Walter Matherly illustrated with
a graph that showed UFs
requests rise sharply while the
Legislatures appropriations fall
just as sharply.
DELICIOUS I
iff) i di steaks I
II I FINE FOOD I
I&lhcusr 1 -*
I student prices I
I Breakfast served §
1 daily. 1
I 1614 N. W. 13th ST. I
| 378-0955 |

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
>: a
:-x-x.:xs-:%-x*:-x<*X'X-xxv; ; > x*x-x*x-x-xi:w
Honda 50 good condition. Helmets
and bookrack. SBO, Call 376-3184.
(A-2t-82-p)
Mobile Home 8 x 28, 1 br., furnished,
AC, 378-7436 evenings 5 til 9.
(A-3t-82-p)
Chopper, 57 Harley, 1200 cc, FLH,
springer forks, excellent condition,
just rebuilt engine, asking $725 or
reasonable offer, contact J. Ahearn,
Reid, 2-8895. (A-2t-82-p)
Mobile Home 8 x 30 occupancy in
the spring quarter. See at Lot L 3
3860 Archer Road SW, Town and
Country or call 392-3261 from 8 to
4. L. Shaw. (A-st-80-p)
EKO Guitar hollow body Ranger VI.
Almost new, electric pick up peace
baby 90 dollars buys guitar and case.
378-5293. (A-st-80-P)
EXCLUSIVE 4 bedroom, 2 baths,
plus study and large screen porch
with cypress ceiling on acre plus
walking distance of Little Westwood.
Call Helen Balyeat 372-0328;
Wiltshires 378-6160. (A-ts-79-c)
BASENJI puppies, barkless, clean,
AKC. Excellent with children. Show
or pet. Call 376-2630. (A-st-80-P)
12x47 Rembrant, air conditioned,
carpets, unique decor, bookshelves,
large tree shaded lot $3900.
376-0554. (A-st-80-P)
DIAMOND solitare engagement ring;
Call Terry at Rm 45 Buckman Hall,
372-9319. Leave message if out. $65.
Brand new, never worn. (A-st-80-P)
1968 New Moon 44x12 central heat,
air conditioned, washer, carpeting,
and furnished. Set up close to
campus. Just like new. 376-1886.
(A-st-80-P)
Gibson 845-12 String new with life
warranty & case, $250 or offer. Save
over SIOO off list. Call John after 11
p.m. 372-1233. (A-st-81-p)
Red Doberman puppies champion
lines, excellent temperment, male
100, females 125, wormed and
puppy shots. 378-4665 after 5.
(A-st-81-p)
77 Japanese rifle sport, plus 37
rounds. S3O. Call 2-1780. (A-3t-81-p)
1968 48x12 Mobile Home central air*
washer carpeted living room 1 bdrm.
just like new. Browns Trailer Park,
Lot 14. Call 376-9005. (A-st-81-p)
TV new portable Magnavox won in
contest. SBO value yours for SSO.
Never used; full warranty. Call
376-8958 after 5:30. A real bargain!
(A-ts-69-P)
G u ns-Guns-Guns- Inventory over
450-Buy- S e 11-Trade-Repair.
Reloading supplies, custom,
reloading- Harry Beckwith, Gun
Dealer, Micanopy 466-3340
(A-ts-69-P)
Brace yourself for a thrill the first
time you use Blue Lustre to clean
rugs. Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co.(A-H-83-C)
1967 HONDA 160 CB. Excellent
condition and low mileage. $340. See
at LANDMARK No. 93 or call
372-2027.(G-lt-83-P)
; : ; .ww-xxx^*x-x.swssx*xx*^
| FOR RENT
Sx*x*x^x*x^x-x*x-:.s:wW:*x<*x*x-xo
Modern, air-conditioned apartment
close to campus, private bedroom,
study area, share bath and kitchen.
378-9453. (B-st-79-p)
Camelot Apts. 1 br. with turret;
furnished, central heat and air,
dishwasher, ww carpet, sauna bath,
pool. Must sublease, call 376-8714.
(B-st-79-p)
Efficiency apartment suitable for
one, two or three. AC pool 1513 NW
5 Ave. Thru third quarter or longer
$75 per month. Call 376-8990.
(B-10t-80-P)
Sublet Camelot Apt for spring and
summer quarter. 3 looking for 4th.
Senior or grad coed to share 2
bedroom 2 bath apt with Spanish
decor, overlooking pool. Call
378-8458 after 6:30. (B-4t-80-P)
Sublet College Terrace Apt. For 3rd.
Qtr. 1/2 block from campus. For 1 or
2 persons. 376-9889. (B-st-83-P)
Furnished two bedroom 1 bath house
for rent air conditioned $125 a mo.
Call 392-1575 before 5 or 378-6829
5:30 and weekends.(B-st-83-P)
Must sublet 2 bdrm. Landmark Apt.
spring & summer quarters, keep our
security deposit. 378-8594.
(B-st-82-p)
| WANTED |
w/Wv/WA ;v.v.V.wiviwiv. .v.v.v.' a
1, 2 or 3 roommates female
Landmark, Spring Quarter.
378-8594. (C-st-82-p)
Coed needs to move to your place by
March 1, prefer Landmark. Call Sue
376-2755 by 10 AM or dinner time,
leave message.(C-3t-83-P)

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14, 1969

WANTED J
fsss-xvx-.'-x-x-x-syxs
WANTED! MAN'S ENGLISH
BICYCLE, 3,5, or 10-speed English
racer. CASH NOW! Call 372-6598
after 6.(C-2t-83-P)
Wanted: two male roommates to
share 2-Br. Landmark Apt. Phase
Two starting third quarter. Call
378-898 2.(C-3t-83-P)
I need a ride to New Orleans Feb. 13
or 14. Call 378-5927. (C-3t-81-p)
Interesting & friendly grads, faculty
& staff & students over 21 for
singles mixer at Lamplighter every
Friday. See Personal for details.
(C-3t-81-p)
One female roommate wanted to
share one bdr. apt. Across from
Norman Hall SSO mo. & utilities. Call
378-8053. (C-3t-81-p)
Female roommate Landmark apt.
$45 monthly, must be hip to tolerate
3 guys no hangups involved as
roommate. Call Andy or Richard
376-3424. (C-3t-81-p)
HELP WANTED |
::vxsw*x*x*xx*NSs?M :*>x*xx*sv; x x*: >S>
RATHSKELLER auditions Mon.
night, Feb. 24 at 8:00. Open to all.
Come do your thing or just come
listen. (E-st-80-C)
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. National Parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
SI.OO to Arnold Agency, 206 East
Main, Rexburg, Idaho 83440.
Moneyback guarantee.(E-st-83-P)
WAITRESS OR CURB HOSTESS
convenient for students full or part
time. Above average pay plus tips.
Uniforms furnished, experience not
necessary, will pay while training.
For interview call 378-2481 or come
by Jerrys Restaurant, 1505 NW 13th
St. (E-st-80-P)

rUjCWr/£i£] J
1 J**************************
3lhe Best Suspense Western Since High Noon.{
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NATIONAL GENERAL PICTURES Presents
GREGORY PECK EVA MARIE SAINT;
fcfes* TECHNICOLOR- THE STALKING MOON
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| DAYS! ]
{ The Fixer."Oased on the Pulitzer Prize- $
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nxer ImR ''ugQesied (or £
* A I D L Il MATURE audiences J
* Staffing /vein DdtCS (parental discretion odv.sed J
{Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman,
San Holm, David Warner, Carol White i
******** *MMMMMMMMMMHMMFÂ¥*********S

HELP WANTED
,v:v.v.v.v.w.v.w.w.*- ## #
Savages Camp Mountain Lake,
Hendersonville, N.C. Boys and girls
6-16: for counselors job, call
378-0285 any evening; interviews
Sunday, February 16, 1-4 p.m. at
University Inn (E-st-80-P)
AUTOS
59 MG A 1500 good cond. must sell,
going into service, S4OO. Call
378-0286 or 372-3572. (G-st-81-p)
Mustang 65, low mileage, excellent
condition, state inspected. Must see
and drive to appreciate. $995, 26 SW
24 St., 376-7456 after 5. (G-3t-82-p)
62 Ply. 6 cyl, radio & heater, 4 good
ww tires. A little body work & a seat
cover would make it a great car
runs well. S2OO. 376-9941.
(G-3t-82-p)
Porsche, 1963. Super red-black
interior, air conditioning, AM-FM
radio, Pirelli radials. $2900.
376-0554. (G-st-80-P)
Volkswagen 1965 deluxe sedan beige,
$795. Phone 378-9081. (G-st-79-p)
GAINESVILLE
1400 HAWTHORNE ROAD-ROUTE 20
The Undergraduates
the Split |

double your pleasure
ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW
Do your own thing
Bring your instrument and
Swing Along with [')/'')(]D| cc
BOBBY GRIFFIN 0 7th. P
of one during
cocktail hours
4-7 PM
Hot & Cold
jHHHjf 'JJ 1 .1 | Hors doeuvres
SI '*'/ from our salad bar
v ,7
\ f, // /
"v
'\; v !.; /
rw University Inn motel
V Everythin# Comfort Desires
X
/ \
/ If US ROUTE 441 SOUTH
f \ GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
Phone FRanklin 2-6333
Night Club & Lounge

MftVifhTSlm¥¥
I VI W. Univtrtiiy Av.| ¥
* STARTS FRIDAY £
£ FEB. 21
J I'AK \>1()l M 1*1(11 KKS ~r,
\ Hill HI M
Â¥ lh<
£ Franco £
£ Zeffirelli
l*roliirtion of
iomeo s
*V I I r 111 rI !.
Jovp story....
* TECHNICOLOR J
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t__PggjgwjLgf^vW"~~l
ij a \f I J'Tl
i i w. Utbfttibf 4. i
+ Paxton Quigleys crime
was passion. ..and his $
- punishment fits exactly^
-W' Hes the exhausted
captive
*
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1-1 py iN >Vette MiMiJx {
>CThE CWRiSiBPHEEjoNES {
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My>l!f|lKM^¥¥¥¥
Uiuvtrsiiy A*^|
* One Day Only
J Tues. Feb. 18 J
} 2:00 and 8:30
*
4 no passes 4
+ JL.
* The film reveals more
* than just the ordinary 4
* Tourist Fare, magni-
4 tying enduring values as J
* reflected in the heir- 4
* looms of people whose
4 heritage transcends all J
)> politics. To better know 4
* and evaluate Eastern
4 Europe, this picture is a J
* visual experience that no 4.
* one should miss.
->
ANDRE tin la VARRE S
J GRAND TOUR of
5 fISTRN j
3 UROP 15
Beyond the- IRON CURTAIN
f
tour guide on stagtin ptksln J
MM.iLM.MX*****



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| PERSONAL
j. i *)
Time is running out to reserve your
seat for EUROPE this summer. $315
lO weeks. NY London NY or go
for credit. 392-1655 or 310
Union.(J-st-82-C)
Mikey U.: Happy Anniversary and
Happy Valentines Day. I Love You!!
Kisses and Squeezes, N. (J-lt-83-P)
Pumpkin: Its Valentines Day & our
anniversary too (almost). I've been so
happy thanks to YOU! Happy
Valentines Day amliyf M C
(J-lt-83-P)
SNUGGLEPUSS one groovy year
together, disregarding rabbit, wench,
sweet thing, and bucky beaver. May
their offspring love forever.
(J-lt-83-P)
A mi amor Carmen en nuestro dia.
Pensando en mi linda Gorda y
rogando pasar pronto un 14 juntos.
Tu novio que te adora, Carlos.
(j-lt-83-P)
Canaee, you see I have this desire
playing hopskotch with a bannister
of sunlight and slowly blossoming,
love my valentine, your green prune.
(J-H-83-P)
My mark is grade A. HAPPY
VALENTINES DAY! I Love You.
Your 3rd year KLUTZ.(J-H-83-P)
Cheryl We both want to wish yo
Happy Valentines Day. Sorry we
can't be with you today, but will
tomorrow. Love, Kitty and
Me.(J-lt-83-P)
Polluted: I love you. What more
can I say? Happy Valentines Day,
1969! Hoping for many more.
Contentedly Your Old Grey
Mare.(J-lt-83-P)
Dearest Mike Thanks for the
wildest happiest 2 yrs of my life.
Even the bad times were good. I love
you lots & lots & more & more. Your
Patty. (J-lt-83-P)
Dearest John This is the happiest
Valentines Day of my life. I love you
very much. Lots of love Alexander
MA.(J-lt-83-P)
Frankly, youre the sweetest
honeydew in the world! Happy
Valentines Day. I love you, your D.r.
(J-lt-83-P)
Happy Valentines Day to the worlds
greatest wife. I love you Shirley.
Your loving husband Larry.
(J-lt-83-P)
Happy Valentines Day Pi Kapps
You've already captured our hearts
Love, your little sisters. (J-H-83-P)
Dearest Marys, Cecilia and Alice,
Anne, Happy Cyn, Krissy and Creep.
Little arrows on Valentines Day to
the 5:30 for dinner bunch. Love and
all, Happy Schef. (J-lt-83-P)
The Friday Afternoon for the
single university crowd over 21 will
meet this & every Friday from 5-7:30
at the Lamplighter. Private rooms,
pleasant atmosphere. Drinks 45c,
ladies 2Uc. Come early & bring your
friends. Friday's a great day to have
fun and drink away midterm worries.
(J-2t-77-p)
JEW prosecuted in The Fixer Arab
killings, Iraquian hangings! We
cannot watch any longer. Our
Conscience objects. If yours does
PLEASE join us at the Plaza of
Amer. Sun, Feb. 16 at 2 p.m. You're
needed! For further info call
392-9865. (J-3t-81-p)
Aunt Jemima invites one and all to
Broward's pancake breakfast, on
Sunday, Feb. 16, from 10:00 til 2:00
in the Rec Room. All you can eat for
50c! Proceeds go to Gator Loan
Fund. (J-3t-81-p)

1
mu IBB!!
fits* {g jj

Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

s%iS?XvX<*X X^X*X*X*XXX*X:.w.v,v.v.v
I PERSONAL I
David D. Will be in Gainesville
weekend of the 21st. Could we get
together? Gayle Maine.
Num, Happy Valentines Day. If you
want to continue a good thing, meet
me tonight under Century Tower, Ist
shift (7 pm) to decide the fate of our
relationship. T.T. (J-lt-83-P)
Like doughnuts? Ski-hopeful girls
will deliver to door Sat. or Sun Place
order 378-3682. (J-lt-83-P)
Cathy four, years down, one to go,
1 hope it don't go too slow lilv'
(J-lt-83-P)
Jennings Hall inv tes everyone on
campus to a dance featuring the
Nation Pocking Shadows. Feb. 14 9
pm 1 am. Free. Jennings Rec
Room. (J-3t-81-p)
A free university in a Democratic
nation. SSOC needs dorm and
off-campus housing contacts for
campus canvassing on issues that
effect your life. Write SSOC, Box
13636, Univ. Sta. or call 376-5044.
(J-st-81-P)
Cream colored male short haired
puppy with flea collar lost Monday
near the Krystal. Shall the circle be
unbroken? E Pluribus Unim.
378-1131. (L-3t-82-p)
Lost: SH-133 notebook & Botany
Lab manual. Appreciate return if
found. Call 378-7562. Reward.
(L-2t-82-p)
LOST & FOUND l
Have you found her? A small, dark
grey striped horny female cat is
missing in Village Park area. Reward.
Call 378-9088. (L-2t-81-p)
Lost: motorola Pageboy paging
beeper in University handball courts.
Reward. 376-7655. (L-st-82-p)
SERVICES
:v:*x.:.%snyxwo:*x*x.nv.vx*x*x*x*x.x.v.;y
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
mpuesto sobre ingresos lncome
tax Llame 376-8605 por la manana
y despues de las 5 pm sabado todo el
dia. Se Habla Espanol. (M-7t-78-p)
VOLKSWAGEN SPEC ALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
iMMfIMi thru sat.
JtHlfc 49:2250-6:sS 49:2250-6:sSmm
mm 49:2250-6:sSmm
SUNDAY 3.57.9
ORSON WELLES
"MacBETH

Page 11

SERVICES
-^V.XX'X'X'X^X'NYXS'X'X'X'NV-v-VX'XYXv!
Need work on your car? Call Bill,
4EG, 12 years experience. Call after
6 pm, 372-4921 or 378-9124.
(M-3t-81 -p)
Lonely? Head needs help? Let om
help you as its helped millions, om
cares, om will help you. Low rates.
Call 372-5457 or 372-1360.
(M-st-79-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)

r
FEATURE AT. |
IMS] I 1:30 3:30 5:30
7:30 9:30
i -l restricted m
I D I Persons Under 16 Not f iff > V
Wykjg/
Marlon Brando Richard Burton James Cobum John Huston^j^Sj||j^
Walter Matthau Ringo Starr introducing Ewa Aulinas
i I
StoUt Today
IN W 13th St 23rd RD / C ] |fl
Telephone 378 2434 I|R
I "A REALLY BEAUTIFUL MOVIE!
"YES, BELLE DE JOUR' IS SENSATIONAL, I
it does -let's be honest about this-
' BRILLIANT! Luis Bunuel, a master of I
"Catherine Denueve-she just might be the
world's most beautiful woman!" H
alued artisis
presents
1 \ CATHERINE DENEUVE
ROBERT and RAYMOND HAKIM present CATHERINE OENEUVE JEAN SOREL MICHEL PICCOII in a film by LUIS BUNUEL
BELLE de JOUR based on the novel by JOSEPH KESSEL of the French Academy Screenplay LUIS BUNUEL and JEAN JEANCLAUOE
CLAUOE JEANCLAUOE CARRIERE with GENEVIEVE PAGE PIERRE CLEMENTI FRANCISCO RABAL FRANCOISE FABIAN MACH A MERIL MARIA LATOUR
MUNI and GEORGES MARCHAL and FRANCIS BLANCHE EASTMAN COLOR A ROBERT and RAYMOND HAKIM Production
Released by ALLIED ARTISTS | suggested for mature audiences^^^
K ir\TC STUDFNT PRICES WILL PREVAIL WINNER BEST PICTURE
NOTE. FOR THIS ENGAGEMENT 1 VEN|CE F|LM FESTj FESTj'
' FESTj' i ,

SUBURBIA*
,_DRIVE IN THEATRE i

You're Captain of
Detectives
Washington, D.C.
and you don't I
like criminals
slipping through
loopholes in the I
law.

COLUMBIA PICTURCS Presents
GEORGE PEPPARD
JEAN SEBERG
RICHARD KILEY
UCHWCOIO*' C

7:00
10:40

BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
EXCLUSIVE FIRST RUN

I'

Your wife has been
murdered and you're
the suspect. Now,
what loopholes can
you find?

i
ALSO AT 9:0(A
"FRANKENSTEIN
CREATED
WOMAN"
STARRING PETER CUSHINC



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14, 1969

and
. 1 1 J

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

STUDENTS INTERESTED
IN LIVING ABROAD: Students
are invited to meet with Charles
Hornsby of the Experiment in
international Living Monday,
Feb. 17, Room 357, Reitz
Union, 7 p.m. Mr. Hornsby will
present information to students
interested in international living
abroad for the summer 1969 or
an academic semester or the
Graduate Year International
Career Training Program. His is a
non-profit organization in the
field of international education.
OPEN HOUSE: An open
house will be held in the
Physical Therapy Department of
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
Tuesday, Feb. 18, at 7:30-9:30
p.m. Faculty and students are
invited.
STUDENTS WANTED: Students
interested in working full-time for
the Florida State Parks from early
June through Labor Day, please
contact Student Employment, Room
23, Tigert Hall, for further details.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
CELEBRATION: A festival of
the Arts is now accepting
interview applications from all
students interested in the
program. Students wishing to
participate in this festival,
encompassing all the arts
including music, drama, the
dance and the visual arts, should
complete applications at once.
Such applications are available at
the Student Activities Desk,
Reitz Union; the Office of the
Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts;
Room 129 Tigert Hall, and in
the dean's offices in the other
colleges. CELEBRATION needs
students who want to be part of
the biggest artistic production in
UF history. CELEBRATION
will be presented throughout the
Spring Quarter of 1970.
Students completing
CELEBRATION applications
will be contacted by telephone
shortly.
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHERS EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of College
classification, are required to satisfy
the speech screening requirement
before being admitted into the
Advanced Professional Sequence or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and
elementary block. English and speech
majors do not take the test, as SCH
201 is required in all of their
programs. Appointments now are
being made in Room 124 Norman
Hall.

fob your next car 10an... m
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GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION fit A I
ssh Avenue at the_^gier_^M2A I _Street_^^_Jjoury£ooajn : _^_3^3opji> !L Monday through Friday

GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: The Council will meet
Thursday, Feb. 20, at 1:30 p.m. in
235 Tigert Hall.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAM: The exam in French,
German, Russian and Spanish will be
held Saturday, Feb. 15, at 9:45 a.m.,
in 207 Leigh Hall.
PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CEH 132 PROGRESS TEST:
T uesday, Feb. 18, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A) report to Floyd 104 or
106; (B) to Little 101 or 109;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little
113, 121,125; (F) to Little 201,
203, 205, or 207; (G) to Little
213, 215, 217 or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
235, 239; (l-L) to Matherly 2,3,
4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
14 or 16; (M) to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 111, 113, 115, 116,
117, 118 or 119; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
(P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109; (R)
to Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V)
to Anderson 2,4, 5, 7,18 or 20;
(W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CEH 133 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Peabody 1,
2,4, 7, 10 or 11; (M-Z) to
Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or
209.
CPS 122 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 20, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A) report to Floyd 104 or
106; (B) to Little 101 or 109;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little
113, 121, or 125; (F) to Little
201, 203, 205 or 207; (G) to
Little 213, 215, 217 or 219; (H)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; (l-L)
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110,
112 or 115; (P-Q) to Floyd 108
or 109; (R) to Flint 101, 102,
110 or 112; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Anderson
2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.

BLUE BULLETIN

PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
FE8.14: FORD MOTOR
CO. ME, EE, ChE, IE, MetE,
Chem, Eng. Mech. TAMPA
ELECTRIC CO. EE, ME,
ChE. THE COCA-COLA
CO. Mkt, Acctg, Engr. ARMY
& AIR FORCE EXCHANGE
SERVICEBus. Ad., Engi,
Mkt, Acctg, Personnel, Trans,
Food Mgt. AV C O
CORP.-MISSILE SYSTEMS
DIVISION Engi, Sci.
AMERICAN HOSPITAL
SUPPLY CORP. all majors
(sales requires science
background). BUREAU OF THE
CENSUSEcon, Geo, Math,
Lib. Arts, Psy, Soc. Sci.
BECHTEL CORP.CE, ChE,
EE, ME. BUCKEYE
CELLULOSE CO.usually
interviews for ChE, ME, IE.
SEABOARD COAST LINE RR
CO. usually interviews for
non -1 ec h n ica I majors.
CHEVRON CHEMICAL
CO.-ORTHO DlVlSlONus DlVlSlONusually
ually DlVlSlONusually interviews for technical
majors. CROWN ZELLERBACH
CORP.usually interviews for
technical majors. HERCULES,
INC. usually interviews for
technical majors.
FEB. 17: LEHIGH
PORTLAND CEMENT
CO. all majors for sales, ChE
for Plant Management. DEPT.
OF THE ARMY-CORPS OF
ENGINEERS CE, EE, ME,
Eng. Sci. U.S. PATENT
OFFICE all engineering,
physics or chemistry.
SOUTHERN RAILWAY
SYSTEMIE, ME, CE, EE.
GENERAL TIRE 8e RUBBER
CO. ChE, ME' EE, IE, Chem,
Acctg. JOHN HANCOCK
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE
CO. Mgt. Training Program,
Acct, Dev, Sales & Sales Mgt,
Mgt. Acctgs, Elec. Data Proc,
General Agency Mkt, Field
Agency Mgt, Summer Acturial
Training Program. WATSON &
CO. Usually interviews
technical majors.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

FEB. 17-18: SHELL
CO. Engr, Sci. ARTHUR
ANDERSEN & CO. Acctg.
LTV AEROSPACE
CORP. AE, CE, EE, ME, Eng.
Sci.
Friday, February 14, 1969
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 p.m.
Love-In, Plaza of the Americas,
1:00 p.m.
Movie, "New Cinema I", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Tolbert Area Movie, "Advice
and Consent", South Hall
Movie Room, 7:00, 9:00 &
12:00 p.m.
Panhellenic Council Ball, Union
Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
; L a
Saturday, February 15
Movie, "New Cinema I", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Tau Epsilon Phi Banquet and
Dance, Union Ballroom, 7:00
p.m.
Tolbert Area Movie, "The
Killers", South Hall Movie
Room, 7:00, 9:00 & 11:00
p.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla., vs.
Kentucky, Florida Gym, 7:45
p.m.
Brazilian-Portuguese Club,
Brazilian Carnival Dance,
Faculty Club, Newberry Rd,
9:00 p.m.
Sunday, February 16
Hillel Lox and Bagel Brunch,
Hillel Foundation, 11:00 a.m.
Hillel Lecture, Hillel
Foundation, Speaker: Dr.
Roy E. Lambert, 12:00 noon.
Music Dept., University
Symphony Orchestra,
University Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Movie, "New Cinema I", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.

Monday, February 17
Movie, "New Cinema I", Union
Aud., 6:00 & 8:30 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 245 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
INT'L Council Banquet, Baptist
Student Center, 7:30 p.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Tennessee, Florida Gym,
7:45 p.m.
Religion in Life, Margaret Rigg,
Film & Lecture, "Images of
Man", Walker Aud., 8:00
p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club, 525
E & I Bldg., 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, February 18
INT'L Week Displays, B, 233
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 2:45 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi, 355 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Music Dept., Music for Flutes,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
' $
UNION BOX OFFICE- Tickets
are now on sale for:
AUDUBON FILM SERIES,
General Public, Faculty &
Staff, $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $.75, Children,
$.50. UNIVERSITY FILM
SERIES, 10 films: General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$5.00, Univ. of Fla. Students,
$2.50, Univ. of Fla. Students,
5 films, $1.50. NEW
CINEMA I, $.75 per person.
FLORIDA PLAYERS,
"AFTER THE RAIN", Univ.
of Fla. Students, $.25; High
School Students, $.75;
Faculty, Staff & General
Public, $1.50.



yHC WILL ADDRESS STATEWIDE GROUP HERE
Operation Concern Meets

Operation Student Concern
will hold its first statewide
conference Firday and Saturday
on the UE campus.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell is scheduled to
welcome the representatives
from 56 state universities and
junior colleges.
Governor Claude Kirk will
address the group during the
conference. Kirk has taken
special interest in the
Operation Student Concern
program and recently recruited
volunteers for the Student
Concern project at Edward
Walters College, Jacksonville.
The UF asked to hold this
conference and we are not trying
to run the student programs or
to take the credit for their
success from them, Jim Bax,
director of the states office of
Economic Opportunity in
Tallahassee, said.
We help them when we are
needed and we act as a catalyst
for student involvement in such
a program, Bax said.

Upper Division
Info Offered
A program designed to aquaint students with upper division schools
will begin next week under the sponsorship of Gamma Beta Phi
honorary service society.
President Richard Spool said Introduction to Upper Division" is
designed primarily to aid freshmen and sophomores in making a
decision as to which upper division school to enter.
In this series of programs, deans of the 14 colleges of the UF,
department heads within each college, and representatives from the
placement office will meet and answer questions from students.
On February 18 the first program will concern the College of
Business Administration. Following a short talk and general questions
in the Reitz Union, the program will break down into smaller rooms
where students can learn more about the various departments.
The placement office representative will be available to tell
students the career possibilities from a degree in the different
departments.
Spool said the programs would be open to all students including
junior and seniors who are thinking of changing majors. It is hoped
that all 14 schools will be covered in programs through the end of this
quarter and all of the next.
The Gamma Beta Phi Society received help on the project from
Donald D. Mott, assistant dean of men and student affairs.
Mott is familiar with the content of fall freshman orientation
programs, and their failure to give the student an adequate idea of
upper division school led to the series Introduction to Upper
Division.

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1212 N. MAIN STREET
(4 MINUTES FROM CAMPUS)

m
r Blk^'.''
JIM BAX
.. .heads state OEO
Operation Student Concern
has been operating officially
under the sponsorship of Kirks
office since June.
Project Samson, theUF
student volunteer program has
been working with Operation
Student Concern since June.
The purpose of this meeting
will be an exchange of ideas, said
Bax.

The UF is centrally located
and because of Project Samsons
success, this is a good place to
hold the conference, he said.
Project Samson will have its
volunteers working this weekend
to show visiting representatives
the methods of planning and
orgainzing such a program.
Wed like to see programs
like Samson extended to other
areas, John Matthews, special
projects chairman for Samson,
said.
The idea behind Operation
Student Concern is student
involvement, and Samson has
shown that there is success in
student involvement, Bax said.
The idea of student
involvement is a great
opportunity to build bridges
between the community and the
university, Matthews said.
It helps to heal the divisions
within society and provides a
two-way learning program where
the person being helped can
develop a friendship with
someone of a different
background and vice-versa. The
person being helped has as much
to offer to the volunteer as the
volunteer has to offer him,
Matthews said.
During the conference we
intend to try to infuse our spirit
of helping others into the
visiting representatives who we
OtAMOMO MtftCHAKX* 09 >MIM
JORDONS
GAINESVILIi Center
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM-9:00 PM Mon-Fr.

hope will take these ideas back
to their schools and develop
their own Samson type projects,
Matthews said.
Panel discussions will include
discussions on how to start such
a program, how to obtain
financial aid, and subjects like
tutoring and recreational
programs.

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Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Saturday

Robert Gilder of the Tampa
NAACP and Charles Clark of the
Vista program will outline
support which is available for
the program from public and
private groups.
$70,000 has been alloted by
the state for the next 12 months
to the Operation Student
Concern program, Bax said.

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14, 1969

UF-KENTUCKY PLAY SATURDAY
Cats Seek Rupps 800

r
ATLANTA The 4th ranked
Kentucky Wildcats are expected
to eliminate every other team
execpt Tennessee from
contention for the Southeastern
Conference basketball title by
this coming Monday
night even with three weeks of
league play left.
The UF cagers will host the
Wildcats Saturday afternoon at
three in the Southeastern
Conference regional game of the
week.
UF is off an impressive
victory over the LSU Tigers, and
they have beat the Cats both
Vi.
6*l
IH JH
TOM KENNEDY
THE BUGALOO?
Pete Maravich's 50-point
output Wednesday night broke
the Florida Gym record for a
Southeastern Conference game.
Maravich topped the old mark
of 44 points set by Gator Dick
Tomlinson against Tampa in
1964.
Ag Bowling
Team Standings:
Fruit Crops 11-1
Forestry Club 9-3
Soils Faculty 7-5
Ornamental Horticulture 7-5
Soils Graduates 6-6
Food Science 6-6
Agronomy 6-6
Meats 5-7
Forestry Faculty 5-7
Animal Science 5-7
Plant Pathology 4-8
Agricultural Economics 1-11
Individual High Game &.
Series: Jim Standish, Animal
Science: 168-164-214 for 546.
Team High Game and Series:
Fruit Crops: 975-1046-944 for
2965.
Converted Splits: Brooks
Humphrys, Fruit Crops 5-7, Phil
Loggins, Animal Science 3-7-10.

The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sport. Edit.. As ** m
Sports Editor
times they have met previously
on television. Last year UF beat
UK at home 96-78. after losing
in Lexington 99-76.
An added attraction for the
game is that a Wildcat victory
would, according to the SEC, be
officially' No. 800 for Coach
Adolph Rupp in his 38 2/3 years
as Kentucky head coach.
Baby Gators,
Cats Clash
UFs Baby Gator seek revenge
Saturday afternoon at 12:45
when they play the Freshmen
Wildcats of Kentucky.
Earlier in the season the Baby
Gators were beaten badly by
Kentucky in Lexington.
UFs Frosh downed Lake City
Junion College 79-65 Wednesday
night at Florida Gym.
The hot Baby Gators, now
10-7 on the season, took off to a
40-27 halftime lead.
Gary Waddell led UF with 19
points and eight rebounds. Dan
Boe added 16 points and led the
team in rebounds with 14. Hal
Kelley has 14 points.
Jessie Hillman paced Lake
City with 16 points.

CELEBRATEI
I With us, Friday after 400 P.M. at our Ist I
I Anniversary at 6HSZETS I
I SPECIALS I
I Beer: 15$ Stein I
fcSHSEEnSS* Pitcher SI.OO
I 3510 SW 13th Street PIZZOS: 25( off small I
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Rupp doesnt agree. He,
counting five wins in a
tournament in Israel in 1966.
says his next win will be No.
805. The SEC says those five
wins were exhibitions and dont
count.
The Wildcats, enroute to their
24th SEC crown in 37 years,
should, barring upset by the
Gators, be at least six games
ahead of whoever is in third
after Mondays action, with only
five games to go.
That will leave it squarely up
to the defensive-minded Vols,
now on a treadmill two games
behind the streaking Wildcats, to
try to head oft Kentucky and
the Vols cant do it alone.
Tennessee, which lost to
Kentucky 69-66 at Knoxville
last month, doesnt meet the
Wildcats again until the final
game of the season March 8 and
by then it probably will be too
late.
Tennessee, which lowered its
defensive yield to 57.1 points
per game by holding Ole Miss to
45 points last Monday, will be at
Georgia Saturday night. Monday
night, the Wildcats and the Vols
switch foes.
Kentucky, averaging 91.9
points per game to lead the SEC
in pffense as well, is 11-0 in
league play and 17-2 over-all.
Tennessee is 9-2 and 14-3.
Bighorns
The bighorn sheep is at home
in ledges, cliffs and steep slopes
of the Rocky Mountain west.
Dick Hcihej
Jeweler/
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Williams Sets Record,
Gators Splash Tide

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UF swimmer Bruce Williams
set a new pool record at Florida
pool Thursday to lead the
Gators past Alabama, 72-41.
Williams, who already has to
top times in the nation in the
200 yard free-style, swam a
1:45.1 to break the old pool
mark set by Mark McKee 1:46.1
in 1968.
The Gators won 10 of 13
events. The Tide won in the 400

NT
NICK ARROYO
WEVE GOT RHYTHM
From the left Guy McTheny, Phyliss Singer, Pam Pemberton, Ann
Clark and Donna Betts limber up for the Gator Olympic Field Day
Saturday, Feb. 22. The event is to raise funds to send Johnnie Lee
Samuels to the Deaf Olympics in Yugoslavia.

Tech Gets Star
ATLANTA (UPI) Tim
Macy, a 6-foot-2, 215-pound
full-back from Sandy Springs
High School who was one of the
most widely sought after
running backs in Georgia,
Thursday signed a grant-in-aid
with Georgia Tech.
Tech coach Bud Carson signed
Macy personally and said hes a
double blue chipper in a year in
which weve gotten an entire
crop of blue chippers.
Macy, who made all of the
all-star teams, gained over 1,100
yards rushing in each of his last
three seasons at Sandy Springs.
The former state heavyweight
wrestling champ is the 44th high
school senior signed to a Tech
football grant so far this winter.

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
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(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
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1515 N. Main St. Phone 376-7581
L -

yard free-style, the 200 yard
breast-stroke and the 200 yard
butterfly-stroke.
UF is now 6-1 in meet
competition this season. The
Gators swim again Saturday at 1
p.m. against East Carolina..
400 Medley: Florida (Strate. Bill:
Perkins, Jim; Russo. Barry;
McPherson, ,Andy) 3:39.1
2.Alabama (Hirten, Bruce; Pursley,
Dennis; Wright, Ralph: Wada,
Jeff) 3:45.6.
10 0 0 free: McKee.
Mark(F) 10:19.4 2. French,
Leo(A) 10:50.9 3.Appleget,
Bob(F) 10:52.5.

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20 0 Free: Williams,
Bruce(F) 1:4 5.1 2.Hough,
Hank(F) 1:49.0 3.LaMontagne,
Jim(A) 1:51.0.
50 Free: Harriston,
Slevc(l) 2 2.4 2.J ono s
Louis(A) 22.6 3.Voves,
Skip(F) 22.9.
200 Individual Medley: Murphy,
Jamie(l) 2:02.6 2. Wade.
Jeff( A ) 2:0 3.7 3. W r ight.
Ralph(A) 2:04.0.
1 Meter Dive: Link,
Bob(l') 2 4 4.70 2. Hoffman,
Cilenn(F) 231.10 3.Noonan.
Chas(A) 2 13.05.
200 Butterfly: La Montague,
Jim (A ) 2:0 5.0 2.K0 ne,
Dennis(A) 2:06.6 3.Ahrons,
Rich(F) 2:09.5.
10 0 Free: Williams,
Bruce(F) :4 8.3 2 Wad e
Jeff(A) :5 0.2 3. Peek,
Tom(F) :5 1.3.
200 Back: Strate, Bill(F) 2:05.3
2.Me Ph erson An d y(F) 2 :08.3
3.W'right, Ralph(A) 2:10.8.
500 Free: Page, Bruce(F) 5:04.8
2;Fre nc h Leo(A) 5:13.0
3.Appleget, Bob 5:18.0.
200 Breast: Pursley,
Dennis(A) 2:17.5 2.McKee,
Mark (I ) 2:17.8 3. Dems ki,
David(A) 2:22.5.
3 Meter Dive: Link,
Bob (T) 2 6 0.10 2.Smi th,
Ray(F) 2 19.05 3. Noon an,
Chas(A) 2 16.55.
400 Free: Alabama (LaMontague;
Kinney; Monillion; Jonos) 3:36.5.
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Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14, 1969

The Florida Alligator
DEAR SIR:
Once more I have been thoroughly fascinated by the utter
foolishness of one of Bill Dunns latest articles: P.E. Policy
Discrimenatory.
You argue against athletes having P.E. waivered during the season of
competition. The present P.E. program is, as I think most people
would agree, somewhat antiquated, and on this point I agree with
you. However, your comparison between the intramural program and
intercollegate athletics is one of the most ridiculous analogies Ive ever
had the misfortune to read. To use your term truly weak.
How can you compare the demands upon athletes (who during the
season devote a minimum of three hours a day to their particular
sport) and intramural participants. Dont forget, Mr. Dunn, that
intercollegate athletics is a business which demands much more
physical as well as mental stress than intramurals do. The two are
hardly comparable.
Would not the present P.E. program be even worse than it already is
if, say the football team, was required to attend P.E. to play a
rigorous- game of vollyball after just completing two hours of
scrimmage!
I am not aware, as you state, that because of this so-called
discrimematory policy the image of the athlete is hurt. You state, that
you are against such a policy when you cant enjoy such goodies to.
Most mature college students realize that privileges are afforded to
those individuals who through personal responsibilities and extra
initiative reach a high level of accomplishments.
What gives you the right to think that you necessarily deserve all
the rights and privilages afforded to those who through long and hard
work reach a pinnacle of success higher than most be it in athletics
or not? WAYNE PHILLIPS, 2UC
(Editors Note: There was no argument mentioned against the P.E.
Privilege granted athletes. The column argued only that the same
waiviers be given other students who likewise, on a relative strength
scale exert themselves physically. 8.D.)
MR. EDITOR:
With all due respect to Bill Dunns position on the Alligator Sports
staff he really, doesnt know what he is talking about when it comes to
athletics.
He sits behind his little typewriter telling us how hard he has it in
PE. And that he deserves the same waiver of PE that UF athletes get.
Mr. Dunn feels that he works as hard as a member of the athletic
teams of this university. Poppycock. (Whatever that is.)
As a one time member of freshmen track I know how hard college
athletes have to work everyday during the off-season not to mention
during the season. And still we only receive one quarter off from PE.
Im sure since Mr. Dunn must play every intramural sport on campus,
he would like to have all three quarters off during the year. And Im
sure he works out everyday during off-season and season.
G. HIUC
(Editors Note: The writer never equivocated the degree of athletic
exertion with that in intra-murals, only perhaps in the relative sense.
The writer furthermore doubts seriously that he would have made the
point had he not himself been a member of the Gator track team. B.
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Sports Medicine Slate Today

The Friday session of the
massive sports medicine
conference being held at the J.
Hillis Miller Health Medical
Center will follow the schedule
listed below:
9 00 Knee and ankle
injuries. Bill Enncking. M.D..
Chief Division of Orthopedic
Surgery, UF.
I 0:30:- Shoulder injuries,
William Allen, M.D.. Assistant
Professor of Orthopedic Surgerv,
UF.
I l :00- -Head and Neck
Injuries Lamar Roberts, M.D..
Chief of Neurosurgery UF.
1:30-- Rehabilitation of the
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I Council of International Organization I
I and Student Government I
I Invite You To Join I
I International I
I Activities I
I Mon. Feb. 17 Banquet (by invitation only)
I Tu6S. Feb. 18 IFC-CIO Dinners for Foreign Students... I
'Romeo & Juliet and 'Foreign Documentaries/ I
I 8:30 P.M. Williamson Hall, Physics Dept. I
I Wed. Feb. 19 Beauty Contest, University Aud. 7:30 P.M. I
I Thur. Feb. 20 Romeo & Julies and 'Foreign Documentsaries, I
6:30 P.M. & 9:30 Medical Center Auditorium
2nd floor
I Fri. Feb. 21 Talent show 8 P.M. I
University Auditorium
I Sat. Feb 22 Reception for Foreign Students at I
the Mr. &Mrs. Charles Lucas Home.
I Dance: 9 P.M.Union Ballroom Band I
I All ALL Activities Free and Open to the Public I

Knee. Fred Allman. M.D.. team
physician. University of Georgia.
2:30 Rehabilitation of the
Ankle. Edward Kissant. M.D.,
team physician. UF.
3:30--Soft Tissue Injuries.
Dale Maxwell. M.D.. team
physician. Florida State
University.
4:30 Demonstration ot
Athletic Taping Techniques. Mr.
Brady Greathouse. Head athletic
trainer. UF.

Climb aboard C
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Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. if)
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Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (f V
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. V/*
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PETE
. .spotlighted last week's card in Cougar
Drags On Sunday
Sunday, Gainesville Dragway presents a full program of stock, super
stock, street and competition elimination.
A new elapsed time (E.T.) format begins Sunday, affording anyone
an equal chance to compete for class trophies.
Each competitor simply passes a safety inspection, makes a few
practice runs and dials his class. Regardless of the type machine,
whether it be an Austin Healey Sprite or 427 Corvette, each entrant
has a fair chance of taking home the purse.
The local Model A restorers club will stage a match race between a
1929 Plymouth Roadster, 1929 and 1930 Model As and 1930
Chevrolet.
Gene Owen of the Gainesville Police Department will be attempting
to break into the 11 second bracket in his Satin Shaker, having
installed a new Bo Laws engine this past week after engine trouble last
weekend.
The Dragway is located three and a half miles north of the
Municipal Airport on SR 225.
No. 17 Dayton Visits FSU

TALLAHASSEE The
University of Dayton, rated 17th
in the latest Associated Press
poll, comes to Tully Gym
Saturday night as Florida State
will be trying to knock off the
third nationally ranked
basketball team this season on
its home court.
Dayton will be the third Ohio
club which has visited Tully
Gym this season and Coach
Hugh Durhams cagers are 0-2.
They dropped a 93-86 decision
to Ohio State and then bowed to
Kent State 76-67.
The Buckeyes are the only
rated club to play in Tully and
go away with their ranking
intact. Southern Claifornia came
to Tallahassee ranked among the
top 20 and was beaten 70-68.
Dayton is one of the quality
teams in the country, said
Durham as his club prepares for
its next to last Tully contest of
the year. They prefer to play a
control game like South
Carolina. We just hope we can
dictate the tempo of the game.
The Seminoles have won six
of their last seven games and
have lost only twice at home this
season to the two Ohio clubs.
Durham will go with the same
lineup hes been using recently
which includes Jan Gies (7.8)
and John Burt (4.8) at forwards,
All-America candidate Dave
Cowens (20.6) at center, along
with Jeff Hogan (13.5) and Skip
Young (15.1) at guards.
Burt and reserve forward
Willie Williams have shown vast
improvement in the last few
outings. Williams has raised his
rebound average to 9.1 and his
scoring to 6.9.
The Flyers 16-4 record (they
played Rice Thursday night in
Houston) speaks for itself. Their
losses were to Davidson (64-63),
Louisville (84-69), Xavier
(59-55) and Western Kentucky
(70-65).

Daytons leading scorer is 6-6
forward Dan Sadlier with an
18.4 average.

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rolets Chevrolets are clamoring for you to buy them now.
Big deal. (You hope.)
Chevrolet offers something even better than hope.
Many popular items are priced less than a year ago.
Such as Powerglide and large VBs. Head restraints
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Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

'. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14, 1969

IjK i lii ill M H K Jr Iw
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ii-ill-|fnnnnnrffn'--nrr'-'n'nr- v WA- .~;v &
ALL-AMERICAN JOHN DARR
.. .the crucial follow through.

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COACH BUSTER BISHOP
. .looks over the pride of the nation

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
Everytime the Gator
cagers take the court one
man is always the last one
on the floor.
That man, All-American
Neal Walk, has so much
personal pride that he is
never satisfied with his
performance, he always
wants to do better.
Many factors enter into Neal
Walks need to achieve.
One of them has nothing to
do with basketball directly.
Neal Walk is a Jew.
Most people dont think of
Jews as having much athletic
prowess, nor are there many
Jews who excell in athletics,
Neal said. So if I can be the
best then Im doing something
for my faith.
The 6-foot-10 center is not
orthodox in his belief, but when
the basketball team huddles
together before a game and is led
in prayer by Kurt Feazel, Neal
steps aside.
I just say a prayer to God in
my own way. I ask him to let me
have a good game and to let the
team win.

PHOTOS BY
BRIAN GOODHEIM

UFS ALL-AMERICAN KEEPS TRYING HARDER
Walk: "I Have A Long Way To Go

them for top honors.
Bflr |B **?
Mr WUL |B[ vJliiteaafcadl
f £ §& sSji|g x B| ; *£* W
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RICHARD SPEARS
.. .watch this one fellas

Neal has had his best
performances against the
strongest competition. In the
nine games he has played against
the Southeastern Conferences
best, Tennessee, Kentucky and
Vanderbilt, he has averaged 19.1
rebounds a game and scored
24.1 points a game. His highest
totals have come against
Kentucky, 29 rebounds and 33
points.
But still he isnt satisfied.
Im not as good as I could
be. I have a long way to go. The
more I improve my leg strength,
then the better I will become on
defense.
Neal doesnt think his shot
will get any better, nor does he
think he has a great shot, just a
decent one for a big man. He
feels his greatest improvement at
UF has been in gaining more
speed and strength over the last
four years.
A man in the limelight as
much as Neal Walk meets with
much criticism, and this
aggravates him when it is from
the uninformed.
There has been a lot said
about the number of rebounds I
am credited with, usually those

NCAA CHAMPS IN ACTION
UFs Golf Champs
Play FSU First
The Gators be gm their regular season play Saturday against the
Seminoles of FSU. The match will be held in Tallahassee.
With every member of the 1968 NCAA Chamions returning, coach
Buster Bishop seems very optimistic on the prospectus of his 1969
squad.
All-Americans Steve Melnyk and John Darr return and hope to lead
the Gators to their second consecutive NCAA title. Wendell Coffee,
John Sale and Richard Spears round out the talented Florida team.
Newcomers David Barnes, Mike Estridge and Andy North give the
Gators plenty of added talent.
Once again Floridas schedule is orte of the finest and most
competitive in the nation. The Gators will participate in the Florida
Intercollegiate, Miami Invitational, Cape Coral Invitational, Houston
All-American, Pikes Peak Invitation, SEC and NCAA.
Through the years, the University of Florida has established itself as
one of the finest golf powers in the nation and reached their highest
point when they captured the NCAA title last season with an all
junior squad. Many golfers have chosen to attend Florida and work
under the guiding hand of Bishop.
Bishop became the head golf coach in 1964. Bishop succeeded the
very successful and popular Conrad Rehling, who became the golf pro
of the University Course.
In four years as golf coach. Bishop has guided the Gator to a 46-6-1
match record. He has produced an NCAA Individual Champion and in
1967 Florida finished 2nd in the country and in 1968 the Gator
captured the NCAA title, a first for any Gator athletic team.
We are going to work very hard this year to stay the number one
collegiate golf team in America. We have every member of last years
championship team returning and plenty of newcomers that will push

who complain dont know the
rules. Basketball is very
complicated; most people dont
know that if you tip the ball
three times thats three rebounds
or if you block a shot and a
teammate recovers it thats a
rebound.
TOM KENNEDY
L_ NEAL WALK
.. .trying harder.

TION

g||||fc I
Hk
DAVID BARNES
.. .frosh golfer

David Miller (who has
criticized Walk for being
credited with too many
rebounds and not really being an
All-American) doesnt know the
game. Im not putting him
down, but youve got to know
many rules before you can judge
others.
Unlike LSU where resentment
against Pete Maravich has hurt
the team, Neals stardom has not
caused dissension in the ranks.
In fact Neal does not consider
himself a big leader, even though
freshmen cagers ask him for
pointers or the varsity elects him
captain.
Im not the type of guy who
is the pacesetter, I mean if I did
something the other guys
wouldnt run out and do it too.
Then there is the tall side of
Neal Walk.
One thing is that the Armed
Forces wont draft you if you
are over 6-8, and you save dimes
on pay toilets by being able to
reach over the stall doors.
Id rather be tall than short,
that way people have to look up
to me. Sure Ive got to bend a

It will be both a challenge to me and the boys to repeat NCAA
Champs. Most ol the top schools in the country will also have top
teams this year and the NCAA should be one of the most exciting
ever, Bishop said.
leb. 2 2 St. Leo, Rollins, Soutli Florida, Tampa; March I Florida
Intercollegiate, Tampa; March 15-Florida State, C.ainesville: March
26-29 Miami invitational; April 2-sCape Coral Invitational; April
12 Tennessee, C.ainesville; April 16-19-Houston All-American, Houston,
Texas; April 26-Ceorgia, Athens; May 1-3-SKC, Athens; May 8-10-Pikes Peak
Invitational Air Force Academy; June 23-28-NCAA. Broadmoor, Colorado
Springs.

JOHN SALE
.. .veteran golfer

.. .keeps his eye on the ball.

A. j** ;
ANDY NORTH
. .frosh golfer

WENDELL COFFEE
...veteran golfer

little on dates but that isnt any
problem, girls can always stand
on their toes.
Being the big man in size and
stature causes the crowds to go
after you sometimes.
If the fans start to razz me
then I like to make that good
play, I think it is the sign of a
good athlete.
Or if a guy makes a good
play on me thats OK. But if I
miss a shot or turn the ball or
dont get the rebound, thats
what I hate to have happen.
A stint in the pros is probably
next in line for Neal Walk and he
is looking forward to eight to 10
years of it. The senior
advertising major likes to think
about the future when making
plans for today
Ive tried to make myself a
well-rounded individual. I play
most sports, listen to music to
relax and Ive been learning
photography lately.
The big star gets a lot of
bumps and bruises on the court.
But like everything else he takes
them, without a word, and just
tries to do better.



THE GUN LAP

Gators Prancing By Cardboard Vols

The UF track team travels to
Knoxville, Tenn. to face the
Tennessee Volunteers and the
Georgia Tech Yellowjackets in a
triangular indoor track meet
Friday.
The Volunteers, who have
dominated Southeastern
Conference track indoors and
outdoors for the past five years
will rate as slight favorites but
better-than average strength in
the field and distance events has
given Coach Carnes men a
better than average chance to
upset their arch-rivals.
The entire varsity crew will be
making the trip and Carnes
strategy is geared around just
how well Georgia Tech shows.
Headed by the present No. 1
collegiate high jumper, Ron
Jourdan, the Gators will go into
the meet with the most
substantial indoor experience
behind them than ever before.
UF thinclads have added a
new gimmick to their
pre-Tennessee soul music
workouts. Posted around the
asphalt track are cardboard
figures wearing orange and white
Tennessee uniforms. Shot putter
John Morton explains, they are
to remind everyone while they
are running that Tennessee will
be ready for us and we need to
be especially mindful of that
during this last week.
* *
UF track club distance ace
Jack Bacheler has been ranked
third in the nation in the 5000
meters and sixth in the 10,000
meters by Track and Field News.
The ranking is on the basis of
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.. .miler
consistency, best times, and
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currently has the fastest
American three mile time of the
season at 13:30. His 13:45 at

REITZ UNION THEATRE XI
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AT THE SELLOUT PREMIERE AT LINCOLN CENTER S PHILHARMONIC HALL THE CRITICS SAID:
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Judith Crist, world journal tribune cue magazine cbs boston globe
PROGRAM NO. 1
February 13, 14,15,16
Enter Hamlet Fred Mogubgub, U.S.A. q .k nuu Hailw R>fin 7. on 11-fMI
Renaissance Walerian Borowczyk, Poland 4 Shows daily. b.OO, 7.30, 11.00
Les Mistons 67 Francois Truffaut France Advance tickets available
Running, Jumping, and Standing Still Film Richard Lester, England
Two Castles Bruno Bozzetto, Italy at
The Fat fend the Lean Roman Polanski, Poland Reitz Union Box Officp
Corrida Interdite Denys Colomb de Daunant, France ei z umon DOX UTTIce
Allures Jordan Belson, U.S.A. 75c admission t-
La Jetee Chris Marker, France
These motion pictures have collectively won almost every major short film award in the world, including:
Mannhlim Festival Golden Ducat; Venice Film Festival Silver Lion of St. Mark; F.1.P.R.E.5.C.1. (International Film Critics' Association) lst Prize;
Oberhausen Festival of the Short Film First Prize; Prix Simon Debreuilh (Mannheim Best Short Film of the Years Festivals; Mar del Plata; Bilbao;
Leipzig Festivals; San Francisco Film Festival Golden Gate Award; International Experimental Film Competition; International Federation of Cine Clubs }
Prize; Tours Festival of the Short Film Special Jury Prize; London Film Festival Selection; New York Film Festival Selection; Cannes Film Festival
Official French Entry; Official Belgian Entry; Annecy Festival of the Animated Film Special Jury Prize; Bergamo Festival of Films on Art Diploma,- Trieste
Festival- of Science Fiction Films Grand Prize; Prix JEAN VIGO French Film Critics' Award; Cracow Festival of the Short Film; Milan Ist Prize of
International Technical Industry of the Cinema; Melbourne Film Festival Ist Prize.

the Washington D.C. invitational
recently is the second best
indoor time, next to El Pasos
Kerry Pearces 13:42.
* *
Jack Nason, freshman
distance runner who is the
fastest miler and two miler ever
produced in Florida will face his
First real test of the season in the
two mile run against Tennessee.
Nason was fifth in the SEC
cross-country finals and recently
won the two mile event against
Ohio State with a time of 9:28.
Several Tennessee runners have
run considerably better than
that, including Owen Self, who
was the SEC cross country
champ.
* *
Giodando Jourdan
continues to simply dominate
high jumping in the United
States this season. Jourdan has
jumped over seven feet in every
meet but one so far. Only one
other leaper, veteran John
Rambo, has jumped seven. But
he has done it only twice. When
they met in the New York
Milrose Games last week, the
curly headed Floridian went 7-1
to beat him.
* *
Meanwhile, on Saturday, the
freshman and B-squad track
team, headed by distancemen
Johnnie Brown and Nick
Caswell, will take on Florida
Junior College and Manatee
Junior College in their first
home meet of the year at 1.

Brown has turned the two miles
in 9:55 while Caswells best half
was 1:54. Both times were

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Cole Slaw cost. \ \ /
French Fried Potatoes 1 /
Hot Rolls _ BUCKET OF /V\V/
CHICKEN K w ]/
SHRIMP SPECIAL YvW / / \ J
DINNER 15 Pieces of \ / // V
.. Golden Fried \ A /V
16 Medium Shrimp . \
Cole Slaw Chicken \ ~y' S J
French Fried Potatoes 1 pt. of Cole Slaw \ J* /
Hot Rolls Hot Rolls \ /
Hot Sauce gp \ /
W. 55 $4.30 \ ( /
CUBIMD ID niMKICD F,SH DINNER \
SHRIMP JR. DINNER Tasty Flounder Filet \
8 Medium Shrimp ole S J a 2 v \ \
Cole Slaw French Fried Potatoes \ I 1
French Fried Potatoes U ot R ,,s I I J 1
Hot Rolls Tartar Sauce Cl QQ 111
Hot Sauce //II
JUMBO SHRIMP 9 ( / \ I
DINNER \L~ )]
6 Jumbo Shrimp y' 1 J J
Cole Slaw \J l /
French Fried Potatoes \ X V
Hot Rolls ] \
Hot Sauce Cl 3C /
>< ALI W 45 M,N M,N-*
* M,N-* for oeuvery
H CALL 378-7412
MARYLAND FRIED CHICKEN
516 N.W. 13th STREET

Friday, February 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

By Caldwell Tumec

indoors and should be bettered
on the larger outdoor track, says
Freshman Coach Temroeck.

Page 19



Page 20

). The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 14, 1969

I * co t ?!id a I
An Arby's Never Goes To Waist } LIZ GREEN I |
1 of the WEEK I
I i |: (dont forget)
I J \wPPmk,i HAPPY HOUR(S) I
I / 2-6 every FRI. I I
ts/ >j£ fi'om Boston Miami 1 I
777 I I Philadelphia & more I
I I Chesters I
I mLvv I
mm I I 1 I jjjM | Wm exciting sounds in l
I AAA W 9 J lv I Pop music today"
I 1405 S.W. 13th Street I Ij| U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc. I
yj |Rathskeller~77|
I OTAHI I i/ o *** Ow List
MUPI Boyd Welsch y ForYoorNeeds
V I vl I TEXTBOOKS
Boyd Welsch, who has become the sparkplug behind the kjrtA# a Kin I ICC ft
Gator basketball team, is the Alligator Player of the Week. NEW AND btD
Welsch turned in the finest game of his career last A P f*MITFf*TIJP AI
Saturday night in a losing effort against Auburn as he hit MlvV-rl I CV. w A
Order Your I 13x17 shots from the field and wound up with 28 points. EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
I He almost single-handly kept Florida in the game after
I I Neal Walk fouled out with over seven minutes left in ART SUPPLIES
I regulation time. The Gators lost in overtime, 81-80, after
I Welsch was injured. I STUDY LAMPS
llel I Monday night the Gainesville senior came back to play
I on an injured ankle, scored 12 points and made the two GYM OUTFITS
Seminole I nterce P t ons at t he end of contest to preserve a key
I 75-73 victory in Nashville against Vanderbilt. C\A#F ATSUIPTS
Welsch, still playing on a swollen and sore ankle, came 3WCM I Jnllvl J
up with his third consecutive top performance Wednesday f*OI I EOF PFTS
_ mm m I night as the Gators crushed LSU, 95-79. He again scored in rCI O
II I double figures and was a ringleader on defense. SFAI
wM I I 111 I As usual, high jumper Ron Jourdan was a top contender vvLLCVC DEAL
II II I for honors this week. The Pensacola junior jumped 7-0 u CT ATIAKICDV
I II I twice over the weekend to capture his event in New York IViAjwl DIAIIv^NEKT
and Baltimore track championships.
I FILM AND DEVELOPING
1 I SERVICE
||||i y i i Omim Sim
U in my nama. fcd | a
9 I have ancloaad $ ($6.00 par eopy K V f
I I BOOKSTORE
|c| yearbook! haw* arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole, U
mmmsmmmSmrmmmmm branch stores-medical center, browardJ
Jiuiammuxua j JR| SHQp JENN|NGS TQWERS & The UN | ON I