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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
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Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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01410246 ( OCLC )
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sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 82

THE SENATOR...
. . if in fact Dr. Megill did make these statements
and that if this university would in fact like to operate
in the absence of legislative interference that a good
first beginning would be the immediate dismissal of Dr.
Megill..it is not my desire to tell you how to run this
university...
Sen. Tom Slade, Feb. 10, 1969

FIRE MEGILL, SEN. SLADE DEMANDS

See Text of Letter Page 8
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
In a surge of reaction to campus dissenters
Sen. Tom Slade, R-Jacksonville, Wednesday
released to the press an ultimatum to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell calling for
the immediate dismissal of philosophy Prof.
Kenneth Megill.
As of Wednesday evening OConnell had
not received the ultimatum included in a
letter from Slade dated Feb. 10.
Slade cited Megills recent statements at
an Accent 69 dialogue as reasons for seeking
his release.
At the dialogue Megill said, I feel the

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Z. NICKARRO^
CROWD GATHERS ON STEPS OF UF ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
...protesting Sen. Slade's ultimatum to UF President Stephen C. O'Connell
EDITORIAL *******^^
. %

Sen. Slades Friendship

Over 2,000 years ago an aging man stood day
after day in an olive grove, feet clad in bare
sandals, body wrapped in a flowing toga.
Gathered at his feet were enraptured young
people, drinking thirstily from their teachers
fountain of knowledge.
The grove was called an academy. The mans
name was Socrates, though he was often called
a gadfly.
Soft of voice but sharp of mind, Socrates
questioned the values of his times. He asked
biting, embarrassing questions.
He urged his students to view the world
around them and change the evils they saw. He

The
Florida Alligator

only people who are talking in a relevant
way are the radicals.
He called black power the most significant
political development of the 20th century.
Today, people see unjustness and they are
not afraid to use radical means to aid in
change, he said.
Slade told OConnell that if Megill did
make these statements and that if UF
would in fact like to operate without
legislative interference a good first
beginning, would be the immediate dismissal
of Megill.
If Megill is still a state employe when the
legislative session convenes Monday that is
going to be, in my considered arid concerned
opinion, the last straw, he said in the letter.
Slade told the Alligator Wednesday if

condemned ignorance, bigotry, prejudice,
inhumanity. He called for needed reform. He
advocated radical methodologies.
The impact of Socrates teaching, echoing
through the centuries, can still be heard today.
Since Socrates, generations of reformers have
questioned the values of their people. They have
taught their students to despise mans
inhumanity to man. They have condemned the
horrors of the societies in which they lived. They
have asked penetrating, embarrassing questions.
They have been gadflies on the body politic.
(SEE 'SEN.' PAGE 3)

University of Florida, Gainesville

THE REGENT...
As long as lam chairman of the Board of Regents I
am going to stand up for the rights of the academic
community as I understand them. That entails not to
allow anyone to interfere with the internal affairs of
any university.
Dr. Burke Kibler, Feb. 12, 1969

UF, State, Student Leaders
React To Slades Ultimatum
Soo Story Pago 2-
Prof. Megill Not Upset,
He Will Continue Teaching
See Story Pago 3
Action Conference Urges
Due Process For Megill
r r
r Soo Story Pago 2-
Megill Says Tigert Rally
Not Really Necessary
Se Story Pag* 3
... I II II
_Student Senate To Meet
O
In Special Session Tonight
- Soo Story Pago 3

Megill is not gone by Monday he will bring
the matter before the senate during the
special session on suspensions.
If Megill is not happy at UF then he can
leave, he said. Maybe he can get peace of
mind somewhere else.
Referring to Wednesday nights
demonstration Slade said if there has to be
a confrontation then we might as well go
ahead.
He said once the matter is on the senate
floor it will be sent to committee committee
committee probably the committe on higher
education.
Upon hearing of Slades demands the
Action Conference Wednesday afternoon
unanimously passed a resolution telling
(SEE 'FIRE* PAGE 3)

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Thursday, February 13, 1969



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13, 1969

Slade Ultimatum Termed Shocking

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Student, university and state officials
Wednesday termed Sen. Tom Slades
ultimatum to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell an unfortunate,
shocking and improper move.
It is an impropriety for members of
the legislature to interfere directly with
any of the university campuses in the
state, said D. Burke Kibler, chairman
of the Board of Regents.
OConnell termed Slades ultimatum
a serious matter. It needs to be dealt
with deliberately and soberly.
He urged university factions to
maintain their cool, lest the
university community fall into the trap
of justifying legislative interference by
ill-considered actions in response to Sen.
Slades letter.
Robert B. Mautz, chancellor of the
state university system, said direct
intervention in a universitys internal
affairs would be unwise .unfortunate
and I think even destructive of the
university.
Student Body President Clyde Taylor
said he was: shocked and disgusted with
the apparently blatant attempt of Slade
to interfere with the orderly operation
of this university.
I am further disgusted with his
ill-disguised attack upon the integrity of
our President, Taylor said.
The Action Conference meanwhile
unamously approved a resolution which
in effect told Slade to keep his hands
off university personnel.
The resolution, proposed by Dr.
Manning Dauer, chairman of the
political science department, stated the
university has a regular method for

§
LawChanges |
j To Be Heard Tonight f
| |
j: Major changes in the election laws will be discussed at a £
|i public hearing today at 8 p.m. in the Student Government $
lobby, on the third floor of the Reitz Union.
Rick Katz, chairman of the election laws and procedure
commission addressed the Student Senate Tuesday night and
moved that these changes be incorporated in the Constitution of
the UF student body.
Major changes include: j
a single method of representation with students voting by j:
colleges and schools rather than living areas. j:
holding elections on Wednesday, a prime day, rather j:
than Thursday >
j: # election officials being paid according to the Federal
Minimum Wage Law, instead of $1 per hour. 5
elimination of specific legal responsibilities of the Clerk of j:
:j: the Honor Court.
i dissolution of the Student Election Board, giving the j:j
>: Honor Court complete power to see that the laws are strictly $
adhered to.
A resolution that the Alligator refrain from endorsing one $
candidate to the exclusion of the other will also be considered.
ji The resolution submits that equal space be given for each $
$ candidate because, as Katz explained, The Alligator £
i automatically receives money from Student fees; therefore it is
not a private newspaper.
Katz also suggested a method of voting using IBM cards
rather than voting machines is a possibility.
X
-i. i m i i ..i 1. ii. ii i ii i i m j i i i i
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials repretent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence, to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United State* Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
d all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one inoprrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
v JfcrtW. correction must b Jhwt before next insertion.

BY STUDENT, UNfYF PCITY state urriuMi*

.W m
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in sgip
mm /
burke kibler
... academic freedom
removing professors, and that due
process must be maintained.
Kibler said Slade is correct in that
universities are not owned by the
students or the faculty they are
owned by the taxpayers.
But we as the Board of Regents
should be instructed to look into all
matters or complaints anyone has, he
said. I think that we should not have
interference from members of the
legislature.
I will stand firm on the position of
defending any professors in their rights
to have a position that may be
unpopular or that I disagree with as long
as they have not exceeded the bounds
of their profession, Kibler said.
A university campus is a place for
the interchange of ideas and no one
should exercise thought control, he
said.
He emphasized that the legislature is
the ultimate authority.
But if the legislature tried to go
directly to the administrations they

AC Passes Senate Reforms

By DAVE REDDICK
Associate Editor
The Action Conference Wednesday passed a
proposal which would cause a major reform of the
University Senate.
The proposal, recommended by the task force on
governance of the university, called for revamping
of senate, reducing its size from 573 to 150.
Three major areas were affected by the proposal:
apportionment; decentralization; and the forming of
a tripartite governmental system.
Fifty-one administrators who are now on the
Senate would be removed in an attempt to make the
group all-faculty committee.
The 150 seats would be apportioned according to
the number of full time students and full time
faculty members.
Attempts to remove the number of students from
the determination of senators were quashed when
an amendment was defeated in a close vote. The
senate members would be elected by faculty
members with rank of assistant professor and above,
and would serve overlapping terms of three years.
An attempt was also made to remove a section
which eliminates all deans and assistant deans, but
that too was overruled.

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Apply Now for 1969
Scholarships, Loans and Stipends available
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11300 N.E. Second Avenue

ROBERT MAUTZ
... intervention unwise
would find that they own only
buildings not people, he said.
Any member of the Communist
Party cannot and should not be
employed by the state, Kibler said,
but anyone who has Marxist
philosophies shouldnt be denied
employment only because of their
ideas.
As long as I am chairman of the
Board of Regents I am going to stand up
for the rights of the academic
community as I understand them,
Kibler said. That entails not to allow
anyone to interfere with the internal
affairs of any university.
Mautz said,l appreciate that any
legislator is interested in operation of
our institutions.
But it seems to me equally clear that
universities can operate as universities
only if the details of the governing
resides on the university or on the
governing Board of Regents, Mautz
said.

The surest way to destroy a
universitys academic freedom is to have
someone or a group other than the
group to which power has been duly
delegated take direct action, such as
interfering in the details of the
administration, the chancellor said.
Any such intervention would be
unwise and unfortunate and I would
hope unneccessary, he said.
I think direct legislative action in a
situation like this would be unwise, he
said, and even destructive of the
university.
OConnell said he had not yet
received Slades letter and thus would
not respond to it.
It is most unfortunate that Sen.
Slade chose to distribute his letter to
the news media before giving this
institution the opportunity to respond
to it, he said. I recognize this to be
his privilege.
OConnell emphasized he would not
take any actions not in complaince with
university procedures.
He termed it inconceivable that
any official would expect him to fire
anyone without first determining in
proper proceedings that there are
grounds for such dismissal.
1 will never do so, he said.
Yet I also say with equal conviction
that if justifiable cause is found to
dismiss any employe of this
institution, OConnell added, I will
not hesitate to do so.
Taylor said, If Mr. Slade is seeking
publicity for use in a future campaign
for public office he has found it,
although the end-results of his
self-serving motives may be the
destruction and disacreditation of our
university.

The plan would reduce the power of the
Agriculture college from its present 25 per cent
control of the senate to about 13 per cent, the
relation of its students and faculty to rest of the
university.
In the past the number of senators was dependant
only on the number of faculty members.
In addition, the task force report recommended
the forming of college-wide councils of students,
faculty and administrators to consider policy
decisions which concern all of them.
The proposal would create more effective
channels of communication between the University
Senate, the Student Senate, and the administration.
A revision of the UF constitution would be
necessary before the plan could be put in operation.
In addition to the governing report, the AC also
passed a plan to form a general education system
which would allow lower division students to take
courses in their perspective colleges.
This plan, if accepted, would greatly increase a
students chance to experiment in various fields
before graduation, without having to attend more
than the usual number of quarters.



ABOUT FlttlNC
Megill Isnt Worried

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
\
The man in the lurch, the man
on which the campus is focused
after a blaze of condemnation
erupted Wednesday over his
statements on radicalism, is
simply not upset over
anything.
Dr. Kenneth Megill, assistant
professor of philosophy, sat at
home Wednesday evening getting
ready to go to a reaction rally in
his behalf.
Nothing has happened, he
said. I am going to continue
teaching.
Megill, 29, was condemned
Wednesday by Sen. Tom Slade,
R-Jacksonville, in a letter to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
for his outspokeness at an
Accent 69 dialogue last week.
OConnell by Wednesday
evening had not yet received the
letter in effect an ultimatum
to fire Megill or else. Slade
released the letter to the press
before it reached OConnell.
Megill said at a symposium
dialogue last Monday, I feel the

Senate Condemns
Slades Ultimatum

Proposals condemning Rep.
Jim K. Tillmans student dissent
investigation bill and Sen. Tom
Slades dismissal ultimatum to
President Stephen C. OConnell
will be presented at a special
Student Senate meeting tonight.
Slade presented the
ultimatum to OConnell
Wednesday, stating that unless
UF Prof. Ken Megill were
dismissed the state legislature
would step in.
Student Senate Majority
Leader Charles Harris said a
policy statement on student
demonstrations will be put to a
vote at the meeting.
The senate met with the Ad
Hoc committee of the University
Senate Wednesday night to
discuss and iron out
differences in the policy
statement, Harris said.
A charter for Students for
Responsible Government will
also be read. The group plans to
initiate project Surge, a
statewide lobby of all university
students to present student
opinion to the state legislature.
The meeting will be short,
but extremely important, and
will count as a regular absence
for senators, Harris said.

| EDITORIAL
Sen. Slades Friendship

fjjFMH PA6 OME^I
Kenneth A. Megill, a quiet philosophy
professor at theUFis also a gadfly.
Last week, Megill stood under the trees in the
Plaza of the Americas and asked his student
audience to examine the world around them.
Supposedly speaking with freedom in the
academy, he told his pupils that there is much
wrong with our world, with our people.
He said that radicalism, possibly including
violence, may be the only way to change the
accumulated evils of centuries manifested in
todays world. , :
Like it was in Socrates time, though, there are

only people in this country who
are talking in a relevant way are
the radicals.
He called black power a
significant political development
and that people who see
unjustness are not afraid to use
radical means to aid in change.
These are the same things I
teach in class, Megill said.
He teaches courses on Marxist
and democratic political theory.
I am happy at UF and I
enjoy working in my department
and would like to stay, he said.
He described himself as not
on any spot. He said he was
remaining pretty calm.
Megill does not have tenure.
He is in the middle of this third
year at UF. Assistant professors
cannot gain tenure until they

Tom Slade Senate Whip

Tom Slade, the 32-year-old
Senate Republican whip from
Jacksonville who gave UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
an ultimatum tp fire philosophy

The senate will meet at 9 p.m.
in the Student Activities Center
of the Reitz Union.
Florida Blue Key President
Manny James announced there
will be a special meeting of the
FBK active chapter Monday at 8
p.m. in the Reitz Union.
James said the meeting was
called to look into the
Tillman-Slade controversy.

Greenman To Speak
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The author of the Greenman Resolution which has been attacked
by UF students asking for a bigger voice in university affairs, will
speak to the Young Americans for Freedom tonight at 8 in room 349,
of the Reitz Union.
Dr. John R. Greenman, UF agriculture economics professor, said
Wednesday he will tell the club his beliefs concerning the role of the
university and what should be done in event the university is involved
in violent demonstrations.
The Faculty Senate has not adopted the Greenman Resolution
but is considering a similar resolution drawn up by the Ad Hoc
Committee on Student Demonstrations. Out of committee and on the
senate agenda, it says the senate supports the judgement of UF
President Stephen C. OConnell in the handling of student
demonstrations.
A copy of the ad hoc committees resolution on supporting
OConnell in a riot situation, was sent to Student Body president,
Clyde Taylor, for suggestions. Greenman said the committee has not
received a reply from the student body head.

people who fear threats against the established
order, against the accepted values, against the
approved methods. \
State Sen. Tom Slade is such a man.
In a letter to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, Slade has demanded that Megill be
fired. If his demand is not met, he threatens, he
will ask for a legislative investigation into the UF.
Slades demand, he contends, was submitted in
the interest of higher education in Florida.
But before the university leaps at the
outstretched hand of friendship and assistance
Sen. Slade has offered it ought to contemplate
the offer.
Because there is a strong possibility that the
hand contains a cup of hemlock.

have put in three full years.
He said he must be
recommended for tenure by his
department at the end of three
years.
Some pretty definite offers
have been made to him from
other universities, he said, But I
have not pursued them.
A controversy and crises
similar to what is developing
over Slades ultimatum has torn
other universities apart as
witnessed at San Francisco State
College and Columbia
University.
M egill disagrees that this
might happen at UF.
It could make UF much
stronger, he said, because
both student, administration and
faculty are united on one issue.

Prof. Kenneth Megill
Wednesday, has served in the
legislature for seven years.
He served two years in the
House of Representatives from

1962-64 before being elected to
the Senate in 1966.
Informed sources say he is
eying the state comptrollers
office for 1970.
Originally from Georgia, he
came to Florida in 1946, and
graduated from Southern
Institute of Technology.
Formerly a registered
Democrat, Slade switched his
affiliation a few years ago.
He is president of three
Jacksonville based firms, Slade
Gas co., Slade Petroleum Co.,
and Slade Heating and Air
Conditioning Co.

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KENNETH MEGILL
...speaks at Tigert
Megill
'Nothing
Happened'
By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Approximately 300 students,
faculty and on-lookers gathered
at the steps of Tigert Hall
Wednesday to protest Sen. Tom
Slades ultimatum to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
calling for the dismissal of Prof.
Kenneth Megill.
But both the philosophy
professor and his department
chairman, Dr. Thomas Hanna,
told the crowd that no rally was
needed.
I dont think this rally is
necessary, Hanna said. I think
the senator already has his reply
in OConnells statement, he
said.
Megill said he shared Hannas
feelings.
As far as Im concerned,
the 29-year-old professor said,
nothing has happened to me.
I didnt know of the
demonstration until a leaflet was
shoved into my hand, he said.
What will happen next
nobody will know, Megill said.
Whats happened up until now
is nothing, except that a man has
seen fit to write a letter to
someone else.
But several student speakers
urged the crowd to act before
its too late.
The Southern Students
Organizing Committee is
circulating a petition urging
OConnell to forbid any
investigations of any kind.
Rally Tonight
A student delegation will
present an ultimatum to UF
President Stephen C.
OConnell today demanding
that he not fire Assist. Prof,
of Philosophy Kenneth Megill
and not permit a political
witch hunt on the UF
campus.
A time slot at 8:30 p.m.
has been set aside for
OConnell to publically
accept or reject the proposals.

Thursday, February 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Fire Megill
PA6t (HIE
Slade in effect to keep his
hands out of UF business.
Megill is an AC member.
Slade in his letter smacked the
AC for its recommendations on
unrestricted sale on campus of
literature of student approved
organizations and on changes in
the state employe loyalty oath.
Because the university
systemi operates with taxpayers
money, he said There is no
place on our campuses for filthy
literature or for radically
oriented organizations or
speakers, or for anyone that
cannot take an oath that he does
not believe in the overthrow of
government.
Slade said he hoped legislative
involvement is unnecessary.
His ultimatum comes on the
heels of a similar
recommendation made by Rep.
Jim K. Tillman, R-Sarasota, last
week.
Tillman called for an
investigation committee on
student dissent and disturbances.
Part of his impetus for the
committee was reported to be
Megills statements.
OConnell said in a prepared
statement to the press that it is
inconceivable that any member
of the legislature or any state
official would after reflection
dictate that I fire any
individual without complying
with due process and proper
proceedings.
The AC said in its resolution
that no person should be fired
without due process and a
hearing.
What is due process, Slade
said upon hearing of the
resolution.
Policy Manual
Explains Firing
A non-tenured faculty
member can be dismissed at the
Presidents discretion, according
to the University Policy Manual.
The President is required to
give the non-tenured faculty
member three months notice
before dismissal if he is in his
first year at UF, six months
notice if he is in his second year
and a full years notice if he has
been here three years or longer.
The President has the power
to assign a faculty member to
another institutional position in
which case the institution is not
released from its contract
committments.
y
The policy of the university
also gives the President the
power to suspend any faculty
member if in his judgment
formal inquiry is likely to
provide the basis for disciplinary
action.
Causes for disciplinary action
include: neglect of duty, failure
to perform the terms of
employment, professional
incompetence, or conduct,
professional or personal,
i, nvolving moral turpitude.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13, 1969

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PI LAMS
...contribute to friendship
Pi La ms Buy First
UF Friendship Brick
UFs Friendship Walk moved a step closer to its goal Wednesday
with the purchase of the first friendship brick by the Pi Lambda Phi
fraternity house.
The bricks have all been paid for, but the purchase of friendship
bricks will add to the spirit of the walk, according to Sherri Cox,
president of the Union Board Special Projects Committee.
Making the purchase was Allen Soden, president of Pi Lambda Phi.
Bricks will sell for $lO but Soden contributed $25.
The purpose of the walk is to ioster closer relations between UF
students. In order to use the walk, hello must be said to all persons
you pass.
An official dedication of the walk is scheduled for Friday at 2 p.m.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell will make the dedication.
The walk will consist of over 19,000 bricks, and will be built by
volunteer student support beginning Monday.
Student, faculty or clubs and organizations may purchase a
friendship brick with their name Fired in it by calling the Union
Board office or at 392-1655, or Sherri Cox at 392-9409.
In addition, Panhellenic is backing the walk with name tags which
will be worn by sororities on Friday. The Say Hello Today tags
will also be available for other interested groups.

(jIU IlSib-, f "1 | f "I T\ "1 i Pure Beef, topped I
Where burger 1 ** 11 B| IJm | 4MI I I off with lettuce,
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gftn beaten I
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Deluxe Burger /
Double Burger
Double Cheese .48 \
Cheese Burger MjjAMBURG I
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1515 S. W. 13th St.
, Only one per customer Thur. j y \ 1

MAKES SPECIAL REQUESTS
Taylor Addresses Senate

Student Body President Clyde
Taylor, made a special, address
to the Student senate at Tuesday
nights meeting, with seven
requests for immediate action
from the senators.
After outlining the
achievments of the past term of
office, Taylor made seven urgent
pleas to the senate:
Investigation in two Reitz
Union offices: W. E. Rion is
Union Director, and Eleanor
Roberts, public functions office,
saying, These are employees
that are road-blocking legitimate
attempts to get some needed
changes.
Taylor said unless
investigations were started
before the student government
changed its officers, It will take
them six months before they
realize who is holding up their
progress.
Taylors second request was
to drum up administrative
support in university events. He
cited a lack of administrators at
the Accent conference, except
for two, until the banquet was
given on Saturday night and the
Lt. Governor was there to see
them.
The third point was to reduce
the personnel turnover in
student government and the
campus.
A fourth point emphasized
that the Faculty Senate Is one
ridiculous, absurd mess of
people, You (student senators)
must espouse change to avoid
the biggest shaft of all time.
There have been some poor
moves from the Dean of Mens
office also this needs
investigation, Taylor said.
Taylor warned the senators to
Constantly watch the Athletic

Association. We have made some
fair arrangements with the AA,
but watch out for them,
will turn around and completely
change the plans if you dont
watch out.
He also said if students
decided they want the proposed
coliseum bad enough they are
y.-.v.v.-.v.-.v.v.v
I* ,%
: Absent Senators!;
* .*
% ;
if These student senators did :
: not answer role at the end of ff
J Tuesday nights student if
:f: senate meeting: Robert ff
if: Ashley, Bernie Barton, ff
Barbara Baxter, Micki :f:
ifi Ciprich, Gene Cochran, James if
Commander, Linda Dallager, :f;
if Sam Davis, Jan Dyro, Susan ifi
ifi Erb, Howard Foster, James ifi
if; Gleeson, Robert Joyner, Skip ifi
if: Kedney, David Kerrins, Patty if
if; Maxwell, Kathy Monaghan, if
if! Thomas Moss, Nick Nicosia, if
if! Barbara Nunn, Lois Ottinger, if
if! Robert Palmer, Charles Riggs, if
if! Jake Schickle, Randall if
ifi Schrader, Kathryn Spellman, if
if! Alan Starling, Joe Still, Jacob if
if! Stuart, Tommy Thompson, :f:
ifi Pat Tidwell, Pat Tuck, Faith :f:
if! Tulino, John Vreeland, Ken >:
X Weil and Alan Fletcher. :
S. W .. AW ... W J

Professor John Greenman
Speaks on the
Greenman Resolution
Young Americans for Freedom
Rm 349 JWR UNION
Thur. Feb.l3 8:00 P.M.

going to have to spend an extra
$5 a quarter to put in a special
fund for this purpose.
Taylor was confident that
student government had nothing
to worry about in the upcoming
referendum. Im sure we can
put our record on the line and
the students will vote to
continue this type of
government.
Also at the meeting, several
election law amendments were
approved on first reading. All
these law changes will be put
before a public hearing tonight
at 8:30 p.m. in the Union, room
118.
A resolution to be sent to the
airlines was passed urging these
agencies to continue the youth
fares they have established in the
past.
The meeting adjourned at
midnight.
I Dick I i CLMif I
Jeweler/
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
| 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
[ Vz BLOCK FROM CAMPUS



Playboy Sale OKd

On-campus sale of Playboy magazine will
begin as soon as an allotment of the magazine is
delivered to the Campus Shop and Bookstore,
according to Student Body President Clyde
Taylor.
According to Taylor, approval for the sale of
Playboy came from Vice President for Business
Affairs William E. Elmore in a letter received
Tuesday.
In his letter Elmore said he was informed by
Sam P. Getzen, director of the Campus Shop and
Bookstore, that there seemed to be a demand for
the popular magazine.
However, said Getzen, upon inquiry to the
distributing agency he found its distribution
quota was gone and he was unable to obtain
copies at that time.
Mr. Getzen informs me, Elmore said, that
as soon as he can receive an allotment Plavbov

Booklets Planned On Results
Os Spring Prof E valuation

UF studentsfor the first
time will be able to read the
results of their next course and
teacher evaluation if student
government coordinator Don
Turlington has his way.
Turlington said Tuesday the
upcoming spring quarter
evaluation will hopefully result
in the publishing of two
booklets:
Geologists
Host Speaker
Dr. Robert F. Dill, of the
Marine Environment Division, U.
S. Navy Electronics Laboratory,
San Diego, California, will
address a meeting of the
Southeastern Geological Society
tonight at 8 p.m., at the Ramada
Inn.
The title of Dills lecture is
Pleistocene Sea Levels and
Continental Margin
Sedimentation.
Local arrangements for the
meeting are being made by Dr.
David Nicol, UF Department of
Geology. There will be a dinner
at 7 p.m. Those wishing to
attend it should contact Dr.
Nicol.
Frat Help Needed
For Greek Week
Fraternity members interested
in working on committees tor
next quarters Greek Week
activities should contact John
Cosgrove or Tom Hayes at the
Phi Kappa Tau fraternity house.
Workers and committee
chairmen are needed and they
must be filled by Sunday. Hayes
said.
[THURSDAY)
V NITE J
THIKTT

ON UF CAMPUS

i A critique of the top 40-50
UF professors, to be chosen
through the evaluation.
0 A supplement to the UF
catalog, giving descriptions of
elective courses pre-requisites,
term papers and testing
procedures..
Professors have been pleased
with the results of past
evaluations, Turlington said, but
students want to see the effect
of their evaluat ion.
Courses will not be evaluated
this quarter, because of a lack of
funds.
The evaluation was not set
up to take place each quarter.
We hope to have the evaluation
first and third quarter every
year. he said.

NEW CINEMA

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Be a Saint! Buy her a little
Something for Va/t tines Day .
Maybe a f/ouncy cotton spring dress.
2401 SW SW 13th Street OPEN Mon Sat
Village Square 9:30 to 6:oopm

magazine will be placed on sale in the Campus
Shop and Bookstore.
Elmore has been extremely cooperative with
us since weve been in contact with him, said
Marc Glick, Taylors administrative assistant.
Its not big, but in the long run its the little
things like this that the students usually have a
great appreciation for, Taylor said.
Previously, Getzen had said in an article in the
Jan, 22 Alligator there was no policy against
selling Playboy on campus but he considered this
as his responsibility to avoid
selling anything that might cause embarrassment
to the university.
Glick said he had written a letter on Jan. 14 to
Elmore requesting him to look into the
possibilities of permitting the sale of Playboy on
campus.

Turlington said the third
quarter evaluation is the most
important, because results can
be analyzed in more detail and
there is more time to make
neccssary improvement s.
Modern Athens
Although Athens is ancient,
nearly all of the modern city has
risen since it became Greeces
capital in 1837.
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VALENTINES DAY SALE
FREE: Bouquet of Flowers
with ANY ZENITH Radio sold
Thur. Feb 13 or Fri Feb 14
All sales must be cash
"Tnuxu radios
IT'S A RADIO...IT'S A CLOCK!
on Swivel Base
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Model Y2BO The Aristocrat-Here it is...the most exciting
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AM-FM RADIOS
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Compact cabinet in choice of A Cj ij b\
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TRANSISTOR RADIOS
I *
HI 5-piece deluxe
I ] GIFT BOX ENSEMBLE*
HI 1 with purchase of any
I 1 Zenith shirt pocket tran-
H | sistor portable shown.
HI ft J r [. id M Zenith Transistor Radio
\vjf7c. Carry Case Batteries
Gift Box
ROYAL 25 *Royal 25-G gift box shown
Here it is a miniature with mercury batteries and ear-
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Thursday, February 13. 1969. The Florida AHigator.

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13, 1969

Folk Opera, Film
Set For Tonight
Duro Lapido, a 30-minute
film sponsored by the Foreign
Language Department, will be
shown tonight at 7 in Room 125
of the Arts and Sciences
Building.
The film, a work in folk
opera, is an introduction to the
Duro Lapido traveling theatre
company of Oshogbo, Nigeria.

TO PROTEST JEWISH HANGINGS
$ Demonstration Planned I

X Our conscience objects.
X That is the slogan of the demonstration
planned for Sunday in the Plaza of the Americas
X to protest hangings of Jewish traitors in Iraq
x and the treatment given Jews trying to leave
v Russia.

Â¥ The demonstration, which will begin at 2 p.m.,
Â¥ is being organized by Leslie Picker, ITJC,1 T JC, who
x calls herself a concerned and proud Jev/.
Â¥ She said she is sickened by the Arab-Israeli
wars in general, and the recent Iraqui hangings, in
X particular. They are utterly disgraceful, she
:j said.
:Â¥ Miss Picker is tired of what she interprets as
Â¥ apathy by many people toward the kiPings.
* Apathy can be worse than the deed itself.
Â¥ According to her, staging the demonstration is
: the only way she feels she can help make people
more aware.
X She djgw a parallel between the Iraq killings
Â¥ and the ldmng oFTfcWs Germany. I just
X want Israel to know that we care, she said. We
SWNNyWA'AW.NViWWAVAV.V.V.W.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V

UF European Travel-Study
Offered College Students

The American Institute for
Foreign Study is sponsoring a
college summer school program
at eight different European
universities.
Total cost for the six-weeks of
travel and study is $650.
During the six-week duration
of the program, approximately
four weeks are spent at the
university and two weeks are
free for independent travel and
sightseeing.
Westerfield College of the
University of London will offer
courses in European civilization.
The University of Dijon in
Dijon, France, the University of
Swizerland in Geneva, and the
University of Strasbourg, in
Strasbourg, France will offer
courses in French language and
civilization.
German language and
civilization will be taught at
Schiller College in Stuttgart,
Germany.
Art history and Italian

Gator PAWN SHOP
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
* DIAMONDS
. GUNS
BUY SELL TRADE
"W# specialize in Gator-Aid
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575

DROPOUTS
O? \
-I THINK I BUGSiH
hear FboTsTfePS/ me! I
T 1|
Mr**

language is offered at the Italian
University for Foreigners in
Perugia, Italy.
The University of Madrid will
offer Spanish language and
civilization, and Russian
language and civilization will be
offered at the University of
Leningrad.
Students interested in
applying for this program must
be enrolled in an accredited
Guest Chemist
Speaks Tonight
Jerome Bieber, organic
chemist, will speak on a leading
French chemist today, in his
topic J.B. Dumas The
Formative Years.
The program will be given at 8
p.m. in Room 211 of the
Mechanical Engineering
Building.
Bieber received his Ph.D.
From New York University at
Buffalo.

wont stand around and watch six million more :
Jews get killed and do nothing. :
In planning the demonstration, Miss Picker
contacted presidents of six fraternities and
sororities, which she feels can support her :
because of their large Jewish memberships. She ¥
was asked to speak at several of the houses. ¥
She also contacted the Young Democrats X
organization, of which she is a member, and last X
Sunday spoke at the Hillel House, where she said
she was fantastically well-received. X
i
0
I dont fight for every cause that comes
along, she said. But Im putting my all into £
this one because I believe in it with all my £
heart. :
Miss Picker, who said many call her a ¥
revolutionary, said she hopes her actions will ¥
start a wave of demonstrations on campuses ¥
across the country. ¥
She predicted a large amount of support for X
her demonstration.
w.v.vw;v;%*:v.v.*.v.*.w.v.*.v.v.v.vw.v.v.v. ...v.v.v.-.v.-.n*-

THEY SOUNP LIKE )
THEY'RE COMIM& dj
I
1 v
' 'o'

college, have a reference from
their deans office and be in good
health.
Students are not required to
speak a foreign language except
those wishing to attend the
University of Leningrad must
have some background in
Russian.
Academic credit may be
earned by special arrangements
with the college before
departure to Europe. Credit is
generally six quarter hours.
UF students interested in this
program should contact Robert
King at 378-4793.

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BY HOWARD POST

(rtow X HEAR 7 ~
#*
C HX g
196? by United Feature Syndicate, Inc. 7


Gator Greek Back With New Format

By JEFF ALFORD
Aljigator Corre*>ondent
The UFs only fraternity sponsored
the Gator Greek will be back in publication this
year but the new editors say any resemblance to
past issues of the magazine will be strictly
accidental.
The only thing this magazine will have in
common with the old Gator Greek will be the
name, said Craig Goldwyn, newly named
Managing Editor. The Interfraternity Council,
who backs the publication, recently announced
that Robert Wattles, Editor-in-chief and
Goldwyn will head the magazines staff.
Wattles is president of Chi Phi fraternity and

Venders Vandalized

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
Two dty vending machine
companies operating on the UF
campus say vandalism of the
machines is a problem but UF
students are not responsible for
all of it.
The Wometco Vending
Machine Company loses SIOO a
month from vandalism on its
325 campus machines, according
to Owen Blucher, Wometco
manager for on-campus
operations.
Ihe Eli Witt Cigar and Candy
Corporation lost $65 in one
machine alone last Friday, Lloyd
Woodard, vending machine
manager for Eli Witt, said. Its 48
machines are usually broken into
on weekends, Woodard said, and
those in the open are hit most
often.
Both companies said
off-campus offenders are

Nibling Named To 'Esquire
Collegiate Advisory Board

Kenneth L. Nibling, lUC has
been named to Esquires sth
College Advisory Board.
Representing a cross-section
of campus opinion today, the
College Advisory Board will be
in New York City as Esquires
guests for the week beginning
March 16.
The Board will be the center
of seminars to determine the
current habits, tastes, likes, and
dislikes of students.
Senior Vice President of
Esquire, Jerry Jontry, said the
panel members will be
photographed for the fashion
pages of the September issue.
The finalists were chosen
from eligible students at colleges
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responsible for much of the
damage.
Woodard said elementary,
junior and senior high school
students have been caught
damaging the companys
machines.
Wometco has insurance on the
money stolen but since the
machines are so vulnerable to
vandalizers it is impossible to get
insurance on them. Eli Witt has
no insurance.
Wometco has two locks on
each machine and Eli Witt uses
padlocks, but people still
manage to pry them open.
Each company has begun
experimenting with alarm
systems. If improperly opened,
the machines will sound off a
loud siren.
Eli Witt has been using alarms
on some machines since last July
and Woodard said they had
helped some.

and universities throughout the
country.
Each board member is the
local winner of Esquires Best
Dressed Man on Campus
Contest, co-sponsored by
Wilsons Department Store.

JENNINGS Hall
presents
The p
NATION I
ROCKING
SHADOWS
Feb. 14 9pm lam
jennings rec. room

SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT STYLE

Goldwyn is a member of Phi Gamma Delta.
According to Goldwyn the purpose of the
magazine will be to increase communications
between Greeks on campus and to suppliment
communications between Greeks and
independents.
But the format will be completely
different it will be designed in the Sunday
suppliment style and printed on newsprint, said
Goldwyn.
The new Gator Greek will be published
monthly instead of quarterly and will include
feature articles on the fraternity system,
fraternity men, campus dignitaries, and for the
first time it will answer questions submitted by
independents about the fraternity system at the
UF.
Goldwyn said the new publication would

Foreign Affairs and
Domestic Relations will be the
topic discusses by Dr. Willard L.
Thorp, professor emeritus of
economies at Amherst College,
at 8:15 p.m. tonight in the Reitz
Union Auditorium.
The public lecture is
sponsored by the Visiting
Scholar Program of the United
Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa.
Dr. Thorp has held positions
as chief economist in the
Department of Commerce,
assistant secretary of state for
economic affairs, and U.S.
representative on the United
Nations Economic and Social
Meet Tonight
Married Couples are invited to
an informal discussion on The
Stresses and Strains of the Early
Years of Marriage. at the
Catholic Student Center Library
tonight.
Dr. Henry Lyons, M. D., chief
at the VA Hospital
will lead the discussion
beginning at 8:30.

Visiting Scholars Program
Features Amherst Prof

Council.
Dr. Thorp will remain on
campus Friday to meet with
various student groups and
classes to discuss international
affairs and economic
development.

TREAT
Your wife, date or
yourself to a FULL
COURSE DINNER served
by your own FRAULEIN.
FULL TABLE SERVICE
EVERY NIGHT s:oopm to 8:00pm
I /bSIa I
TREAT
Yourself and Your date
again by staying to I
hear one of the JL
NIGHTLY SHOWS. JJI.
(Like we said)
TREAT YOURSELF at the jKWKJ) J
U. of F. Faculty Club, InrA
Eattisfeeller''
Joe Whalon nitoly ot the Piano

Thursday, February 13,1969, The Florida Alligator,

encourage open debate about Greek
organizations.
In the past the magazine has served primarily
as a catalog of the fraternity houses on campus in
an attempt to inform prospective rushees of the
locations of the fiouses.
The new magazine, said Goldwyn, will
take a more realistic view of the system and will
include less propaganda.
One of the most revolutionary ideas for the
Gator Greek will be the adoption of an editorial
stand with policy to be determined by an IFC
panel, he said.
It will be staffed by volunteers from the
fraternity houses and financed by the IFC and
advertising sales. Present plans call for a staff of
about 25 with the first edition scheduled for
publication early in the spring quarter.

f 1 i
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at
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Page 7



Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13, 1969

'Ham And Grits

Setting For The Purge

In the office of philosophy
Prof. Kenneth Megill hangs a
poster (circa 1930) of V. I.
Lenin leading the proletariat
masses in a blaze of color
backdropped by fluttering Red
flags and raised arms of defiance.
Megill picked up the poster
during a visit to the Soviet
Union in 1960.
His office is in the recently
remodeled old Florida Union,
which is now called the Arts and
Sciences Building.
There is no white-painted
name on the black signpost in
front of ASB, but an apparently
perceptive wag has chalked in
the apt title of Marcuse Hall
on the vacant spot.
Marcuse is a California
Marxist and true hero of the new
Left, who was chased out of the
school system there by ardent
right-wingers. He is reportedly
hiding in the ASBs basement.
If any place on or off campus
can be labeled as the UF center
of dissent, it is the illicitly, but
fittingly, named Marcuse Hall.
Now every dissenting center
needs someone who can
synthesize radical thought
flowing in from all factions, and
who can put it into form and
make it sound consistent with
other divergent radical thoughts
around the country.
UFs grand radical thought
synthesizer is Dr. Kenneth
Megill, sometime proclaimed
successor to cause-loser Marshall
Jones and above-mentioned
poster collector.
Megill is unabashedly an
advocate of radical revolutionary
change on campus, and his goal
is a free university in a true
participatory democracy with
liberty and justice for all.
For those of you who dont
know what participatory
democracy is, it is a system
some say it cant be systematic systematichowever,
however, systematichowever, in which everybody
simply participates.
It must be made clear that
participatory democracies and
free universities arent things
radicals win a lot of friends with
by advocating. Theres probably
no university senate anywhere
complete with Greenmans and
alarmists that will submit to any
change in the status quo without
a fight.
Where does that leave the
radical? Certainly not in the
middle of the road.
Appeasement may be the word
for diplomats, but not for the
red-blooded 1969 campus
radical. His job is already
mapped for him. He must step
outside society, because by his
own admission he is a misfit. For
change to come, it must be
brought about by forces working
on societys conscious from
outside.
It is logical then that UF
campus radicals, since they
havent made any headway in
gaining even the slightest inkling
of a true democracy or a
free university, but instead
have met with opposition from
the alarmist closed-door,
tight-lipped University Senate,
should continue their fight from
beyond UFs unaccomodating
campus.
But they havent done this.
Instead they have tried to gain
recognition from the UF
establishment, picking up

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
v/ Harold Aldrich
NjjSj/ Editor-In-Chief
PoCI/htflJtlAy Dave Doucette
. Managing Editor
All
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor

support along the way from even
the house press administration
newspaper, the Alligator.
Horrors.
Marcuse will never forgive.
And Megill screamed excuses in
the form of what appeared to be
new, and better of course,
attacks on those bastards in
the administration from the
laza during Accent last week.
Now hes in real trouble. The
soothsayer of all seasons, the
radical synthesizer has attracted
new off campus listeners.
Enter cigar-chomping, bourn

Raving

Happy Hunting

I recently read an excellent Gainesville Sun editorial taking to task
State Rep. Jim K. Tillman of Sarasota, who wants to investigate
disorder and interruptions on Florida college campuses.
The editorial explained that Rep. Tillman should not try to harass
people like the kid who cannot understand why a fine college
building is named after U.S. Sen. Spessard L. Holland, who in a
single day last May voted against food distribution to the poor, yet
vigorously defended a $610,000 annual subsidy to the South Puerto
Rico Sugar Co. of Fellsmere.
But such remarks prevent us from discovering the true culprits,
those at UF who deserve persecution, revenge, punishment, legal
lynching, and inquisition at the hands of Tillmans Furies. I,
self-styled defender of the purity, holiness, and virginity of our
beloved campus, would like to bring wrath and destruction down
upon the devilish heads of those who would perpetrate disorder and
interruptions upon us, the silent majority of tired, Tigert-fearing
Americans.
Who HAS practiced violence, etc. at this campus? Well, for one,
fraternities. Greeks recently mounted a Trojan horse and confronted
other Hellenic souls, the result of which was IFC suspension. Last
quarter another struggle, this one worthy of Thermopylae or
Marathon, took place, and MACE was used to subdue the heroes of
whom Thucydides or Herodotus would have been proud to write.
The assorted weaponry in both instances was impressive, and the
use of gendarmes to quell the uprisings indicated disorder and/or
interruptions. Yet no fratmen have been burned, drawn and
quartered, or castrated. Why?
Last quarter the initial SSOC meeting of the school year was
proceeding non-violently when, all of a sudden, several Students for
Wallace burst upon the scene, clutching a white (of course) banner
with an obscenity (the word Wallace) printed in blue.
This disruptive act was duly reported by this newspaper. Yet what
has since happened to these disorderly people? Nothing. The
American Independent Party has been recognized without use of an
inquisition, which shows that being On The Right is more important
than being right in Administrative eyes.
Now that a genuine witch hunt has been proposed, lets really crack
down on the dangerous foes of Peace and Quiet, Law and Order. Or
maybe .. maybe we should just forget about the whole thing.
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Budnssr. Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
382-1681,382-1682 or 382-1683.
Opinions expressed fte the Florida AUfcstor are those of the editor* or of
the softer es hsvtklt md tfcm* *r *
' 1 *>. ..

By Dave Osier

Florida cowboy Jim K. Tillman
and his band of Charley
Johnsian vigilantes.
And Wednesday Sen. Tom
Slade, from Jacksonville and a
Republican like friend Tillman,
issued an ultimatum calling for
Kenneths immediate dismissal
The purge is about to begin.
Kenneth Megill didnt really
want to become a martyr. But in
trying to put a new stimulus in
his wayward radical pupils, he
may become an issue himself.
Pity. Blond, tow-headed
Kenneth doesnt even have a
beard.

By David Miller

Senator
Slades
Letter
The Florida Alligator is relinquishing its editorial
space today so that the university community may
have the opportunity of reading, in full, thejetter by
State Sen. Tom Slade, calling for the removal of UF
philosophy professor Kenneth Megill.
Dr. Stephen OConnell
President
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Dear Steve:
I have viewed with some concern the events of the past several days
which relate to the activities of students and professors and also the
possibility of legislative action in this area.
I realize that it is the desire of both students and faculty to operate
in the absence of legislative interference. I also hope that this will be
possible. However, the university system is a branch of state
government and, as such, is the responsibility of the legislature.
A professor is a state employee and a student is in attendance at the
expense of the taxpayers of the State of Florida. Therefore, the
legislature does have an obligation and a responsibility to be
concerned with every facit of higher education; its quality, its
efficiencies, its future plans and also the conduct of the employees
and of the students who are privileged to obtain an education at far
less cost than would otherwise be possible.
I therefore respectfully suggest that to avoid legislative interference
the presidents of the various state universities must have an
atmosphere which would not make necessary legislative concern. To
this end, I would like to point out several things which have
concerned me recently.
The University of Florida Action Conference, which is composed of
students, faculty members and administrators, has recommended
unrestricted sale and distribution of literature for student approved
organizations on the campus, the allowance of students to determine
what organizations will be allowed on campus, and a change in the
loyalty oath from I do not believe in the overthrow of the United
States Government or the State of Florida to I am not actively
engaged in the overthrow of the United States Government or the
State of Florida.
Keeping in mind that the university system operates at the expense
of the taxpayers of our state, I think that you and all persons in
positions of responsibility have an obligation to see that they are
operated in the mainstream of acceptable standards. There is no place
on our campuses for filthy literature or for radically orientated
organizations or speakers, or for anyone that cannot take an oath that
he does not believe in the overthrow of the United States Government
or the State of Florida. If these conditions are not acceptable to either
the employees or the students then the same alternative is available to
them that is available to each of us and that is they can leave where
they are and go somewhere else where their conduct and views might
be more acceptable.
The newspaper recently reported that Dr. Kenneth Megill
advocated the organization of a strong teachers union to join at the
proper time the radical student movement and take over the
University . In addition, he was alleged to have told this
student-teacher meeting that the students must realize that they are
an oppressed class living in an oppressed country, that only radicals
are talking in a relevant way, and that the only new idea in this
century is the concept of black power. This has got tomake the blood
of every Florida taxpayer boil. That University does not belong to the
professors nor does it belong to the students. It is the property of the
people of this state.
I am therefore recommending to you that if in fact Dr. Megill did
make these statements and that if this University would in fact like to
operate in the absence of legislative interference that a good first
beginning would be the immediate dismissal of Dr. Megill and a
warning that that course of action will follow in all reoccurring similar
situations.
It is not my desire to tell you how to run the University of Florida,
but I feel, if the statements attributed to Dr. Megill are true, that he
does not serve the best interest of our educational system or our State
and that he or anyone of similar views should be requested to relocate
i they can find any place that wants a teachers union and radical
students to take over a university.
Legislative involvement in the day to day affairs of our universities
should be used only after the last straw that broke the proverbial
camels back has been applied, but if Dr. Megill is still a state
employee when the legislative session convenes on February 17,1969
t at is going to be, in my considered and concerned opinion, the last
straw.
I anxiously await your reply.
Kind personal regards.
.'< . .
1 Sincerely yours,
TOM.SLADE



Midnight Fire Drill: Everybody Needs One

MR. EDITOR:
Now that we residents of Rawlings Hall
have had the thrilling experience of our
first fire drill of the quarter, I would like
to lodge a protest to whoever it is who
plans these things.
No, I am not protesting against the fire
drills themselves. On the contrary, I think 1
that it is very important for every student
living in a dorm (oops, I mean residence
hall) to know that when a bell with a
loud, incessant ring starts sounding off at
12:15 AM, the student must
(1) shut the windows.

Ifc
1 VI ff .jftrVWHl rSSa l

Broyles Superiority Complex

MR. EDITOR:
The concept of nuclear
superiority must be the most
absurd idea in the modern
political repertoire. To imagine
that such an idea is viable,
which, based on his February 11
comment, Dr. Arthur Broyles
must; is equally absurd.
One of his premises derives
from the archaic and false
notion that the Russians are
willing to lose as many people as
are necessary to win a war. This
is a dated and shallow insight
into the Soviet philosophy.
His use as fact of Dr. Eugene
Wigners estimate that the
Soviets could build shelters to
cut population losses to 2
million is also ridiculous since
their civil defense program is in
its infancy relative to ours and
the rapidity of nuclear warfare
has obviated the relevancy of
shelters, especially on the
outskirts of cities.

Staff Writings

Ladies and Gentlemen look
around the gymnasium and find
the nearest fire exit, please
observe the no smoking
regulation. The overture will

GDI Always Gets Stuck In The End

MR. EDITOR:
Well, we get stuck again. It seems that a GDI
cant make plans for any big weekend without being
stopped by the fraternities.
I, for one, am sick of sitting in the end zone every
fooiball 501.. Cof the a "d then getting jnoved
back ten rows for Homecoming, while fraternities
get good seats.
I,'for'one,'-am sick of voting for an honest S.G.

'La Mancha Left Audience Standing

(2) pull up the shades,
(3) throw on a trenchcoat and a pair
of hard-soled shoes (extremely
important),
(4) go down the proper fire exit, and
(5) wait until all the noses are
counted, then proceed back upstairs to
wait until the bell sounds again (usually,
about an hour later, after everyone has
gone back to sleep).
The bell, of course, signals a repeat of
the entire procedure.
As I said before, it is vital that a student
know all of this. Os course, I am not

His later statement: . . we
require a margin of safety over
their forces just to be sure that
we are even with them, is the
basis for all arms races.
Moreover, the pursuit of such a
policy has been proven to
enhance our position negligibly
because the Soviets tend to
follow suit.
The fact of the matter is that
in order to be truly superior we
need what Robert McNamara
has termed a First Strike
capability: the ability to
annihilate the enemy the first
time and reduce to nil his ability
to retaliate. Such a superiority is
not present on either side, and
to attain it would mean the
expenditure of near bankrupting
sums.
Also, due to modern missile
and warhead technology and the
absence of a first strike
capability the effectiveness of an
anti-missile missile system is a

begin in two minutes, the
emcee said.
So began the SG sponsored
production of Man of La
Mancha.

candidate, only to have him defeated by the power
plays and backroom politics of the Fraternity Blocs.
I, for\?ne, am sick of being told that there will be
no seats for me at Frolics after Ive planned my
whole weekend.
I, forgone, am sick and tired of being a a
- a student who doesnt count at the
University of Florida.
MARK SCHLEIFSTEIN, GDI
: ----- to. k. k k- to to A a A M &

pipe dream and does not warrant
the expenditure of the vast sums
needed to implement it. And
even if we did reach a first strike
capability our position would be
precarious and horridly
expensive to maintain since the
Soviets would not be blind to
our actions.
Presently both the Soviet
government and our own are
beginning to realize the
fruitlessness of massive nuclear
buildup and are feebly groping
for a solution and end to it.
Actions such as the one Dr.
Broyles suggests and the
attitudes inherent in them would
destroy this and the possibility
for real peace for many more
years and force America to
remain morally and financially
bankrupt in domestic social
programs, the true area for
massive buildup in our society.
GIL KORENBLIT, 4AS

SG succeeded in cramming
4,820 students into the Florida
Gym Sunday night to view Man
of La Mancha without the
interest of their audience at
heart.

taking into consideration the fact that if
there really ever was a fire approximately
25% of the residents would remember the
exact procedures. The rest would
probably just grab their most precious
possessions and start running!
It is because of the fact that only
residence halls and their occupants
experience the joys of fire drills that I am
registering my protest. Why cant
classroom buildings such as Little Hall,
Walker Auditorium, and Peabody Hall
stage fun fire drills like those of
elementary and high schools.

jAdriiu omjl 'DiMtot
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters
to the editor must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers names may be withheld from
publication for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters in the
interest of space.
Jennings Lunch
Last Gross-Out

MR. EDITOR:
During our last and final visit
to Jennings Cafeteria, we were
grossed^out!
While separating pieces of pie,
a woman behind the serving line
would lick the knife and
continue using it. This process
was repeated several times!
While we stared in disgust.

Towers Staircase
Wishes You Well
MR. EDITOR:
After reading the notice in the Alligator regarding the vacancies of
two Student Senate seats in the Twin Towers, I am once again
reminded of the meaninglessness of campaign promises. As a
candidate for one of the two seats in question, I well remember the
protestations we all made of our dedication to the job and our deep
interest in representing the Towers in the Senate.
It is extremely unfortunate that those who won the positions found
it necessary to move upward in the ranks of student leaders after only
one quarter. As one of their stepping-stones, Im sure the now totally
unrepresented Towers wishes them well in their climb to the top.
LINDA BAYER, 3AS

The production touched the
audience, but was marred by the
obviously hap-hazard seating
plan. The more expensive seats
resulted in neck-stretching and
back breaking for two and a half
hours.
Additional seats placed on the
gym floor to accomodate the
extras were not sufficient.
Students who purchased seats
for the upper decks found to
their dismay that there was no
room, rushed down to the floor
seats and found those seats
occupied also.
For many the production
consisted of the back of
** ie<)

Thursday, February 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Fellow students, remember those great
times when a test would be interrupted so
that we could march out onto the
sidewalk, field, etc.!
Remember those exhilarating times we
would have to repeat the fire drill 5 and 6
times!
Remember all of these things the next
time you have a fire drill in your dorm
(oops, I mean residence hall.)
Lets return the fire drill to the
classroom where it belongs!
ROBIN FORMAN, lUC

By Annette Van Dam

Are these the sanitary
conditions that the students of
the University of Florida
deserve?
LAURA SEYMOUR, lUC
LEE PARRISH, lUC
DEBY PRUITT, lUC
BARBARA KIMBALL, lUC
TERRI MONAGHAN, lUC

someones head to the
accompaniment of the Man of
La Manchas musical score.
Little men in uniform paraded
around the gym removing
occupants from one section and
placing them in a less likeable
spot.
After a 20-minute delay, the
show commenced but
latecomers, with tickets in their
possession continued to
scramble for seats that were
non-existent.
Anticipations of a quiet
evening of enjoyment were
turned into chaos.
Blessed be the day when our
campus will be the proud owners
pf a coliseum. VtVdt.Vt n i

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13,1969

Page 10

Limit One Moyannoisa of Your Choice With $5.00 or More Purchase Excluding C'g
PINEBREEZE GRADE "A" FRESH FLA. ALL WHITE CHASE 6l SANBORN
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COOKING 01L....35WPP88
WESSON OIL 39 H ID
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DOG FOOD. io/89t Cake Mixes....3/sl* Seo bHI Jr
3-oz. JELL-O JUMBO VANITY
Gelatin 6/49* Paper Towels 4/$1 Limit 1 Coffee of Your Choice with $5.00 or More Purchose Excluding Cigarettes.
46-oz. THRIFTY MAID jb m m
papple Juice 4/si. Astor Coffee 39^
an? P f /Cl 20-oz. DIXIE DARLING PRESTIGE m. dixie darling berry
It II Ab Vienna S sage 5/sl. Breod M c 2/39-
jHB m mi
nw W|Nn niYic
Mushrooms.... 4/$ 1 No Return Bottles [l J I
WINDOW BOX BRACH| FISCHERS
4-PIl G.E. STANDARD winn.oixie stores, inc.copyright-ibsb
u ht Bu,bs w 79 PW o,s- m p aA,
Del Monte 4^ll Q
No. 303 Can DEL MONTE 20-oz. DEL MONTE AAm \\\/ ( \] /)f
Cocktail...4/sl.Catsup Z/U. T rs
Peaches 3/sl.Gr. Peas 5/sl. I r Cake Mix 3/$1 (\f )
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COMPARE THESE PRICES and SAVE! rSfCT\ "USWET MKMff VjWf/Ot
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SUNNYLAND M A CV\i^l2D>s
or BUTT HALF . 59<
12 oz. BORDEN'S SINGLY WRAPPED AMERICAN
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ROUND STEAK An
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CHEESE 79* W CORN CHUC< USDA OjOICE FED BONELESS TOP SIRL^^
siloKiTriilf" 7Q( ROAST.... 59* STEAK b$ 1 39
SLirtb bologna.. 59 STEAK... 69' RIBS -59*
3-oz. TARNOW SMOKED SLIOD BEEF W M
UA mi TIIDIIiY V/ Cl USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED CALIFORNIA W-D BRAND PLATE BEEF SB
H r *K £ Y 3/51. ROAST 79 < S j EW 3 ... 99 < J'iij
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PORK STEAKS 5r n / # Q r^gK\nV/
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jyM BH** I *?,.
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Prices Good All Week
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IliuLlV fjljX WINN-DIXIE STORES. INC CO P V RIG H T 1 .6. [ HALF I
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STRAWBERRIES 3-.sl. FROZEN FOODS
FRESH HRM HEADS ||||i TASTE O'SEA PERCH 2-Lb. TASTE O' SEA BREADED PERCH
C B ? AGE Vw Eni Dinners... 39* Steaks 99*
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WASH. STATE Extra Fancy Golden or Red Delicious || /||||i # |
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Carrots 2/25* Onions 5 39* Limeade/sl. Beans 4/$ 1.
GOLDEN RIPE hah. Potatoes 89* Margarine29*
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dove. 12 oz. 35G..22-OZ 43 <. ..32 oz. B^ ZE Lu ge 4K G ANT S n -7 1\ I[|l|Â¥ TOP VAuTsTAMM I HTIW TOP VAufsffMM [[fllT i
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Thursday, February 13.1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
' ... !!
Mobile Home 8 x 30 occupancy in
the spring quarter. See at Lot L 3
3860 Archer Road SW, Town and
Country or call 392-3261 from 8 to
4. L. Shaw. (A-st-80-p)
ITS inexpensive to clean rugs and
upholstery with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-82-p)
Honda 50 good condition. Helmets
and bookrack. SBO, Call 376-3184.
(A-2t-82-p)
Mobile Home 8 x 28, 1 br., furnished,
AC, 378-7436 evenings 5 til 9.
(A-3t-82-p)
Chopper, 57 Harley, 1200 cc, FLH,
springer forks, excellent condition,
just rebuilt engine, asking $725 or
reasonable offer, contact J. Ahearn,
Reid, 2-8895. (A-2t-82-p)
EXCLUSIVE 4 bedroom, 2 baths,
plus study and large screen porch
with cypress ceiling on acre plus
walking distance of Little Westwood.
Call Helen Balyeat 372-0328;
Wiltshires 378-6160. (A-ts-79-c)
EKO Guitar hollow body Ranger VI.
Almost new, electric pick up peace
baby 90 dollars buys guitar and case.
378-5293. (A-st-80-P)
BASENJI puppies, barkless, clean,
AKC. Excellent with children. Show
or pet. Call 376-2630. (A-st-80-P)
1966 MGB-British racing. Green, wire
wheels, good condition. SI4OO or
best offer. Call Bob at 378-7748 or
see at 120 SW 25 St. (A-3t-80-P)
DALMATION pups, purebred, 11
weeks old, good to train for anything
you desire, $45 each. Call 372-3177
after 5:30 p.m. (A-3t-80-P)
12x47 Rembrant, air conditioned,
carpets, unique decor, bookshelves,
large tree shaded lot $3900.
376-0554. (A-st-80-P)
Beat the high cost of rent. Bx3o
trailer located on Archer Rd. Fully
carpeted and furnished for
$450 Call Nelson 376-9717.
(A-3t-80-P)
DIAMOND solitare engagement ring;
Call Terry at Rm 45 Buckman Hall,
372-9319. Leave message if out. $65.
Brand new, never worn. (A-st-80-P)
1968 New Moon 44x12 central heat,
air conditioned, washer, carpeting,
and furnished. Set up close to
campus. Just like new. 376-1886.
(A-st-80-P)
7.7 Japanese rifle sport, plus 37
rounds. S3O. Call 2-1780. (A-3t-81-p)
Gibson 845-12 String new with life
warranty & case, $250 or offer. Save
over SIOO off list. Call John after 11
p.m. 372-1233. (A-st-81-p)
Red Doberman puppies champion
lines, excellent temperment, male
100, females 125, wormed and
puppy shots. 378-4665 after 5.
(A-st-81-p)
Battery charger and 12 rechargeable
cells. Brand new. My cost S3O, your
cost, sls. Call 392-6026 after 5 and
ask for Bill. (A-2t-81-p)
1968 48x12 Mobile Home central air
washer carpeted living room 1 bdrm.
just like new. Browns Trailer Park,
Lot 14. Call 376-9005. (A-st-81-p)
I FOR RENT |
Modern, air-conditioned apartment
close to campus, private bedroom,
study area, share bath and kitchen.
378-9453. (B-st-79-p)

;.j*.wwcw>:.:.:.%%v.ssv.v.vviyw:*:*X*x*X*
FOR RENT
>ww;?ws*:wx-:-x*:oo*x*x*x<*x-:xxxx*' i
Camelot Apts. 1 br. with turret;
furnished, central heat and air,
dishwasher, ww carpet, sauna bath,
pool. Must sublease, call 376-8714
(B-st-79-p)
Effieiency apartment suitable for
one, two or three. AC pool 1513 NW
5 Ave. Thru third quarter or longer
$75 per month. Call 376-8990.
(B-10t-80-P)
Sublet Camelot Apt for spring and
summer quarter. 3 looking for 4th.
Senior or grad coed to share 2
bedroom 2 bath apt with Spanish
decor, overlooking pool. Call
378-8458 after 6:30. (B-4t-80-P)
Must sublet 2 bdrm. Landmark Apt.
spring & summer quarters, keep our
security deposit. 378-8594.
(B-st-82-p)
SWMVWKVKWaWWWMWWW
WANTED
Need 1 male roommate 42.50 plus
half of util. 2 bdrm. on NW 19 Ave.
Call Bill 372-6278 between 6 & 10.
(C-st-78-p)
I need a ride to New Orleans Feb. 13
or 14. Call 378-5927. (C-3t-81-p)
Interesting & friendly grads, faculty
6 staff & students over 21 for
singles mixer at Lamplighter every
Friday. See Personal for details.
(C-3t-81-p)
One female roommate wanted to
share one bdr. apt. Across from
Norman Hall SSO mo. & utilities. Call
378-8053. (C-3t-81-p)
Female roommate Landmark apt.
$45 monthly, must be hip to tolerate
3 guys no hangups involved as
roommate. Call Andy or Richard
376-3424. (C-3t-81-p)
1, 2 or 3 roommates female
Landmark, Spring Quarter.
378-8594. (C-st-82-p)
HELP WANTED 1
RATHSKELLER auditions Mon.
night, Feb. 24 at 8:00. Open to all.
Come do your thing or just come
listen. (E-st-80-C)
WAITRESS OR CURB HOSTESS
convenient for students full or part
time. Above average pay plus tips.
Uniforms furnished, experience not
necessary, will pay while training.
For interview call 378-2481 or come
by Jerrys Restaurant, 1505 NW 13th
St. (E-st-80-P)
Salesmen part time. Good money.
Call 376-1306 after 5 p.m.
(E-st-78-p)
Savages Camp Mountain Lake,
Hendersonville, N.C. Boys and girls
6-16: for counselors job, call
378-0285 any evening; interviews
Sunday, February 16, 1-4 p.m. at
University Inn (E-st-80-P)

NOW AT ... 1:30 3:30 5:30
Bb'yfVfWE 1 GOOD GRIEF IT'S lai: 1
11 candy \ fcA Mi
Technicolorcrc ir |_sj
J ACCIDENT
In.w. i3th st -t23rd rd|
Telephone 378 2434 U |
1 c unuels £Masterpiece ofTLrotica!
MUfk. "A REALLY BEAUTIFUL MOVIE!"
New York Times
SamStlMk BRILUANT! Luis Bunuel Bunuellli
lli Bunuellli 3 fl£ cinematic erotica!"
I ** ur^ RViW
"YES, JOUR' IS SENSATIONAL, it *
does let's be honest about this turn you CATHERINE DENEUVE
on!"
WINNER BEST PICTURE
. Life Magazine Venice film festival
1 <0

Page 12

J, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13, 1969

| HELP WANTED I
';T>X ; X*X.>>X X*X*XXNSXM*>>>X*X*X:iSS!J!
RELIABLE help wanted, male,
mature student for 3-4 hrs early Sat.
a.m.; must have reliable
transportation; permanent job. Call
FRASER 376-4912 ANYTIME.
(E-st-77-P)
s*x*x*x*x-x*x*x*xxixwxi w*x*x x*x*xix?*;
AUTOS
, x*x*Mix:srw*x*: x*: >xiSTWX*:< e | W.r
Porsche, 1963. Super red-black
interior, air conditioning, AM-FM
radio, Pirelli radials. $2900.
376-0554. (G-st-80-P)
1968 VW Karmann Ghia. Radio, WW,
automatic stick-shift (no clutch),
21,000 miles (still under warranty)
Phone 392-9475 after 6 p.m.
(G-st-78-p)
59 MGA 1500 good cond. must sell,
going into service, S4OO. Call
378-0286 or 372-3572. (G-st-81-p)
Mustang 65, low mileage, excellent
condition, state inspected. Must see
and drive to appreciate. $995, 26 SW
24 St., 376-7456 after 5. (G-3t-82-p)
62- Ply. 6 cyl, radio & heater, 4 good
ww tires. A little body work & a seat
cover would make it a great car
runs well. S2OO. 376-9941.
(G-3t-82-p)
Volkswagen 1965 deluxe sedan beige,
$795. Phone 378-9081. (G-st-79-p)
;NXss*w<*x<*x*xx*xx->x:x*x.ss:^;
PERSONAL
>
vr*:xs?w : ; :*x*x*x-:sss : : x*x*x*x*NSS!K*: x*x
JEW prosecuted in The Fixer Arab
killings, Iraquian hangings! We
cannot watch any longer. Our
Conscience objects. If yours does
PLEASE join us at the Plaza of
Amer. Sun, Feb. 16 at 2 p.m. Youre
needed! For further info call
392-9865. (J-3t-81-p)
Aunt Jemima invites one and all to
Browards pancake breakfast, on
Sunday, Feb. 16, from 10:00 til 2:00
in the Rec Room. All you can eat for
50c! Proceeds go to Gator Loan
Fund. (J-3t-81-p)
Time is running out to reserve your
seat for EUROPE this summer, $315
10 wks. N.Y. London N.Y. or 90
for credit 392-1655 or 310 Union.
(J-st-82-c)
The Friday Afternoon for the
single university crowd over 21 will
meet this & every Friday from 5-7:30
at the Lamplighter. Private rooms,
pleasant atmosphere. Drinks 45c|
ladies 20c. Come early & bring your
friends. Fridays a great day to have
fun and drink away midterm worries
(J-2t-77-p)
A free university in a Democratic
nation. SSOC needs dorm and
off-campus housing contacts for
campus canvassing on issues that
effect your life. Write SSOC, Box
13636, Univ. Sta. or call 376-5044
(J-st-81-P)

| PERSONAL
Jennings Hall invites everyone on
campus to a dance featuring the
Nation Rocking Shadows. Feb. 14 9
pm 1 am. Free. Jennings Rec
Room. (J-3t-81-p)
| LOST & FOUND £
Cream colored male short haired
puppy with flea collar lost Monday
near the Krystal. Shall the circle be
unbroken? E Pluribus Unim.
378-1131. (L-3t-82-p)
Lost: SH-133 notebook & Botany
Lab manual. Appreciate return if
found. Call 378-7562. Reward.
(L-2t-82-p)

ALIBI LOUNGE |
Now has entertainment 6 nights a I
week. Featuring I
The Siting Richard Parker 4 I
Thur., Fri., Sat, I
And for your Listening Pleasure I
Chuck Conlon I
Sings and plays the Gibson I
Mon., Tues., Wed. |
n love
*llft js. y un 9 man t,ancl ? ||j|||££^|ll|
Based on the Pulitzer + MIMiELjX
Prize winning novel .*
by Bernard Malamud. TJc ;nThe mm/i
F wFfw v 1
I The Best Suspense Western!
Since High Noon.!
i'Jx *(i
rOCrriDV NATION AL GEN ER AL PICTURES Presents
GREGORY PECK EVA MARIE SAINT
in a Pakula-Mulligan Production of
\Ej* the stalking moon

| LOST FOUND §
Lost: motorola Pageboy" paging
beeper in University handball courts.
Reward. 376-7655. (L-st-82-p)
GAINESVnir'^Sr
2400 HAWTHORN! ROAD-ROUT! 20
The Undergraduates
vsJTieOvei^hirties!
BTHHMpSaiBL?YEARS|
|thcplit|
-



m bi
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

W<.KXXIX>:t;IVI W<.KXXIX>:t;IVI
- W<.KXXIX>:t;IVI LOST & FOUND 1
>:
WXCC'X'^W'SjiNVAV.V.WX'X'XtXtX.y.v.vy
Lost: looseleaf notebook containing
notes to all my classes lost last Thurs.
If found please call 378-5201, Ask
for Joe. Reward. (L-2t-81-p)
Have you found her? A small, dark
grey striped horny female cat is
missing in Village Park area. Reward
CaU 378-9088. (L-2t-81-p)
SERVICES I
Lonely? Head needs help? Let om
help you as it's helped millions, om
cares, om will help you. Low rates.
Call 372-5457 or 372-1360.
(M-st-79-p)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)

I Students Rate Profs? |

Students should have an
influential voice in evaluating
the merits of their professors.
A guide to elective courses
should supplement the catalog
to help students choose courses.
Information like student ratings
of the instructor and the
curriculum as well as a
description of the workload
should be included.
These are recommendations
recently made to President
OConnell by the Presidents
Committee on Teaching
Evaluation.
Composed of nine faculty
members and two students, the
committee presented these
proposals in a series of four
recommendations which it
unanimously passed.
The first stated that all
teaching faculty should
participate in a teacher
evaluation program. The results
of the first evaluation would be
sent only to the teacher. Later
ratings would go to the
department chairman and dean
as well.
The second recommendation
emphasized self-determination
for colleges. They would decide
which courses would be given
first priority in the evaluation.
We feel strongly that if the
evaluation effort does not have
college backing, it will do less
good. Each college had its own
special problems...which cannot
be forseen and handled from
central administration, the
report said.
The third recommendation
provided that each college
should work with the Institute

THURSDAY SPECIAL I
11AM 9 PM I
HOT ROAST BEEF
Served with I
FRENCH FRIES
cole slaw M m Ml I
HOT ROLLS MC I
& BUTTER I
1225 w UNIV. AVE. I
j^BLOCK_F£Q^£A^PUS__|

XX'! !'!*NNSVAv;v;*;vxX(y,y//Xv;v>;*Xv!*!* l 'i'
SERVICES
alg i?? n y ur car? Call Bill,
6 pm 37? S 4 Q^ erience CaM after
(M-3 P t"Ji- p ? 72 4921 r 378-9124.
itisfart S n RACKET
fnrt rtS 9Uaranteed Pickup
Can M ,ve a ry n and near campus.
37 a 8-24 M B9. a ( n M d -18?-59 T p e ) nniS S*"* 6s
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Typing done in my home.
Dissertations, theses, term papers etc.
Call 376-4058. (M-3t-80-P)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)

of Higher Education to find an
instrument of evaluation best
suited for them.
The fourth recommendation
briefly described the elective
course guide. The Committee
intends to work with Student
Governments teacher-course
evaluation program in
for initiating more specific
recommendations. Similar guides
from other schools are being
used as models.
A major obstacle for the SG
program at present is that no
funds have been alloted to it.
Committee chairman Dr. Corbin
Carnell added a recommendation
to the report that money be
alloted to the project, perhaps
from the recent Esso grant for
the improvement of teaching.
Not mentioned in the report
was a fifth recommendation
which the committee later
passed suggesting that recent
alumni be included in the
evaluation program. Their
different perspective in judging
their professors and courses
might prove helpful, the
committee decided.
Members of the Presidents
Committee are Dr. Harry H.
Griggs (journalism), Dr. A.
Gerald Langford (English), John
S. Kitts (music), Dr. John
OConnell (chemical
engineering), Dr. R.F. Palmer
(pharmacology), James E. Pace
(animal science), Dr. William
Purkey (education) and Richard
B. Stephens (law).
Student representatives are
David Birk, chairman of the SG
teacher-course evaluation
program, and Linda Miklowitz.

| SERVICES
S ft
Impuesto sobre ingresos lncome
Llame 376-8605 por la manana
y despues de las 5 pm sabado todo el
dia. Se Habla Espanol. (M-7t-78-p)
'

(COED muni)
\ ALL LADIES DRINKS I
J
iSSIHIBSTY
REITZ UNION THEATRE
jf'T JANUS FILMS PRESENTS THE ARCTURUS COLLECTION
lipnrjf a collection of brilliant short films
mm by the directors of the 60's<4 70's)
/jT
535* *-**** muMSTii *
AT THE SELLOUT PREMIERE AT LINCOLN CENTERS PHILHARMONIC HALL THE CRITICS SAID:
"Santa Claus Came 49 Weeks Early "Extremely Worthwhile" "An Excellent Cross-Section" "Like a Breath of Fresh Air
Judith Crist, world journal tribune cue magazine cbs boston globe
PROGRAM NO. 1
Enter Hamlet Fred Mogubgub, US A. February* 13, 14, 15, 16
Renaissance Walerian Bcrowczyk, Poland .. ___ ___
Les Mistons 67 Francois Truffaut, France 3 Shows daily: 6:00, 7:30, 11:00
Runnini, Jumping and Standing Still Film Richard Lester, England AHuaiuv au .il.hlA
Two Castles Bruno Bozzetto, Italy MQVance TICKBXS avaiiaOl
The Fit lend the Lean Roman Polanski, Poland Reitz Union Box Office
Corrida Interdite Denys Colomb de Daunant, France w
Allures Jordan Belson, U S A. 75centS admission
la Jetde Chris Marker, France
Thasa motion pictures have collectively won almost every major short film award in the world, including: s
Mannhtim Festival Golden Ducat; Venice Film Festival Silver Lion of St. Mark; F.I.P.R E S.C.I. (international Film Critics Association) Ist Prize;
Oberhausen Festival of the Short Film First Prize; Prix Simon Debreuilh (Mannheim Best Short Film of the Year's Festivals; Mar del Plata; Bilbao;
Leipzig Festivals; San Francisco Film Festival Golden Gate Award; International Experimental Film Competition; International Federation of Cine Clubs
Prize; Tours Festival of the Short Film Special Jury Prize; London Film Festival Selection; New York Film Festival Selection; Cannes Film Festival
Official French Entry; Official Belgian Entry; Annecy Festival of the Animated Film Special Jury Prize; Bergamo Festival of Films on Art Diploma; Triesta
Festival of Science Fiction Films Grand Prize; Prix JEAN VIGO French Film Critics Award; Cracow Festival of the Short Film; Milan- Ist Prize of
International Technical Industry of the Cinema; Melbourne Film Festival Ist Prize.

gjllSlllMHlfl STARTS TODAY!
EXCLUSIVE FIRST SHOWING
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
ADELE MATTHEWS GEORGE PEPPARD
JEAN SERERG
never l RICHARD KILEY.
HAVE AN
AGAIN v
i I jf^^ ANKENSTE 1N CREATED

Thursday, February 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



p&at&tpu
Red Cabbage .2 '£"'49 c Cherry, Florida
| NibletsCorn 3 . f M IAII#
Prices Effective MMI/;! White Acre PeOS 4 $ 1 ""
Kidney Beans .4 US. 59 c 4 $|
£39* Cocktail Peanuts-r-69= Umi p1 ..,
*Spicy"Hearts ~39* ; S!^ te 49 PHlsury FlOUr
Creme Hearts 39' | /. Ug 49*
\ "To My Valentine" ni. OOc 3
~ * XQC :: Olives ran JV
- neans pk OT r r .,. V. oatmeal 10c-off label, Detergent
Box i.491 S^ ies 3 39 s ianf Cheer
i/ Plus Green Stamps Coupon purchase Vanilla Wafers . pkg. 39 c mUt A' --
A I 1.00 or more any of the above listed Orach's Valentino 3 u Mm OC
V w *-j-vr nc 11 pkg. B *ar
Fresh Pork Sandwiches .... pack 4y
clnen| |l#|al* OQC Roalemon Reconstituted (Limit 1 please with Other purchases of
bnouiaer ricnics . ' * v Lemon Jujce r 39 c 5 .0 0 ., -.....x<-.
Boston Butts b. 49 e dfr||i specials s.ar-Ki.t tight M .t
£-?* Margarine" £3l* 1 Chunk TUIId
' stoakS oeeeoeeeeee Ik. Wisconsin Choose Bor Tasty
Tasty Loan Fresh Pork Longhom Cheese Tb. 79 c 6 ca ns 2
Beef Liver E. r 65 e i Frosh Sharp Cheddar. pro. 75 .1.
Cogolend's Tarty Old Fashion -j | -* O C Armour's Doliclou. Frosh Pillsbury Asst. Flavors
Braunschweiger 1" 49 c OI"k MOCkS e#oe |b v # Pimento Spread cup 49 c mm*
Harman's Orange-land L.bol Breakstones Imitation CQKG MAIXQS
Herman s Wieners pk.49 c MMllil 2-11*. 00c * 00
Coolc-Q.ik Breadod SCIUerkVXIUt OOpk 9. 33 PHUbury Cr..on, 9 re 9- $1
Veal Steaks pl£! 89 C Swift's Premium Wafer-Thin Dinner Rolls can 39 c P k 9*
9 c Swift's Premium Asst. F.avors ~ hal#
Link Sausage ... pkg. 69 Swift's Premium Butter-Basted SI lewd * S Turkey & frozen foods Pillsbury Pie
t Piet sweet Frozen Florida Orange Cone. m e > 9 1/2-0 Z. edb.
Gravy Orange Juice 2 £ 69 c CrUST MIX P k 9. IV
Dellelous Sliced Red-fy. it New Colgate Pre-Soak
Virginia Ham,£ *1.49 l h "^f ocktail 3 '* New Axion ST 79*
TTe . went English Muffins 2Si 49' |
Smoked Daisies Is. 89 1 iik Crisco Oil £T 39 e
Armour's Star Flavorful Mira Cure BrOd DOUgh 3 leavos 59 FB.P Bartlett
Sliced Bacon.. it 65* 39= Pear Halves 3C $ 1
Birds lyo with Brown Sugar. Froson Dele Low-Cal Fruit
___ ___ Sweet Potatoes .S, 1 39 c r A rUtni o # 303 EQc
Bird. (y. Froson VtOCKTUII O Cans 3T
Broccoli Spears .. X* 33 C Green Giant Cream Style Golden
Booth's Quick-Frozon W* C C
9 c orn O an. av
. ...... Lykes Delicious
Sandwich Thins .X 1 49 c |j Chill With Beans 4 # on. $ 1
Artsassi w£££3 -"--. astn
mm mu c0.f0.... 01 ne.a :
i Singleton's Family-Pack "" down produce tone
Frozen Breaded Shrimp tight told! eed lie with huh i #
- I GRAPEFRUIT 5* IBiJkJBF
~ . Whitts Shrimn 1. 5] oq
IVyt EXTRA Dr. Nuoy-s root stock (in bud A bloom) YV niftf OrUIITip ...lb. 1.07
ROSEBUSHES ...h s l 79 7 s<
WITH TNIt COUPON ANO PUICMASI OP IfiSfll .. e.
U.S. No. 1 all purpos Famou* Oscar Mayor Brand V y OOO /^^;
*r^!d* POTATOES 89 c Plump Wieners .. ii: 69'
Assorted Klees t Swift's Premium Tasty Frosh
reg.pki. ; m n.ru. Sliced Bologna 59 ~i,
9 C deli specials
I EXTRA Florida Sno-whito Sllcod Chopped Ham or Slicod
CAULIFLOWER 3*-**! Cookcdsdomi r- 49 a/nimiiyv| 1014 N. MAIN ST.
"7'.:'L" 7 I Sr.TlKiinrinp tn 8 Health Salad 39 e I'l lUDLIA /I m C im OdU CT
b...',5, u D ANJOU PEARS .. 8 t., 59< |te....,.*l 125 SW. 34th ST.
Boneless Society Ham Carrot Sa ad p .!. e
44. (ixpiret Sot- Feb. is. i*4) Gallon can sizo potted .. b. OT
AZALEAS e each 99 c S Bar~B-QChickens g 79 c BKiti^l 2630 NW 13th ST.
E3^?(?H l !lS! l P^3!l!H?ffH l !lt?l"il s feJjl!H?(^!!^!l!l s &^|i|lk*tiwnStani|ispgHltoreMrst3miisl
_ I WITU THIS couron AMS FUICHASS OF HiDadM
Forman s Regular Swift's Premium Roll Style [ Tarnow's Oven Ready Ii ; Fox Deluxe : I ....
or Hot Piccalilli ; Pork Sausage <;t Meat Loaf ; Cheese Pizza < Valley Frost Frozen
12-oz. jar 1-lb. pkg. < I lVz-lb. or 2Vz-lb. | 14-oz. pkg. [ Whole Strawberries
|| 47 (Sxpire, Sot- Feb. IS. ,969) || .. re. Set- Feb. . j | 49. ..Kylres So,- ,949, J I ## IV*-lb. bag <
wooooooooc>oaaoOftAofeAAAAAaflflflAflflflAeAlrWOOOA^vftA^^Artr,nA^Pcho^ a^^^r.finnnnnftft v r^ftftftftflftftfiflftnt)flflftftn t ft y |ftflflftftaa^nr|nr)ann ?S nnnn I JIV*!*! |

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13,1969

Page 14



I Thursday, February 13.1969, The Florida Alligator,

1 / j [|/v(v WHILE THEY LAST! ("'N.
Throw'Rugs ... *2<£^x
to make you I
[cand your home) more beautiful. ft) I
Extra S&H Groan Stamps (when you clip & redeem these coupons)
reenStam ps reenSta mps mps fill reenSta mos fill UWG reeiTsta mps
WITH TMII AMO with WITH WITH THIS COUPON AND PUICHAU OF BiialifliMLfl WITH THII COUfON AND TUICHAtI OT HKaiitfl
IVI qt. Oval Casserole $|J ___ u "jit J :
I" Square Cake Pan 1| Crest Reg. or || Poliden* Tablets 11 5x9 Deep Loaf Pan M Tooth Paste || <]> Any Adult Tooth Brush j > .
mq. Utility Baker || 5 OX. size If 40 Ct. <1 4 (..p, s.b. <1 CeP< *iJ?Jl t hWa,h
1 qt. Casserole 1. (Expires Set., tab. IS, 19*9) * (Expire. Sat., Seb. 15, 1*69) < £ < * .....
1. (Ixpires Set., Feb. IS, 1900) J > ] > * (Expires Set., Seb. IS, 19*9) <
I [ifl G reenSta mps [ 111 W G reenSta mps j [ill G reen R ftam ps [ 111 G reenSta mps rpl| fill G ree mps
BbJbbl WITH THIS COUtON AND PUKCHASt Os RKoiiiiIHHHBMHB WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCHASE OF WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCHASE OF WITH THII COUPON AND PUICHASI OT WITH THIS COUPON ANO PURCHASE OF IkloSSidH
B ll Prell Liquid Shampoo || Dep Setting Gel ;[ > Miss Breck Reg. or < l Adorn Hair Spray I
Skin Lotion || 1V u || Crystal Pink or Super < > Super Hair Spray | | _
7 OX. bot. II 11V2 OZ. hot. || 7 16 ox. size | is h-t 6.4 oz. or 13.7 oz. ;
mb yb*> Ilvnirei Sat Fab IS 19691 U OZe DOle < b
B* (Sxpires Set., Feb. 15, I 960) |>> *' (Ixpire, Set., Seb. 15. || (Sxpi,.. Set.. Feb. IS, 1*69) |; (Expires Sat., Feb. IS, 1969) if 10 (Ixpire. Set.. Seb. IS. ISOS) J
I[l 11G r eenSta mp s [ill] W G reenSta mps [ill Green Sta mps fTI G reen j [ill ]> HJhAmI WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCHASE OF WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCHASE OF WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCHASE OF WITH THIS COUPON AND PU RC HASB OF KmbIUhJLJ WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCHASE OF HbttiilH
II Gillette Foamy 11 Right Guard J ; Hai Karate II Wilkinson Stainless Steel j > Arrid Extra-Dry
| Lemon-Lime, Reg., Menthol If Spray Deodorant H Shave Lotion ][ Razor Blades j; ; Deodorant
11 oz. can <|| 4 oz. can J | 4 oz. size || 5 et. pkg. | J 5. oz. size
| 11. (Sxpires Set., Feb. IS, 1f69) J | ,a (Sxpires Set., Sab. IS, 19**) <> |# (Sxpires Set., feb. IS, 19**) | T ,4 (Sxpires Sol., Feb. IS, 1969) j J IS. (Expires Sat., Sab. IS. I**9) J
I [ill fulfil [pJ [if 11 G reenSta mps
WITH THIS couroN AND rusCHASi or WITH THIS couroM ANO WITH THIS courow AND rUSCHASS or WITH THII WITH Bbiiii
IS* **s*
; Vick's Formula "44" !| Pail ,, < Johnson's Baby Shampoo Two Pkgs. Alka Seltzer One-A-Day Vitamins or
! Cough Syrup I P < 7 oz. bot. 25's Vitamins with Iron
; 6 oz. or 3Vi oz. size jj; 10 Ct | (.xp.r.. s.b. is. i***, ;!* i*. .xpir.. 5.. s.b. is. i*.*, j 100 ct. hot.
i I*. (Expires Set., Seb. IS, I**9) [jj i >7- (Sxpires Set., Seb. IS, 19*9) J; > J: J J | (Sxpires Set., Seb. IS, 19*9) J
a a a a A&AAAhAA ft ft ft ft p AAAAAAAAbAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!^^gAAAAAAAAAAAAAl l AAAAAAAAAbAft A BftAAAAAaaaAaehr
j[l 11 reenStam ps reenSta mps [ill reeiTsta mps fill WG reenSta mps [ill I I Bayer Aspirin if Q Tips Cotton Swabs 1: If ToTuqUid If Capri Bath Oil 1
100 t. ; I n 7 p* 1 * | | 3 oz. or 5 oz. size 11 or 4 et blot* || 32 OZ. size 1
*l. (Expires Set.. Seb. IS. 19*9) <| 11. (Sxpires Set., Seb. IS, I**9) 1! j M (Ixplres Set.. IS. I***> if 14 (Sxpires let.. Seb. IS, 19*9) If IS. (Expires Set. Seb. IS. 19*9) I
I hfinfinnftnnnAnnnnnn*'*fIfIaftnr>nfra**aftaAHIUtAAAAftftAAftAftAA^X^^^AAAAAAAAAAAAI!AAAAAAAAAAAAAftAAAKXAAAAAAAAftAAAAAAAAbAAAeeeAAAAAAg^KW^AAAyAAAAAAAAAAIWAAAAAAAAAAAAAIUUbJc
mps reenStamps [ 111 l^WGreenSfa mps ll II mps JwG reenS>amps^3
IMoxzema Skin Cream i| Lysol Spray Disinfectant 11 Anacin Tablets j I Mennen Sos Stroke S Dristan Decongestant I
6 oz. size If 7oz. can | 100 ct. I Rog. or Menthol | a4 ct. or SO ct .... j
I*. (Expires Set. Seb. IS. I***) (Expire. Set. Seb. IS. 19*9) 3 1. (Sxpires Seb. IS, 19*9) j f (Sxpires Set., Seb. IS, I**9) ff * (Sxpires Set., Seh. IS, 19*9)
i t-JISaSr I Oeermoy Coffee Silters I | Srs£ i
,JZZZ. T ,V.L, jf j: |: JZZpTnm j
p 'EXTRA B" EXTRA
|[lTil^GreenstanipsWlflliM^GreenStanipsPa|l|lMwGreenStampsP!l|lHl^GreenStampspallllMWGreenStampsPo
|| 11 a AA -_. ft' Swing-A-Way Wall Typo
I 50 lbs. Swift's Vigoro I f Any Mop or Broom if SI.OO or more of any Candy. Opener
I* 7 (Sxpires Set., Seb. IS, 19*9) If (Expires Set.. Seb. IS, 19*9) If <,K# If *. (Ixpire. Set Seb. IS. 19*9) I
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flilll^GreenStampsPj|flll^G reenStamps fa-M+Qliftpk*Pb** p^|
UuLJ with .... coerox A , kdULAJ with ' rWPrCWt
I Biuotte Rubber ll c '* ***** | Prices are effective in all Publlx Markets tHURrV fl MOfiS
I j Thurs, Fri, Sat Feb. 13, 14, 15,1969 'SAWM6S

Page 15



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13, 1969

Page 16

STRENGTH IN MANPOWER
Samson Is Conceived

(Editors note): This is the
first of a two part series
explaining the conception,
development and goals of the
UFs Project SAMSON.
Almost a year ago, in March
1968, Mike Wittman was a
section adviser in Buckman Hall.
Many of the men in that hall
knew Wittman and frequently
came by to talk with him. One
night, a foreign student came to
Wittmans room with something
on his mind.
He had become keenly aware
of the recial unrest, crime and
poverty in America. He asked
Wittman why more Americans
didnt help their fellow
countrymen who are
underpriviledged.
Wittman didnt know. He
wondered himself.
That night the idea for the
Project SAMSON Coordinating
Group, took root.
A few days later Wittman
contacted several other
University of Florida students to
see if they believed there was a
need for a student group
interested in helping the
underpriviledged in this
community.
Their unanimous feeling was
that surely the most affluent
generation this country has
known could do something to
help those who were less
fortunate. An Executive Board
was established to organize
SAMSON.
From its conception,
SAMSON was a rather unique
idea. Its initial purpose was not
to originate projects of its own,
but to coordinate and offer the
one thing most existing projects
for the underpriviledged in
Alachua County lacked
enough manpower.
In its capacity as
coordinator, Wittman explains,
SAMSON serves as a liaison
between interested students and
local anti-poverty agencies. It
informs students about the
programs in need of their talents
and, in turn, lets these agencies
know what talent is available.
The biblical SAMSON was
r
STUDY IN
CUERNAVACA
Learn to speak SPANISH
Intensive courses, with drills,
supervised labs, and theory
taught by experienced Mexican
teachers.
$135 per month.
Study in the INSTITUTE FOR
CONTEMPORARY LATIN
AMERICAN STUDIES.
Examine themes such as "Protest
and its Creative Expression in
Latin America" and "The Role
of Education in Social Change"
in 10 to 30 new courses each
month.
Access to excellent library.
* S3O per credit.
Live in CUERNAVACA
Near Mexico City, *t 4,500 feet
elevation, with Mexican families
or in dorms or bungalows.
Approx. SBO per month.
Request catalog from
Registrar Cidoc W.
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Cuernavaca, Mexico
k. A

noted for his strength. Project
SAMSONs strength lay in the
UFs student body, for it was
from this pool of human
resource that SAMSON could
draw to man already existing
projects which needed help.
SAMSONs originators had
another essential purpose in
mind to organize a structure
which would keep programs
from crumbling when students
graduated or went home for
holidays and summers.
We felt, says one SAMSON
founder, that a good deal of
disappointment, frustration and
mistrust could be eliminated
among the people SAMSON
sought to help if provisions were
made to avoid leaving projects in
mid-stream.

Does it really work?

If you ve ever resorted to NoDoz at 4 a. m.
the night before an exam, youve probably
been disappointed.
NoDoz, after all, is no substitute for
sleep. Neither is anything else we can
think of.
What NoDoz is is a very strong stim stimulant.
ulant. stimulant. In fact, NoDoz has the strongest
stimulantyou can buy without a prescrip prescription.
tion. prescription.
Caffeine.
Whats so strong about that?
If we may cite The Pharmacological
Basis of Therapeutics: Caffeine is a
powerful central nervous stimulant. Caf Caffeine
feine Caffeine excites all portions of the central
nervous system. Caffeine stimulates all
portions of the cortex, but its main action
is on the psychic and sensory functions.
It produces a more rapid and clearer flow
of thought and allays drowsiness and
fatigue. After taking caffeine, one is ca capable
pable capable of more sustained intellectual ef effort
fort effort and a more perfect association of
ideas. There is also a keener apprecia appreciation
tion appreciation of sensory stimuli.
Very interesting. But why take

Once Wittman and his
Executive Board had established
SAMSONs philosophy and
purposes, they approached
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor to see whether student
government would sponsor such
an undertaking.
SG lent SAMSON full support
and funded it as a special
presidential project. Secretary of
Student Affairs John OShea
joined SAMSON forces, and the
project was officially off the
ground.
SAMSONs core group took
great care in charting their way
in the beginning. They felt that a
well organized, sound
foundation was essential for the
livelihood of the project.

A/^\

Thursday, February 20, 1969
igJL, CIVIL ENGINEERING
IB SENIORS!
YOUR FUTURE CAN BE IN TRANSPORTATION!
Our expanding transportation engineering
program includes an annual billion dollars in
highway construction.
No Exam-Tuition refunds for Graduate Study.
See our recruiter on February 27. Visit your
Placement Office Now for brochures and SIGN UP to hear
the full story, or write to:
Director of Manpower
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
State Campus Building 5, Albany. New York 12226

NoDoz when you can get caffeine in a
, cup of coffee?
Very simple. You take NoDoz all at
once i nstead of si ppi ng coffee for 10 mi n nutes.
utes. nutes. And if you take two NoDoz tablets,
the recommended dosage, you get twice
the caffeine in a cup of coffee.
Two tabletsisnt that likely to be
habit forming? Definitely not. NoDoz is
completely non-habit forming.
Which means its safe to take
whether youre cramming at night. Or
about to walk into an 8 oclock c,ass. Or
driving somewhere (even though youre
rested) and the monotony of the road
makes you drowsy.
One last thing you should know
about NoDoz. It now comes in two forms.
Those familiar white pills you take with
water. And a chewable tablet called
NoDoz Action Aids*. It tastes like a choc chocolate
olate chocolate mint, but it does everything regular
NoDoz does.
And if youve managed /

MRS. LOIS C. BENTON

will interview graduate students in all
liberal arts fields at the placement office
for the 155 colleges, universities, schools
of theology, and elementary and secondary
schools of The United Methodist Church.



Gators Bounce Tigers9s-79

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UFs Gators couldnt stop
Pistol Pete Maravich
Wednesday night, but they did
cool the LSU Tigers 95-79.
Maravich, with 14 points in
the last two minutes of play,
accumulated a total 50 points,
but shot a poor .333 percentage
from the floor.
The Gators tried a 1-3-1 trap
defense, with one man coming
out to double team Maravich, to
stop Pistol Pete. The defense
was successful in holding the rest
of the Tigers to a cool .310 field
goal percentage.
UF dominated play, except
midway through the first half
when LSU tied the score up
23-23. The Gators had jumped
out to an early lead, and wound
up the half leading by seven
points.
LSU, switching from their
usual man-to-man defense,
tried to stop All-American Neal
Walk with a 1-2-2 defense.

flj
H H ; %' --v-

-* #
Good Morning.
Saturday is the day the Gators
get their chance to play giant
killers against the third ranked
team in the nation Kentucky.
They will get their chance on
a regionally televised network.
Several weekends ago, Sports
Network Inc. telecast the
Georgia-UF game in Athens new
Held house. It was a poor
commentary on student support
at UG. Lets dont have the same
thing happen here.
The Gator athletic
department has contacted
fraternity, sorority and dorm
groups asking them to bring
banners identifying themselves
when the camera pans the
crowd.
Lets show the Wildcats what
wild really means.
*
Who did I hear say Alabama
doesnt have a chance to win the
Southeastern Conference
basketball title?
As theyre saying in Tide
territory: All we have to do is
win fourteen of our last ten
games.
*
For those of you who may
have missed her highness,
Madalyn Murray last Friday
afternoon, the noted athiest did
bring out one point of note to
the sports fan.
Yes, I am against prayers
before football games, said the
gray-haired, paunchy speaker.
Providing, of course, that they
are said for a state-supported
team. Theres nothing you can
do about the others.
Then she added: There are
some teams however, for which
the only hope is prayer.
She may be loud but she may
SHANNONS
24-bour
WRECKER
7th St. & SER W372-1379
W.Univ.- NIGHT 376-4009

UF On Candid Camera

'Pistol' Pete Gets 50

Walk was not to be denied, as
he scored on 12 of 20 field goals
and 10 of 14 free throws for 34
points. The 6-foot-10 center also
took down 22 rebounds in
leading the Gators to victory.

Medicine Men Begin
The first session of the Sports Medicine Seminar begins today at 9
a.m. at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center Auditorium.
A Trainer s Experience in the Use of Cryotherapy in the Care of
Athletic Injuries at the 1968 Olympic Games by David Wike, Trainer
at the University of Miami, should provide interesting facts on the
United States team at the high altitude Olympics at Mexico City.
Other discussions scheduled for Thursdays sessions focus on
pre-competition physical examination and conditioning of the athlete.
Distinguished faculty participating in the seminar include Dr. Fred
L. Allman Jr., president of the American College of Sports Medicine
and Dr. Carl S. Blyth, University of North Carolina, chairman of both
the NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical
Aspects of Sports and the American Football Coaches Associations
Committee on Football Injuries and Fatalities.
Nine specialists from the College of Medicine faculty, the Student
Health Service and the College of Physical Education and Health at
the UF will also participate in the seminar. All participating physicians
will have to pay a registration tee, but non-participating observers will
be admitted free, as space permits.

THE CLIPBOARD

be right on that point.
*
Theres a downtown
Gainesville morticians
apprentice who says hed like to
match his talent against Cassius
Clay in the art of boxing.
When I box them, they stay
boxed, he claims.
*
Sincerely hope none of the
stock car drivers at this months
Daytona 500 make the same
mistake a prominent Kentucky
Derby horse did recently.
Section seven; part one of the
official NASCAR regulations
states: Any participant who
shows evidence upon medical
examination of having used any
stimulating or tranquilizing drug
must leave the premises
immediately and will be subject
to penalty.. .
*
Burr Heishman, manager of
Gainesville Dragway is quite a
promoter. Perhaps next to Track
Coach Carnes, he takes the cake.
Hes now thinking of bringing
Miss Florida State University *o
visit the local track to match
Miss UF, Karin Ostlund, whos
made quite a name for her
gearshifting.
Heishman will also be coming
up with new promotion stunts
throughout the winter and
spring quarters including round
robin fraternity and sorority
meets and a feature run between
a noted administration higher-up
and a noted student government
wig. g
HELP!
Earn between S2O $35 per
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your campus. Become a cam campus
pus campus representative for VISA,
an International Student Mar Marketing
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WASHINGTON, D. C. 20036

Andy Owens supplied a big
punch again with 23 points and
14 rebounds. Ed Lukco, who
didnt play the whole game, had
12 points on 5 of 6 field goals
and 2 out of 2 free throws.

By Bill Dunn

Speaking of promotion,
details will soon be available
about the first annual
confrontation (sports-wise)
between the Alligator Statt and
the scribes of the Crocodile, the
new campus mag coming out
soon.
Stay tuned.
[THURSDAY ]
V NITE J
THIRSTY

To ALL STUDENTS and university personnel....
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UF plays Kentucky at home
Saturday at 3:10 p.m.

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Thursday, February 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

ijr *oles & services
(UiA M'Chk)
% wig salon #
jL 1013 w. university ave. J
VX2 blocks from campus I £j

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13, 1969

Chi Phi Wins Again, Ropes Roll

Chi Phi continued on its
rampage of the Blue League
Tuesday night rolling over Theta
Chi 59-40. Four Chi Phis scored
in double figures with Steve
Kaufman leading the way with
20 points. Kaufman received
plenty of support from the rest
of his team as Bob Wattles hit
for 17 and Bruce Weeks and Bill
Carter each tallied 10 points.
Glenn Repple hit 12 points for
the Theta Chis.
The gap between the first
place Chi Phis and the Fijis
spread even further as the Fijis
dropped a game to the third
place Delta Chis, 46-38. Bob
Peck scored 20 for the Delta
Chis and Dane Griffin shoveled
in 17 for the Fijis.
Dennis Register scored 15
points for the Phi Taus as they
registered a 40-26 win over the
AGRs. In the only other match
of the evening, DU walloped
Delta Sigma Phi 31-13. John
Bryan scored 14 points for the
winners and Clyde Smith scored
10 for the Delta Sigs.
The Road Runners, currently
in fourth place in the
Independent League, opened up
the single elimination bowling
tournament with a resounding
1521-1360 loss to the Ropes.
Todd Bagnulo was low man
for the Runners with a 116-235.
Butch Van Fleet scored a
167-333 for the Runners and
Bill McClintock rolled a 190-343
for the winner Ropes.
Georgia Seagle Hall, formerly
Liquid Sugar
More than 50 per cent of all
liquid sugar goes to the beverage
industry.

Shakes
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' McDonalds.
is vour kind of place.
s Corp 1968
201 N.W. 13th St.

The Florida Alligator

the Spudnuts, opened under their
new name by being blasted by
the Student Contractors
1329-1285. Low man for the

all you have to do to
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A
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kind!

IN INTRAMURAL ACTION

SPORTS

MARC DUNN
Sports Editor

BILL DUNN
Assistant Sports Editor

losers was Mike Stewart with a
108-239. Lanny Carter put
together a 170-335 to pace the
Contractors.

The Newell Entomology
Society exterminated the
College Kids 1532-1391. Stewart
Samuels rolled a 191-359 for the
bugmen. Frank Story
contributed to the raid with a
111-252 low set for the Kids.
CLO brutalized the Keystone
Kops 1383-1260. Rod Emerson
was low man for the Kops and
low man to date in the
tournament with a 84-201. Jerry
Presher tallied a 168-313 for
CLO.

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Gators Play The Numbers Game

By BETH GRAVES
Alligator Feature Writer
Tradition and superstition
influence the lives of many
people daily, whether by habit
or choice. More particular is the
factor involved in athletes
selection of numbers that
identify them for three years of
their careers and may possibly
carry them through their
professional ranks.
Throughout the past seasons
of football at the UF certain
numbers have received an aura
of respect and admiration from
the fans such as 3 5-Larry
Dupree, 14-Bruce Bennett,
83-Lynn Matthews, 52-Bill Carr,
89-Charles Casey, 44-Richard
Trapp, 33-Larry Smith, and the
retired number 11-Heisman
Trophy recipient, Steve Spurrier.
Although most fail to admit
it, athletes lean towards their
previous high school, little
league, or midget team
numbers. A winning season or
lucky number may be the key
reason for-the slight superstition
the players have; others could
care less, just so long as they get
the chance to play.
Superstition found its way
into the recruiting aspect of
football this past season when
Larry Morris from Pensacola
signed a grant-in-aid with the UF
under the condition that he wear
number 52. It seems that Bill
Carr, also from Pensacola was a
Senior on Morris high school
team, and having a great deal of
admiration and respect for Carr,
he favored the chance to follow
in his footsteps.
Such was the case with Jerry
Vinesett from Savannah.
Twenty-four was a highly
admired number at his high
school and when it was passed
down from a senior to him
during his junior season, he
carried it along to date, for no
particular reason. Vinesett
went to a little trouble though;
he asked senior, Gene Peek, for
his number this past season so as
not to disturb the continuity of
24 on his back.
Mark Ely explained the
hit-and-miss principle of number
claiming, when asked the
co-ordination.
I was lucky enough to have a

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By Habit, Choice, Superstition

graduating senior wearing my
high school number when I was
a freshman, so when the time
came to choose my number, 26
was open, Ely said.
In the back of thie minds, the
freshman are now figuring out
lucky or successful numbers for
their remaining three years.
John Reaves is hoping for a
seven on his Gator jersey folr the
69 season. Maybe a 7-11
combination will go
hand-in-hand representing the
Reaves-Spurrier performances.
Richard Kensler wore 53 his
past freshman season, but hopes
to change.
In high school I wore 77,
another double number of 55
could easily take its place,
Kensler said.
Prior to the 6B season a new
ruling was made concerning the
numbering of offensive linemen
which hindered a few ot the
Long River
The Volga is the longest river
in Europe, running for 2,300
miles, says Colliers
Encyclopedia.

NEW CINEMA

players from retaining their high
school traditions.
It states, At least five
offensive linemen must wear
numbers 50-79. And no matter

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Boeing 707 intercontinental fan jets with
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originates in Miami, Florida and departs on
the following Wednesdays: June 11, 18, 25.
July 2,9, 16, 23, 30. August 6, 13-
For complete information write:
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where they line up, men with
such numbers cannot be
receivers. This has killed the
tackle eligible play.
Head offensive Coach Fred
Pancoast comments that there is
no getting around the rule;
whereas it completely cuts out
the tackle eligible play, it does
aid the defenders in a
double-check assisting the
coverers by their line-up position
and their numbers.
So there is a little background
for the numbering of the
players; not only does it aid the
fans in identifying their favorites
every year, but it remains as i.
unique mysticism within the
players themselves.
Miller-Brown I
I
I
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL RU
376-4552
authorized
DEALER

Thursday, February 13,1969, The Florida Alligator,

The following people
may pick up their Hall of
Fame certificates at the
Seminole Office, 337 Reitz
Union, between 2-5 P.M.:
Ric Katz
Larry Smith
Phil Burnett
John Ritch
Manny James,
Martin Edwards
Sharyn Hackney
Mary Jo Holland
Roddy Grubbs
Gary Goodrich
Jean Johnson
John Morton
Clyde Taylor
Pete Zinober
John Dodson
John McPhail
Rene Millard
Jack Vaughn
Harold Aldrich
Joan Schaffel
Bill Zewadski
John Toppe
Irene Minkoff
Sue Elfen Winkle
Marti Cochran
James Moody
The above named plus
the following people may
pick up their Who's Who
certificates:
Gary Christiansen
Roger Brown
Tom Thoman
Bill Wack
Phil Lazzara
Doug Lamb
Greg Johnsoii/N
Deafen
Daveuoucette
Janet Dippenworth
James Devaney
David Chesser
" ~ o >
Sam Block
Skip Berg
Judy Gnliam

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 13, 1960

1859-1969.. .110 YEARS YOUNG
Two Convenient Locations
601 $ .W. 2 Ave.
1130 N.E. 16 Ave.

| LIMIT 1 WITH 5.00 FOOD ORDER \
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