Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
AC Asks For More Colleae Participation

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second of a
three-part series examining the three basic aspects of
a proposal on university governance slated for
Action Conference consideration Wednesday.)
By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer ~-
As a part of its nine-page recommendation to the
Action Conference, the Task Force on University
Governance has proposed individual colleges play a
larger role in determining their own policies.
The report suggests that such decentralization be
carried out where ever feasible. It cites the most
important policy areas as: development of new
programs and curriculum, use of college facilities,
the development of lecture programs of intellectual
interest to individual colleges, and the establishment
of standards of tenure and promotion of college
faculty.
Chaired by Dr. Ruth McQuown, professor of
political science, the task force will present its
proposals to the Action Conference Wednesday.
In order to facilitate this decentralization of
power, recommendations are made to: establish

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 80

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NICK ARROYO
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NICK ARROYO
IMPOSSIBLE DREAM
Patricia Marand, star of "Man of La Mancha," rebukes David
Atkinson for his idealism. Atkinson plays the leading role of Don
Quixote, an incurable optimist. The musical played to capacity in
Florida Gym Sunday night.

The
Florida Alligator

new structures and strengthen existing ones for
insuring the widest possible participation of college
faculty, students, and administrators.
The most concrete part-of the report concerns
tenure and promotions of faculty: The
college-wide faculty body should be strengthened,
the report proposes, for the assumption of
responsibility for developing standards for the
granting of tenure and promotions throughout the
college.
Decisions on promotion and tenure presently
must go through the department chairman, dean of
the college, the university personnel board, and the
president, according to Dr. Franklin Doty, dean of
University College.
Doty said other areas in which the
decentralization might be applied are the
establishment of new courses and degree
requirements. Presently, he said, every substantial
change in the curriculum of any college must come
through the curriculum committee. Doty is a
member of the task force.
Frederick W. Conner, vice president for academic
affairs, refused to comment directly on the
proposals before they are presented to the Action

University of Florida, Gainesville

BILL LIKENED TO WITCH HUNT
State Legislature Reacts
Quickly To Accent '69

See Editorial, Page 6
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The symposium of
dissent ushered in by
Accent 69 last week was
quick to produce reaction
in Floridas legislative halls.
After hearing of UF
philosophy Prof. Kenneth
Megills statements on radical
student revolution and of
student upheaval at Florida
State University, Rep. Jim K.
Tillman, R-Sarasota, an FSU
alumni, last Tuesday submitted a
bill to create a joint
House-Senate committee to
investigate causes of student
dissent and disturbances.
Tillman reportedly initiated
the bill after reading a Tampa
Tribune story about Megills
statements at ACCENTS
dialogue last week on the Plaza
of the Americas.
I dont know what the
motivation was according to the
Tribune; story, Megill said
Monday. The things I said on
the plaza are the same things I
teach in class.
Megill teaches courses on
Marxist and democratic political
theory.
Tillmans investigation has
already been labeled as a new
Johns committee which
instigated a so-called witch hunt
on state university campuses in
the late 1950 s and early 19605.
Johns is one-time Senator
Charley Johns frbm Starke,
whose committee hit campuses
in a hunt for sexual perverts,
communsts, atheists and
obscene literature.
But Tillman told the state
press his committee wont be
interested in the private lives of
students or faculty.

The apparent impetus for
Tillmans action, Megills
statements, went like this:
I feel the only people in this
country who are talking in a
relevant way are the radicals.
Megill called Black Power the
most significant political
development of the 20th
century.
The civil rights movement is
dead, thank God, he said.
Today people see unjustness

*
flacks Influence j
I U.S. Literature
' *
,
: (EDITORS NOTE: The theme of Black History Week, which j:
: started Sunday, is a regeneration, a recognition of the j:
: contributions the black American has made to society. Tonight :
at Bin the Reitz Union auditorium UFs Afro-American Student :

j: Association will present a panel discussion on the role of black
American literature.)

£ By DAVE HORNE :
£ Alligator Special Writer >
*
*

: To say that the black man has influenced the creation and £
£ maturity of a distinctly American brand of literature isnt £
£ grasping the true essence of his achievements. :
Os course, Phillis Wheatly was among the first americans to :
get a book of her works published and receive international :
: accolades. :
: Os course, the slave Jupiter Hammon created complimentary :
:j 18th verse to be included in Americas literary history. :
Os course, his curious early social systems provided an ample :
: atmosphere for the birth of black work songs, then spirituals, :
: jazz and blues. j:
: Os course, the controlling elements of an evolutionized but :
: still curious social system bastardized it and called the resultant '<
: residue their own. ts
: Os course, there arose black authors writing about white :
> heroes and the problems of passing, of escaping lynch mobs and :
of just learning how to live.
: Os course, there appeared fiery essayists of the era of j:
j; (SEE'BLACKS'PAGE 2) j:

Conference. He said, however, he was generally in
favor of decentralization for the sake of simplicity
of operation.
I think too many things are decided through this
office, Conner said. He favors decisions being made
on lower levels with provisions for accountability by
those actually making policy.
Though the general guidelines are set down for
promotions in the university policy manual, Conner
said the departments hold the most power in this
area.
The university personnel board has only turned
down about she of the last 400 ,or 500
recommendations made to it, Conner said.
The Board of Regents officially grants tenure to
faculty, but Conner said its approval is most often
automatic.
The report also recommends the establishment of
college-wide councils of students, faculty, nd
administrators, to discuss and recommend policies
on those matters which affect all three constituent
elements. The report says such bodies are
appropriate for policy-making on matters other than
tenure and promotions.
Part III: A tripartite government for UF.

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Tuesday, February 11, 1969

and they are not afraid to use
radical means to aid in change.
In submitting the committee
bill, Tillman said he took
opposition to things like
professors urging the takeover
of schools and urging students to
join radical student
movements.
This is not the purpose for
which they were hired, he said.
Theyre hired to prepare
students to go into the world
and earn a living.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. February 11, 1969

Senate Views 'Gator Policy, Voting

Student Senate tonight will
discuss election law changes and
an Alligator equal space
resolution.
Ric Katz, chairman of the
election laws and procedures
commission, submitted the
commissions report last week

V- -- -- -- -- -- --
;j
'Blacks Influence Music.
j
Literature In America
: : : :
CFROM PAGE ONE *5
4* *
: :
*
: agitation for emancipation and later participation, integration, :
: and now semi-separation. :*

And, of course, through their artistic talents the black :
American exposed the myths about who understood who, and
who would rightly inherit the world.

<
: But most importantly of all, the black American author, the
: playwright,the minstrel, the dancer, and the musician has always :
been able to reach and describe the basic humanness, the :
foundation thrust of life itself through knowledge of his own j;
pain and abuse. : :
S J
v The black element of this society has been to the very depths j;
of suffering. :
Through a God-given literary talent, he has transformed the j:
X evil into a worthwhile good. jj
l|Sv.v.v.v-v.%v. w.%sv.r.:.v.v.v.v.v.v.ww.Vv.v-:.:-v.v.v.%v.r.*.
1969 Gator Loan Fund
Off To Raise SIOO,OOO

Sporting a new name and a
new 1969 chairman, Dollars For
Scholars (DFS), now the Gator
Loan Fund (GLF), is off to raise
a one-year goal of SIOO,OOO.
The new chairman is Jeff
Weil, and his first money-raising
project will be Fund Week 69
beginning Monday.
F und Week 69 will be
co-sponsored by Panhellenic. It
is a week-long effort to sell
Campus Pacs for SO cents. Spirit
shakers will also be sold.
v
At the Kentucky game on
Saturday, a collection will be
taken for the benefit of the
GLF.
The GLF will also sponsor
Camigras April 1418.
The Gator Loan Fund is the
new name for UFs DFS. A
copyright on Dollars For
Scholars forced the campus loan
organization to seek a new
name.
UFs part of the service is to
raise SIOO,OOO annually to
match nearly $5 million put up
by the federal government.
I SHANNONS I
24-hour
I WRECKER I
I 7th St & SE RV I

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials .Represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $ 3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

recommending revisions needed
in the Student Government
election proceedings.
The commission also prepared
the resolution urging the
Alligator to give equal space to
candidates that are not endorsed
by the Alligator since the paper

Some $6 million .has been
distributed locally by DFS since
the funds inception in 1958.
There are presently 2,800
students at UF taking advantage
of the funds services.
Cage Tickets
Available
Tickets for the UF-Kentucky
basketball game Saturday will be
available today.
The Wildcats are leading the
Southeastern Conference
currently, and are favored to
take it all and represent the SEC
in the NCAA tournament.
Tickets can be picked up at
the Gate 13 ticket window of
the stadium between 2:30 and 8
p.m.
On Wednesday from 1 to 5
p.m. tickets can be obtained for
the UFTennessee game on
Monday, Feb. 17.
Ist Greeting Card
Greeting card historians say
the first American greeting card
was mailed by R.J. Pearse of
Albany, N.Y., in 1853.

is supported by student funds.
If the Alligator does not
follow the equal space policy,
it should refrain from
endorsing one candidate to the
exclusion of the other, the
resolution states.
The commission proposed a

WITH DISINTEREST IN AC
Students Hurt Own Cause

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Corbin S. Carnell,
curriculum task force chairman
and University College professor,
said Monday that previous lack
of student interest in Action
Conference has discouraged
faculty from giving them a voice.
Students who have
contributed most to the Action
Conference, said Carnell, have
been graduate and law students,
while the undergraduate
students have been remaining
quiet.
Carnell said several proposals
being presented to the
conference in the next few
weeks are of great importance to
students and we need all the
student votes we can get.
At Wednesdays Action
Conference meeting proposals
affecting the apportionment of
University Senate,
decentralization of policy
making, establishment of a
tripartite governmental system
and reorganization of University
College will be presented.
Franklin A. Doty, dean of
University College, said Monday
students have not been faithful
in attendance of conference
meetings.
Right now there are 60
members evenly distributed
among the three factions
(administrators, faculty and
students).
Student attendance is very
important now because these
proposals are important to
them, Doty said.
Carnell said Student Body
President Clyde Taylor had not
been to a conference meeting
this quarter.
Its a shame he has been
allocated a Student seat and
hasnt used the opportunity to
vote, Carnell said.
Carnell said the lack of
student interest may be due to
academic pressure and
centralization of interest.

Burger Chefs All-Week
Celebration
OF THBR NEW OPENING ON MAIN ST.
Double-Cheese Burger Special
Boy one Get the Second One for a Penny
Offer Good Toe. A Wed.
Feb. 11 & 12
AT BOTH LOCATIONS §
1412 N. MAIN ST. Yl / I

single method of representation
be adopted on the basis of
colleges and schools rather than
the present system of
representation by living areas.
An airline resolution will also
appear on tonight s agenda.
Scott Holloway, minority

Several students joined the
conference with concern over
one or two areas to be covered.
Once these came up, they lost
interest.
Carnell presented a resolution
to the conference proposing

Philosophers Schedule
'ModelDemonstration
Whether their leanings be left, right, or in between, faculty,
administrators and students will all have a chance to protest
Wednesday.
The Philosophers Union will sponsor a model demonstration
from noon to 1 p.m. at the Plaza of the Americas. Dubbed Absurdity
69, the protest is a spoof on a proposed policy statement on campus
demonstrations.
The proposed policy, now in the University Senate, advocates the
use of any and all available resources to quell student disturbances. In
order to emphasize the absurdity of a regulated demonstration, a
strict set of rules has been imposed by the union for all participants in
Wednesdays demonstration:
Beards must be clean and neat.
I No littering is allowed.
Mini skirts shorter than two inches above the knee are not
permitted.
i Peace symbols must be worn discreetly.
Each student must bring his student card and either his birth
certificate or drivers license to the demonstration. No one under 18
may participate.
Members of the union will check the demonstrators to see that they
comply with all regulations.
The Union will provide white armbands (without any insignia) and
protest signs. We protest very much and I would like to object,
will be written on some signs. Participants are urged to bring their
lunch.
Following a march from the Arts and Sciences Building to the
Plaza, nonspeeches and a nondialogue will be presented. Among
those invited to speak are a representative from the Physical Plants
and Grounds Division, requested to talk on damage caused by walking
on the grass.
Demonstrators will be allowed to speak on any topic they wish.
David Gorman, spokesman for the union, said that the idea for the
demonstration originated at the organizations Thursday afternoon
meeting. I anticipate a very good crowd, he said. All those who
have always wanted to take a passionate stand on something, but
lacked the gumption are invited to take advantage of this
demonstration, he said.
The nonprotest is not aimed at Tigert Hall, according to Gorman,
but rather at the Greenman Resolution.
James Hennessey, assistant dean of student affairs, has approved
the demonstration as long as students in classrooms and the library are
not disturbed.
The Philosophers Union is a non-political organization of seniors
and graduate students in philosophy.

floor leader, prepared the
resolution urging airlines to
continue the student reduced
fares instead of discontinuing
the service as has been rumored
The meeting will be held in
Reitz Union room 349.

students be given three credit
hours for Action Conference
membership.
It was voted down by the
students themselves, Carnell
said.



School Without Classes?
Get Grades The UF Way

UF students can complete up
to one-fourth of their upper
division course work without
ever going to class.
The UFs Division of
Continuing Education, through
the Department of
Correspondence Study, offers
122 college credit courses. Eight
of the UFs Upper Division
colleges offer correspondence
courses for work toward a
degree, according to Edgar R.
Alligood, head of the
Department of Correspondence
Study.

Campus Paks On Sale
\
Campus paks are now on sale around Gainesville and on the UF
campus.
Campus paks are gift packages containing appropriate toiletries for
men and women.
With all proceeds going to the Gator Loan Fund, which replaces
Dollars for Scholars, the 50 cent campus paks are sponsored by the
Panhellenic Council and Student Government.
The federal government will match the proceeds from the sale,
giving $9 for every $1 worth of campus paks sold.
The sale of the 2,000 campus paks will end Saturday. There will be
a donation collected at the Florida vs. Kentucky basketball game in
the Florida Gym Saturday night.

Looked into a bank lately?
We invite you to take a closer look at C&S. Its the shape of things to come. Headquartered in Atlanta, m tfj
Georgia, were the largest banking system in the Southeast, and the 44th largest bank in the United States. I
The C&S Management Development Program provides accelerated preparation for manage- |
ment and staff responsibilities. C&S tailors its program to fit the individuals career objectives ""T"
and educational background. Well be on campus February 18 The Placement Office can arrange j ]
interview, or you may contact Charles R. Hoskins, Personnel Officer, C&S Bank, Atlanta,Ga.
THE CITIZENS & SOUTHERN BANKS IN GEORGIA J I I
An Equal Opportunity Employer |||j : C v I
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Alligood said a student could
take as much as 25 per cent of
his upper division work through
the correspondence study
program.
The Florida Correspondence
Study Program is assigned to the
University of Florida but it
represents all state universities,
Alligood said. Currently, courses
are available only from the UF,
FSU, and the University of
South Florida, he said.
During the 1967-68 fiscal year
the department received over
4,000 enrollments, according to

Alligood. He said that an
increase in enrollment is
expected this year.
Alligood said the college
courses use the same textbooks
and cover the same material
classroom courses do.
By taking a correspondence
course a student learns
self-discipline. He learns how to
study, how to organize his
thinking and how to present his
material, Alligood said.
We plan to add many more
subject areas in the near future.
There is a great demand for
correspondence courses in all
areas, he said.
Most students dont know
about the department, according
to Alligood. Were not allowed
to advertise, he said. But
students are catching on from
other students who have taken
correspondence courses.

t WW'HL B flft
' 'jfrt ? V Sm j| jg£- V
R A N DYBASSETT
BOYS AND GIRLS TOGETHER?
No, just girls. Representing sororities and independents on campus,
this group of Lambda Chi Alpha little sister pledges pose for their
class photograph.
V"""
| ipSa-Fla. Beauty
! r 312 W. Univ. Ave. 1 i
:* :
(across from L& W Cafeteria) ;
: : :
\ Wholesale Salon Supplies £
i £ FEATURING S j
i 2k CLAIROL HELENE CURTIS j
!nS.. m ..!!£L
Tuesday, February 11, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 11, 1969

Dedication
of
''FRIENDSHIP WALK"
Friday
February 14, 1969
2:00
I Friday, February 14, at 2:00 in the ~
Plaza of the Americas, President
I Stephen C. OConnell will dedicate
I "Friendship Walk,
I "A path to be traveled only in
I awareness of the people among.
I The walk will begin a tradition of quiet liy- 3s. if
x^\/ \
friendliness in that it may only be II 1 > S V
vVyT X
used if the student says hello / 4
to every single person he f ( / Jfy
I / N,
I passes. \ J /
j, y 7 ' n
I \ V >Jr The Special Projects
lv \ \Jr Committee of the Union Program
I \ \ V Council is sponsoring "Friendship
j \ \ \ Walk and will be hostessing the
I \ \ dedication party from 1:00 to 3:00 in
I \ \ y**** aza Refreshments will be served.
I %
I \ : Each student group dedicating-s^~
1 \
1 j / V y/ y a port of the walk is invited to
j ,ollow Resident OConnell in laying
a friendship brick and the entire student
..... O .-. ...
body is invited to help in the construction of
"Friendship Walk.
'> f



'China Film
Set For Today
Felix Greenes color
documentary China will be
shown today at 3 p.m. in the
Reitz Union auditorium
The presentation is free and
sponsored by the Political
Science department.

COED RAZZING BECOMES HISTORY
I
<
Tradition Lost In Shuffle

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
Law students arent shuffling anymore.
Shuffling, an old UF tradition, has quietly
passed away with the opening of the new
Spessard Holland Law Center.
No longer must coeds fear entering the law
library, for shuffling has become extinct. The
carpeting makes shuffling impossible.
When a girl entered the old library, law
students would shuffle their feet on the old tiled
floors, causing much embarrassment for the
unknowing trespasser.
In coed dorms and sorority houses, freshmen
and pledges were warned of the danger and most
knew better. But there were many who were
shuffled.
Lanie Fuller, 3JM, said when she was a
freshman a law student took her to the library
and left her. The students began shuffling and
pounding on tables.

UF Soloist Featured Tonight
At Gator Symphonic Concert

Bill Booth, a UF senior will be
the featured student soloist at
the annual formal concert of the
Gator Symphonic Band tonight
at 8:15 in University
Auditorium.
Booth will play the first
movement of Mozarts Third
Concerto as a tuba solo. This
work was originally written for
horn, and is practical for the
tuba only by exceptionally able
performers. Booth, a music
major, is also active in the local
Skydivers club.
Other selections by the band
include the Overture and
Caccia by opera composer
Gian Carlo Menotti, winner of

ALL POLAROIDS
WILL BE
SOLD
jlk|uhk 1232 WEST
jUifli*-, UNIVERSITY AVE.

DROPOUTS
. ~f X
LEEF? ALR.J
t IW by U.m >

three Pulitzer Prizes for
composition. Another featured
selection will be a composition
by Dr. Jerry Neil Smith, former
professor of the UF Department
of Music, entitled Epilog.Dr.
Smith now teaches at the
University of Colorado.
Trumpeter Robert Foster, a
specialist on the Department of
Music faculty, will play the
selection La Mandolinata by
Bellstedt, and follow it with the
Del Staigers arrangement of the
Carnival of Venice. Foster is a
student of Armando Chitala and
Frank Elsass.
The remainder of the program
includes Howard Hansons

Miss Fuller said at first she thought, Oh, boy!
I got here just in time. Somethings going to
happen.
But then 1 realized they were all looking at
me. 1 couldnt find away out and nobody would
talk to me.
When I finally made my way out of the
building, I was followed by a group of law
students who explained the custom, she said.
She said she hasnt been back since.
The Florida Coed, anAWS introductory
booklet sent to all freshmen, says in its traditions
section, Law students shuffle any coed who
walks into their law library- so beware! Only
women in law school or women who are
conducting legal research are allowed here.
Bill Douberley, 3LW, said there were actually
three traditions: the shuffle, the table pound and
the hiss.
Douberley thinks the table pound will
eventually replace the shuffle in the library.
But right now, coeds can and do use the
library freely.

,
f I HEAR THINGS w
GOING BUMP IN
THE night..
GOING BUMP
(M THE NISHT.

Centennial March Diversion
in F, by Frackenpohl; Concert
Piece for Winds and Percussion,
by Pearson; and the concert
march, The Minstrels, by
conductor Richard W. Bowles.

I Six ways to say {
! I love me. *129. j
TttIKXUHI |

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w/ITALIAN SPAGHETTI & Salad Y I I
VEAL CUTLET I
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Tuesday, February 11, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

: W HOWARD POST
, GauZy?
I MAYBeTt'S MY ] \
IMAGINATION. \

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 11, 1969

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
'* exercise of responsibility."
\vsjjy/ Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Ptatotlm Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor
Staff Writings
White & Black
Hands & Faces
By Carol Sanger

One or two or three or four
thousand faces in a crowd can
tell one or two or three or four
thousand stories ... or they
can tell one.
The faces at the Accent
symposium Friday afternoon
told two stories. The stories of
the white man and the black
man. They were one in the
crowd listening and laughing to
or at Madalyn Murray. But I
watched them become two as
the words of Julian Bond fell
upon the late afternoon campus.
The faces of the young
Blacks. Faces that seemed to
know and understand more than
the words the young Georgia
legislator calmly spoke.
The face of the young Black
man who stared into the face of
Julian Bond with eyes hostile
and defensive. Staring from the
other side of America and trying
to decide if this man speaking
was from his side or had sold out
to the other. And he heavily
chewed on a piece of gum, his
mind unknown.
And the face of Julian Bond,
almost stoic, sometimes cynical,
always passive. And the faces of
the two crowds.
The white faces listening,
listening hard to comprehend
words that could only be words
and they knew they were only
words to them and would always
be just words but they listened.
As the Black heads bent to
the ground and the words of
Julian Bond told of the Black
struggle in education the faces of
the white young were the faces
of people learning. Trying to
learn.
The words had been heard
before. They brought back
memories of the spring
campaigns of Rockefeller and
Kennedy. But to the Black faces
they brought memories of
reality. Memories of away of
life.
The lines were drawn.
Black hands reaching out in
the belligerant Black Power sign.
And Bond saw them but his face
didnt tell. Only during the
questions after his speech did
Bonds face change with a smile
or understatement or a vague
hint of a frown.
Right ... sock it to em! or
Bond in 76.
Black hands clapping in one
jeer as Bond said they had won
the right to fight for the white
mans war thousands of miles
from home.
The face of Julian Bonds
young son, engrossed in a paper

cup and loudly sucking air
through a straw. Unaware.
The faces of the white and
black, the young and old,
thinking of their dreams
festering in the sun like a raisin
until they become dried out.
Black eyes that looked up
from behind the wafting smoke
of a burning cigarette. Looking
upon a ... I wondered what
they looked up at.
The face of a white woman
squinting like the sun was
blinding her vision. But there
was no sun. The hour was late.
And her face searched Bonds as
if by staring and squinting long
enough she could know what
made this man live and breathe
and speak. And she too bent her
head to the earth.
And the Black voices,
becoming more and more one
Black voice. Chortling at Bonds
understatements, breaking up
into fractures voices as a splinter
would rise up.

Raving

Many people at this and other reactionary locales are quite
concerned about the threat of violence, unrest, militancy, and the
like. The same people who have perpetually put down dissent and
social reform are now afraid that the underdogs are about to rise up
against the oppressive forces of the status quo. Perhaps it would be
helpful at this time to quote from an article by Dick Gregory entitled
Breaking Out: A Black Manifesto. Some excerpts follow:
We are dealing with a dishonest country, and worse, with one that
is totally mad. People talk about riots hurting our cause. That is
wishful thinking. Riots should hurt; any act of violence should hurt.
But we are living in a nation so insane that riots have only helped the
cause. After the Detroit riots, Henry Ford hired 6000 blacks in two
days. We know why: because the fire got too close to the Ford Plant.
Dont scorch the Mustangs, baby. If the Indians come to Detroit and
start burning, they will hire 6000 red folks next. I wonder why this
country can wake up only after an act of violence.
We are damn sick and tired of people telling us to quit marching
and go down into the ghetto and pull our brother up by his
bootstraps. Give him some boots first.
If the word relief upsets you, please change the name to foreign
-aid. That doesnt seem to bother you. We are saying that we are living
in a nation so insane that 22 of the richest people in America never
pay income tax because of a tax loophole. That doesnt bother
America. But if some black man wants to get relief, if some woman in
the ghetto black or white needs to write off her babys milk,
that upsets this country. Something is wrong.
We pretend that there is freedom of choice and majority rule. We
went to the polls in 1964 and voted for the lesser of two evils. We
ended up with evil all the same. When yoiwstoop to vote for the lesser
of two evils, youre dirtier than they are. Di Spock went out in 1964,
marching for L.B.J. all the way, and now they have put him in jail. I
hope you cats wake up.
much I can add to Dick Gregorys words. As Dylan
says, he that gets hurt will be he who has stalled. I just hope we wake
up.

1 Just Hope We Wake Up

EDITORIALS
A Witch Hunt

Jim Tillman, Republican state
representative from Sarasota, wants a real
old-fashioned witch hunt.
Tillman has introduced a bill to set up a
House-Senate committee to investigate
the causes of campus unrest. He wants to
know why radicals are taking over Florida s
colleges and universities.
Hes also curious about college professors
who urge kids to join radical movements
rather than teaching them how to get out of
school and earn a living.
No, no, he promises, this isnt going to be
another Johns Committee which, like Mr.
Clean with a dirty shirt, cleansed the state s
universities of pinkos, communists, atheists,
homosexuals and other assorted brands of
misfits and perverts, beheading a significant
number of damned good teachers in the
process.
Tillmans committee wont be concerned
about their personal lives, he assures us.
So this time it wont matter if the teacher
or student is the happily married father of

Thanks For Accent

Last week, people all over Florida read
about events at the University of Florida.
Last week, UF students confronted some
of the great issues shaping the destiny of
American life.
Last week, several of Americas
intellectual and political leaders spoke their
minds within the walls and under the trees of
our university.
The leaders spoke, and the students
listened, not always agreeing, but still
listening. The students spoke, and the
leaders listened, also not always agreeing. A
realistic, meaningful and sometimes
controversial dialogue of ideas took place.
And that was the goal of ACCENT 69.

Maybe This Water Isn 7 Polluted But How Can We
Drink Through These Air Masks?

three brilliant children living in middle class
suburbia or a bearded, disheveled hippie
sharing a one-room shack with his
girlfriend if hes radical, hes got to go.
The universities of Florida, the bastions of
truth and intellectual inquiry, must be
purged. The degree factories must have the
sludge cleaned from their machinery.
Before our benevolent legislature gathers
the wood and oil for the stake burning,
though, it ought to wonder not how to rid
the campus of radicals, but rather how to
change the conditions of our society which
created the need for radical thought and
action.
Such as oppression of blacks, widespread
poverty, unjust wars, countless murders,
unfair justice, undemocratic politics run by
crooked politicians, enough nuclear bombs
to destroy the world 25 times over.
And thats just for starters.
If Mr. Tillman really wants to know why
there are radicals at Florida universities, we
suggest he look in the mirror.

The goal the ACCENT executive committee
sought was reached and surpassed.
For such huge success, for the many hours
of dedication they gave the University of
Florida, for the role they played in helping
make the UF a center of learning, the
university community owes ACCENT a debt
of gratitude for a job well done.
The ACCENT executive committee
included Larry Berrin, Frazier Solsberry,
Ronnie Bloom, Tom Blackmon, Tom
DeMarco, Joe Hair, Jeff Weil and Nancy
Register.
When you see any of them on campus, tell
them thanks for ACCENT.

By David Miller



Speaking Out

Pro-Government Speakers Blew Accent

Accent 69 brought to the UF
many fine speakers in various
fields, some showing true
understanding of their area of
study, others demonstrating a
lack of comprehension in theirs.
Two speakers, Frederick
Flott and John Finlator, seemed
to be rather limited in their
ability to expound on the
subjects they were addressing
themselves to. Flott spoke on
the American involvement in SE
Asia, Finlator on the drug scene.
Interestingly enough these
were the two gentelemn who
represented the federal
governments point of view.
They both serve as high ranking
officials in the national
administrative bureaucracy
which runs this country.
Flott, Foreign Service Officer
for the U.S. State Department,

Sentimental Dissent

MR. EDITOR:
Congratulations, Mr. Jacobson, for managing to
contaminate almost a third of a page of type with
your disjointed commentary entitled, Dissent At
The Law Dedication. (Feb. 5,1969)
Aside from the stunning lack of journalistic
perspective which your article demonstrates, the
substance of your remarks induces a few basic
questions, namely:
What is the real point of your discussion ... to
inform the academic world that you and your
buddys feelings were injured when people called
you obnoxious and shameful?
That the Constitution protects your right to
protest, especially when participants behave like
good boys should (and I believe your assurance of
how nicely you in fact behaved) but people who
don't cotton to your song and dance and say so are
out of line?

Safe To Attack The Dead

MR. EDITOR:
Im afraid Mr. Jones, in his letter concerning
Allen Pierleonis article, reverses the facts to
serve his own twisted ends.
Mr. Jones conjured up a poor Jim
Harmeling (he didnt have the decency to
correctly spell his name) who never experienced
success in academics, in school politics or in civil
disturbances.
How safe Mr. Jones must feel attacking the
dead but I suggest he note that James Harmeling
was one of the most brilliant of UFs psychology
students. The recipient of a graduate fellowship,
he was most admired by his professors.

Soviet Kindling Point Unknown
America Prepare For War!

MR. EDITOR:
The February 6 issue of the
Alligator carries a column by
Mr. Lee Hilliker in which he
discusses the desirability of
nuclear superiority vs. nuclear
sufficiency. Here are some
arguments in favor of nuclear
superiority.
Although we and the
Russians have enough nuclear
forces to eliminate over 80% of
each others population if it is
unprotected; it has been
estimated by Dr. Eugene Wigner,
Nobel prize laureate and
Professor of Physics at
Princeton, that the Russians
could build shelters on the
peripheries of their cities,
evacuate their populations to
these shelters, and cut their
losses to 2 million people.

was first secretary to the United
States Embassy in South
Vietnam. According to his own
statements, he was involved in
making key decisions as to US
policy in SE Asia.
His understanding of the
situation there, having been
there for 3V& years, was on the
elementary school level. His
attitude, that of a matter-of-fact,
well thats the way it is type of
thing.
He was honest enough to
admit that the US really is not
concerned with seeing
democracy flourish in the area,
but rather with protecting its
own economic, financial
interests.
Finlator, Associate Director
of the Federal Bureau of
Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs,
is a proponent for strong federal

When we consider that they
lost 13 million killed in World
War II and 10 million killed in
the process of collectivizing then thenfarms,
farms, thenfarms, the 2 million figure does
not seem to be sufficient to
make a nuclear war intolerable
under all circumstances.
We can increase their losses
by increasing our attack force or
decrease our own losses by
building shelters and antimissile
systems. The Russians are
already much ahead of us in civil
defense.
If we had a large nuclear
superiority, we could aid our
defenses by attacking their
missile sites and air fields. It
seems unlikely that they can
launch their entire force at one
time. Since more than one
missile is required to knock out
a hardened site, a considerable
superiority is required.

Perhaps you could have enlightened everyone
with constructive criticism of the general policies
you so ardently abhor, or you might have divulged
the name of the state leader who tried to
associate you with communism.
But these considerations could have served only
to elevate your article from its quagmire of
sentimentality. (How about free beer and wider
sidewalks, while youre at it?)
Finally, I take it upon myself to apologize for
the not so subtle hints that you should not
consider the legal profession; if you can manage to
add logic and consistency to your reasoning
processes youll be a marvelous addition io the legal
profession. In short, I do not argue that your
placards were out of place, but your excuse for a
column was.
RICHARD T. GARFIELD, ILW

He founded UFs Freedom Party which did
more, by its very existence, to liberalize the
administration than the combined student
governments of the last 10 years.
He was on the national steering committee of
S.N.I.C.K. ... an organization which was
undeniably in the forefront of the civil rights
struggle.
I guess youre a happy, healthy achiever ..
.constructively maligning a man who can no
longer defend himself ... but remember, Mr.
Jones; more and better men than you remember
Jim Harmeling and serve his memory well.
JANE ROSS FAUST, 4JM

laws concerning drug control
and regulation. He spoke on the
topic in a rather detached
manner, never really concerned
with substantiating his claims.
Finlator advocated a policy in
which the federal government
would be the guardian of its
citizens, instructing them as to
dos and donts and rights and
wrongs of individual action. Vet
he never seemed to feel there
was a moral, ethical question
involved, that of individual
freedom.
It is hard to believe that
attitudes and understanding,
demonstrated by Flott and
Finlator, are prevalent in the
higher echelons of the federal
bureaucracy. Can the
policy-makers in Washington
really have such a poor
understanding of humanity both

If it is our intention to stay
abreast of them in nuclear
forces, it again becomes
necessary to be superior because
our intelligence is quite
uncertain. Thus we require a
margin of safety over their
forces just to be sure that we are
even with them.
I agree with Mr. Hilliker that
there is much about nuclear
warfare that is very difficult to
think through logically. This
suggests that we may not really
understand under what
conditions nuclear war may
start. It is for this reason that I
advocate that shelters be
provided Tor everyone and that
an antimissile missile system be
installed without delay.
ARTHUR A. BROYLES
PROFESSOR of PHYSICS
and PHYSICAL SCIENCES

jAddia (mi 'VlMmt
"There is no hope for the complacent man/ 9

at home and abroad?
To accept these mens
statements is courting nothing
short of a national disaster. For
both mens positions have been
refuted time and again by those
sincerely working for a
constructive policy in the
international sphere as well as
the national.
It would seem that a
complete revamping of our
international philosophy is an
immediate necessity. Yet Mr.
Flott tells us that we shall
perservere, that the US has aided
the cause of peace and freedom
in SE Asia.
Our internal policies of
suppressing drug users by strict
law enforcement has proven of

Accent Unartistic

MR. EDITOR:
Good old Student
Government, in its valiant
attempt to bring freedom of
all types to the campus,
neglected to consider one type. I
(and several others) feel that our
rights were infringed upon by
Student Government Wednesday
evening.
We went to the auditorium to
hear Anson Mount at 7:30 p.m.
and Louis Harris at 8:30 p.m.
because that is the time SG had
advertised they would speak.
(Even the programs handed to us
at the door reiterated this
speaking schedule.)
Yet, at 7:30 p.m. the
audience was subjected to varied

The 'Giant Lie
Is All Too Real

MR. EDITOR:
In your Wednesdays editorial
section, Uncle Javerneck, if
that is his real name, said
something in his article about
communism which really scares
me. To quote him directly, Still
there is no sane, intelligent man
alive in the United States today
who is not capable of realizing
that the concept known as The
Communist Conspiracy is a
giant lie.
Well, he is wrong that there is
no sane, intelligent man who is
not capable of realizing it is a
giant lie because it is not a giant
lie. It is regretfully, as real as it
can be.
Here is why I can say this.
About three years ago I was in
the Orient and occasionally
would tune in Radio Peking in
China for a laugh. One time I did
not laugh, however, because I
heard something similiar to the
following straight from The
horses mouth:
We, as Communists, are all
dedicated to one purpose: to
eliminate by any means

Tuesday, February 11, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

By Alan Jacobson

no value. Yet Mr. Finlator tells
us it must be so.
How long can we remain still
and permit ourselves to be
dragged toward oblivion.
Certainly the 6B election hasnt
improved things. Will John
Gardner, Michael Harrington, or
John Galbraith play a significant
role in the Nixon
administration? Or will Strom
Thurmond be at Nixons side in
a guidance capacity?
Maybe violence in the cities
at home and starvation in the
countryside will shake our
leaders up to the point of
considering Have we made a
mistake Somewhere. For
rational argument certainly
hasnt done the trick.

entertainment (someones
idea of artistic, cool protest,
no doubt), obviously planned,
but not even listed on the
program. The audience was
hardly given the free choice
beforehand to choose whether
or not they wanted to spend
that half hour viewing the
entertainment.
Most of us did stay, however,
because we thought SG would
eventually produce the speakers.
They did about a half hour
later. The fact is that if I have a
half hour to waste, I prefer to
choose how I waste it.
While SG is shouting, Tell it
like it is, I suspect they add a
last whispered word yall.
MIKE KUEHR, 3AS

whatsoever any form of
government different from our
own. We consider any such form
of government a direct threat to
ourselves, and thus will use any
tactics to cause their
overthrow.
Now this sounds like
something a lot different than a
giant lie when heard as official
policy directly from the
Communists themselves. I am
not saying that we should go on
witch hunts and kill all
Communists in this country or
anything of that nature. I am
saying, however, that there is a
threat and it is very real and not
to be taken lightly.
And this is what scares me.
Uncle Javerneck, who sees the
supremely innocent communists
as being no threat whatsoever to
us horrible Capitalists has
labeled myself and others who
would rather keep our own form
of government intact as non-sane
and nomintelligent persons. I
wonder if this is the case or if it
is the other way around?
'l
\ BILL JOYNER, 3AS

Page 7



Page 8

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 11, 1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

POETRY READING: Prof.
Don. Petesch will give a poetry
reading on "Two More
Contemporary Poets" Thursday,
Feb. 13, from 4:40-5:30 p.m., in
the Reitz Union, Lounges 122
and 123.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
DEADLINE: Candidates for
admission to the junior class of
September, 1969, should
complete the department's
application procedures during
the winter quarter.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
CELEBRATION: A festival of
the Arts is now accepting
interview applications from all
students interested in the
program. Students wishing to
participate in this festival,
encompassing all the arts
including music, drama, the
dance and the visual arts, should
complete applications at once.
Such applications are available at
the Student Activities Desk,
Reitz Union; the Office of the
Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts;
Room 129 Tigert Hall, and in
the dean's offices in the other
colleges. CELEBRATION needs
students who want to be part of
the biggest artistic production in
UF history. CELEBRATION
will be presented throughout the
Spring Quarter of 1970.
Students completing
CELEBRATION applications
will be contacted by telephone
shortly.
VISITING LECTURER: Dr.
Willard L. Thorp, professor
emeritus of economics at
Amherst College, will give the
Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar
Lecture at 8:15 p.m. Thursday,
Feb. 13, in the Reitz Union
Auditorium. He will discuss
"Foreign Affairs and Domestic
Relations."
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: The Council will meet
Thursday, Feb. 20, at 1:30 p.m. in
235 Tigert Hall.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAM: The exam in French,
German, Russian and Spanish will be
held Saturday, Feb. 15, at 9:45 a.m.,
in 207 Leigh Hall.
STUDENTS WANTED: Students
interested in working full-time for
the Florida State Parks from early
June through Labor Day, please
contact Student Employment, Room
23, Tigert Hall, for further details.

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SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHERS EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of College
classification, are required to satisfy
the speech screening requirement
before being admitted into the
Advanced Professional Sequence or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and
elementary block. English and speech
majors do not take the test, as SCH
201 is required in all of their
programs. Appointments now are
being made in Room 124 Norman
Hall.
PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CEH 132 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A) report to Floyd 104 or
106; (B) to Little 101 or 109;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little
113, 121,125; (F) to Little 201,
203, 205, or 207; (G) to Little
213, 215, 217 or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
235, 239; (l-L) to Matherly 2,3,
4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,13,
14 or 16; (M) to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 111, 113, 115, 116,
117, 118 or 119; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
(P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109; (R)
to Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V)
to Anderson 2,4, 5, 7,18 or 20;
(W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CEH 133 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Peabody 1,
2,4, 7, 10 or 11; (M-Z) to
Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or
209.
CPS 122 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 20, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A) report to Floyd 104 or
106; (B) to Little 101 or 109;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little
113, 121, or 125; (F) to Little
201, 203, 205 or 207, (G) to
Little 213, 215, 217 or 219; (H)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110,
112 or 115; (P-Q) to Floyd 108
or 109; (R) X 6 Flint 101, 102,

BLUE BULLETIN

110 or 112; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Anderson
2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
CBS 262 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B) to
Little 101 or 109, (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121 or 125, (F)
to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; (G)
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219, (H)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
235 or 239; (l-L) to Matherly 2,3, 4,
5, 6,7,8, 9, 10. 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16;
(M) to Matherly 102. 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110, 112 or
115; (P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109; (R)
to Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20; (W-Z)
to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) to Peabody 201,202, 205,
208 or 209.
CLC 142 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb 12, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B)
report to Little 101 or 109; (C) to
Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113, 121
or 125; (F) to Little 201, 203, 205 or
207; (G) to Little 213, 215, 217 or
219; (H) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235 or 239, (l-L) to
Matherly 2, 3. 4, 5. 6,7, 8, 9. 10, 11.
12. 13, 14 or 16; (M) to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115, 116,
117, 118 or 119; (N O) to Anderson
104, 110, 112 or 115; (P-Q) to Floyd
108 or 109; (R) to Flint 101, 102,
110, 112; (S) to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or
20; (W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 143 PROGRESS TEST :
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. in
Peabody 101, 102, 112.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B) to
Little 101 or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121 or 125; (F)
to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207. (G)
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219; (H)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
235 or 239; (l-L) to Matherly 2, 3. 4,
5,6, 7.8, 9. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16;
(M) to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119,
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110, 112 or
115; (P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109; (R)
to Fling 101, 102, 110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2. 4, 5. 7, 18 or 20; (W-Z)
to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 253 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) report to Peabody, 201,
202, 205, 208 or 209.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
FEB. 11: TENNESSEE
VALLEY AUTHORITY
Arch, CE, EE, ME, NuE, Acctg,
Econ, Mgt. NAVAL
ORDNANCE LAB ME, EE,
AE, Chem. DEFENSE
INTELLIGENCE AGENCY
Forestry, Gol, Geo. Lib. Sci,
Math, Nu. Phy. STATE FARM
INSURANCE CO. Acct. Bus.
Ad, Econ, Lib. Arts, Law. GULF
POWER CO. EE, ME. MAAS
BROTHERS, INC.any major.
HEATH SURVEY
CONSULTANTS. INC. Fores,
Agron, Hort, Wild Life Mgt.
NEWPORT NEWS
SHIPBUILDING & DRY DOCK
CO. ME, Eng. Mech, IE, EE.
TEXACO, INC. usually
interviews for tech, majors.
FEB. 11-12: THE BOEING
CO. usually interviews for
techn majors only.
FEB. 11-12-13: E.l. DUPONT
DE NUMOURS & CO.,
INC, ChE, ME, IE & Chem.
FEB. 12: FORD MOTOR
CO. Bus. Ad. Econ, Mkt, Stat,
Finan, Acctg. CELANESE
CORP. Eng. & Sci, Bus. Ad.
FEB. 12-13: SHELL
CO. Acctg, Mgt, Banking &
Finance, Econ. GENERAL
ELECTRIC CO.EE, ME, AE,
MetE, ChE, IE, NuE, Chem,
Acctg, Fin, Econ, Math,' Bus.
Ad, Lib. Arts.
FEB. 13-14: FORD MOTOR
CO.ME, EE, ChE, IE, MetE,
Chem, Eng, Mech. >
FEB. 13: W.O. DALEY AND
CO.Acctg.
Tuesday, February 11
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 2:45 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet, University
Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 362
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Center for Latin American
Studies Colloquium, Latin
American Colloquium Rm,
Univ. Library, 8 p.m.
Music Dept: Univ. of Fla.
Symphonic Band Annual
Formal Concert, University
Aud., 8:15 p.m.

Wednesday, February 12
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Dancing Lessons, 245 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society,
349 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 362 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Pharmacy Dames Meeting, home
of Dr. and Mrs. W. Lauter,
724 S.W. 21st Avenue, 7:30
p.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla vs.
L.S.U., Florida Gym, 7:45
p.m.
Thursday, February 13
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Accounting Lecture, Dr. Thomas
R. Prince, Room 18 Matheriy
Hall, 3:30 p.m.
Poetry Reading .& Discussion,
Prof. Don Petesch, "Two
More Contemporary Poets",
121 Union, 4:40 p.m.
Movie, "New Cinema I", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Christian Science Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Association, AFA 1058, 7:30
p.m.
Caribbean Discussion Series,
Latin American Colloquium
Room, College Library, 8:00
p.m.
Young Americans for Freedom,
349 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Phi Beta Kappa Lecture, Dr.
Willard L. Thorp, Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m., Reception
in 121 Union, 9:30 p.m.
Friday, February 14
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Movie, "New Cinema I", 6:00,
8:30 & 11:00 p.m.
Panhellenic Council Ball, Union
Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
Tickets are now on sale for the
AUDUBON FILM SERIES,
General Public, Faculty &
Staff, $1.25; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $.75; Children,
sso, and for the
UNIVERSITY FILM
SERIES, 10 films: General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$5.00; Univ. of Fla. Students,
$2.50, Univ. of Fla. Students,
5 films, $1.50



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

t.vovjt
FOR SALE
FLINT lock pistol S&W 22 MRF
p.stol 257 Ruger 3V9 Scope 25-308
Mauser rifle franchi 12 ga 3 Mag &
extra barrel Rem XPIOO. Must sell.
372-7912. (A-st-76-P)
Stereo Motorola portable. Excelled
condition, recently overhauled. Onl
$40.00. Call now, 378-2226
(A-3t-78 p)
1967 Honda 50, under 1500 miles,
good condition, SIOO. Call Burt,
376-9816. (A-4t-78-p)
EXCLUSIVE 4 bedroom, 2 baths,
plus study and large screen porch
with cypress ceiling on acre plus
walking distance of Little Westwood.
Call Helen Balyeat 372-0328;
Wiltshires 378-6160. (A-ts-79-c)
1968 YAMAHA 3Gscc. Excellent
condition. Windshield and heavy
rack. Phone 372-7916 ask for Bruce.
( A-2t-79-p)
EKO Guitar hollow body Ranger VI.
Almost new, electric pick up peace
baby 90 dollars buys guitar and case.
378-5293. (A-st-80-P)
BASENJI puppies, barkless, clean,
AKC. Excellent with children. Show
or pet. Call 376-2630. (A-st-80-P)
3-speed, 2-track channel master tape
recorder, model 6548, one year old,
barely used, call 376-8870 any time.
(A-3t-79-p)
Zeta Tau Alpha member pin. Like
new. White gold. Best offer. Call
376-4080. (A-2t-79-p)
Mobile Home-12x60, 3 bedrooms,
l>/2 baths, excellent cond. SSOO
down, assume paymts. Days
376-4616 ask for Beverly/nights
481-2088. (A= st-77-P)
1966 MGB-British racing. Green, wire
wheels, good condition. SI4OO or
best offer. Call Bob at 378-7748 or
see at 120 SW 25 St. (A-3t-80-P)
MOBILE HOME 8 by 30 occupancy
in the spring quarter. See at lot L 3
3860 Archer Road SW, Town and
Country or Call 392-3261 from 8 to
4. Shaw. (A-st-80-P)
DALMATION pups, purebred, 11
weeks old, good to tram for anything
you desire, $45 each. Call 372-3177
after 5:30 p.m. (A-3t-80-P)
Graduates Liquidation. Sale: Upright
piano, excellent tonal qual. $225. 54
Chevy, pea-green & sun roof, SSO.
Canvas 2-man kayak (great for
tubing) $35, Norton 500 twin, tare
classic, runs well & fast, S6OO, chair
swing, fits two (warm summer nights
guys!) sls, 376-9755 or 378-8482.
(A-2t-79-p)

| NOTICE |
| W-2 (tax withholding) |
| forms for all students |
| who worked in the Florida |
| Alligator Production Lab j
1 during 1968 are available j
1 in Student Publications j
| |
| Business Office, Bam-4pm j
= s
I or in the Lab evenings. j
ss
I I
£ t : ; ~
= ||U

FOR SALE
12x47 Rembrant, air conditioned,
carpets, unique decor, bookshelves,
large tree shaded lot $3900
376-0554. (A-st-80-P)
Beat the high cost of rent. Bx3o
trailer located on Archer Rd. Fully
carpeted and furnished for
$450 Call Nelson 376-9717
(A-3t-80-P)
DIAMOND solitare engagement ring;
Call Terry at Rm 45 Buckman Hall,
372-9319. Leave message if out. $65.
Brand new, never worn. (A-st-80-P)
Tame baby flying squirrels 6.50.
Argentinan screech owl 22.00. Baby
boas 8.00. Young 3' boas 10.00. Fish
crow 12.00. Underground Zoo
378-8810, 378-7152. (A-2t-80-P)
1968 New Moon 44x12 central heat,
air conditioned, washer, carpeting,
and furnished. Set up close to
campus. Just like new. 376-1886.
(A-st-80-P)
MAG WHEELS set of 4 keys tone
"Customags 5 lug, 13 inch, NEW.
Cost SIBO, will sell for SIOO, spinner
caps included, Call 378-4772.
(A-st-77-P)
FOR RENT |
Modern, air-conditioned apartment
close to campus, private bedroom,
study area, share bath and kitchen.
378-9453. (B-st-79-p)
Camelot Apts. 1 br. with turret;
furnished, central heat and air,
dishwasher, ww carpet, sauna bath,
pool. Must sublease, call 376-8714.
(B-st-79-p)
Efficiency apartment suitable for
one, two or three. AC pool 1513 NW
5 Ave. Thru third quarter or longer
$75 per month. Call 376-8990.
(B-10t-80-P)
Sublet Camelot Apt for spring and
summer quarter. 3 looking tor 4th.
Senior or grad coed to share 2
bedroom 2 bath apt with Spanish
decor. overlooking pool. Call
378-8458 after 6:30. (B-4t-80-P)
V\V.V.V.SV.WWWW,WW.WV.W.V.V,
WANTED |
One coed for 16th Ave. apt. Own
room, S6O month. Call 376-6268
after 6 pm, ask for Chris. (C-3t-79-p)
2 male roommates for spring quarter
to share 2-bedroom apartment.
$41.25 per month plus utilities.
Frederick Gardens apt. no. 20. Call
378-6551. (C-3t-79-p)

Tuesday, February 11, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

:;iX*X*X*XVNW:*X<*X-X*X4.NS?;SWO*
WANTED |
yxwsrws*xww<<4xyssrwx-xx:x-. s?w*w
1 roomate to share, bedroom in
apartment 2 blocks from campus.
$35 a month. Call 372-6066.
(C-2t-80-P)
Need 1 male roommate 42.50 plus
half of util. 2 bdrm. on NW 19 Ave.
Call Bill 372-6278 between 6 & 10.
(C-st-78-p)
HELP! Need ride back from
Pensacola on Sunday Feb. 16. Please
call Vicki at 378-5585. (C-2t-79-p)
Roommates for large 2 bedroom apt.
all carpeted AC & heat. 62.50 per
month. Two people. 31.25 apiece.
(C-2t-79-p)
;;X*>X<*XX4X-XiSS?W?WW#WNW! W?OTWSS
HELP WANTED |
ZV-SNvX*X X"X*Xv.V.SS ; X"X X*X"!"S*.v; X*X*R i
Salesmen part time. Good money.
Call 376-1306 after 5 p.m.
(E-st-78-p)
shakeys Pizza Parlor male help
wanted. 21 or older, part time. Must
be able to work on weekends. Apply
in person after 4. 3510 SW 13th St.
(E-2t-79-c)
RELIABLE help wanted, male,
mature student for 3-4 hrs early Sat.
a.m.; must have reliable
transportation; permanent job. Call
FRASER 376-4912 ANYTIME.
(E-st-77-P)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between 8 5. (E-10t-71-c)
RATHSKELLER auditions Mon.
night, Feb. 24 at 8:00. Open to all.
Come do your thing or just come
listen. (E-st-80-C)
WAITRESS OR CURB HOSTESS
convenient for students full or part
time. Above average pay plus tips.
Uniforms furnished, experience not
necessary, will pay while training.
For interview call 378-2481 or come
by Jerrys Restaurant, 1505 NW 13th
St. (E-st-80-P)
Savage's Camp Mountain Lake,
Hendersonville, N.C. Boys and girls
6-16: for counselor's job, call
378-0285 any evening; interviews
Sunday, February 16, 1-4 p.m. at
University Inn (E-st-80-P)
GIRL WANTED: Steady work, keep
stock and clean in dress shop. Steady,
Dandylion Boutique, 1236 NW 3rd
Ave. (E-3t-79-c)
;;4x: x x*x x-x-xx*xxiss:K x x*x*x*xxx%*;
AUTOS
:j :
/WX wX'"WSwK >>XvXWs%v; x ; x lw
BUICK 1964 Skylark Wagon heater,
air, radio, new tires very clean $1045,
utility trailer 4x6 $45. Paintings
18x22 sls each. Linesman belt
372-7912. (G-st-76-P)
1965 Sunbeam Alpine tremendous
condition must sell for school
expenses best offer will get it. Call
372-7971 nights and all weekend.
(G-st-76-P)
Valiant 62. Comfortable new
upholstery. Excellent condition, low
mileage, stereo radio. Call 376-9527
after 5. (G-st-77-P)
Porsche, 1963. Super red-black
interior, air conditioning, AM-FM
radio, Pirelli radials. $2900.
376-0554. (G-st-80-P)
1968 vW Karmann Ghia. Radio, WW,
automatic stick-shift (no clutch),
21,000 miles (still under warranty)
Phone 392-9475 after 6 p.m.
(G-st-78-p)
Volkswagen 1965 deluxe sedan beige,
$795. Phone 378-9081. (G-st-79-p)
1964 T-Bird, 2 dr hdtop. Loaded
$1495. 376-1611 x 384 or 378-9130.
(G-st-77-P)
1967 VW low mileage, radio, sedan.
Good condition must sell $1395
Cash. Call 378-3996 for information
after 5 p.m. (A-51-7 7-P)
1959 Morris Minor 1000 Good
condition. Only driven on weekends
by sweet young coed. Make offer.
Call 392-5072. (A-3t-78-p)
' *-\
THRU MMMi I
Roserparys
Babv
4:25.6:50.9:20
o

Page 9

:xwvy:yX'X<*:*x-x*x*x-X'X-x.:.x.v.x.:.:.v
PERSONAL
S ¥
*xw : x*x*x*x*xx;?w*>x*x*xxw!?w x*x<'>:
take a trip with harry tea. down the
yellow brick road passing go. onward
to mardi gras goes the harry tea tour
once again, round trip transportation
S2O. reservation deposit required
before thursday 13th. call 378-8686
or 378-4954 all 41 or under please.
(J-3t -7 9-p)
SKI WEEKEND! Great opportunity
for person with car. Reservations for
Feb. 20-22, Room $3 a night in
Gatlinburg. Have riders need driver!
Get away from it it all, come with us
to play in the snow. 378-5107.
(J-lt-80-P)
LOST & FOUND
Dissecting kit, found in McCarty
Hall. Can be picked up in rm. 126
McCarty Hall. (L-3t-79-nc)
SERVICES
*' in
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks. repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
Lonely? Head needs help? Let om
help you as its helped millions, om
cares, om will help you. Low rates.
Call 372-5457 or 372-1 360.
(M-st-79-p)
SITTER-WEEKDAYS 2:30-5:30 for
two school boys; sls per week. NW
area 372-5885 Evenings. (M-st-77-P)
Impuesto sobre ingresos lncome
tax Llame 376-8605 por la manana
y despues de las 5 pm sabado todo el
dia. Se Habla Espanol. (M-7t-78-p)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
Typing done in my home.
Dissertations, theses, term papers etc.
Call 376-4058. (M-3t-80-P)
|l!iK I 2:15 4:45
7-15 9 ; 45
candy
Technicolor" CRC ; r 1R |
WSiy TODAY
i .'HI L, i
I ONLY
Nobody
Waved Goodbye
"A marvelous movie.
The New Yorker
1:40 4:10 5:40
7:10 8:40 10:10

LADIES
' .. ... ... .. . . ~r
Would you believe that for your
patronage every Tues. evening you can
name your favorite drink and at the
same time be serenaded by the
fabulous CHUCK CONLON
all for only J9 ALIBI LOUNGE 3334 w. Univ.

SERVICES
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
r iviATTHELMI
SHOOTS THE
I WORKS! I
I TheSili-ncers
g 7:07410:49 color |
ALSO AT 9:12 I
1 LEE MARVIN !^|
B gives it to you XW fj
| POINT BLANK |
M Prfj e
Doll§ju V f
9:10 ONLY E
7 0 0 / j9MU4M u
& fill wm lil r r
sP JJk
v-s: Nitro was their %
t weapon against
five blazing
oil infernos! 1
JOHN WAYNE!
it KATHARINE ROSS /
ytfii IHAI
OL 2i poj
' the \
\jjflh fixer ;
Bdsed on the Pulitzer £
4r Prize winning novel
by Bernard Malamud
a****
V Downtown O olnnvillt |
njfxnjviWr^v
W. tAiymity >1
How much WM'
* love can a B
t young mon itand ?
jwmilux :
uhmr}\ /
O^AWC
*



l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 11, 1969

Page 10

-'HOW TO STAY OUT OF THE ARMY=
Review Series Announced
Os Service Info Books

(EDITORS NOTE: Student Government has
recently set up a Selective Service Information
Bureau, 5.5.1.8., headed by Tom Infantino. The
5.5.1.8. information composite is located on the
first floor of the old library. This is the first of a
series of book reviews of the material contained in
the composite.)
By HENRY MATTA
Alligator Correspondent
How to Stay Out of the Army, subtitled A
Guide to Your Rights Under the Draft Law, is a
book written by Conrad J. Lynn, a lawyer who feels
that every young man, even the most disadvantaged,
should have access to the same information and
techniques used by the rich.
This guide is meant to encourage every draft-aged
youth to claim his full rights of deferment or
exemption under the law.
The first part of the book briefly explains in
respective chapters the mechanics of the draft
boards organization, registration and classification.

Kuniyoshi Exhibit
Best Show To Date

By DON NATTRESS
Alligator Correspondent
The University Art Gallery is
exhibiting the works of the
Japanese-American artist, Yasuo
Kuniyoshi, through March 30.
Kuniyoshi, who died in 1953,
painted pictures of a
dream-like, or nearly
surrealistic nature, according to
the secretary of the Gallery, Mrs.
Maijorie Burdick.
Mrs. Burdick said the Galleiy
is only able to get the Kuniyoshi
paintings byway of loans from
individuals and museums.
Some of the loaners include
the chairman of the board for
Encyclopedia Britannica, the
Carnegie Institute, the Chicago
Institute of Art, and the
Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Personnel Services
Awarded Fellowship
The Department of Personnel Services has been awarded a two-year
fellowship program under the Education Professions Development Act
for the preparation of junior college counselors.
The two-year program is open to beginning graduate students or to
persons with graduate preparation in areas other than counseling. It is
designed to lead to the Specialist in Education degree in the College of
Education. Six students will be selected for this program.
Fellowship recipients will be,paid a scholarship of from $2,400 to
$2,600 for each calendar year plus an allowance for dependents.
TUESDAY STEAK SPECIAL
11 AM 9 PM
LONDON BROIL STEAK
SERVED WITH
CHOICE Or POTATOES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD fl|^L
HOT ROLLS A BUTTER
'***JltfUltfi w/c
1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Vi BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

After the paintings leave
here they will go to the
Smithsonian Institution for two
months, said Mrs. Burdick.
Mrs. Burdick also mentioned
that Roy Craven, director of the
University Gallery, had
Kuniyoshi as a teacher in
1949-50 when Craven was in the
Art Students League in New
York.
Mr. Craven has woiked for
three years putting this show
together, Mrs. Burdick said.
This is probably our best show
to date, die added.
Many works of Kuniyoshi will
be displayed, with paintings in
the University Gallery, and
drawings and lithographs in the
Teaching Gallery.

The reader is well advised throughout as to the time
factor and other such quirks, which might keep him
from receiving an appropriate deferment or
classification.
An entire chapter is devoted to the I-A pool, the
only classification from which candidates can be
called into the service.
The next major portion of the book delves into
the different classifications available to registrants.
Many pages are dedicated to expounding upon the
different deferments and classifications.
An interesting chapter in Lynns book is entitled
Canadian Haven. It deals with the pros and cons
of escaping into Canada to evade the selective
service machinery.
Another portion of the book has to do with the
complexities of being a conscientious objector and
with the militancy in the anti-draft fight. The
author rounds out the book with a couple of case
histories of litigation in the courts.
As a sort of appendix there is a section entitled
Things To Keep in Mind. This section contains
aids which might help to improve the readers
chances for obtaining a deferment or exemption.

McDonalcfs
Hamburgers
The way you like em best!
...100% BEEF
...GROUND FRESH
... PREPARED WITH CARE
...HOT OFF THE GRILL
... ON TOASTED BUN
...UM-M-M-M GOOD!
Come in any time.
The service is fast
our prices are right!
McDonalds.
is your kind of place.
CMcDonald'. Corp 1966
201 N.W. 13th St.

OK WISE GUY
You Know Everything. Where can you go
and see two complete shows a night, get
table service, a terrific decor and only pay
25< to get in Tue.-Wed.-Thur this week?
HA! THATS EASY
the
U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc. K
&atf)SkeUer Jgjti
t> .ill

Tuesday, February 11,
explore an
engineering career
on earths
last frontier.
Talk with Newport News On-Campus Career Con Consultant
sultant Consultant about engineering openings at world's
largest shipbuilding companywhere your future
is as big as todays brand new ocean.
Our backlog of orders running for years ahead means
competitive starting salaries, career security, with your
way up wide open. It also means scope for all your
abilities. Were involved with nuclear ship propulsion
and refueling, nuclear aircraft carrier and submarine
building, even automation. We're a major builder of
giant water power and heavy industrial equipment.
Were starting to apply our nautical nuclear know-how
to the fast expanding field of nuclear electrical power
generation on land.
Interested in an advanced degree or research? Were
next door to Virginia Associated Research Center with
one of the worlds largest synchrocyclotrons, offering
advanced study in high energy physics. Were close to
Old Dominion College and University of Virginia Exten Extension
sion Extension Division, where you can get credits for a masters
degree, or take courses in Microwave Theory, Solid
State Electronics, Nuclear Engineering and other ad advanced
vanced advanced subjects. Ask about scholarships, tuition grants,
and special leaves to implement these study and re research
search research opportunities.
Ask, too, about the pleasant living and lower living costs,
here in the heart of Virginia's historic seaside vacation
land, with superb beaches, golf, fishing, boating, hunting.
IMMEDIATE ENGINEERING CAREER OPENINGS
Mechanical Engineers Naval Architects
Electrical Engineers Nuclear Engineers
Marine Engineers Civil Engineers
Industrial Engineers Metallurgical Engineers
Systems Analysts
See our representative
G. O. Vaughn
Tuesday, February 11
Hell be at the Placement Office to answer questions,
discuss qualifications, take applications for fast action.
c s
Newport News
SHIPBUILDING AND DRY DOCK COMPANY.
NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA
An Equal Opportunity Employer. U.S. Citifenship Required.
KEEP YOUR EYES ON GATOR ADS
FOR DOGGONE GREAT VALUESII



COMPLETED IN 1950
UK Coliseum A Memorial

(Editors Note: Due to
increased enthusiasm over a new
UF activities coliseum, this is the
second of an Alligator weekly
series of articles describing the
facilities at the other
Southeastern Conference
Schools.)
Only a little more than a

I I I I fl
If 111
IMB 11111 I
K ill
H If If If lr
Bis If l! I! Jl j *,-£ 'J / *J *Jv
v *Jv if if if it t
L':-- I i
UK COLISEUM
... finished 19 years ago
Gators In Clutch,
Nip Vandy By 2

In a hectic game in which the
Gators led by as many as 12
points and were behind by as
many as 11, Coach Tommy
Bartletts basketball squad won a
last minute Southeastern
Conference contest over the
Vanderbilt Comodores 7573
on the road Monday night.
Little guard Mike
Leatherwood iced the game with
21 seconds remaining when he
dropped in two charity tosses
after the Gators were clinging to
a 72-71 lead.
Center Neal Walk, who had
just learned he had been invited
to play in the East-West All Star
in April, contributed 24 points,
to pace the Gators who ended
up with four men in double
figures.
Forward Andy Owens scored
20, Mike McGinnis, 12 and Boyd
Welsch, 10.
The Gators fought back to a
two point lead at the end of the
first half after being down by 11
points. McGinnis dropped in a
35-foot jumper with 3:59
remaining in the half to put the
UF into the lead for the first
time 32-31.
Within a few minutes it was
tied again and the Gators held
the ball playing for one shot
before the buzzer. Walk got it
with eight seconds to go and the
Gators led at the half 3735.
Before the game had ended
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quarter century ago, the
University of Kentucky provided
its basketball team with its
second homea magnificent
new Alumni Gymnasium seating
2,800 spectators.
A great many persons freely
suggested that the arena would
prove to be a white elephant
which would never be crowded to

the lead changed hands nine
times but never by more than a
three-point margin in the last
five minutes. Tom Hagen was
the big factor for the Comodores
with 22 points.
It was the first time since 1954
that Coach Roy Skinners team
had lost five straight games.
The win left the UF with an
11-7 record against all
opponents and 65 in
conference play while
Vanderbilt was left sporting
10-8 season and 55
conference marks.
The Gators return to action
Wednesday night to take on the
nations leading scorer, Pete
Maravich, and the Louisiana
State Tigers at Florida Gym.

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anywhere near capacity by the
sport that then was considered
little more than an innocuous
winter-months pastime.
But the hardwood game
blitzed the nation and
Kentuckys teams forged to the
national forefront in such a
crowd-pleasing manner that the
huge hall soon could not
begin to accommodate the large
number of fans seeking to whet
their new-found interest. In fact,
the situation soon developed to
the point where only the student
body and faculty were admitted
and for several years about all
the Kentuckians at large knew of
their state universitys famed
cage teams consisted of
information gleaned from the
radio and newspapers.
In 1941, when Dr. H.L.
Donovan became president of
the University, one of his first
recommendations was for a
building that will properly take
care of our athletics, our health
service, physical education,and
recreation. From this beginning
came the plan that culminated in
the construction of 11,500-seat
Memorial Coliseum, an
unparalleled edifice costing
$3,925,000 by the time it was
completed in 1950.
The huge building, which
serves as a memorial to the
nearly 10,000 Kentucky heroes
who lost their lives in World War
II and the Korean conflict,
covers an entire city block and
contains as much space as a
seven-story office building.
Situated along Avenue of
Champions, the Coliseum is used
primarily for basketball games
but also serves as the site of a
sellout community concert and
lecture series as well as
numerous physical education
classes and conventions.
In sharp contrast to the early
days in Alumni Gym, the
Texas Ibpulation
Almost 11 million persons
live in Texas an increase of
about 11,420,000 since April,
1940.

present hall plays host to more
than 150,000 Kentuckians
annually for appearances of the
famous Wildcat cage teams
alone and interest is increasing
with such strides, as evidenced
by sellout crowds throughout
the past four seasons, that even
this splendid arena is rapidly
becoming too small.
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REITZ UNION THEATRE .g.
JANUS FILMS PRESENTS THE ARCTURUS COLLECTION Y
DIRECT FROM NEW YORK'S PHILHARMONIC HALL
a collection of brilliant short films
by the directors of the 60s (& 70s)
Maim/
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New Cinema
PROGRAM NO. 1
Enter Hamlet Fred Mogubgub, U S.A.
Renaissance Walerian Borowczyk, Poland
Les Mistons 67 Francois Truffaut, France
Running, Jumping, and Standing Still Film
Richard Lester, England
Two Castles Bruno Bozzetto, Italy
The Fat and the Lean Roman Polanski, Poland
Corrida Interdite Denys Colomb de Daunant,
Allures Jordan Belson, U.S.A.
La Jetee Chris Marker, France
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Tuesday, February 11, 1969, The Florida Alligator,


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Page 11



Page 12

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 11, 1969

Military Units
Plan Track Meet

The Army and Air Force
ROTC units at the UF will
sponsor a track benefit Feb. 22
to raise funds to send
Gainesvilles Johnnie Lee
Samuels to the World Deaf
Olympics in Yugoslavia next
August.
The program will feature

The Florida Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor
SPORTS IN BRIEF
UFSC Wins Tourney
An Olympic Field Day will be held Saturday, Feb. 22 to raise funds
to send Gainesvilles Johnnie Lee Samuels to the World Deaf Olympics
in Yugoslavia next August.
The program will feature fraternity-sorority, dorm,faculty, ROTC,
Alligator-Student Government and organization competition.
A 75 cent donation will be asked of all spectators. Samuels needs
SIBOO to make the trip, S4OO has been raised.
* *
Dorm League basketball finals will be held tonight at Fla. Gym
starting at 6:45.
Reid 4 and Towers 3 will vie for the East Campus championship.
Reid 4 is the current leader in the East standings moving ahead of
Jennings 5 in basketball. Towers 3 has made a game showing as they
are currently in next to last place.
In Graham Area, second place Newins faces sixth place Cooper for
their area championship.
Tolbert 4 and South 3, two teams far from the lead in the Tolbert
standings, have gained berths in the finals of that area. Gaddum
section of Hume Area stands ready to move into first place in the
standings as it faces Yocum for the Hume championship. Gaddum
would forge ahead of Yeaton who led the league going into basketball.
Murphree area, playing a longer schedule, has its semi-finals
scheduled for tonight.
* *
The rains came Saturday afternoon and the UF Soccer Club learned
to swim and play soccer at the same time.
UFSC won the championship as it defeated San Antonio S.C 4-0;
St. Petersburg Kickers 1-0 and tied Clearwater Tritons 1-1 in the
last minute of play. Second place went to the Clearwater Tritons.
Outstanding for the UFSC: Manuel Wills; Scott Hurley; Everlardo
Gonzalez; and George Corfield.
Saturday starting at 12:30 the UFSC will hold another soccer
tourney with the visiting teams being: McDill Air Force Base;Glynco
Georgia Naval Air Station and the Florida State Soccer Club.

SECsTopScorers
Name G Pts Ave
Maravich, LSU 17 716 42.1
Issel, Kent. 18 454 25.2
Lienhard, GA. 17 402 23.6
Walk, Fla. 17 395 23.2
Hagan, Vandy 18 418 23.1

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fraternity, sorority, dorm and
faculty competition in track and
field events, which will be
detailed later.
Samuels, a prepster at St.
Augustine Deaf and Blind, needs
SI,BOO to make the trip. Nearly
S4OO was raised for him last
month when the UF track team
put on a similar program.

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