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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
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daily
normalized irregular
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English
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v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
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29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
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Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Accent Makes An Impression

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SEN. WAYNE MORSE
... greeting well-wishers

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 7 9

Atheism, Black Power Espoused

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RANDY BASSETT
BOND'S GHOSTWRITER
... Julian Bond's son Manny plans a future speech

Restructuring Proposals Ready

See Editorial, Page 8
(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first of
a three-part series examining the major
aspects of a proposal scheduled for
Action Conference consideration
Wednesday.)
By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
After seven months of study into UFs
decision-making structure, the Task Force
on University Governance will present
proposals for major reform to the Action
Conference Wednesday.
The proposals affect three major areas:
The apportionment of the University
Senate, the decentralization of policy
making to the college level and the

Wayne Morse Appeals To Liberals

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
Strom Thurmond and Wayne
Morse, just about as far apart as
Jackie Gleason and Twiggy,
shared boos and applause in the
final segment of Accent 69
Saturday night.
Thurmond, Republican
Senator from South Carolina,
spoke first, telling the 2,000 plus
gathered in Florida Gym the
shift toward executive agencies
marks a clear drive toward
socialism and totalitarianism.
The Southern conservative
also took a swat at liberal
proponents.

America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida, Gainesville

TO BE PRESENTED WEDNESDAY

establishment of a tripartite governmental
system for the university.
The task force, chaired by Dr. Ruth
McQuown, professor of political science,
recommended that the size of the
University Senate be reduced from its
present membership of 573 to 150.
It further proposed that the 51
administrators who now are members of
the University Senate by virtue of their
jobs be removed. They would sit on a
separate administrative body and the
senate would be composed solely of
faculty.
The 150 seats of the proposed Faculty
Senate would be apportioned according
to the average percentages of faculty and
students in each college. The members to
fill these seats would be elected popularly
by faculty holding taniir.liirihie

Our preachers and teachers
have eroded habits of obedience
by the preaching of civil
disobedience, he said.
Subversive forces, communists,
and anarchists have organized
conspiracies to create havoc.
With that several boos and
hisses rang out.
I expected to get a reaction
from that, he answered, I
usually do, and it usually comes
from those socialistically
inclined.
More sounds of disapproval.
He then said the Vietnam war
was being controlled by the
Soviet Union.
The Vietnam War could

Monday, February 10, 1969

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Boisterous Madalyn Murray and subdued Julian Bond, leading
exponent* of atheism and black power, respectively, spoke to 3,500
students assembled for Accent 69 on the Plaza of the Americas
Friday afternoon.
No god has ever done anything for man, Miss Murray told the
crowd. An atheist loves his fellow man rather than a god.
She contended religion has caused more misery to mankind than
any other force in the history of the world.
It is a crime that atheists in America have to color their beliefs
with other names, she said. I do not believe there is any god,
heaven, hell, life after death; I do not believe in any holy books; I do
not believe in any saviors, whether they be Moses, Jesus, or Strom
Thurmond.
Miss Murray, who initiated litigation to have prayer removed from
public schools, is currently conducting a tax-the-churches drive.
The churches own 25 per cent of all privately owned land, she
said. Every taxpayer in this country has to pay S2OO more each year
simply because the churches dont pay taxes.
If you have violations of church-state separation in your college,
she told the UF students, Ill expect you to do something about it.
Julian Bond said violence may be the only answer to racial
problems of an era when a hillbilly huckster from Alabama can
amass 9,000,000 votes and a Cinderella bridegroom from South
Carolina can dictate policies to the President.
Handsome and dignified in a conservative tweed suit, Bond said
conditions for blacks have not gotten better they have gotten
worse.
He cited unemployment figures: In 1930, the rate was the same for
(SEE 'BOND' PAGE 4)

have been ended in Moscow any
time the Soviets chose to do so,
he said. There will never be
peace in Vietnam until we
recognize that Vietnam is part of
a world-wide strategy which the
Soviets are conducting against
us.
He said the United States had
indulged in reckless attacks
against South Vietnamese
leaders.
In 1963, he said, we stood
by and implicitly approved of
the overthrow and assassination
of Ngo Dinh Diem.
In retrospect, he said, it is
clear that Diem was a vigorous
and brave leader.
Sarcastic Ohs, from the
audience.
Again we hear from the
Socialist sympathizers,
Thurmond said.
The Senator said peace could
only be attained through
realistic bargaining.
lf necessary, he said,
specific pressures, such as the
resumption of bombing, must be
(SEE THURMOND' PAGE 4)

positions in the ranks of assistant
professor and above.
The proposal provides that three
students and three administrators should
sit on the Faculty Senate but not vote.
It would help to rectify the present
University Senate where membership is
given to 475 faculty solely by virtue of
their holding the rank of full professor.
Fifty of the members are elected from
among the ranks of the associate and
assistant professors.
In figures compiled by the Task Force
reflecting the Senate membership in
December, 1967, the unequitable
apportionment is shown most graphically
in the case of the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS).
The IFAS, composed of faculty of the
- (SEE TASK' PAGE 2)

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MADALYN MURRAY
... advocate of atheism
Atheist Also
Spokesman
For Drugs
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students and Accent
Symposium guests received a
two-toned picture of the use of
drugs from free-thinking atheist
Madalyn Murray try them but
use common sense while doing
it.
Miss Murray participated in
an Accent program on
Problems in the Free Use of
Drugs Thursday night with
John Finlator, associate director
of the Federal Bureau of
Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.
, Miss Murray substituted for
Jean Houston, a previously previouslyscheduled
scheduled previouslyscheduled Accent speaker, in
addition to giving her own talk
on atheism Friday afternoon.
M iss Houston had been
scheduled to speak but fell and
broke three ribs while boarding
her Florida-bound plane in New
York.
Finlator told the audience
that legislation is now being
drafted to cover all drugs that
have been abused in the past or
are subject to abuse in the
future.
Miss Murray told students
they should be free to do what
you want with their bodies.
Sure, you should try LSD,*
she said. Sure, you should try
marijuana. How are you going to
know what it does if you.
dont?
You are people, not pigs,
she said, in a warning to use the
drugs intelligently. Dont act
like pigs.
Miss Murray then struck out
at government attempts to
control the drug problem, saying
(SEE 'SPEAKERS' PAGE 4)



Page 2

!. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 10,1969

Task Force To Presenf Proposals

C wt
College of Agriculture, the
Agricultural Extentions and the
Agricultural Experiment
stations, holds 143 seats on the
University Senate and thus
comprises one-fourth of its
membership.
It has 279 full, assistant and
associate professors when the
experiment stations are
included, comprising 20.4 per
cent of the total university
faculty. Its 985 students
comprise only 5.2 per cent of
the total student body.
Under the apportionment
plan proposed by the Task
Force, the percentages obtained
by comparing the faculty and
students of a college to the total
student body and university
faculty would be averaged to
determine the colleges
representation in the Faculty
Senate.
This plan would reduce the
power of Agriculture from 25
per cent of the present
University Senate to 12.8 per
cent of the proposed Faculty
Senate.
On the other hand, the
College of Arts and Sciences and
the University College would
have their representation raised
because of their large total
faculties and numbers of
students.
The task force report stated

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NICK ARROYO
GATOR GIRL
Jeanne Vagnini, 1 UC, from Key West dries out with a smile after a
bout with an infamous UF sprinkler.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at GainesviUe,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $ 3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
, times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

that the senate should be as
small as possible to encourage
full and widespread discussion
within it and as large as
necessary to insure that every
college has at least one
representative.
It asserts that a maximum
size of 150 would fit these
requirements.
In its report to the Action
Conference, the Task Force
stated that all of its proposals,
with the exception of the
apportionment plan for the
Senate, were unanimously
adopted.
A majority of six members
voted for the plan which took in
account the size of the faculty
and student body in each
college: Dr. McQuown, students
Norma Munn, Jeanne Johnson
and Clyde Taylor; Professor of
Economics Irving Goffman; and
Law Professor Earnest Jones.
Three members favored
apportionment only by the
number of tenure-eligible
faculty: Dean of the University
College Franklin Doty; Dean of
the College of Dentistry
Edmund Ackell; and Provost of
the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Science E. T. York.
In recommending that
administrators be removed from
the faculty body, the task force
statement said, The effect of
participation of administrators
in the course of voting and
shaping faculty decisions in such

a body is to distort faculty
opinion on significant policy
questions and thereby to weaken
faculty as a creative force in the
development of educational
policy.
Dean Franklin Doty of the
University College, predicted
that there would be a
reconstitution of the University
Senate, though not necessarily
along the lines of the Task Force
proposal.
Citing the senates
establishment of its own
constitutional committee to deal
with the question, Doty said, It
is all part of the general attitude
of inquiry and questioning on
the campus at this time.
A change in the composition
of the University Senate would
be accomplished by amendment
to the UF Constitution.
Dr. Manning Dauer, chairman
of the Department of Political
Science and a member of the
constitution committee, said
that a plan to make the
membership of the senate
Swimming Pools
Being Planned
Two swimming pools, to be
built near student dorm areas,
are still in the planning stages
now, according to Michael
Davidson, SG secretary of
recreational activities.
The pools have top priority
at the moment, said Davidson.
Plans call for one pool to be
built in the Yulee-Broward area
and another pool near the
Graham-Hume area, according to
Davidson.
Dr. Harold Riker, director of
housing, said the UF was
considering the plan and would
make a decision in the next two
or three weeks.
Estimated cost of the project
is $150,000.


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elective was proposed about ten
years ago.
However, the full professors
were reluctant to vote for the
plan which would have put them
out of the senate, he said.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, who is the presiding
officer of the University Senate,
said he had consulted with the
local chapter of the American
Association of University
Professors on the matter.
The existing view seems to
be that the president should not
inject himself into faculty
matters through the senate. This
seems to be a sound position. As
presiding officer of the senate, I
am supposed to be completely
neutral.

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I ha n<> yet decided
whether I will take a position. If
I, as president, should take a
position, then I want to do it.
It is my understanding that
the Board of Regents must
approve all amendments to the
University Constitution,
OConnell said.
'
Pointing out that she was sure
there would be dissatisfaction by
some faculty with the proposals
and that there would be
compromise, McQuown said,
We were expressing an ideal, a
pure view. We are pointing the
direction in which many people
think reform should go.
(Part II: Decision Making on
the College Level.)



Douglass:'Noblest Slave

The Black Student
Organization at UF, the
Afro-American Student
Association, wishes to
recognize a Black man we
should perhaps remember.
We salute you the
spirit now free
Frederick Douglass.
The Noblest Slave that ever
God set free, as Douglass was
called by W. E. B. duois, himself
a great Black, was born Frederick
Augustus Washington Baily.
Douglass, the foremost of the
Negro abolitionists, described his
beginnings in the opening pages
of his Narrative: In Talbot
County, Eastern Shore, State of
Maryland, near Easton, I,
without any fault of my own
was born in February,
1817. ..My only recollections
of my mother are a few hasty
visits in the night on foot. .. of
my father, I knew nothing. I
hardly became a thinking thing
when I first learned to hate
slavery.
Douglass learned to read from
his mistress until the affair was
discovered and the lessons
brought to a halt. In his early
teens he taught at a little
country Sunday school until
white men broke it up, warning
him not to try to be another
Nat Turner.
His master sent him to a man
who enjoyed the reputation of
being a first-rate hand at
breaking young Negroes for
training. The first week he was
flogged so severely that he bore
forever the scars upon his back.
At the age of 21, Douglass
escaped to New York disguised

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as a sailor. He was invited by
William C. Coffin, the
Abolitionist, to tell his story at
an antislavery convention in
1841. From that day he became
a public figure. He toured with
Collins, Garrison and Phillips. He
was attacked by mobs in Boston,
Harrisburg and Indiana. Enroute
to Europe, some Southerners
threatened to throw him
overboard for a speech he made
on ship. He lectured there two
years, on slavery and women
suffrage. While in England, he
raised enough money to
purchase his freedom and
establish a newspaper on his
return to the United States.
In 1847, in Rochester,
Douglass founded the newspaper
North Star. Its slogan was
Right is of no sex Truth is of
no color God is the Father of
all, and we are all Brethren.
Douglas later changed the
papers name to the Frederick
Douglass paper.
Douglass believed that he and
Black abolitionists could make

'Students For Kirk
Being Formed At UF
/
A Students for Kirk Club is being organized to improve Gov.
Claude Kirks image, according to Steve Huisman, 4JM.
Our primary purpose is to lay a good foundation on which a good
re-election campaign in 1970 can be constructed, said Huisman,
president of the club.
Huisman said he got the idea for the club from an advertising class
project.
Appointments have been made with Kirks press secretary, Russell
Stratton, to discuss campaign tactics, according to Huisman.
Students interested in joining the club should contact Huisman or
Miles Collier, vice-president.

positive contributions by being
activists in the antislavery
movement. He said that ... the
man who has suffered the wrong
is the man to demand
redress... the man who has
endured the cruel pangs of
slavery is the man to advocate
liberty.
After emancipation, Douglass
turned his mind to
Reconstruction. He demanded
ballots and land for freedmen. In
1883, he denounced the Negros
so called emancipation as a
stupendous fraud. .America
abandoned the Negro, left him
an outcast man in law free; in
fact, a slave.
In this period he became an
elder statesman. He was named
Marshal of the District of
Columbia and Minister of Haiti;
but he continued to press claims
of Negroes. His battle cry was
Agitate! Agitate!
In February, 1895, the
Noblest Slave died at
Anacostia Heights, Washington,
D. C.

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M T^ y Febmafy 10 > 19 $ 9 > The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 10,1969

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WILLIAM DOUGLAS
... final speaker

Thurmond And Morse
Show Varied Views

FWM M6t (Hit
applied toward specific aims to
enhance the enemys interest in
peace.
Again hisses.
Thurmond said the Soviet
Union was able to deliver more
and heavier warheads than the
U.S.
Harrington
Asks Funds
For Poverty
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Michael Harrington, author of
The Other America, a book
which guided both President
John F. Kennedy and President
Lyndon B. Johnson in their war
on poverty, called on the
government to* allocate for
poverty the money that will be
available when the war in
Vietnam ends.
Speaking as part of Accent
69 Friday night, Harrington
asserted that the funds should be
siphoned into welfare programs
rather than anti-missile systems
that the military will be
advocating.
Two-thirds of the poor
people in this country receive no
welfare payments at all, he
said, and of the ones that do, a
fourth dont get enough.
He called poverty a
magnetic field, because it
affects people from bordering
strata as well as those who are
classified poverty-stricken.
Unemployment statistics,
which usually give a bright
picture of employment rates, are
misleading. They do not take
into account people who are
underemployed and those who
are not looking for work.
Most people have the wrong
idea about people on welfare,
he said. They think they are
free-loaders who indulge in
riotous living at the
governments expense. Nothing
couid be further from the
truth.
He said most poor people
work long, hard hours and any
welfare payments they receive
just sustain them at a level of
subsistence, if that much.
The standard argument about
pulling yourself up by your
bootstraps does not hold water,
either. Though immigrant grade
school dropouts a few
generations ago could make it
by hard work, that is not the
case today.

Justice Douglas Concludes Accent
On An Apologetic Note Os Failure

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
A tired William O. Douglas,
justice of the U.S. Supreme
Court, concluded Accent 69
Saturday night by telling the
audience, made up mostly of UF
students, that his age group had
failed them.
Im sorry to report to you
that my generation has ended in

Mixed applause from the
audience.
Surely you are not in favor
of the Soviet Union, he said.
He concluded his speech
saying the Nixon administration
must restore our superiority so
that peaceful negotiations will
restore order and justice to the
world.
Morse, ex-Senator from
Oregon, spoke next, but he
abandoned his prepared speech
after hearing Thurmonds talk.
He immediately lashed out
against the Vietnam war, saying
foreign policy should be
returned to the citizens.
Secret policy has no place in
foreign policy making when it
conceals facts that the people, as
judges, should know, he said.
The American people must
take over foreign policy making
so we dont send our boys to
become fodder again in World
War III, he said.
Morse said he had always
opposed the Vietnam War, while
many supported it.
I have never voted for any
measure that led to the
involvement of the United States
in the Vietnam War, he said,
and Im proud of it.
The ex-Senator, who was
defeated in November, indicated
he would run for governor in
1970 and senator in 1972.
When questioned about the
capture of the U.S.S. Pueblo
Morse said he felt an
investigation was necessary, but
not necessarily a military
investigation.
He said he was surprised to
find that the only means of
protection for the intelligence
ship were several Phantom jets,
stationed several hundred miles
away.
Morse was interupted many
times with applause and he was
given a standing ovation
following his speech.
STROM THURMOND
... final speaker
<*

political bankruptcy, he said.
He said the young people of
America were responsible for
changes on a world-wide level.
Federalism, he said, is the
only way that we as a nation
can survive the nuclear age.
He said he often spoke on
one of his two favorite topics:
conservation and international
affairs.
But since both of those have
become kind of controversial,
he said, I thought Id talk
about something not quite so
controversial the Supreme
C o urt.
Hp said the underdeveloped

|Jg : It-
RANDY BASSETT
PAUSING A MOMENT
... Georgia legislator Julian Bond at the microphone
Bond, Murray Speak
f FROM PAGE ONE T
whites and blacks, but in 1965, 30 per cent more blacks were
unemployed.
Violence has been the United States official policy abroad, and
this has seeped down to local police stations.
This makes blacks think non-violence is really a joke, said Bond.
So he called for a new movement, initiated by blacks and based on
racial self-interest, to solve the white problem.
This new movement must speak for laboring classes but not
become a mistress of organized labor.
It must have two goals, full employment and a guaranteed income
tor all Americans, to make the American nightmare the American
dream.
Questioned about the validity of a guaranteed income, Bond
pointed to Stn. James 0. Eastland. D-Miss., who receives government
subsidies amounting to $150,000 each year for not growing cotton on
his plantation.
Nobody gets too upset about that, he said.
And he asserted that the $4,000 poverty base set by the federal
government is too low.
Bond was questioned about the two school districts in the South
that were given a 60-day extension to desegregate before losin federal
funds: .....
I think it would be amazing if they could do in 60 days what they
havent done in 14 years, he said.
Bond, 28-year-old member of the Georgia legislature and leader of
the insurgent Georgia delegation to the Democratic National
Convention last August, was calm and serious in his remarks. While he
talked, his young son sat unperturbed beside the platform.

nations of the world were
experiencing a brain drain,
which would doom them to
mediocrity.
The sadness of his own life,
Douglas said, was that we have
made so few steps trying to solve
world problems.
The question thai your
generation will have to answer,
he said, is just how much of the
worlds keeper you are going to
be, or are you going to,
cooperate with the other World
powers.
He said only by working
together could the nations of the
world survive.

Douglas concluded by
charging the mostly student
audience with influencing the
Congress and United Nations
through education to move in
the direction of federalism.
Its the only way we can
survive. he said.
I Drug Use j
| Speakers |
| f ffiuK PA6i OWE |
it should strike first at the
pushers of drugs.
Instead, she said, the
government tries to control the
problem by controlling the mass
of young adults.
Its alienating the people
who need the help, she said.
They are trying to control the
crowds when it would be easier
and better to control the
pusher.
Miss Murray suggested taking
much of the mysticism out of
drugs by making them widely
available. In this line she
suggested making them available
through doctors prescriptions.
That would stamp out illegal
drug traffic, according to Miss
Murray.
Falling under attack by the
hard-hitting, portly atheist, were
students needing LSD to
heighten inner visions.
Thats for the retired. You
havent lived yet...you havent
wrestled society, she said.
You need all the intelligence
you can get to meet this world
head on. Its a heck of a life out
there.
What you young people
need to do is to make a
tremendous assault on the war in
Vietnam, in cleaning up our
slums, in cleaning up our
educational system.
If you would use drugs in a
prolonged, protracted way, I
think you would be idiots, she
concluded.
Finlator, who opened the
program, warned that legalized
usage of marijuana would almost
certainly result in increased
traffic of the drug that would
have a bizarre effect on users of
marijuana.
Marijuana is a hallucinogen,
he said. It affects the cerebral
cortex, but, unlike alcohol, it
distorts sensory perception. We f
have a very poor idea of the
effect of such interference with
perception on this
interdependent, technological
society.
Finlator credited the
LaGuardia Report with findings
that marijuana produces
significant impairment of static
equilibrium, hand steadiness,
complex reaction time, and one
type of memory. Later studies
have confirmed the effects on
reaction time and memory.
LSD was described as one
of the most potent drugs ever
discoyered by man. Its effects,
both acute and cronic, are still
under study.
The government and the
public, Finlator said, will ask for
stringent rules for new uses in
the future.



UF Scientists Listening
For Jovian Radiation

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Some people record letters on
tape and others record pop
music. UF radio astronomers
record the planet Jupiter and
they go all the way to South
America to do it.
Jupiter makes a good bit of
low frequency noise, more than
' celestial body except the
These decametric bursts are
ci. si fled as swishing or
spitting, according to Carl
Olssc-n, assistant professor of
physical sciences and astronomy.
UF has been recording the
Jovia* radiations for 13 years in
Florida. For the past 10 years,
UF:. astronomers have been
listening in Chile, with the help
of the University of Chile.
The eventual goal of the
two-country operation is to be
able to correlate data from the
two sets of tape-recorded signals,
compute the exact position from
which the noise is coming, and
hopefully determine its cause.
The instrument used for this is a
very long baseline (VLB)
interferometer.
Chile is a favorite spot for
astronomers because of its good
climate, crystal clear skies, and
limited rainfall. According to
Olsson, it is rapidly becoming
the astronomy capital of the
Southern Hemisphere. Russia,
the and several European
countries have observatories
there.
Since radio astronomers listen
rather than look, they chose
Chile for another reason. Maipu
(just outside Santiago) was
selected for the site of the first
observatory because its lattitude
is the same as that of Florida,
but 7,000 kilometers to the south southproviding
providing southproviding a continuous
monitoring of Jupiter over the
years.
To get away from the sounds
of civilization, a second Chilean
observatory was founded in
1964, near Huanta, a remote
Andean village. The results from
this station have been better
than any other, but its very,
remoteness has caused
operational difficulties and it is
currently deactivated.
In construction of the station,
a 60-foot pole was needed for an
antenna. Olsson explained that
in Florida the telephone
company takes care of
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everything, but in the Andean
mountains the same task is not
so easily accomplished.
He and his crew had to chop
down a tree and cut off its
branches. To get it into the
valley it had to be cut in half,
each half carried separately, then
spliced back together again.
Steps were drilled with a hand
auger.
The operation of the new
station began with an old
generator in an adobe hut,
listening equipment in a
converted ambulance, and crew
sleeping in a prefabricated shack.
UF hopes to have the plant back
in operation within a year.
Olsson stated that it now has
all the modern conveniences
including an outhouse.
Chilean personnel operate the
Maipu station year-round, under
the direction of J. May. UF
faculty and students analyze and
interpret the data collected, plus
make yearly trips to supervise
operations and install new
equipment. Dr. Alex Smith,
chairman for astronomy, and
Olsson plan to visit the stations
next month.
Observation is sometimes
hindered by location of the
planet. The next few years will
be big for Chile, Olsson
predicted. Jupiter is moving
and we are successfully receiving
in both Chile and Florida.
Radio, like optical astronomy,
is limited by the earths
atmosphere, so many scientists
are looking to the future. We
may eventually have a satellite
observatory on the moon,
Olsson said. We have to be
careful, though, he cautioned.
A lot of work can be done on
earth that may be neglected in
the glamorous race to get things
orbiting.
Financial assistance for Jovian
radiation research comes from a
number of places. Both the UF
and the University of Chile
receive funds from the National
Science Foundation. In addition
UF is assisted by the National
Aeronautics and Space
Administration, the U.S. Army
Research Office and the Office
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of Naval Research.
UFs own observatory is
located in Dixie County, where
one paid observer monitors
Jupiter five nights a week
Faculty and graduate students
man the station over the
weekend. A new radio telescope
is being constructed which will
have 640 linked antennae. This
project, under the direction of
Dr. T.D. Cain and Jorge Lenz,
will hopefully allow the
astronomers to listen to the
planets, the sun and other
sources of radiation.
I No Action
V ,*
*

| On Proposal |
**
* No action was taken on the
X voluntary class attendance
* proposal by the University
Senate at its meeting :£
v Thursday afternoon. >:
Dr. Roy Lassiter, dean of :
academic affairs, said the £
X senate was considering the £
* Action Conference proposal £
* on class attendance with two

amendments.
V %
v The first amendment £
v would be to make class :
£ attendance mandatory for
: : : freshmen, Lassiter said. The
other amendment would :
prohibit surprise quizzes. £
I* ~ ,*
Dr. Lassiter emphasized :j
that the proposal had not £
been passed and was subject £
j to further amendment before £
j; passage by the senate. £
£ The senates next regularly :
£ scheduled meeting is :
$ Thursday, February 20.
*' *
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Playboy Reaches Clergy

Although Playboy has in the
past been called an evil devil
by clergymen for ruining the
younger generation, it lists 4,000
members of the clergy among its
subscribers.
The clergy receive a special
subscription rate of $2 per year
as compared to the regular rate
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Monday, February 10.1969, The Florida Alligator,

Whereas once Playboy was the
target of fire and brimestone
from ministers, about the only
letters from clergy it receives
today are when their
subscriptions get fouled up, said
Anson Mount at Wednesday's
Accent program.
Your Gontrator \
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9714011

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 10,1969

E. Germany
Announces
Land Blockade
BERLIN (UPI) Communist
East Germany said Sunday it
will forbid members of the West
German armed forces and
electoral college from using land
routes into and out of West
Berlin beginning Saturday.
Despite Communist protests
and threats, the 1,038 member
electoral college has scheduled a
meeting in West Berlin for the
first time in 21 years on March 5
to name a successor to West
German President Heinrich
Luebke.
Taking effect 12 days before
the scheduled visit of President
Nixon, the ban will last until
further notice, the
Communist announcement said.
It is aimed directly at crippling
the West German election.
West Germany called the
move a violation of the
agreement that guarantees free
travel into the western outpost
110 miles inside Communist
territory and said it brought a
new element of tension in
East-West relations.
It meant the troops an
members of the electoral college
would have to fly into West
Berlin, their most common
mode of transport into the city
anyway. The Communists do
not control three Allied air
routes to the city.
The U.S. State Department in
Washington had no immediate
comment on the Communist
announcement. Diplomats in
London said the four Western
powers that control West
Berlinthe United States, West
Germany, France and
Britain would surely file a
diplomatic protest.

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Unidentified Nude
Claims $ Motive
By FRANK ROBSON
Alligator Correspondent
The unidentified male who appeared nude in the Graham area
cafeteria during fall quarter last year said that money was his motive
in the caper.
In an exclusive interview with this reporter, he asked that his
identification be withheld.
The following is his rendition of the incident:
I came out of the shower one evening in my usual attire nothing
and sat down to a bull session with some of the guys, said the
freshman political science major.
This assembly was the beginning of an odd and peculiar plot.
You know how bull sessions are, well, these guys said I was
chicken, but they phrased it differently. And I was, said the
5-foot-10-inch male.
He was coaxed by his friends until a $25 bet for the prank was too
much to turn down.
Before pulling off the prank, they put in a call to the campus police
to see how much the fine would be if apprehended. They would pay
the SSO fine if necessary.
One Tuesday evening he gathered his pillow case and Gator tie and
headed for the wooded area bordering Flavet Village. After entering
the woods he hesitated for a while, then finally doned his costume.
For safety sake, I was to run in one door and out another. Two
friends were guarding the entrances in case someone would chase me.
All sorts of people were around that you usually dont notice at
night. I had all kinds of things running through my head. I didnt
know if I could do it. I just started running, he recalled.
He reached the cafeteria and flung open the doors and stood four
to five feet inside. The door scared me as it closed, but I stood there
a little longer. I just remember seeing a bunch of boys and girls. I felt
like a little boy peeping through a hole in a fence. I wasnt really
there.
Instead of running through, he exited via the same door.

1969 by feature Syndicate. Inc.

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Theft, Sex Offenses Are Leading UF Crimes

Theft and sex offenses are the
leading crimes committed on the
UF campus.
The enrollment increase each

Advisory Committee
To Assist Freshmen
By JAN SCHMALENBERGER
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Herbert J. Doherty of the social sciences department has
announced the formation of a student-faculty advisory committee, to
be a channel of communication from the students in the American
Institutions course to the faculty.
Six students and five faculty members are on the committee, which
is concerned with students enrolled in the freshman institutions
course.
We were concerned how students might best be represented in
department administration, Doherty said. We finally decided in our
last faculty meeting that the most practical plan would be to have a
special committee.
Monthly meetings of the committee are planned.
Faculty members were chosen by the social science departments
policy committee, and students were chosen by six of the faculty
whose names were chosen by lot.
We will be hearing mostly student viewpoints. It will be a two-way
exchange, Doherty said. Student members may want discussion of
certain problems involved in the course, or they may want to make
changes.
He said this should facilitate the facultys understanding of what is
on students minds, and the students understanding a little more
why we operate like we do.
Student members are: Robert M. Baker, Barbara Ann Boyt, Samuel
L. Crouch, Joseph T. Rizzotto, Dianne C. Schauseil and Linden R.
Shoemaker.
Faculty members are: Drs. Steven S. Conroy, Paul L. Hanna, E. A.
Hammond, Wallace M. Nelson and George C. Osborn.
- Dohery is chairman of the committee.
Friendly 'Hello' Admission
Price Os Walk On Trail

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Within the next month, there
will be a new red brick road at
UF. The admission to the path
will be the word hello.
Friendship Walk is the
name given to the trail, and it is
the idea of the Union Board
Special Projects Committee.
Sherri Cox, 2UC, chairman of
the committee said the walk will
be constructed on the Plaza of
the Americas, covering one of
the present cement walks.
We will hold a dedication for
the walk this Friday, she said.
There will be enough cake to
feed 2,000 students, and as of
now, UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will make the formal
dedication.
Our committee approached
OConnell several weeks ago
about the idea, and he was
highly in favor of it.
Plans now call for the walk to
be built by students, with the
majority of the help coming
from fraternities and sororities.
Work will begin Monday.
Dedication Bricks will also
be available. To help finance the

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INCREASING ENROLLMENT ENHANCES PROBLEM

year also brings with it an
increase in student crimes, says
UF Investigator Gene E. Watson
of the University Police.

project, students, fraternities,
and sororities will be able to
have their name or organization
fired into one of the bricks.
We have also contacted the
Alumni organization, Cox said,
and they have assured that each
alumni class will purchase a
brick.
When completed, the walk
will be open only to students
who bid a greeting to all other
students traveling the path.
Archeology
Discussion
An illustrated discussion on
archeology in the Lesser Antilles
will be presented Thursday in
the Latin American Colloquium
room of the library.
The discussion is part of the
monthly scries on the study of
archeology in the Caribbean.
Speakers are Adelaide and
Ripley P. Bullen, staff members
of the Department of Social
Sciences at the Florida State
Museum.

Objects which seem to attract
most thieves are auto parts and
private possessions, such as
money or jewelry, in dormitory
rooms.
Students who fail to lock
their doors when they leave are
the most common victims of
theft.
Watson estimated that
between 40 and 50 cases of theft
occur each month.
The only prevention that can
be taken against thievery in the
dormitory, Watson said, is to be
cautious about locking doors
and keeping small amounts of
money or nothing of great value
in rooms.
The unscrupulous thief takes
only five seconds to walk from

r Action Line 1 Busy
With Student Woes

By BILL KING
Alligator Staff Writer
The Ombudsman Action Line
(392-1650) receives several calls
a day concerning various
problems of UF students.
Names and specific problems
of callers are kept confidential.
The following questions are
example of calls received by
Ombudsman.
A UF student asked, Why
cant single students apply for
married housing even if they
intend to be married before they
move in?
Dave DeCoster, administrative
assistant of housing said there
are two reasons single students
cant apply.
The single student is applying
for something he is not eligible
for and he is depriving other
married students of what they
have a priority for, he said.
Another student had his car
hit and it wasnt his fault. After
he replaced a damaged bumper,
the University Police charged
him $1 for a new parking
sticker.
The Ombudsman had the
student offer proof of the
damaged bumper and a new
decal was issued free.
A past UF graduate didnt
receive a tassel at his graduation
and wanted to know how to
obtain one.
Tassels are available for 50
cents plus tax and handling.

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the hall to a room, pick up an
object and walk back to the
hall, Watson estimated.
Lack of cooperation from the
victims is a major problem in
prosecuting offenders, he said.
Ranking second in crimes
committed on campus are sex
offenses, Watson said. Various
degrees, such as indecent
exposure or molesting, occur
either in the daylight hours in
parking lots and sidewalks or in
the evening hours on poorly lit
pathways.
Drugs in general, such as
marijuana, L.S.D. and speed, are
becoming a prominent problem,
Watson said.
Complaints usually are

The Ombudsman will listen to
any problem, but no legal advice
is given.
A married student protested
the $5 charge for a new picture
ID when she had her name
changed.
Although she did not receive a
refund, in the future new IDs are
issued for $1.50 to students with
a name change.
One student was upset over
the infirmary not distributing
birth control pills after the
Alligator series. She was referred
to County Health Department.
Ombudsman was instrumental
in helping a student get his Final
exam date changed when it was
scheduled during the last week
of classes.
At times the Ombudsman has
his hands tied. He was unable to
help a student find his lost girl
friend. He lost her at a party.
The Ombudsman Action Line
is open 24 hours a day. Betweem
2 and 5 p.m. daily calls are
answered in person. All names
and specific information are
kept confidential.
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Monday, February 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

telephoned in as anonymous
tips.
Specific actions are carried
out by the campus police in
accordance with the degree of
the crime committed and the
circumstances surrounding the
case.
Minor violations by the
students are turned over to the
dean of men while major
offenses, such as larceny or
possession of drugs are taken to
the county jail and charged
accordingly.
Watson said that prior to the
holidays and the beginning of
each quarter the student crime
rate reaches its peak.
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Page 7



Page 8

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 10,1969 >

EDITORIAL
Consider A Change

A lot of good ideas have come out of the
UFs Action Conference. Another good idea
is forthcoming this Wednesday when the
Task Force on Governance will present
proposals for major reforms in the governing
structure of this University.
As with previous Action Conference
proposals, the true, measure of success
cannot be taken now.
Nevertheless, as we report today in a page
one story by Dean Bunch, the Task Force on
Governance has given us much to think
about.
Is the present University Senate viable?
Can it be improved? What types of changes
would make the University Senate more
effective?
These are some of the questions the
governance task force set out to answer. The
answers appear to be well considered.
Briefly, the Task Force on Governance
reports that there is much that can be done
to make the present Senate a more viable
and effective body.
First, it is recommended that the Senate
be renamed as the Faculty Senate. To make
the name more than a facade, it is further
recommended that administrators be
removed from the Senate as active members.
Second, the task force recommends that
the Senate reduce its membership from a
present 573 members to a more cohesive and
reasonable 150 members.
Third, the task force calls for a basic
reapportionment of the Senate so that the
UFs various colleges can be equitably
represented. Where for example, at present,
the Institute of Food and Agricultural

The American Dream

Farmer John Doesnt Like Disturbances

Prof. John Greenman,
reactionary right arm of the
University Senate, doesnt like
to see people disturbed.
He especially doesnt like to
see people disturbed about
things like the malapportion malapportionment
ment malapportionment of the University Senate
that gives him his over-weighted
power.
Because the fact that his
College of Agriculture has a
representation far out of
proportion to its student
constituence is a state of affairs
that he seems to like just fine.
And the fact that the old
farming prof, is so close to the
earth, so to speak, makes him
resent the idea that a bunch of
long haired bearded city slickers
can stomp around in the Plaza of
the Americas and pack the soil
too tightly around the grass
roots.
So ole farmer Johns done sat
down n drew hisself up bunch
o resolutions t quell
disturbances.
Some o th thins Johns agin
are:
9 mass-jaywalking in the
pursuit of a political objective.
[ The
I Florida
Alligator
Published bv students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices
in Room 330, Reitz Union, Phone
Ext. 2832.

non-faculty members
becoming obnoxious at
university events.
(and this is something that
deserves to be quoted word for
word) disrupting normal
activities.
doing violence to Gods
green growing things (unless
youre tagging trees for the Ag.
Dept.).
littering campus in the
pursuit of a political objective.
Now these are all noble ideas
worthy of any right-thinking

The Fifth Column

Youre Hurting Your Paper, Harold

They got a new man in
paste-up. (Paste-up: thats the
place where the people take the
justified copy after its been to
the typesetter and trim it with
razor blades and paste it on
wooden boards so it can be
photoed and sent off to the
printer; as you can sec, it
requires a lot of talent.)
At any rate, James Cook is
now doing paste-up. For those
of you who are unfamiliar with
him allow me to give you a brief
description. James Cook is 22, a
philosophy major, he has hair
down to the middle of his neck
and he was the news editor of
this newspaper until last
Wednesday.
This may be unimportant, but
he also had more writing talent
than the rest of the Alligator
staff combined.
But what happens is that

Sciences composes 25 per cent of the Senate
membership while it has just 6.4 per cent of
the UFs student enrollment and 20.4 per
cent oi the UFs ranking faculty, under the
new system it would have a more reasonable
12.8 per cent membership of the Senate to
its credit.
Such a figure as 12.8 per cent is arrived at
by averaging the percentage of ranking
faculty and students in each college. Under
the Faculty Senate proposal to be made
Wednesday such an averaging would be done
in every college.
Also of note in the Task Force on
Governance proposal is the suggestion that
three students and three administrators
should sit on the Faculty Senate but not
vote.
At the very least, this would give students
some voice in the affairs of the Senate. It
would also not leave the administration
without an avenue of communications with
the faculty.
Not unlike all significant proposals, the
Senate reform program is neither simple nor
easily implemented.
As we will show tomorrow, however, the
Task Force on Governance has considered
the best interests of students, faculty and
administration in making these proposals.
And with a restructured system of
government all sections of this university
will be fairly represented in either the
proposed Administrative Council, Faculty
Senate or Student Senate.
The program is basically sound. It should
be carefully considered.

university prof. But one suspects
that his idea &f what constitutes
a disturbance is a little narrow.
One suspects that when he
deplores obstruction of traffic,
he isnt concerned with rushing
fratmen being herded across
13th Street against the traffic
signal or post-Homecoming
celebrations in the streets.
One suspects that when he
objects to interference with
educational activities, he isnt
talking about running a
lawnmower outside a classroom

peoples personalities and
philosophies conflict. It seems as
though there is no room on the
editorial board of this newspaper
for a long-haired literate liberal.
It seems as though if you were
on Steve Hulls side last year
during the palace coup (i.e.
you chose to remain on the staff
because the paper needed all the
help it could get in order to
publish) then you had two
strikes against you.
It seems as though the editor
of this newspaper is still
operating under the illusion that
he s putting out a southern
version of the New York Times,
and forget the fact that this is a
student newspaper written by
students.
It seems as though there is no
room for real literary talent on
this paper if it manifests itself in
a contrary manner. Rather one

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
? Editor-In-Chief
Puitollw Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
All
Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor
v iPI \ \\y\ v\- ", . lyXjt
WVm 3S&jRk v. us ; '?r^ y CL-- :
7 4/w Charles De Gaulle, Peacemaker In The Middle East

or moving furniture overhead.
One suspects that he isnt
talking about boring lectures or
unfair grading systems.
One suspects that when he
refers to disallowing indoor
demonstrations, he isnt talking
about instructors temper
tantrums.
One suspects that when he
speaks of keeping non-university
elements out of campus
demonstrations, he isnt
suggesting that local residents
not be allowed to cheer the

must always be objective,
(that great holy word that is
always bandied about by the
professionals on this staff but
has yet to be achieved by any
newspaper anywhere.)
So what we do is tell him he is
editorializing in his
presentation of. the news. This
doctrine is a corollary to the
irresponsible theme we used
to shall Steve with last year.
And we tell him that he cant
take authority, (and of course
taking authority is essential for a
student newspaper that doesmot
have to show a profit and that
has a change in management
every six months) and finally we
tell him he will be allowed to
resign.
Its just that this isnt a
southern version of ANY
professional newspaper and if
there isnt 1 room for different

By Uncle Javerneck

Gators on to victory.
No, one suspects that he is
talking about political dissent
(Yuh mean t tell me, son, that
yuh kin look around yuh, see th
green grass n th blue sky, n
Gods own great golden sun, n
tell me that yuh dont bleeve in
th war policy).
It would seem that on
Greenmans animal farm, all
animals are equal but
establishment animals are more
equal than non-establishment
animals.

By Jason Straight

editorial philosophies on this
paper then our present editor
and managing editor are taking
themselves far too seriously.
Because as much as this paper
is a vehicle for information and
opinion, it is also a laboratory
for student, experimentation.
And if the editor of this paper
cant see that then' hes really
missed the point.
There is a plaque in the
editors office that says that this
paper is the best student paper
in the country. The plaque
emphasized the excellence of the
editorial and feature pages.
James Cook ran the editorial
pages of this paper when it won
the award.
And Ill tell you what, Harold.
You may be hurting James Cook
by doing this because no one
took more pride or care in his
work on this paper than he did,



Recognizing SSOC Would Reduce Threat

MR. EDITOR:
Re: Non-Violence Doesnt
Justify SSOC
Mr. Moore has made a good
distinction between violence and
force. However, his logic fails in
the final paragraph when he
concluded that since SSOC (in
his opinion) would use force to
obstruct the rights of others,
then it should not be chartered.
Two questions arise concerning
his assumption that force would
be used.
First, what can an
organization within the system

As 'Reform-Radicals Reach For Recognition...

Selective Enforcement
Wasnt Manufactured

MR. EDITOR:
On Jan. 30, Pres. OConnell
released a statement regarding
the Lavon Gentry case in which
he says:
When I learned of the
Gentry incident last September I
recognized then that it had all
the earmarks of a planned event
designed to be used as an issue
upon which discord, if not
disruption, could be created on
this campus. and also in the
same release This does not
mean that issues of importance
should not be raised and aired,
only that they should not be
manufactured.
My immediate reaction is, if
this were true, why handle the
incident in such a manner as to
actually help those who had
planned and manufactured this
dreadful conspiracy? Why did
the administration persist in its
adamant stand on this matter?
Shortly after the arrest of Mr.
Gentry, and prior to a decision
to accept the case, the local
ACLU investigated the matter
and reached the conclusion that
there had been such confusion
during the entire incident as to
warrant a very human mistake
on the part of the campus

Dont Kid Kibler With 'Non-Violence Plea

MR. EDITOR:
Mike Hittlemans article
SSOCs People Non-Violent in
Tuesdays Alligator (January 28)
is harmful to the spirit and
purpose of the New Left or
student movement on this
campus and every other
university campus in this state.
Mr. Hittlemans intent is a
noble, liberal one if I read him
correctly: to grease the gears for
the recognition of SDS-SSOC by
painting the local organization as

Our 'Liberal Institution Choking
On Its Own Feet Once Again

MR. EDITOR:
This school muffed it again. Supposedly a liberal
minded institution, it has once again stuck its foot
in its mouth by taking action against Scott
DeGarmo, who, in my estimation, is a martyr
looking for a cause. Now it looks like another Pam
Brewer scandal all over again.
Cant these people see whats happening?
DeGarmo and his playmate are looking for
publicity, thats all.
So what there was naked girl in a
newspaper and a not too attractive one at that.
Most of the students seemed to ignore it. Ive heard

possibly do, in the way of force,
that cannot be done from
outside it? Would the members
put guns to the heads of student
senators and force the passage of
radical legislation?
And even if their position as a
recognized group presented a
previously unaccessible method

police.
Accordingly, ACLU
representatives Bob Shetterly
and Clyde Ellis met with
administrators Frank Adams and
James Hennessey in an attempt
to have the matter settled out of
city court. This was certainly an
act of concern for the university
community on the part of
ACLU, as the case was felt to be
an excellent one from a legal
standpoint.
It should be pointed out that
this was done in spite of the fact
that the police reports at that
time (and later testimony in
court bore this out) made it
clear that the contents of the
poster was an issue.
This is hardly the conduct of
conspirators planning discord,
disruption, or manufacturing
issues. I also know that
individuals in Student
Government requested that the
administration handle this
matter differently and were
refused.
In view of this, perhaps Pres.
OConnell would do well to
follow his own advice prior to
implying that all those involved
with the Gentjy case were
conspirators attempting to
disrupt the campus. I quote

a non-violent group, seeking a
revolution without bloodshed.
Whether this is the case or not is
of little consequence at this
time.
What is of great consequence
is the manner in which
Hittleman is obviously answering
D. Burke Kiblers simplistic
argument reported in the
Alligator Monday, January 20,
1969 (New Regents Head
Blasts SDS, SSOC).
Kibler must be answered; we
cant sit by and let the highest

Adoiaml ViMwt
44 There is no hope for the complacent man."

more comments made on the Alligators Gator
Girls!
Probably the only objection the administration
would have heard, would have been from little old
ladies in tennis shoes.
But no they had to get all upset about it and
get the issue distorted far beyond any real
implications it might have had. DeGarmo, himself,
stated, .. .outside stories featured the spoff idea as
we intended it.
Youd think this institution would learn not to
make the same mistake twice.
KAREN KITAIF, 3ED

of coercing others, the
establishment, with its
overwhelming majority, would
not let itself be intimidated (as
the victim is in your analogy of
force to an armed robbery).
Certainly, the rebellious group
would be thrown out of the
system and lose a great deal of

from his statement
Understanding and
appreciation of differing views
and opinions, even accord, can
be reached between individuals,
and progress in human relations
achieved only by our starting
with the basic premise that those
about us have equally good
motives.
A final point of concern.
There has been repeated
emphasis upon the fact that Mr.
Gentry was found Not Guilty
because of some technicality,
with the implication that
somehow courts are unable to
punish lawbreakers because of
technicalities.
Mr. Gentry was charged with
defacing public property, and
Judge Hampton ruled in favor of
Attorney Wilsons request for a
directed verdict of Not
Guilty. One may call this a
technicality if you like, but it
seems a strange term.
If a man is charged with
having committed a murder, and
the victim suddenly appears
unharmed, is the release of the
supposed murderer a
technicality?
NORMA P. MUNN

ranking administrator in the
educational bureaucracy begin
his term of office in the fashion
of a dictator.
But let us not answer in the
manner of Hittleman, crawling
and groveling before the master,
saying No Boss, we aint violent,
no suh, no suh. This is not the
time for begging and pleading.
Take the man at his word, Mr.
Hittleman. Kibler said, SDS is
not important in itself, but
because it stands as something in
the minds of the people:

its power and prestige. Does a
robber steal if he knows he will
be caught?
This brings me to the second
question. Which group is more
likely to resort to coercion as a
means of obtaining
influence one which is denied
the legitimate channels of

> . why handle the incident
in such a manner as to actually
help those who had planned and
mKflkllM manufactured this dreadful
conspiracy? Why did the
administration persist
stand on
Gentry: A Bigot
MR. EDITOR:
It is rather amusing to see how bigoted the unbigoted can be in
their own defense. Master Lavon Gentry, practicing martyr, is a
primary example. He has banded together with himself in the defense
of one of the less defensible persons to have made headlines or public
nausea in the past few months, Mrs. Thomas.
His quotation-mark studded eructation in her behalf which was
printed in your paper on the fourth of this month is one of the most
sterling examples of wretched twaddle perpetrated in the defense of
those who prefer action not first considered and thoroughly studied
that has ever been seen.
Mr. Gentry and those of his genre are becoming tiresome. They
fling themselves into the arms of the Inquisition and complain when
the thumbscrews are not tight enough.
They demand that they be maltreated to assuage some obscure
craving for punishment when they should be demanding that great
masses of human beings stop being punished for a series of biological
and historical accidents over which they had no control.
C. Y. WELLES

violence. So be it!
If this is the real reason for his
opposition to the chartering of
SDS-SSOC, Im sure
would comply if the ruling were
enforced without discrimination.
If Kibler boots out Military
Science, NASA research
projects, and all teaching and
research funded by the
Department of Defense, perhaps
the most universal symbol of
violence in the world today,
SDS-SSOC would probably be
perfectly content to remain
off-campus. (He would have to
realize, of course, that the
Department of Defense funds
well over half of the research

Chivalry Is A Broken Arm
MR. EDITOR:
1 do not agree with the contention of the ACLU that President
Stephen C. OConnell take immediate remedial action to restore Scott
DeGarmo, editor of the University Report, to his position of graduate
assistant in the Research Library.
My advice to Scott is to take the loss of his job, contemplate his
sins, and be grateful that an outraged brother or sweetheart has not
come forward to break his arm. Chivalry and honor may just not be
dead.
: CHERYL HERRINGTON, lUC
N *7" '

Monday, February 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

communication, or one which is
part of the system and can hope
to persuade others of the
righteousness of its goals?
It is the frustrated minority
that resorts to force to gain its
ends, and not the minority
within the system.
DAVID BURDETT, 2UC
P.S. The implication that all
radical left organizations
practice force could lead one tp
remember KKK nightrides and
the police riot in Chicago and
make the same generalization
about the radical right.

going on at this and any other
large university).
In fact, SDS-SSOC would
probably prefer to fight their
battles out in the open where
urbanites ans suburbanites could
witness the struggle, and not in
the insular cocoon spun by
administrators of universities to
placate the taxpayers.
Let us reason with D. Burke
Kibler, and hear his words
carefully. If the Black American
has taught the White American
anything at all it is that we can
not beg for democracy we
must demand democracy.
WILLIAM L. PARTRIDGE, 7AS

Page 9



l. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 10,1969

Page 10

W Campus Crier
I \\ SPONSORED3Y STUDENT GOVERNMENT
I wkwiww**" 1 r '** lw^^^^^*****^^^***^**
THIS WEEK AT THE
&ati)£kdler
i
o
10 Feb. Jazz Octet
11 Feb. Joe Mark (Folk Guitar) Stephanie Spencer (Folk-Rock)
12 Feb. Jim Hansen (Country Western Folk) Bossa Nova Group
13 Feb. Dan Flynn A Mike Foly Joy Chutz (Folk)
14 Feb. The Co-existence Liz Green
15 Feb. Bob Dussia (Back by popular demand) Kathy Uincent
FACULTY STAFF STUDENTS U. ofF. Faculty Club, Inc. I
Youre all Welcome to the Rathskeller for Its AI I t* A \~\
breakfast, lunch and a Fraulein served German V 2) Vt-V VV V Sj
dinner. Theres never a charge except for Y\ II
entertainment after 8:00 P.M. 7/7-^
TAKE A PROFESSOR TO LUNCH THIS WEEK (
SUPPORT GATOR LOAN FUND

NOTICES
Need a Baby Sitter? We have a large supply and are eager to help out. Call the
Student Government Labor Department 35 P.M., Monday Friday at
392-1665.
Students:
Have YOU thought about work in Europe?
Have YOU considered counseling at summer camps?
Have YOU wanted to work for the Government in Washington D.C.?
Discover Summer Employment Opportunity sponsored by Student Government.
Contact the Department of Labor, 392-1665.
TO ALL S.G. BUDGETED ORGANIZATIONS:
ALL BUDGET REQUESTS FOR YEAR 69-70 ARE DUE IN THE OFFICE
OF THE TREASURE OF THE STUDENT BODY BY FEBRUARY 15,1969.
FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH THIS REQUEST WILL RESULT IN A
DELAY OF THE RELEASE OF FUNDS.
ALSO REQUIRED IS A BREAKDOWN OF ALL SOURCES OF INCOME
AND AN ACCOUNTING FOR FUNDS SPENT FROM SEPT. '6B.
JOHN ENGLEHART
SEC. of FINANCE
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCES
INAUGURATION OF
THE FLORIDA FAIR HOUSING AUTHORITY, A UNIVERSITY
COMMUNITY SERVICE.
THE AUTHORITY SHALL ENDEAVOR TO MEDIATE AND ARBITRATE DISPUTES
BETWEEN TENANTS AND LANDLOARDS, BETWEEN FELLOW TENANTS AND WILL
IMPLEMENT OMBUDSMAN IN THE SOLUTION OF HOUSING DIFFICULTIES.
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE AUTHORITY INCLUDE
MAINTENANCE OF UNRESOLVED COMPLAINT. RECORDS CONCERNING BOTH
LANDLORDS AND STUDENTS. AN INSPECTION SERVICE IS ALSO MAINTAINED
FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL AGGRIEVED PARTIES.
WE INVITE THE STUDENT BODY AND LOCAL PROPERTIED INTERESTS TO
SOLICIT THE AID OF THE AUTHORITY IN SETTLEMENT OF COMMON PROBLEMS.
PHONE OMBUDSMAN 392-1650 24 HOURS A DAY. YOUR CALL WILL BE
RELAYED. FROM 3-6 MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, PHONE STUDENT
GOVERNMENT 392-1665. OFFICES, THIRD FLOOR, REITZ UNION.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION HEARING
Mandatory or Voluntary PE
Monday, February 10-3:30 P.M.
Room 361 Florida Union
Any student interested is invited to attend now and voice his opinion.
The Senate Committee wants to represent YOU.
SAMSON
Drivers with cars urgently needed for SAMSON field trip to St. Augustine
scheduled for Saturday, Februray 22, 1969 from 9AM to 7PM. Volunteers
contact SAMPSON Office after 3 P.M. 3rd floor Reitz Union (long hours &
no pay).
PANCAKES ALL YOU CAN EAT SCX
PANCAKES ALL YOU CAN EAT $.50
Southeast Broward Sponsors this breakfast-lunch on Sunday, February 16 in
Broward Rec Room.
Come after church or when you get up 10:00-2:00
Juice and coffee is included along with excellent service by the residents.
Bring your friends.
GATOR LOAN FUND PROJECT
have a question or a problem ?
call
Ombudsman
392-1650 student gvt.
' , '' r
- : __ \
be sure to leave name, address & phone no.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.;;y; x<*:^*x-x*x-x<.:.:.:.:.:.snsyxw*xs x*:*;;
FOR SALE
Vespa 125 cc 66 runs very well. S9O
or best offer; Raleigh five speed bikes
26 in., boys and girls 5 mo. old. Call
378-8610 after 5. (A-st-75-p)
6 6 Allstate Sears Motorscooter.
White, 2600 miles. I no longer use it
enough. With helmet $125. Call
376-6558 after 6 p.m. George rm 5
(A-st-75-p)
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines,
Ved/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
( A-st-75-p)
FLINT lock pistol S&W 22 MRF
pistol 357 Ruger 3V9 Scope 25-308
Mauser rifle franchi 12 ga 3 Mag &
extra barrel Rem XPIOO. Must sell
372-7912. (A-st-76-P)
Mobile Homel2x6o 3 bedrooms,
lVz baths, excellent cond. SSOO
down, assume paymts. Days
376-4616 ask for Beverly/nights
481-1088. (A-st-77-P)
Fender Duosonic Guitar, very fast
neck, good condition S9O. EKO
hollow body dual pickup guitar, light
wood S3O. Call Larry at 392-8952
(A-3t-77-P)
MAG WHEELS set of 4 keys tone
"Customags 5 lug, 13 inch, NEW.
Cost SIBO, will sell for SIOO, spinner
caps included, Call 378-4772.
(A-st-77-P)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading supplies,
Custom, reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340. (A-ts-69-p)
Stereo Motorola portable. Excellent
condition, recently overhauled. Onl
$40.00. Call now, 378-2226
(A-3t-78-p)
1967 Honda 50, under 1500 miles,
good condition, SIOO. Call Burt,
376-9816. (A-4t-78-p)
EXCLUSIVE 4 bedroom, 2 baths,
plus study and large screen porch
with cypress ceiling on acre plus
walking distance of Little Westwood.
Call Helen Balyeat 372-0328;
Wiltshires 378-6160. (A-ts-79-c)
1968 YAMAHA 305 cc. Excellent
condition. Windshield and heavy
rack. Phone 372-7916 ask for Bruce.
(A-2t-79-p)
Graduates Liquidation. Sale: Upright
piano, excellent tonal qual. $225. 54
Chevy, pea-green & sun roof, SSO.
Canvas 2-man kayak (great for
tubing) $35, Norton 500 twin, rare
classic, runs well & fast, S6OO, chair
swing, fits two (warm summer nights
guys!) sls, 376-9755 or 378-8482.
(A-2t-79-p)
3-speed, 2-track channel master tape
recorder, model 6548, one year old,
barely used, call 376-8870 any time.
(A-3t-79-p)
Zeta Tau Alpha member pin. Like
new. White gold. Best offer. Call
376-4080. (A-2t-79-p)
FOR RENT
Modern, air-conditioned apartment
close to campus, private bedroom,
study area, share bath and kitchen.
,*378-9453. (B-st-79-p)
.i
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7:15 9:45
candy
Technicolor" crc |W|
TODAY
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"ELVIRA
MADIGAN
at
1:30 3:10 4:50
6:30 8:10 9:50

FOR RENT
r^ a J e room te to sub let
ContTA ap rtment spring quarter.
Contact Judy after 7 oclock
378-9489. (B-st-74-p) clock.
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
Road opposite Stengel
R ' ,d rport Married student couple
only. SSO per month for long-term
&-99W?8%Wr Sheo pnone
Camelot Apts. 1 br. with turret;
furnished, central heat and air,
dishwasher, ww carpet, sauna bath!
Pool. sublease, call 376-8714.
WANTED
gCT.r in minim ,n iswwx-xwMMaaJ
Need 1 male roommate 42.50 plus
half of util. 2 bdrm. on NW 19 Ave.
Call Bill 372-6278 between 6 & 10
(C-st-78-p)
Rmmte for 2 bdrm upstrs apt 14
blks frm cmpus on SE 4th Ave.
Kmda run down but groovy for
parties. Call Harry Tea 378-4954
378-8686. (C-st-75-p)
HELP! Need ride back from
Pensacola on Sunday Feb. 16 Please
call Vicki at 378-5585. (C-2t-79-p)
Roommates for large 2 bedroom apt
all carpeted AC & heat. 62.50 per
month.gTwo people. 31.25 apiece.
One coed for 16th Ave. apt. Own
room, S6O month. Call 376-6268
after 6 pm, ask for Chris. (C-3t-79-p)
2 male roommates for spring quarter
o S c hare 2-bedroom apartment.
$41.25 per month plus utilities.
Frederick Gardens apt. no. 20 Call
378-6551. (C-3t-79-p)
~ ; ; ;
HELP WANTED
Salesmen part time. Good money
Call 376-1306 after 5 pm
(E-st-78-p) M
RELIABLE help wanted, male,
mature student for 3-4 hrs early Sat.
a.m.; must have reliable
transportation; permanent job. Call
FRASER 376-4912 ANYTIME
(E-st-77-P)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between Bs. (E-10t-71-c)
GIRL WANTED: Steady work, keep
stock and clean in dress shop. Steady,
Dandylion Boutique, 1236 NW 3rd
Ave. (E-3t-79-c)
Shakeys Pizza Parlor male help
wanted. 21 or older, part time. Must
be able to work on weekends. Apply
in person after 4. 3510 SW 13th St.
(E-2t-79-c)
AUTOS
1968 VW Karmann Ghia. Radio, WW,
automatic stick-shift (no clutch),
21,000 miles (still under warranty)
Phone 392-9475 after 6 p.m.
(G-st-78-p)
1959 Morris Minor 1000 Good
condition. Only driven on weekends
by sweet young coed. Make offer.
Call 392-9072. (A-3t-78-p)
Valiant 62. Comfortable new
upholstery. Excellent condition, low
mileage, stereo radio. Call 376-9527
after 5. (G-st-77-P)
1967 VW low mileage, radio, sedan.
Good condition must sell $1395
Cash. Call 378-3996 for information
after 5 p.m. (A-st-77-P)

Exam Weary?
Let it all hang out at the
ALIBI LOUNGE
Highballs only 29< on Mon.
Featuring the talented
CHUCK CONLON
Play the Guitar 3334 W. Univ.

Monday, February 10, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

;I%*?;xX?X*X*X"X-XXXX*X-SSSrXX*X i X*X-:<.;
AUTOS
w.. >
.>.w.v.vX?X*X*X<*X*XXXX*Xi:*SrX X*X'X-X*v
1964 T-Bird, 2 dr hdtop. Loaded
$1495. 376-1611 x 384 or 378-9130.
(G-st-77-P)
Volkswagen 1965 deluxe sedan beige,
$795. Phone 378-9081. (G-st-79-p)
BUICK 1964 Skylark Wagon heater,
air, radio, new tires very clean $1045
utility trailer 4x6 $45. Paintings
18x22 sls each. Linesman belt
372-7912. (G-st-76-P)
1965 Sunbeam Alpine tremendous
condition must sell for school
expenses best offer will get it. Call
372-7971 nights and all weekend
(G-st-76-P)
I PERSONAL
5 v
Y.NXW>\X%X*X*X.;SOX Im just back from Bogota, Colombia
with ruanas, capes, silver and emerald
jewelry, Indian decor pieces in
brilliant colors. Ruana colors are
magnificent! Eunice Renshaw, The
Spanish Main, 105 W. University Ave
372-0667. (J-st-75-p)
Dear Bear: Happy Birthday, doll. I
hope you have many more like this
one! I love you very much. Love,
Snugs. (J-lt-79-p)
Dear Paul, Happy */2 year. Its been so
great I think Ill stay around for at
least 50 more. Your loving wife, M.L.
(J-lt-79-p)
CHAMPEAUX too late for Friday.
Remember fur and young ladies,
steaks and cold cokes, and the days
before we were Miss & Mr. May
everyday bring at least one smile; and
college days be memories of 7th
graders and beer, and many more
things to come. (J-lt-79-p)
take a trip with harry tea. down the
yellow brick road passing go. onward
to mardi gras goes the harry tea tour
once again, round trip transportation
S2O. reservation deposit required
before thursday 13th. call 378-8686
or 378-4954 all 41 or under please.
(J-3t-79-p)
LOST & FOUND |
Found: Understanding Tolkien near
Flint Hall on Tuesday. Call 392-8825
to get your book. (L-lt-79-p)
LOST: gold ring with script initial
S set in black oblong stone. Great
sentimental value. If found or can
give info, 392-9088; Reward.
(L-st-78-p)
LOST: contact lenses. Pale blue in
plastic vial. Lost near library or plaza.
Healthy reward offered! Call
475-2351 after 6:00 pm. (L-2t-78-p)
Kappa Sigma fraternity ptn lost
between Little Hall and Rawlings.
$25 reward for its return. Call Bert
Develle 376-9198. (L-4t-76-P)
Lonely? Head needs help? Let om
help you as its helped millions, om
cares, om will help you. Low rates.
Call 372-5457 or 3 72-1 360.
(M-st-79-p)
aiHnaarn |
Valley BS|E| b
M [pp| L
Dolls F
O rBVTTTV u
6*i i ] r

Page 11

LOST A FOUND
X
x*x*xi?x*x*x*x*x*v*x*x*xv.v.v; ; :'l!
Dissecting kit, found in McCarty
Hall. Can be picked up in rm. 126
McCarty Hall. (L-3t-79-nc)
:..vxx*xx*x<-Nv.*:*xx*x*xxx.x.x.v.*rt*;s^
SERVICES
** )*'
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Impuesto sobre ingresos lncome
tax Llame 376-8605 por la manana
y despues de las 5 pm sabado todo el
dia. Se Habla Espanol. (M-7t-78-p)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
SITTER-WEEKDAYS 2:30-5:30 for
two school boys; sls per week. NW
area 372-5885 Evenings. (M-st-77-P)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tenrjis .Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
I'maithelml
SHOOTS THE
I WORKS! I
I mm
The Silencers
] 7:07*10:49 color |
also AT 9:12 I
I LEE MARVIN
* gives it to you
| POINT BLANK" |

DOUBLE YOUR PLEASURE
ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW
Do your own thing
Bring your instrument and
Swing Along with
BOBBY GRIFFIN
of one during
cocktail hours
JHE' Hors doeuvres
from our salad bar
N f
s
* *. i. / /
' University Inn motel
*, v Everythin# Comfort Desires
/ \
' jP y US ROUTE 441 SOUTH
\ GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
-_ ... Phone.. FRanklih. 2:9333. ,__
Night Club & Lounge

THRU
Rosemary*
4:25.6:50.9:20
1 w w w. w sf\
tNitro was their \
weapon against
five blazing %
oil infernos! %
JOHN WAYNE!
If KATHARINE ROSS /
it#/* i mat AjiAOUAiron #
~wi m. w.iwt irVwM
the \
wif xer 3
+ Based on the Pulitzer £
+ Prize winning novel
% by Bernard Malamud.
4 How much
love can a
# young man stand? B
'f MiMiEUx :
OMr/\ ChriSopmecJoNeS .
W&KWe




Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 10,1969

Nixon Continues Informal Discussions In Miami

KEY BISCAYNE
(UPI) President Nixon,
pleased by South Floridas
bright but blustery weather,
continued informal diplomatic
discussions here Sunday instead
of flying back to the rain and
snow of the nations capital,-''
The President planned to take
off for Washington at 3 p.m.
EST Monday. Meanwhile, in the
bright warm weather of his Key
Biscayne winter home, he
continued a low-key, shirt-sleeve

Nixon May Be Peace Catalyst
For Deadlocked Conference

PARIS (UPI) President
Nixons mission to Paris this
month may provide a turning
point in the deadlocked Vietnam
peace conference, Allied
diplomatic sources said Sunday.
All four negotiating teams
were said to be looking toward
Nixons arrival Feb. 28 as the
possible catalyst for moving the
talks into substantative matters.
No progress has been made
since Jan. 25 when American,
South Vietnamese, North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
diplomats sat down for the First
time to Find away to end more
than eight years of Fighting.
South Vietnamese Vice
President Nguyen Cao Ky,
arriving back in Saigon from
Paris Sunday, said his
government was waiting for the
Communists to make some sign
of goodwill before serious talks
can begin. Ky, the overseer of

Thomas Jefferson Award
To Be Student Decision
Students will now be able to select the winner of the Thomas
Jefferson Award, according to Dr. Franklin A. Doty, dean of the
University College.
This is a SSOO cash award, furnished by the Earll McConnell
Foundation, to reward excellence in teaching in UC, Doty said.
This years winnerthe fifth faculty member to receive the
award will be chosen in the spring.
Donald D. Carter, Jr., and James W. Norman, 111, jointly reported a
procedure for the selection of the winner by ballots cast by the UC
students. Previously, nominations were made to a committee of
faculty which made the selection.
They are going to make a ballot, and will be able to weigh the
ballot in proportion to the student exposure of each faculty
member, Doty said.
The ballots will then be programmed into a computer for analysis.
CHICKEN
SPECIAL
3 pieces chicken
french fries
cole slant *
hush puppies
free
PORE-BOY DELIVERY
1029 W. UNIV. AVI: DIAL
ACROSS FROM £7O JAAa
UNIV. CITY BANK J>ol I BrA

approach to tense international
situations in discussions with
Secretary of State William P.
Rogers and Dr. Henry A.
Kissinger, the presidents
assistant for National Security
Affairs.
There had been some talk of
Nixon returning to Washington
Sunday afternoon, but the
weather here was too good and
conditions in Washington 100
wet and chilly. Whereupon,
Nixon exercised one of the more

the Saigon negotiating team,
blamed the impasse at Paris on
Communist stubbornness.
Allied sources Sunday raised
the possibility that Nixon may
revamp and revise his own
Vietnam policy after looking in
on the talks during his three-day
sojourn in Paris.
Nixon will be traveling with
Secretary of State William P.
Rogers and Henry Kissinger,
special White House adviser on
foreign policy. Arrangements are
being made to provide the
traveling White House with
special working space in the U.S.
embassy.
Under Nixons direction,
Rogers and Kissinger will be in
close contact with the American
negotiating team headed by
Ambassador Henry Cabot
Lodge.
Nixon has devoted a full day,
March 2, to talks on the peace

pleasant prerogatives of a Chief
Executive he decided to work
for another 24 hours where the
weather was better.
On the international front,
presidential Press Secretary
Ronald Ziegler said Nixon still
plans to visit West Berlin for
several hours on Feb. 27 during
his five-nation tour despite
growing tensions with East
Germany. The East Germans
have announced a ban starting
Feb. 15 on land travel by

conference.
If the talks stick to their
once-a-week pattern of full
sessions, there will be three more
meetings before Nixon arrives.
But off-stage contacts have
already been re-established
between the United States and
North Vietnam. It is a well-kept
secret how often American and
Communist negotiators will
meet privately before the
presidential mission.
NEED ZIPPY
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members of the West Germany
federal assembly which will elect
a West German president.
The Florida white house
announced Sunday that the
chief executive signed his first
bill Saturday night a joint
house resolution appropriating
an additional $36 million for
unemployment compensation
for some 70,000 ex-servicemen
and former federal employees.
The funds for fiscal 1969
were requested in the budget

ff,V~~r UF s REPRESENTATIVES V
~~ Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
If Dan Sapp Bill Worsham f
i Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
! 7 George Corl Harold DeVane
1 Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave. 1
I NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208 I
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
College Men
(In major Florida Cities)
INTERNATIONAL SMC ORGANIZATION HAS
OPENINGS FOR HIGH CALIBER MEN WHO NEED
GOOD PAYING SUMMER EMPLOYMENT TO EARN
MONEY TO CONTINUE COLLEGE. THOSE
ACCEPTED CAN EARN 1000.00 3000.00 THIS
SUMMER
REQUIREMENTS:
MEN 18-28, NEAT, PERSONABLE WITH CAR. MUST
BE WILLING TO WORK FULL TIME.
BENEFITS:
$300.00 PER MONTH SALARY PLUS COMMISSION
AND BONUS. 2 DAY INTENSIVE TRAINING ALL
EXPENSES PAID. ONE WEEK MIAMI-NASSUA
VACATION FOR TWO FREE! EARN SIOO.OO
$500.00 SCHOLARSHIPS
YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND A GROUP
INTERVIEW
- NO OBLIGATION -
PLACE: JWRU RM 118
TIME: 11:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M.
DATE: THUR. FEB. 13
PLEASE BE ON TIME

submitted Jan. 17 by former
President Johnson to
supplement a congressional
appropriation of $92.2 million.
Nixon acted after the Labor
Department informed him
nearly all the states will have
exhausted their funds under the
appropriation by Feb. 10.
In another action' the
President is dispatching his
special assistant Robert J. Brown
to Mississippi as a disaster
trouble shooter.



Soviet-Bloc Trawlers Flushed From Coastline

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (UPI)
A fleet of 50 Soviet-bloc
trawlers, flushed from American
waters Saturday, fished four
miles beyond the 12-mile limit
off the Virginia coast Sunday
under surveillance by two Coast
Guard cutters.
The cutters, the 210-foot
Cherokee and the 82-foot Point
Arena, were dispatched to the
areas Saturday after an aircraft
reported that about 20 trawlers
were two miles inside U.S.
waters. The trawlers backed
away before the Coast Guard
arrived.
The Cherokee and Point
Arena said all the trawlers had
kept well outside U.S. waters
since the incident. The cutters
reported that the trawlers were
from Russia, East Germany and
Poland.
The Arena, carrying 12 men
and armed with five 50-caliber
machine guns and an 81mm

California's Beaches Spread
With Absorbant Straw, Talcum

SANTA BARBARA, CALIF.
(UPI) Cleanup crews spread
straw and talcum-like powder
Sunday to restore 30 miles of
southern Californias once
sparkling beaches, now
transformed into tar patches by
tons of crude oil.
Conservationists also feared
much of the Santa Barbara
channel would be a dead sea
because of the pollution.
Carl Hubbs, a marine biologist
at the Scripps Institute of
Oceanography in La Jolla, said,
Theres no doubt that
everything is going to be killed
from Coal Tar Point to as far as
Rincon Beach, about 20 miles.
Gov. Ronald Reagan declared
the coastline a disaster area as
the 800-square mile oil slick
floated ominously off beaches
from Point Mugu to just west of
here, a distance of about 40
miles. Beaches were smeared
from here to Ventura.
Union Oil Co., whose offshore
well was the source of the more
than 230,000 gallons which
fouled beaches and killed sea
life, said the main
concentration of oil around its
platform appeared to be
breaking up.
The well was sealed Friday

FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 90c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378,3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

UPI
NEWS
mortar, reached the area first
Saturday to find that the
trawlers already had withdrawn
past the 12-mile limit.
The Arena threaded its way
through 20 of the trawlers to
one of two mother ships and the
skipper, Lt. Leo Black, passed
over a written message to the
Soviet commander warning him
that any violations in the
future will be subject to
boarding and seizure. The
Coast Guard identified the
mother ship as the Pamorze.
The Coast Guard said it
received no response from the

night after cement-like drilling
mud was poured into the
hole. Union reported the flow of
natural gas, which still bubbled
Saturday, had halted.
More than 600 tons of straw,
which can absorb up to five times
its weight in oil, has been used
by 500 workers in Santa Barbara
alone. The talcum is sprinkled
on the straw to increase its
absorbency. After the straw is
saturated, it is carted away for
burning.
Conservationists were pleased
that the flow of the crude oil
was stopped but were skeptical
of the possibility of fully
restoring beaches.
Frederick Eissler, a national
director of the Sierra Club,
issued a statment here:
Were heartened that the
massive leak has been stopped
and the existing site has been
abandoned. The cleanup will
remain a major, probably
impossible problem and we can
expect that many areas in the
Pacific Ocean in the channel will
be a dead sea. We certainly
recommend that chemicals not
be used in the clean-up
operation.
The Club fears that chemicals
will destroy additional sea life.

Soviet Commander. Radio
messages from Coast Guard
headquarters in Portsmouth also
went unanswered.
The Cherokee, a 210-footer
equipped with a three-inch gun
and two 50-caliber machine guns
and carrying a crew of 80 men,
arrived Saturday night to join
the Point Arena in patrolling the
area.
The Coast Guard said no
other sea or air
requested because the
deployment of the two cutters
seemed to be a very routine
situation.
The cutters said Sunday that
the trawlers were scattered over
a large area 15 to 16 miles east
of Chincoteague, Va., three to
four miles outside U.S.
territorial waters. The area is
considered a prime cod fishing
ground and the Coast Guard said
There is good fishing out there

The State Department of Fish
and Game reported that 263 of
727 birds brought to its
treatment centers had died.
Conservation groups said
additional thousands may have
died uncounted.
No official damage estimate
has been made. But a property
owners and businessmens group
here has filed a $1.3 billion
damage suit against Union Oil
and other operators of the
offshore facility.
At least 1,500 men will be at
work on beaches on Monday to
clean up the muck.
Got a Sick Car?
Our 5 skilled
Mechanics have
over 80 years
experience
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
Corvair Specialist
1031 So. Main 376-7771

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FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N. Main St. Phone 376-7581

and reason for them to be in the
area.
A Coast Guard aircraft first
spotted about 20 trawlers inside
U.S. waters. Officials said the
planes surveillance evidently

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14 SHRIMP IN A BASKET
Served with
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Quantity Discounts
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Monday, February 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

caused the skippers to withdraw
their boats.
The Coast Guard said it had
the legal responsibility to
seize any foreign flag vessel
fishing inside the 12-mile
boundary.

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator. Monday, February 10,1969

JOURDAN WINS IN TWO MEETS
UFs Magic Man Does It Again

UFs jumping Gator Ron
Jourdan, continued his winning
ways with seven-foot magic in
Friday nights Madison Square
Garden Invitational and
Saturday nights All-Eastern
Invitational in Baltimore.
Jourdans jump of seven-foot
even in the Madison Square
Garden Invitational set a new
meet record for the high jump.
Jourdans winning jump
Saturday night marked the sixth
straight time this season that he
has cleared the magic seven
foot barrier.
He has won eight consecutive
indoor titles so far this season
and still remains unbeaten. Dick
Fosbury, 1968 Olympic Games
Champion, numbers among
those beaten by Jourdan.
The rangy Gator juniors
laurels this season include
consecutive wins in the
Washington Invitational, the
Chesterfield Invitational in
Richmond, the Philadelphia
Classic, the Ohio State Indoor
Invitational, the prestigious
Millrose Games, the Boston
Cage Tickets
Available
Tickets for the UF-Kentucky
basketball game Saturday will be
available Tuesday.
The Wildcats are leading the
Southeastern Conference
currently, and are favored to
take it all and represent the SEC
in the NCAA Tournament.
Tickets can be picked up at
the Gate 13 ticket window of
the stadium between 2:30 and 8
p.m.
On Wednesday from 1 to 5
p.m. tickets can be obtained for
the UF-Tennessee game on
Monday, Feb. 17.
Gal Gymnasts
Excel To Win
In Peach State
The UFs womens gymnastics
club copped its third consecutive
dual meet on the road by
out-manuevering Georgia College
for Women Friday night
50.65-36.05.
Pacing the Gators gals to a 3-1
season record, Miss Kim
Smaflwood placed first in floor
exercises and all around while
the UF captured all firsts and
seconds in the entire meeting.

O.* W*
Climb aboard V
/The S.S. Winnjammer
Luncheons served from 11 :00 A.M w\
j Dinners to 1 2 :00 P.M. jj
I Bernie Sher at the Organ \\
I on \ P
Thursday, Friday 8i Saturday I
Oysters & Clams on the half shell 4m
Michelob on draft Wy-
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty t C \
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. V
Reservations accepted
* 'j'*' Harry M. Lanton, Manager £s/
Closed Sundays

The Florida Alligator

MARC DUNN
Sports Editor

AAU Invitational, the Madison
Square Garden Invitational on
Friday and last nights victory in
the All-Eastern Invitational.
Jourdans next competition
will come from Tennessee and
Georgia Tech in Knoxville on
this Friday. The entire UF Track
Team will give Jourdan plenty of
company and support in
Fridays meet.
Ron Coleman, UFs first
Negro athlete, will get
chance to compete for the
Gators in the long jump.
The two-mile relay team of
Bill Ballinger, Bob Lang, John
Parker and Eamonn OKeeffe,
ranked in the top five among the
nations two-mile relay teams
will get back in action after a
weeks rest.
Netmen Set
UFs tennis team is hard at
work preparing for their opener,
Feb. 28 with Rollins in Winter
Park.
The squad is in the mist of a
ladder tournament to determine
what places the Gator netters
will perform.
The top Gators have been
Armi Neely, Jamie Pressly, Steve
Beeland and Charlie Owens.
T ennis Coach Bill Potter
enters his 18th season with one
of the finest coaching records in
the nation.
Potter owns a 244-71 record
in 17 years at UF. Under his
guidance the Gators have
captured two SEC titles and
have finished second twice.
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
8 Cars, T rucks, 4-wheel 8
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BILL DUNN
Assistant Sports Editor

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a perfect size7
It has nothing to do with
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female weight gain... I
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This fluid retention not j wt m y-J |
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your looks but how j |B V :
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i

After the meet in Knoxville
will come more invitationals like
the Mason-Dixon Games in
Louisville on Feb. 15. Then the
Indoor Track Southeastern
Conference championships 'in

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Montgomery on Feb. 28 and
March 1, the Jesuit Invitational
in Tampa on March 8 and the
indoor season ends with the
NCAA Indoor Championships in
Detroit on March 14.



Lagers Au- Burned In Overtime

Coach lommy Bartletts
basketball Gators, playing Neal
Walk-less for the final ten
minutes, dropped a tension-filled
81-80 Southeastern conference
game to Auburn Saturday night
in overtime.
All-American center Neal
Walk fouled out just past the
midway point of the second half
but the scrappy Gators held
their own right down to the final
regualtion buzzer with forward
Andy Owens subbing for the
6-10 Walk.
With the score tied at 73-73
with three seconds left on the
clock, guard Richard Vasquez
" s V\ :
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TmK^
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JIM HAYNES
.. .moves up

Grid Staff Realigned

Coach Ray Graves has named
former star halfback Lindy
Infante as coach of the Baby
Gators freshman football team.
Infante replaces Jim Haynes,
who will move up to assistant
offensive coach of the varsity
squad. Haynes, a former
Pensacola High School coach,
joined the UF coaching staff in
1967.
Infante, a 1962 UF graduate
and star running back, joined
Graves coaching staff in 1966.
The changes were part of
Graves realignment of the Gator
coaching staff after last seasons
disappointing 6-3-1 Gator
record.
Haynes joins an offensive
varsity alignment which is

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TACKLE VANDY AWAY TOKIIftHT

drove the lane but his layup was
in and out and the game went
into overtime.
Auburn outrebounded the
Gators in the overtime period
building up a 77-76 lead which
they never relinquished. Gator
Ed Lucko and Owens cut a pair
of three point Tiger leads to a
point with driving layups before
the overtime buzzer soupded
with the Gators a point short.
Senior Boyd Welsh suffered a
severe ankle sprain after playing
the finest game in his career as a
Gator with an output of 28
points.
Welsh is extremely doubtful
Ik
LINDY INFANTE
. .heads frosh

headed by Fred Pancoast and
also includes offensive assistant
coaches Ed Kensler and Bubba
McGowan. The defensive staff
remains the same headed by
Gene Ellenson with defensive
assistant coaches Jack
Thompson and Don Brown.
Good Service Starts
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SEC STANDINGS
Cons. All
WL W L
Kentucky 9 0 15 2
Tennessee 7 2 12 3
Vanderbilt 5 4 10 7
Georgia 6 5 10 7
Florida 5 5 10 7
Auburn 5 5 9 7
Miss. St. 4 5 6 io
LSU 3 6 9 7
Miss. 2 7 5 10
Alabama 1 8 4 11
for tonights game with
Vanderbilt in Nashville.
The Auburn loss dropped the
Gators to 10-6 against all
opponents and 5-6 in conference
action.
Though the setback came as a
crucial blow to the UFs bid for
§ berth in the National
Invitational Tournament the
SEC runner up spot is still open
after third place Vanderbilt
dropped one to Georgia 90-83.
With the Kentucky Wildcats
and Coach Adolph Rupp still
running strong ahead of the
pack, there does not seem to be
any chanceunless its a team
strikefor the Wildcats to lose
their crown.
Kentucky clobbered hapless
Mississippi Saturday 104-68 in a
pre-season warmup for its
predicted confrontation with the
nations No. 1 ranked UCLA
Bruins in the NCAA
championships.

Rip up our instructions
on self-defense.
After all,
its dentines Day.
Mr, *
>jku
(
V
Normally, we Insist that every man read the instructions on self- I
defense that we put in every package of Hai Karate After Shave aW
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like every woman to tear our instructions to shreds. That way you
can give your guy Hai Karate, with some instructions of your own. JeX|
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1969 Leeming Division, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y.
/ -*

Louisiana State and Pete
Maravich, who travel to
Gainesville Wednesday night to
face the Gators, nosed humble
cellar-dwelling Alabama 81-75
while second place Tennessee
held on to its inside track for
conference runner up spot with
an 80-50 squashing of hot-cold
Mississippi State.
The UFs Baby Gators took

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Monday, February 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

one on the chin Friday night;
89-71, at the hands of Chipola
Junior College of Marianna. On
Saturday, they got back on the
winning track with a 94-85 win
over North Florida Junior
College.
The Gator frosh take on Lake
City Junior College at Florid#
Gym Wednesday night.

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 10,1969

FSU Reaches Out To Win By A Hand

Arch-rival Florida State
handed UF Swim Coach Bill
Harlans crew its first setback of
the season in hostile Seminole
territory Saturday 61-52.
The Gators grabbed first
places in a trio of the first five
events but could not match the
Seminole home pool strength in
the diving events and in the final
event the 400-yard freestyle
relay which they lost by two
tenths of second, costing them
the meet.
It was a revengefully similar
win for FSU after the Gators
managed a close win in the same
event the last time the two
teams met in Gainesville. That
time the Gators won the meet
by a 63Vi-49V'2 margin.
Bruce Williams paced the
State Scribes
Tap McAshan
Gainesville High School
quarterback Eddie McAshan was
selected the states top prep
school football player of 1968
by the Florida Sports Writers
Association.
The 6-2 180-pound blue chip
college prospect, who has yet to
sign any of the multitude of
offers he has been given, led the
Hurricanes offensive unit that
piled up 408 points last season.
During the past season, he
passed for 2,240 yards,
completing 63 per cent of his
aerials, throwing at least one
scoring pas per ballgame leading
his team to a 9-1-1 mark.
After being wooed by more
than 100 colleges, McAshan has
reportedly narrowed his choice
down to Georgia Tech, Florida
State and Kansas but Gator
recruiters still think they are in
contention too.
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ife < * & hHHH
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A FRACTION OF A SECOND
. .the difference in a close meet

Gators with a record breaking
10:19.9 in the 1,000 yard
freestyle. The powerful
sophomore tanker, who last
week was rated the top 200-yard
freestyler in the nation, passed
up his speciality to swim the
longer events Saturday. He also
won the 500-yard freestyle.
It was the first loss of the
season for the Gators against
their five wins. Harlans tankers
take on upcoming Alabama
Thursday afternoon at three in

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GATORS DUNKED FOR FIRST TIME

the Florida Pool to try to get
back in the winning habit.
Sophomore Mark McKee was
the only other double winner,
taking the 200-yard breaststroke
and the 200-yard individual
medley.
Gator sprinter Tom Peek, who
was a member of the FSU
freshman swim team and later
came to the UF to fulfill his
career under Harlan, was nosed
out in the 50-yard freestyle by
Dean Jerger.

2 00-yd freestyle l. John
Stafford (FSU) 2. Hand Hough (UF)
3. Barry Russo (UF) time: 1:47.8.
200-yd. individual
medly l. Mark McKee (UF) 2. Bob
Bridges (UF) 3. Ron Potts (FSU)
time: 2:03.3.
One meter diving l. Howie
Acosta (FSU) 2. Phil Boggs (FSU)
3. Bob Link (UF) award: 294.90
meet record.
200-yd. butterfly l. Barry Russo
(UF) 2. Jim Vining (FSU) 3. Bruce
Rathman (FSU) time: 2:00.6.
100-yd. freestyle -1. Dean Jerger
(FSU) 2. Jim Harrison (FSU) 3. (tie)
Steve Hairston (UF) Andy
McPherson (UF) time: 49.1.
200-yd backstroke l. Bill Strate
(UF) 2. Bill Gest (FSU) 3. Dennis
Shiels (FSU) time: 2:04.9.
5 00-yd freestyle ,l. Bruce
Williams (UF) 2. Jim Thompson

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(FSU) 3. Mark Jenkins (FSU) time:
4:58.2.
200-yd breaststroke l. Mark
McKee (UF) 2. Norm Loges (FSU)
3.'Jim Perkins (UF) time: 2:17.0
meet record.
m 11
Miller-Brown
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ONE MILE
NORT.J OF /DV
THE MALL MU
376-4552
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