Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
ODK Will Produce Art Festival In 1970

UF Omicron Delta Kappa,
mens national leadership
honorary, will produce
Celebration A Festival of the
Arts in the Spring of 1970.
ODK President Fred Breeze
said Robert B. Mautz, Florida
universities chancellor, will be
honorary chairman of the
festival which will encompass
the entire spectrum of the arts.
Included in the quarter-long
program will be major
presentations of music, dance,

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Kol 61, No. 7

IN FIVE-FOUR VOTE
Committee OKs SSOC Charter

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PLAYBOY ALIVE AT UF

Contrary to UF's "no-policy" policy, Playboy is
alive and well at Shands Teaching Hospital. The
Shands giftshop is apparently the only place on
campus where the magazine may be purchased. Sam
P. Getzen, director of UF bookstores and campus

Black History Week Begins Sunday

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The traffic light, used every day by everyday rush-hour drivers and
grocery-shopping housewives, was invented by a black American.
Blood plasma, so essential to the success of many medical
operations, was perfected by a black American who died because a
segregated-white hospital refused to admit him.
These innovations are probably two of the most significant in mans
struggle with himself, but unlike the electric light and the automobile
their inventors have gone unnoticed in the history books.
History of the black American and his contributions is probably the
least known part of the American drama.
On this premise UFs Afro-American Student Association (AASA)
has initiated Black History Week on campus beginning Sunday.
Throughout the history of this country, the black American has
always done his share in society, AASA spokesman Dave Horne, said,
but there has been a noticeable lack of' recognition for his
achievements.

Included in the quarter-long program will be major presentations of music,
dance, drama and the visual arts. .. festivity with good taste will be the
prime goal Fred Breeze

drama and the visual arts,
Breeze said.
We hope the $30,000
project will become a state-wide
arts festival. The program is
primarily directed toward the
students and faculty and
proposes to stimulate an active
appreciation of the art forms.

The
Florida Alligator

shops said recently there is no university policy
against selling it, but he considered it his
responsibility to avoid selling anything that might
cause embarrassment to the university.

All functions will be presented,
as informally as possible.
Festivity with good taste will be
the prime goal.
In making his announcement
Breeze also noted that in May of
this year ODK will sponsor a
mini-festival in the form of an
art show and sale. This

University of Florida, Gainesville

Black History Week is the first of its kind on campus and will be
presented as a black experience in the midst of a predominantly white
UF student population.
Kicking off the week Sunday is a panel discussion including
ministers from five predominantly black churches in the Gainesville
area in University Auditorium from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Each minister will give an historical survey of his sect in relation to
the black American. Jacksonvilles Edward Waters College Choir will
give renditions of several historical spirituals associated with the
religion of the Afro-American.
Presently there are approximately 150 black students at UF. About
a third of them are members of AASA, which was formed two years
ago as a social group when blacks found they were cut qff from most
campus activities, Larry Jordon, AASAs former press secretary, said.
.The rest of the week through Friday AASA will present a series of
discussions and skits on the role black Americans have played in
society.
(SEE 'BLACK' PAGE 3)

mini-festival will concentrate on
the visual arts.
John Toppe, SAR, will be
general chairman of Celebration.
Vice-Chairman is J. Bruce
McCurry, 3AS. Dave Rouse,
4BA, will be Celebrations
financial chairman and Derek B.
Donley, SAR, will be chairman

Final Approval Now
Rests With OConnell
By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer

The bid by the Southern Students Organizing Committee
(SSOC) for recognition as a campus organization is nearly a
reality, according to an announcement by Rush E. Choate
Thursday.
The approval of UF President Stephen C. OConnell is

needed now.
In a report sent to
OConnell Tuesday, Choate,
chairman of the Student
Organizations and Social Affairs
Committee, reported that the
application by SSOC had been
approved by a 54 majority
decision.
Chaote said recognition was
based on assurance by SSOC
that it would function within
the rules and regulations of the
University of Florida and refrain
from violence.
Choate said the organization
must function within the
established channels of
procedure at the university and
refrain from any disruption of
any university operation.
It must conduct its activities
free of violence and in a lawful
and peaceful manner, the
report said.
Recognition of an
organization can be withdrawn if
it does not follow these
guidelines in the future.

of the art show and sale. Trish
Cotthoff, 3JM, will serve as
executive secretary.
Toppe said students who wish
to work in the program are
urgently needed.
Both students and faculty are
invited to apply for interviews.
Forms will be available
starting Friday morning at the
Reitz Union student activities
desk, in the College of
Architecture and Fine Artsmain
office and Tigert Hall room 129.

America's
Number I
Colleya
Daily

Friday February 7, 1969

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O'CONNELL
... his decision
By gaining recognition, SSOC
is entitled to use university
facilities. This was the main
reason for seeking a charter,
Chairman Ed Freeman said in
October when application was
made.
A chartered organization
would be able to apply to
Student Government for money,
Freeman said. He also thought
more potential members would
be attracted to the group if it
were chartered.
SSOC had been affiliated with
Students for Democratic Society
until last November when SDS
was dropped from the name.
Freeman said at the time that
the SDS label had been used
for publicity.
Freeman has said SSOC
proudly accepts its label as a
radical group and names two of
its goals as ending racism and
attempting to completely
restructure the university.
The organization has offered
university students education
seminars of draft evasion and
supported California grape
pickers on strike.



The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7,1969

Page 2

Playboys Anson Mount Predicts Upheaval

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Anson Mount, Playboy Public
Affairs Manager, said Wednesday
night at Accent that the youth
of today will live to see the day
when man attaches no more
significance to the color of a
mans skin than he now does to
eye color.
He predicted more strife,
social upheaval, and the downfall
of the precious southern way of
living in comments on sexual
freedom and the new morality.

Accent Schedule
I \
FRIDAY v
' : r
I 2to 4 p.m. Plaza of the Americas
Julian Bond
I Madalyn Murray
7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Florida Gym
Frederick Flott, Vietnam specialist
8:30 to 9:30 p.m. Florida Gym
Michael Harrington, leftist author
I 9:30 to 10 p.m.
Questions
10 to 11 p.m. Reitz Union, Rooms 122,123
I Reception
I SATURDAY
Michael Harrington LBJ's Great Society
| 9lo a.m. Reitz Union 122,123
Frederick Flott War iii Vietnam
9lo a.m. Reitz Union 349
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. University Inn
I Delegate Luncheon
Panel Discussion on Civil Disobedience
I Melvin Belli, William Kunstler, Tobias Simon and UF law prof.
Fletcher Baldwin
2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Union Ballroom Larry King, Miami radio-TV
commentator and journalist will moderate.
I Florida Gym Accent Finale
Sen. Strom Thurmond 7 p.m.
Sen. Wayne Morse 8 p.m.
Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas 9:15 p.m.
OConnell Will Approve
Pass-Fail Grading System

By JANIE GOULD
ARigrtor Staff Writer
The pass-fail grading system is
passing a final hurdle approval
from UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
He said Thursday he will
approve the Action Conference
proposal in which
undergraduates can take
electives without being graded.
I am afraid, however, that
the pass-fail system is not going
to mean what the students think
it is, he said.
For example, Florida State
University has a similar grading
system, but only four per cent
of the students use it.
Most people want to be
evaluated, he said. Most

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
.than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

One of our mistakes is to
assume that the moral revolution
is the same as the sexual
revolution, Mount said.
Calling sex on campus a paper
dragon, he said those who
indulge in it are thought sinful
by those who dont. Those who
dont indulge in sex are
considered lying by those who
do.
Young people are more moral
in their sex life and attitudes
than their rigid parents.
Man becoming civil is

students want recognition for
excellent work. If the pass-fad
system does encourage students
to wander outside their major
and minor and broaden then theninterests,
interests, theninterests, it will be of value.
The new grading system will
go into effect at the UF no
later than the fall quarter,
according to OConnell.
Developed by Action
Conferences Curriculum Task
Force, whose chairman is Dr.
Roy Lassiter, the pass-fail
system was approved last week
by the university senate.
All undergraduates but
first-quarter freshmen will be
eligible to register for one course
per term in which they will be
graded either satisfactory or
unsatisfactory.

IN ACCENT SPEECH

attributed to his conquering his
own environment and not
because of supernatural help.
This is what the hippie and
student radical movements are
all about.
It is not the money a man
makes that makes him successful
but rather the quality of the sum
total of his human
relationships.
We are doing all right and I
dont think well miss the
University of Florida, was
Mounts reaction to a question
of his opinion of Playboy
Magazine rales banned on the
UF campus.
We all have our problems but
that is your problem, not ours,
he said.
Mount said Playboy is sold at
the bookstore of the Yale
Divinity School.
Circulation of Playboy is
more than five and one half
million and is read by more than
half of all college men, he said.
Playboy has more circulation
than any other American
magazine overseas except
Readers Digest, Mount raid.

Houston Breaks Ribs,
Accent Engagement

By JUDY SPIRO
Alligator Staff Writer
Jeanne Houston, who was
scheduled to speak at Accent
Thursday night, is in the hospital
with three broken ribs.
Thursday, while boarding a
plane leaving from New York,
she had a coughing spasm and
fell. She was released from the
hospital last week after being
treated for pneumonia.
New Consciousness was
Mrs. Houstons planned topic.
She is the director of the
Foundation ior Mind Research
and co-author with her husband,
Robert E. L. Master, of The
Varieties of Psychedelic
Experience, a comprehensive
study of the effects of LSD on
the human personality.
John Finlator, associate
director of the Federal Bureau
of Narcotics and Dangerous
Drugs was to speak with her on
drug use.
At press time, Jeff Weil,
Accent Speakers chairman, was
trying to contact Dr. Sidney M.
Jourard, UF professor of
Psychology, to present his views
on drugs. He said that Madalyn

Wg||i|lJl TFYomrazA is |
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IT'S FROM I
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ANSON MOUNT TALKS WITH GUESTS
... at reception after Wednesday speech

Murray may speak instead,
giving a few introductory
remarks on her speech to be
given today at 2 p.m. in the
Plaza of the Americas.
Weil said, this is one of those
unfortunate circumstances that
we have no control over.
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Grinter Becomes Acting Executive Vice

By Alligator Services
Dr. L. E. Grinter, dean of the
Graduate School for the past 17
years, was named acting
executive vice president
Thursday by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
The appointment is effective
immediately and will continue
until July 1 or whenever the
office is filled, President
OConnell said. We have a
critical need for someone to
assist in the administrative
operation of the University.
We ate continuing to
conduct interviews for the vice
presidents position and hope to
have a recommendation ready
for the Board of Regents soon,
President OConnell added. In
the meantime, however, I know
of no person who could perform
the demanding duties of this
most important office more
effectively or with greater

Black Experience
Planned For UF
The schedule, similar to Accents which ends Sunday night,
includes:
9 A Black Happening, Plaza of the Americas, Monday, 8:15 to
8:45 p.m. This is described as a spontaneous emotional experience in
a brief but poignant skit that will honor the spirit of past black
heroes.
9 The Role of Black Literature, Tuesday, Reitz Union Auditorium,
8:15 t0'9:30 p.m. A panel discussion including a member of Lincoln
High Schools outspoken students, the president of Santa Fe Junior
College AASA, a selected member of UFs AASA and Dr. Andrew
Robinson, principal of Jacksonvilles predominantly black William
Raines High School.
9 Wednesdays panel debate from 8:15 to 9:30 p.m. in the Reitz
Union Auditorium will be an attempt to analyze the historical aspects
of militancy and non-violent resistance. The topic will be Is the
non-violent campaign for civil rights dead?
9 Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Black History Week moves off campus for
a meeting of black student groups from other Florida universities.
9 The week will climax with a satirical play Friday from 8:15 to
9:30 p.m. in Norman Hall auditorium, A Day of Absence by
Douglas Turner Ward. The admission is 50 cents. All other events are
free.
Climb aboard
Hhe S.S. Winnja mmer jn
Luncheons served from 1 1:00 A.M. In
J Dinners to 12:00 P.M. Ji
j Bernie Sher at the organ A\
Thursday, Friday & Saturday Ml
Oysters & Clams on the half shell M
Michelob on draft
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (C\
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M.
Reservations accepted /
| Harry M. Lanton, Manager VJ| /
Closed Simdays
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i ONE MOMENT
On Gator Advertisments H* (
| And Save DOLLARS _ |

distinction than L. E. Grinter. I
am grateful that he is willing to
accept the appointment.
Dean Grinter had planned to
retire last June but agreed to
remain as dean until his
successor could be chosen. Dr.
Harold P. Hanson, chairman of
the Department of Physics at the
University of Texas, will succeed
Dean Grinter July 1.
The vice presidency has been
vacant since April, 1968, when
Dr. Frederick Conner replaced
Robert B. Mautz as vice
president for academic affairs.
Mautz is now chancellor of the
State University System of
Florida.
Commenting on his new
assignment, Dean Grinter noted:
I fully recognize the
extraordinary demands upon
President OConnells time in
terms of the upcoming legislative
session, campus problems that

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DEAN GRINTER
... temporary post
are more extensive than in
previous years, budgetary
difficulties associated with
inflation and the absolute
necessity that the University of
Florida become a truly
distinguished university.
This has led me to feel that
it was important to give my time
to the duties until the vice
presidents position can be
filled.
Dr. Grinter came to the UF in
1952 as dean of the Graduate
School and director of research
after 15 years of service as vice
president, dean and research
professor at Illinois Institute of
Technology.
A&S Info
Students in the College of
Arts and Sciences can pick up a
summary of the new rules
recently passed by the university
senate in room 113 in Anderson
Hall.
These regulations go into
effect immediately, Dean
Harry H. Sisler said.

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Dr. Grinter was one of 22
distinguished engineering
educators named by the
American Society for
Engineering Education to its
75th anniversary Hall of Fame in
1968. He was president of the
society in 195354.
Sigma Xi, the 120,000
member science honorary
fraternity, recently appointed
Dr. Grinter to a four-year term
on its executive committee.
First man to receive a
doctorate in engineering from
the University of Illinois, Dr.
Grinter has had an outstanding
career in research and academic
administration.
He served as president of the
Engineers Council for
Professional Development from
1966 to 1968 and is the author
of books and articles for
professional journals. Dr. Grinter
served as consultant to the
editor of Encyclopedia
Brittanica on revisions of
sections on engineering and
metallurgy.
A member of numerous

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Friday, February 7,1969, The Florida Alligator,

President

honorary societies, Dr. Grinter
serves on committees for the
U. S. Office of Education,
American Council on Education
and the National Research
Council. He has been a
consultant for the Southern
Regional Education Board and
served on the engineering
advisory committee of the
National Science Foundation.
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Page 3



Page 4

\, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7,1969

Hospital Crisis Threatens To burst

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
At odds with each other for
almost a year, officials at UFs
Shands Teaching Hospital and
the State Budget Commission
are again in a tift over an
impending budget emergency.
The money-pinching crisis,
which almost closed the hospital
last spring, is threatening to
burst through by April if action
is not taken before then.
Although the crisis has not
erupted this month as predicted,
the $784,714 supplemental
hospital budget request made by
the Board of Regents recently is,
according to commission
Executive Director Wallace
Henderson, not for any
emergency.
The request does not have
any statement referring to a
crisis, he said, or to avert a
possible one.
The hospitals director, Stuart
A. Wesbury, told the Alligator
last week the money is for the
current fiscal years fourth
quarter and not for money
shortages this month.
If the hospital doesnt get

Law Picketing Permissible
But 'Damn Poor Manners

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
It was permissible, but damn
poor manners of the two
students who picketed the Law
Center dedication Saturday, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
said Thursday.
Mike Hittleman and Alan
Jacobson appeared at the
dedication ceremonies bearing
placards which took issue with
the law center being named for

Americas Pulse Worries Lou Harris

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
Louis Harris the man with his thumb on the
pulse of America is a man worried about what
he measures.
He asks what America is taking from the 60s
into the 70s and he frowns, puffing on a
well-worn pipe.
The answer obviously bothers him, but his job
is to tell it like it is.
Harris did just that at Accent Wednesday.
This country will never be the same after the
19605, Harris reflected. We may very well
blow apart at the seams in the next decade.
This country is divided up between people
who want change and those who dont and its
fracturing us right down the middle.
The nationally syndicated pollster-columnist
sees the threat as both internal and external.
The external threat, according to Harris, is the
threat of nuclear destruction. The internal threat
to the American union is the growing dissent and
division in society caused by the racial conflict,
the non-conformists and the generation gap.
The test of the 1970s is whether we can
conquer these problems. They must be resolved
positively.. theres no turning back, he said,
relighting a dead pipe.
Harris polled more than 240 campaigns before
he retired from private polling and started his
column in 1963.
After that I began to feel like I was about
240 years old.

I ANALYSIS |
iooocccccceooocccooccoooooooocci
the money by April, we will
have a problem, he said.
The hospital is budgeted
adequately up to the fourth
quarter which is April through
June, he added. Last spring the
hospital was so low on funds it
operated on a day to day basis
and bought critical medical
supplies on credit and with
money trickling in from patient
fees.
The $784,714 is a reduction
of an original $901,000 hospital
request made through the
regents in December.
The hospital must know in
advance, at least two months,
that its going to get the money
in order to plan expenses for the
fourth quarter, Wesbury said.
Planning is a management
tool, he noted.
The planning Wesbury is

U. S. Sen. Spessard A. Holland.
OConnell said the two must
not be conscious of Hollands
record in the Senate.
Apparently they didnt do
their homework, he said. If
they had, they would have
recognized Sen. Hollands efforts
in passing the constitutional
amendment which eliminated
the poll tax.
This, as much as anything,

IF NO MONEY COMES

He said polling gave him the feeling of being
where it is.
There is a funny story about how I got
started in polling. I ran for editor of the Daily
Tarheel at the University of North Carolina and
was defeated by someone who had the support
of only three people on a staff of 27. I lost by
three votes and people have been saying that I
have been trying to find out why I lost ever
since.
Harris worked on the special advisory
committee to John F. Kennedy in the 1960
campaign with Robert Kennedy, Ted Sorenson,
Pierre Salinger, Kenneth ODonnell and
Lawerence OBrian.
His voice dropped when he spoke of Kennedy.
I have never met another public figure before or
since who had such a keen sense of polling and
the techniques of public opinion.
Harris said the country has a wait and see
attitude toward President Nixon.
People were quite relieved to see the end of
the Johnson era.
Nixon is a very different man than Johnson.
When he says cool it I think he really means it.
Harris said the jury is out on the Nixon
administration.
Harris blamed the Chicago riots at the
Democratic convention for putting Humphrey
in the hole.
Sixty-five percent of our national sample said
if the Democratic Party cant run its own
convention better than it did then it certainly
cant run the country.

referring to depends primarily
on about one-third of the
request package, $282,000,
which is for operating
expenses-money needed to
medicine, bandages, tissue paper
and other necessities.
Presently this portion is
scheduled to be reviewed by the
ex-officio budget
commission the governor and
his cabinet meeting Feb. 18.
Sources in the commission
office expect no problem in
pushing this part through.
When the hospital was funded
for the 1968-69 Fiscal year and
its appropriation was passed by
the legislature, commission
officials told Wesbury and
Health Center Provost Samuel P.
Martin that the budget was not
adequate and an additional
special request would have to be
made later.
When Martin resigned Nov. 19
from his $38,800-a-year job as
provost of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, of which the
381-bed Shands Hospital is a
part, he said, I am leaving one
problem, and that is in the area
of our relations with
Tallahassee. He is due to leave
June 30.

has aided the cause of minority
groups. And yet, one of the signs
called him a bigot.
Jacobson said in an Alligator
column this week his purpose
had been to show the prominent
people assembled at the law
center that there is
disagreement with their general
policies.
Many of the dignitaries,
especially Gov. Claude Kirk,
could not accept our right to
dissent, he said.

STUART WESBURY
... hospital director
Commission sources say the
requests expense fund portion
was the only one they were
expecting, because when the
original budget was passed that
part was known inadequate.
Apparently other shortages have
been foreseen by the hospital
because of later developments.
The budget commission
apparently not prepared to deal
with the other portions of the
request and has had to analyze
them-subsequently slowing the
process down.
The remainder of the request is
under commision scrutiny, and
the regents are being asked to
justify some of the items in it,
Henderson said.
The rest of the jequest
includes:
$185,000 in overtime pay
for personnel working in
emergency operations and
routine patient treatment. Under
state personnel regulations a
person may work overtime but a
recent UF directive says no
campus employe may work after
hours except at the health
center.
$150,000 in salaries for
personnel with new job
reclassifications, for promotions
and new positions critically

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... Health Center Provost
needed to bring the hospital up
to normal standards. Teaching
faculty and physicians are on a
separate budget.
§ SIOO,OOO for a pediatrics
intensive care clinic and a small
outpatient clinic.
Wesbury said the cause of the
request for money to handle
salaries is the reclassification of
some jobs by the State Personnel
Board. The new requirements
for these jobs call for higher
salaries.
Also, increased salaries are
needed for promotions in order
for the hospital to compete with
the Veterans Administration
hospital across the street.
The VA offers higher paying
and promotable jobs.
S hands hospital has lost
several qualified persons to the
VA hospital because it wasnt
able to promote them.
It is doubtful the increased
salaries and overtime pay
portions of the request will
reach the commission by Feb.
18 when the expense part does.
Asst. Budget Director Joe Cresse
said Tuesday.
He said the personnel board
has not approved those requests
and is still analyzing them.
Accompanying the whole
request is an ad-hoc, joint
legislative committee report,
dated Sept. 14, which outlined
most of the money problems
facing the hospital.
The committee found the
hospital in a critical state and
said its problems stemmed, in
part, from, besides lack of
proper expense funding, the
failure of the personnel board to
recognize peculiar problems of a
teaching hospital and its slow
response to reclassification
requests and allocation of new
positions.
Last week budget director
Henderson said, I will make no
comment on the report.
Previously he said he had not
studied the report, although his
office did have it.
In a recent Alligator interview
Health Center Provost Martin
pointed to the budget
commission as the main snag in
getting a viable hospital budget
to begin with.
If no money is forthcoming
for the April-June period
apparently the hospital will have
to make other plans.
Even if expenses are provided
for, there may be cutbacks
in salaries and job layoffs.
It boils down to the essence
of urgency, Wesbury said.
There is no sense of urgency in
the budget commission now.



Greek News
By MIKE SIMMONS |
Alligator Staff Writer
KAPPA ALPHA THETA The Thetas are being led this quarter
by their new president, Linda Forbes; first vice president and pledge
trainer, Ann Clark; second vice president, Sallie Jusko; secretary,
Linda Edmunds; and treasurer, Cindy Miller.
The girls initiated 24 new sisters Friday, and awarded the best
pledge award to Beth Graves and the highest scholarship award to
Peggy Eaton.
Congratulations go to Ann Luvisi, a new Lambda Chi Little Sister,
to Jennifer Leverette, Phi Delta Theta pledge class sweetheart, and to
Valarie Dodd, Delta Tau Delta pledge class sweetheart. Beth Graves is
now a columnist for the Alligator, Cyndy Hoey is executive
commander of the Angel Flight, and Jean Luehrs is an area
administrative officer. Janet Boldizar and Peggy Eaton are now
members of Alpha Lambda Delta. Kay Ingals has been chosen a
member of Mademoiselles College Board, Linda Edmunds has just
received an appointment from the Honor Court, and Susie Clarkson is
the new ATO Little Sister vice president.
DELTA CHlSaturday the Delta Chis hosted 40
underpriviledged children from the N. E. Gainesville Neighborhood
Center. Following a cookout lunch Our Gang movies were shown
and the Chi Omega pledge class helped in providing recreation for the
group.
Sunday the brothers began this years Little Sister rush with an
outdoor dinner, hoping to add 15 new girls to the organization.
Twenty-eight new brothers have been initiated and the new winter
pledge class is 21 strong.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA Jan. 25, the ATOs made their way to the
St. Johns River for a weekend retreat, discussing such things as how
the fraternity can bettjer serve the school and community.
Mike Moore, Jim Bachs, and A1 Hill joined the ranks of Scabbard
and Blade this week, giving ATO the largest representation in this
body.
Jamie Murphy is swimming for the Gators, and the brotherhood
copped the number two position in fraternity scholarship last quarter.
ALPHA CHI OMEGA Alpha Chis and their dates recently
celebrated their annual weekend at Golden Hills Country Club in
Ocala and Blue Springs. Sandy Harris, ATO, was honored as Carnation
Man.
Peggy Pink, Dee Moustakas, and Carol Gilmore are Lambda Chi
Little Sisters. Nancy Pierson and Karen Kay were tapped for Savant,
and Ellen Rupp for Angel Flight. BeV Black is a new member of Alpha
Lambda Delta.
Officers for this year are Karen Kay, president; Leslie Perry, first
vice president; Jane Leslie, pledge trainer; Eileen McDargh, third vice
president; Elaine Wigging, treasurer; Mandee Gustafson, recording
secretary; Sandy Ryan, corresponding secretary; and Debbie Jones,
rush chairman.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON The men of Tau Kappa Epsilon met
with the IFC Executive Council at an informal dinner this week. An
address by IFC President Steve Zack lauded the Tekes achievements
during the past year, including doubling membership and obtaining
their new house.
For the first time in the history of the University of Florida,
fraternity life has been combined with apartment style living. A
complex consisting of eight four-man apartments, each including a
kitchen, dining area, living room, bath, and two bedrooms, forms the
living area of the house. A new social wing allows partying with
banquet capacity.
Field Supervisor Bod Kellam from TKE Naitonal has been a guest
of the house for the past week.
ALPHA DELTA PI The ADPis new officers for the coming year
Jamie Sinnet, president; Donna Bets, vice president; Anne
Roberts, recording secretary; Linda Lewis, corresponding secretary;
Beth Vann, treasurer; and Carol Still, rush chairman.
Winter rush has brought five enthusiastic new pledges to the house.
Sisters Carol Butler and Celeste Hardee have been tapped by
Savant, and Nancy Ruskin, Susan Hazen, Laurie Beth Amick and
Debbie McClintock were initiated into Alpha Lambda Delta.
Lohse Barten was elected as Panhellenics over-all rush chairman,
and Sue Durham is a new member of the Student Senate.
Bonnie Boland and Ronnie Richards were elected by the Lambda
Chis as Little Sisters of the Cross and Cresent.
New members of Angel Flight are Celeste Hardee, Margret Fleming,
and Jo Lynn Pijot.
DELTA TAU DELTA The Winter Quarter started off the Delta
Tau Delta with the election of new officers: Bill Killings worth
president; Dan Roach, vice president; Tom Herman, recording
secretary; Jim Larsen, corresponding secretary; and Jim Maslanka,
sergeant-at-arms.
The 33 new Delt initiates received their pins at a banquet Feb. 2.
Formal Winter Rush for the Sisters of the Iris will begin Feb. 9 by
special invitation. ?
The brothers of Delta Tau Delta will play host to the Kady
Ladies for a dinner-social Feb. 7.
KAPPA SIGMA The men of Kappa Sigma recently initiated 18
new Little Sisters into the Star and the Cresent!
Congratulations go to brother Steve Skarda who was awarded the
Haskins and Sells Foundation Award for senior accounting students,
and to brother Tom Jones, recently inducted into Phi Eta Sigma, after
obtaining a 4.0 average.
Pledge class officers for the Winter Quarter are: Jim Wells,
president; Rick Miller, secretary; and Garry Zeigler, activities
chairman. Pledge of the Year is Danny Kandel.

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Friday, February 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7, 1969

Page 6

Dance Set
For Tonight
The Styrophoam Soule will
be featured tonight at a dance
co-sponsored by the Dance
Committee of the Reitz Union
Program Council and the Reitz
Union Barber Shop.
The dance will be held from 9
p.m. to 1 a.m. on the ground
level terrace of the J. Wayne
Reitz Union.
Refreshments will be provided
by the Reitz Union Barber Shop.

TODAY FOR MED SERIES
Surgeon Guest Speaker

Dr. Owen H. Wangensteen,
internationally famed surgeon,
teacher and researcher, will be
the guest speaker today for the
History and Philosophy of
Medicine Lecture series
sponsored by the UF College of
Medicine and supported by
Publix Markets.
A professor of surgery at the
University of Minnesota, Dr.
Wangensteen will speak at 12:10
p.m. in the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center Auditorium on The
Surgical Arena.
The talk will focus on the
development of medical
knowledge on the pathology and
treatment of intestinal
obstruction. Area physicians,
health professionals and other
interested persons are invited.
Dr. Wangensteen is most
noted for developing the modern
method of treating intestinal
obstruction with the stomach
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tube suction method now used
routinely in postoperative
surgical care. Physicians still
make reference to the
Wangensteen suction method.
In addition, he has made noted
research contributions in the
areas of peptic ulcer disease and
cancer of the alimentary tract.
Only two surgeons in the
United States are members of
the National Academy of
Sciences. They are Dr.

Have your day
in the
butchers market.
Then check with the man from LTV Aerospace.
wv
p
As a man, youve got ideas and ambitions t 0 tota work force js exceptiona || y
and values that wont show up on anybodys high. Wh.ch adds up to a pretty good
version of the butchers chart. You know it MM spot for you to be in -as an engineer,
we know and as a man
As an engineer, you want something So, after you've been weighed and
more than your daily bread. And we know n.easured, inspected and all but dis-
sected try to stay in one piece wont
At LTV Aerospace Corporation, we you? Wed like to talk to the whole man.
have something pretty special to offer
you -as a man, as an engineer OM I S NTE RVIEWS I
We ve got scope. Engineering scope
that can take you from the bottom of MON. FEBRUARY 17
the ocean to the outer reaches of TUES. FEBRUARY 18
space. Opportunity scope that extends L ...
to the top levels of management.
Figure it out. LTV Aerospace is one M e ""'" te ,e with urre P re3enta
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HAPPENED ?
yoj i>LfcbF i>LfcbF'
' i>LfcbF' WALKED
11 | RIGHT INTO f m
D
A m **!

Wangensteen and Dr. Lester
Dragstedt, research professor of
surgery at the Health Center.
Dr. Wangensteen is a charter
member of the American Board
of Surgery and presently is
serving as a consultant to the
Surgeon General, U.S. Public
Health Service. He is president
this year of the American
Surgical Association and the
American Chapter, International
Surgical Society.

BY HOWARD POST
f WHY DIDN'T] [ C**l'T TOcJ KMovTI
you STOP I IT'S DANGEROUS I
ME? / TO WAKE UP A 1
w r SLEEPWALKER/? W
1 1/~\
. i.................,. bbsy [

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Inflation-Curb Proposal Sent To Washington

A resolution calling for the
curbing of inflation has been
adopted and sent to President
Richard M. Nixons Secretary of
the Treasury David M. Kennedy
by members of the Gainesville,
Florida Campus Federal Credit
Union.
The resolution calls upon the
secretary of the treasury,
Federal Reserve Board, Council
of Economic Advisors, and
Congress to take all steps to curb
inflation so that members of
credit unions may invest their
savings in these credit unions
with the assurance that their
savings will not in the future be
dissipated by inflation.
Furthermore, the
resolution reads, our members,
together with all people should
be assured that they can invest a
part of their incomes in U.S.

Chile Seminar Project
To Update Teaching

Fifty teachers and
administrators of bi-cultural
American community schools in
South America are being
updated on classroom
techniques by two UF
educators.
The project, a two-week
seminar which began Monday, is
being conducted in Santiago,
Chile, by Assistant Dean
Emmett Williams and Dr. Robert
Soar, professor, College of
Education.
Faculty from community
UF Debaters
Place Third
Two UF debaters took third
place in team competition at the
Mardi Gras Invitational Debate
Tournament, hosted by Tulane
University, Jan. 30 and Feb. 1.
Gregg Mathews, 3AS, and
Ralph Glatfelter, 4AS, defeated
Drake University debaters in the
quarter finals and lost to the
University of lowa
representatives in the semi-finals.
Mathews was ranked fourth
among the 224 speakers
participating in the tournament.
The debate topic was:
Resolved: That Executive
Control of United States Foreign
Policy Should Be Significantly
Curtailed.
UF debaters are participating
in tournaments, February 8-9, at
Northwestern University and at
Spring Hill College.

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Savings Bonds, retirement
programs and insurance policies
and be assured that when these
savings are needed they will, have
a dollar purchasing equivalent to the dollar they
invested.
The resolution was
drawn up by Dr. H. Glenn
Hamilton, professor emeritus of
agricultural economics and a
charter member of the campus
credit union, and brought before
the board of directors for
approval.
After approval by the
directors of the credit union, the
resolution went to the total
membership, which adopted it
Jan. 29.
In passing this resolution we
are showing that we hope
inflation will not take initiative
away from the small savers,

schools in Argentina, Chile,
Uruguay and Paraguay are taking
part in the seminar on
Research: A Key to Teaching
Effectiveness.
Dr. Williams, director of two
previous seminars of this type,
said the theme of this years
conference is systematic
observation of classroom
teaching.
Concentration will be on the
use and development of
procedures for discussing in
very precise language what goes
on in the classrooms.
The trend toward the use of
these procedures is growing
very fast in this country and
Dr. Williams hopes to hasten the
time for the technique to take in
the overseas schools.
American community schools
serve both children of American
businessmen in South America
and children of other
nationalities interested in
experiencing education with an
American flavor.
The majority of teachers are
nationals of the host country,
says Dr. Williams. He notes that
the school in Santiago has an
enrollment representing 23
nationalities.
Called the South American
Regional In-service Seminar, the
program is sponsored by the
U.S. Department of State
through the Office of Overseas
Schools. It is coordinated by the
College of Education.

BY CAMPUS CREDIT UNION

said Mrs. Louise Hinton,
secretary-treasurer of the
campus credit union.
This is who it affects more
than anyone else.
Mrs. Hinton said 75 per cent
of the campus credit unions
members have shares of less than
SSOO, qualifying them as small
savers.
If you have more than that,
you can invest it in land or in
stock, Mrs. Hinton said. The
small man can really save only in
a savings account. We pay a high
interest rate, and even then the
investors are hurt.
The campus credit union,
established in 1935, was the first
credit union established on a
college campus and the 171st
credit union to be chartered
under federal law.
It has 6,372 members with
total shares valued at
$3,942,028.60.
Copies of the resolution have
also been sent to McChesney
Martin, chairman of the Federal
Reserve Board; Paul W.
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McCracken, chairman of the
Council of Economic Advisors;
Sen. Spessard Holland; Sen. Ed

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Friday, February 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Gurney; Rep. Don Fuqua; and
Robert H. Finch, health,
education, and welfare secretary.

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7, 1969

Page 8

'Crisis Crisis Is No Crisis At All

The criticism is frequently voiced that this
is a crisis oriented campus.
Many members of the university
community express a genuine revulsion
toward the crisis attitude which they
maintain thrives here.
No doubt the crisis of the week is a
reality to*many of us. There are endless
crises, Oso it seems, involving press
censorship, poster-pasting, beer drinking,
conduct rules, naked women, and, well, just
about everything the mind can imagine.
Crises are healthy manifestations of
concern with real problems and
potentialities in an aroused University
community.
For years it has been popular here to
maintain that the mass of students are an
apathetic and unconcerned lot. Once that
may have been true. a
But today the UF has nearly 20,000
students and additional thousands of faculty
and staff members, all very much concerned
and all very much aware in their seperate
ways.
Regardless of unachieved goals, regardless
of thwarted desires to be a university first
in the South and second to none in the
nation, the UF is not really as bad as it
would sometimes appear.
For all its problems the UF has a
Rathskeller and an Accent, an award
winning faculty and a frequently
distinguished student body.
It is from this group of leaders and

Eastern 502, Runway One, Then National 301 AFTER
Pan Am 103 Which Follows The Piper, Then United. .

Staff Writings

Beyond The Reference To Nigger Jim

The United Black Students at
Miami Dade Junior College had
Huckleberry Finn dropped
from the required reading list
last week, because it was
embarassing to the Negro.
In doing so, they overlooked
one basic truth of the American
college student he seldom
reads any of the required
material. They had the book
stricken from its safest location.
Many of them probably read
as far as the first reference to
Nigger Jim, dropped the book,
lit their torches, and headed for
the library.
Now they will never know

how the book ended. They will
never know why Huck said of
Jim, I knowed he was white
inside, or how he came to
believe it. But they wont be
embarassed.
The book was banned from
the Concord, Mass, library in
1885, as.trash suitable only for
the slums. Mark Twain said, A
rattlin tipoff. That will sell
25,000 copies for us.
Twain adds he wrote Finn for
the adult mind. He developed an
unappeasable bitterness of his
unfaithful guardians, who not
only permitted but compelled
me to read an unexpurged Bible
through before I was 15.

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
PflX iMskifv Dave Doucette
. .. Managing Editor
AM p p
. Raul Ramirez
Executive Editor News Editor
leaders of this state these people are that
a social consciousness leads to a seeming
proliferation of problems.
No doubt some of our problems are real.
We do have a crude Code of Student
Conduct. We do have an ongoing economic
anemia.
Nevertheless, we also have countless new
first-rate buildings, an ever expanding system
of libraries, a nationally recognized set of
programs in engineering, the sciences,
journalism and other disciplines, and most
inportant of all, a desire to become ever
better.
Though we frequently kick ourselves for
our shortcomings, we have much to be
proud of.
No troops stood upon our campus when
the first black student came here. No riots

EDITORIAL

Staff Writings

Girls In Rollers And Nightcream

It was one of those nights when the girls
upstairs placed their stereo speakers in the windows
and acid rock or sweet soul drifted in my windows,
and the book sitting on my lap bobbed up and
down, and the words of wisdom followed the course
of the music out my door.
And an obnoxious girl with a raucous voice
banged on my door and announced a section
meeting would start in ten minutes and attendance
was mandatory or offense slips would be issued, and
of course she was one of the main speakers and
didnt want anyone to miss hearing her.
So I threw on my housecoat, rounded up my
roommate who otherwise wouldnt have gone
because she sometimes forgets to tie her head on
and needs me to remind her; and then we shouted
for everyone else on the floor, which only has 20
girls, to hurry because we were already late, and in
bootcamp file we marched to the convocation.
The president of the section rambled on and on
about nothing and nothing, and girls in rollers and
nightcream and daisy bathrobes chomped on gum
and looked at everyone else through transparent
glasses and talked to the air or to the person next to
them if that girl wasnt already talking to someone
else, and the speaker rattled on, and nobody heard.

It embarassed him, you see.
In Twains own opinion,
Hucks character is no better
than those of Solomon, David
and the rest of the sacred
brotherhood.
Dr. William Robinson,
associate professor with the
English Department, has used
the book in his course and has
never had any one complain of
any book he has used. This is the thev
v thev first quarter he has had a Negro
in his class, however.
Dr. James Hodges, English
Department chairman, says the
books used here are used under
their own merits and not as a
' '.'ice of propaganda.

Hopefully the instructors
point out Hucks moral
evolution toward Jim. If they
don t, the students gripe is with
the teachers and not Mr. Twain.
At any rate, by removing Finn

The Florida Alligator
SusptceTof til s l ud ts of the of Florida undor the
%*** of the Board of Student Publications.
3M-1681 B 3 U q7^>o AdV rti i,Vfl Hkm in Room 330 Union. Phanm
*** 1681. 392-1682 or 392-1683.
'ufoTHticZ "* tho ** th dilor ** f I
uck \d not tbo o f U*Unirefdty of Florid*."

have closed our classrooms to those who
seek to lear. And throughout this region,
people in all walks of life respect the
university.
Certainly, we have much to do, though.
We must become an intellectual center
more representative of the socio-economic
composition of this state and nation. We
must improve the quality of our professors
and physical facilities and administration
before frustration leads to violent
confrontation. We must become a center of
learning acknowledged nationally as a place
of true distinction.
In sum, we have yet to leave the much
talked about brink of greatness for the
reality of national educational prominence.
Unfortunately such a goal may be far
from our immediate grasp.
Despite this reality, we need not hang our
head in shame nor make excuses for our
shortcomings.
Instead, we should accept our
community-wide debate on excellence for
what it is and continue to press forward.
The crises we have here are the crises of
unfulfilled dreams. So long as we dream,
each knowing that most of us seek the same
goal of greatness, we need not worry about
our crises.
Man would be a vile creature were it not
for his never ending desire to improve
himself and his society.
That phenomenon at our university
constitutes no crisis.

The topic was hall government, and they wanted
us to vote for a change, a change that wasnt going
to take place till next year and the voting wasnt
till next quarter and someone finally asked why
should we give a damn, but received only silent
approval, but at least she was heard.
One by one sly girls created one excuse or
another and managed to slip out the door, noticed
only by the girls who wished they had enough
courage to do the same.
The-girl -wit h -1 he large-rock-on-her-finger-t hat hatcounts-for-something-where-it-was
counts-for-something-where-it-was hatcounts-for-something-where-it-was droned on and
giggled some about signing out and flipping in, but
the freshmen knew they would do as they wanted
anyway and upperclassmen smirked because they
could come and go as they pleased, so why the hell
were we penned up in this overcrowded room?
It finally ended with an hour and a half of
precious time gone and little was accomplished
because, like I said, they just wanted us to listen to
things we already knew or could have heard in a
floor meeting or about things which wed forget by
the time any decision or vote was needed anyway,
and then theyll have to do this all over again.
I wonder if anyone will listen next time?

By Lonnie Brown

By Dee Dee Horn

from the required reading list,
they have made the book more
appealing to college students.
But why do I write? Who will
read this past the reference to
Nigger Jim?



Parking Memo
Editors Note: This is the full text of the memorandum
passed by the Benton Engineering Council on traffic and
parking problems.)
The University Parking and Traffic Committee and Arnold Butts
should be commended for their proposed solution to the parking and
traffic problems by the addition of commuter parking lots on the
campus perimeter. Although additional parking areas will not offer a
complete solution, they will certainly alleviate the problem a great
deal.
The Benton Engineering Council has reviewed the proposed Parking
and Traffic Plan and has voted unanimously to submit the following
observations and recommendations:
A. Proposed Leased Transit System

1. A careful analysis should be made of existing
pedestrian traffic patterns (i.e., which students,
drivers vs. nondrivers, go from one place to another)
to determine if, in fact, a bus system is necessary at
this time. This analysis should include a review of
the history of past student government sponsored
bus services, it is believed that utilization of this
"free" service has been wholly contingent upon the
weather.
2. If this analysis indicates that a bus service is
necessary, bids should be let for a privately owned,
free enterprise (pay as you go) transit system.
3. The profit incentive system would assure quality
performance to the customer since the
responsibility of tokens, change making, promptness
and reliability should be that of the owner.
4., The proposed transit company has been having
financial difficulty even though it is subsidized by
the city.
a. It is believed that the campus
community should not be
required to guarantee an annual
income to this company without
further unbiased investigation.
b. It is also believed that the
risk of the success of the
proposed bus system should be
taken by those who profit
financially by that bus system.
B. Proposed Fees
1. The cost of leasing a transit system has been
estimated to approach SIOO,OOO or approximately
60% of the total revenue per year. Upon initiation
of a free enterprise bus system, the individual
registration fee should be reduced proportionately.
2. The basis of charge, as presently proposed, is in
reality a discriminatory tax based on annual income
and individual status. A fee system should be
initiated which does not use such discriminatory
practices.
C. Effective Date
1. Current decal was issued under the assumption
that it would be valid until September, 1969.
2. If it felt that this supposition should be honored
by the University.
3. Advantage should be made of the time available,
by virtue of the existing "implied contract", to
review and modify the proposed Parking and Traffic
Plan.
In conclusion, we acknowledge that the foregoing observations and
recommendations are not all encompassing, but simply an attemp to
highlight the major weak points. j
We believe that the Parking and Traffic Plan as it exists can be
improved by making the review and modification a campus wide
effort. The Benton Engineering Council would welcome the
opportunity to participate in any future meetings or contribute in any
way possible to this program.
Very truly yours,
Ed. Dupont, SEG President
BENTON ENGINEERING COUNCIL
Special Committee on Traffic and Parking.
Bill Slippy, 7EG, Chairman
Jim Hollis, SEG
Randy Crowe, 4EG

:Speaking Out

The American Fixer

Seeing the excellent movie The Fixer brought
certain memories to the surface of my mind.
Like: reading that 85 per cent of Polands Jews
were destroyed by the Third Reich. Like: hearing
from my mother that my grandparents village in
Poland was wiped off the map; the lucky ones
emigrated to America just in time (my grandfathers
radical activities caused him to leave). Like: hearing
my grandmother ramble on in Yiddish, being able to
distinguish only the word Pogrom.
It would be nice to believe that all such miseries
have been eliminated in America, the Land of the
Free. This, however, has not been the case.
Early in 1915 Leo Frank, an Atlanta Jew, was
lynched by a Georgia mob spurred on by the
Jeffersonian hate sheets of Tom Watson, most
popular Peach State Populist of the pre-Talmadge
days.
This marked the rise, for the second time, of the
Ku Klux Klan, an organization devoted mainly to
training potential Southern cops. These events have
been accurately chronicled in Harry Goldens A
Little Girl Is Dead and C. Vann Woodwards Tom
Watson: Agrarian Rebel. About this time the Jew
was climbing out of his Northern slum.
Our universities, supposedly beacons of

I OPEN FORUM:
Aivia mi ViMwt
I "There is no hope for the complacent mam,"

Different
Melodies
MR. EDITOR:
This letter is in response to
the letter in Thursdays Alligator
(Jan. 30) with the heading
Nauseating Chimes. I want to
agree with the letter writers.
What they neglected to
suggest, however, is that the
reason the chimes were offensive
when they were played is
because there was absolutely no
variety to the musical program.
I dont mind hearing
Suwanee River once in a while
but a constant diet of it was
rather monotonous after a while.
Therefore, I have a few
suggestions for the Music
Department or those in charge
of the chimes:
9 Develop a varied repetoire
of music why not include
some classical or contemporary
music?
Play the chimes only at
certain hours possibly at 12
noon and/or 5 oclock p.m.
and only for a 15 minute time
period.
9 Visit the campus of the
University of Michigan where at
5 oclock p.m. it used to be a joy
to walk home listening to the
good sounds the chimes there
put forth.
What I object to basically,
then, is not the playing of the
chimes but rather the utter
monotony of hearing the same
insipid melodies over and over
again.
A little variety would solve
the monotony which I am
certain other students also
experience.
JOYCE DEWSBURY, 6AR

Student Committee
Investigates PE
MR. EDITOR:
I think the time has come when I must explain directly to the
Student Body what my committee on physical education has done
and is still doing. It seems that somewhere between what actually
happens, and what I hear about and read about in the morning paper,
there is a tremendous gap.
During the last quarter Bruce Harlan introduced the idea of
voluntary physical education to the student senate, and a committee
was appointed to look into the matter.
At that time I was appointed chairman; 11 fellow Senators
volunteered to join the investigation, and seven of them have been
very active. We have read surveys, seen letters from doctors, reviewed
the entire program of required physical education, talked to the PE
Department and looked at records from other colleges.
After all this we unanimously made our decision that mandatory
physical education was the best answer.
We also recommended things like one hour credit per quarter
(without upper-division colleges raising their requirements for
entrance,) changes in the actual program, additions of such sports as
horseback riding and ping pong, notification to students of what is
offered at what period, and allowance for men students to
concentrate in one sport.
The Department of Physical Education under Dean Stanley and Dr.
Holy oak have been very helpful, and have cooperated with the Senate
Committee in every way possible.
This past Tuesday Sen. Clyde Ellis suggested to my committee that
we have an open meeting for interested students to attend. Fine with
us. The statement that I made to the Alligator concerning this matter
which was quoted wrong should read we are not looking for mass
demonstrations from students for voluntary PE at this meeting.**
Instead we are interested in students that have thought the matter
through and have some new approaches to the question that we have
overlooked. That doesn't mean we will change our decision, but
neither does it mean that we won*t, if we have missed some valid
points in our investigation. The meeting is Monday, Feb. 10 at 3:30
in the complex on the third floor of the Florida Union. Whether you
are for mandatory or voluntary PE come if you have something to
contribute.
JOYCE MULLER. 3AS
SENATOR BROWARD-RAWUNGS
CHAIRMAN, SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON PE

Friday, February 7,1969, The Florida Alligator,

By David Miller

knowledge, did their best to stem the tide of
Judaism by incorporating the device known as the
Jewish quota, somewhat similar to the pol tax
and the doctrine of Interposition.
When youre accepted by UF, you fill out a form
asking for Religious preference (Optional). Its
optional now because the quota has been lifted. So
when I wrote Jewish, I made references to the
quota system.
Fortunately, they still accepted me, as Id already
sent them money. But I left the space marked
Race empty, as I felt it irrelevant.
Last November, early in my third year at UF, the
Registrars Office sent me a note addng me to hurry
up and fill in the Race space.
I continued to leave it blank; the note reminded
me of the racist attitude that is characteristic of the
rulers of this university and of the state in general.
You see, I dont easily forget the lessons of
history, whether it be the BabiyYar of Philadelphia,
Mississippi.
Despite what the flag-waving zealots may say, I
know that the American system continues to
persecute its minorities. The American Fixer cannot
be erased from our consciences. But, of course,
thats a scapegoat of another color.

Page 9



Page 10

I. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7,1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM:
The Foreign Language Functional
knowledge examination wHI be given
to graduate students Saturday, Feb.
8, from 10 a.m. through noon in
Anderson Hall, Room 18.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
CANDIDATES February 7, is the
deadline for removing of "I" grades
(except 699 and 799) for candidates
for graduate degrees for March 25,
1969, graduation.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
DEADLINE: Feb. 7 is the deadline
for applying for Graduate School for
the 1969 Spring Quarter.
PRE-MEDICAL and,
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS
Registration with the Pre-Professional
Counseling Office, Room 105
Anderson Hall has been extended
through February 7. Absolutely NO
registrations will be permitted after
this date. You must bring the full
names of your instructors and the
section numbers with you in order to
register.
PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
FEB. 7: CORNING GLASS
WORKS Eng., Sci. MONSANTO
CHEMICAL usually interviews for
tech, positions. PPG INDUSTRIES,
INC. all areas in Eng, Prod. Mgt.
Quality Control, Prod. Planning,
Indus. Sales, Controller's Training
Program, Employee Relations and
Mgt., Info Systems. NORTH
AMERICAN ROCKWELL-AUTO ROCKWELL-AUTONETICS
NETICS ROCKWELL-AUTONETICS & LAUNCH OPERATION
- EE, Physics, Eng. Sci, ME, Stat,
Math. GARRETT CORP.
Al RESEARCH MFG. CO. OF
ARIZONA ME, AE.
CHARLESTON NAVAL
SHIPYARD-NUCLEAR DIVISION
NE, Physicists, Metallurgists, ME, EE,
ChE, IE. SOUTHERN RESEARCH
INSTITUTE Chem, Biology, ME,
EE, Metallurgy. JOSEPH E.
SEAGRAM & SONS INC. Chem,
Bact., Bus. Ad, Mgt., ChE, ME, EE,
Acctg. DEPT. OF HOUSING 8i
URBAN DEVELOPMENT Civil

NEXT CAR
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION gi A

Eng. CALGON CORP. Chem, ChE,
Mkt. E.I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS
8i CO., Bus. Ad, Math. RUST
ENGINEERING CO. CE, EE,
ENE, ME, BCN. NASA-LANGLEY
RESEARCH CENTER ME, EE,
ChE or AE and Physics. THE MITRE
CORP. usually interviews for tech,
degrees. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
LABS usually interviews for tech,
positions.
FEB. 10: PRUDENTIAL
INSURANCE CO. OF AMERICA
Lib. Arts, Bus. Ad. VITRO CORP.
OF AMERICA EE. MILLIGAN &
BURKE staff acctg. Audit, Tax.
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES CE,
Civil Engineering Assistant.
MOTOROLA, INC. EE, ChE, ME,
Eng, Phys, Chem. BUCKEYE
CELLULOSE 00. usually
interviews for ChE, ME & IE.
TENNESSEE VALLEY
AUTHORITY CE, EE, ME, NuE,
Acctg, Econ, Mgt. NAVAL
ORDNANCE LAB. ME, EE, AE,
Chem. DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE
AGENCY Forestry, Geol, Geo,
Lib. Sd, Math, Nu. Phy. BOEING
CO. usually interviews for tech,
majors only. E.l. DU PONT DE
NEMOURS & CO., INC. ChE, ME,
IE, Chem.
PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CBS 262 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B) to
Little 101 or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121 or 125; (F)
to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; (G)
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219; (H)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
235 or 239; (l-L) to Matherly 2, 3. 4,
5. 6.7,8, 9. 10. 11, 12. 13, 14 or 16;
(M) to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110, 112 or
115; (P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109; (R)
to Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2,4, 5. 7, 18 or 20; (W-Z)
to Walker Auditorium.

BLUE BULLETIN

CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) to Peabody 201,202, 205,
208 or 209.
CLC 142 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb 12, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B)
report to Little 101 or 109; (C) to
Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113, 121
or 125; (F) to Little 201, 203, 205 or
207; (G) to Little 213, 215, 217 or
219; (H) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235 or 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4, 5,6, 7,8, 9,10,11,
12, 13, 14 or 16; (M) to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115. 116,
117, 118 or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110,112 or 115; (P-Q) to Floyd
108 or 109; (R) to Flint 101, 102,
110, 112; (S) to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or
20; (W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 143 PROGRESS TEST :
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. in
Peabody 101, 102,112.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B) to
Little 101 or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121 or 125; (F)
to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; (G)
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219; (H)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
235 or 239; (l-L) to Matherly 2,3, 4,
5. 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13. 14 or 16;
(M) to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117. 118 or 11$;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110, 112 or
115; (P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109, (R)
to Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20; (W-Z)
to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 253 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) report to Peabody, 201,
202, 205, 208 or 209.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Friday, February 7,1969
VISTA, Recruiting & Testing,
Games Area Lobby & 206
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Hillel Exhibition, Hillel Lounge,
10:00 a.m.
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m. /
MENSA Luncheon, Rathskeller,
Main Cafeteria, 12:00 noon.
ACCENT, Madalyn Murray &
Julian Bond, Plaza of the
Americas, 2:00 p.m.
Dept, of Engineering Science &
Mechanics, Speaker: Dr. E.
Turan Onat, McCarty Aud.,
4:00 p.m.
Movie, "Nevada Smith", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
ACCENT, Speakers: Frederick
Flott & Michael Harrington,
Florida Gym, 7:30 & 8:30
p.m.
ACCENT, Reception, 122
Union, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, February 8,1969
Hillel Exhibition, Hillel Lounge,
10:00 a.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Auburn, away
Movie, "Nevada Smith", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
India Club Meeting, Study
Lounge, 1225 S.W. Ist
Avenue, 8:00 p.m.
ACCENT Speakers: Frederick
Flott, 349 Union, 9:00 a.m.;
Michael Harrington, 346
Union, 9:00 a.m.; Speakers:
Melvin Belli, William
Kunstler, & Tobias Simon,
Reitz Union Ballroom, 1:30
p.m.. Speakers: Strom
Thurmond, Wayne Morse and
W.O. Douglas, Florida Gym
7:00 p.m.
ACCENT: Reception, 122 Reitz
Union, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, February 9. 1969
Hillel Exhibition, Hillel Lounge,
10:00 a.m.
SGP: "MAN OF LA MANCHA,"
Florida Gym, 8:15 p.m.

Monday, February 10,1969
Hillel Exhibition, Hillel Lounge,
10:00 a.m.
Bowling Instruction, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Vanderbilt, away.
Dancing Lessons, 354 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Cicerones Meeting, 123 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Society of Engineering Science
Meeting, 428 E & I Bldg.,
7:30 p.m.
Self Defense Lessons for
Women, C-4 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Student ACLU Meeting, Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m. (Movie)
Tuesday, February 11,1969
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361 &
355 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet, University
Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Center for Latin American
Studies Colloquium, Latin
American Colloquium Room,
Univ. Library, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept.: Univ. of Fla.
Symphonic Band, Annual
Formal Concert, University
Aud., 8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
ACCENT '69, $3.00 General
Public, includes all events:
* Faculty, Staff & Students,
Free. MAN OF LA
MANCHA, Faculty, Staff &
General Public, $3.00, $2.25
& $1.50/Univ. of Fla.
Students, $2.50, $1.75 &
SI.OO. UNIVERSITY FILM
SERIES, 10 films, General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$5.00; Univ. of Fla. Students,
5 films, $1.50. AUDUBON
FILM SERIES, General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$1.25; Univ. of Fla. Students,
$.75; Children, $.50.



$55,000 Awarded In Research Grants

Research grants totaling $55,000 have been
awarded by the UF Humanities Council to 22
faculty members in University College and the
Colleges of Arts and Sciences and Architecture and
Fine Arts.
Vice President for Academic Affairs Frederick
Conner, chairman of the Humanities Council, states,
The award is another indication of the growing
awareness that research in the area of humanities is
important, too.
He notes that the source of the grant is the
universitys Division of Sponsored Research.
Grants are made on a competitive basis through a
faculty selection committee and include such
diverse projects as a study of the tragic hero in
Renaissance drama, an edition of Spanish proverbs,
a study of caste in contemporary Hindu teaching
and symphonic compositions.
Recipients and project titles are:

ORAU Schedules Meeting
For Tuesday At Union

The prestigious 41-member
Oak Ridge Associated
Universities (ORAU) will hold
its semiannual Board of
Directors meeting at the Reitz
Union at 9 a.m. Tuesday.
Purpose of the session is to
plan the next years program and
approve the annual budget to be
submitted to the Atomic Energy
Commission.
ORAU is a 2 2-year-old
association of 41 Southern
universities and colleges seeking
to explore implications of the
Oak Ridge National Laboratories
for the universities and for the
maximum growth of science.
The UF has been a member
for 20 years, and presently two
University professors are
administratively involved in the
programsDr. Billy G.
Dunavant, director of the
Division of Nuclear Sciences, is
University of Florida Councilor
for ORAU, and Dr. Herman E.
Spivey, professor of English, is a
member of the Board of
Directors.
In addition, Dr. Harry Sisler,
dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences, helped design a
research program at Oak Ridge
in transuranic elements, and Dr.
Positions Open
For Publication
The FI on da Engineer
Quarterly has staff positions
open for anyone interested in
gaining practical experience in
publications.
Journalism and Art students
as well as engineering students
are encouraged to apply for
writing, layout, photography
and art work.
The deadline is more leisurely
and writers would work
primarily on their own, editor
Ray Samras said.
The writing leans to general
interest articles and features.
For more information, call
Ray Samras at 372-1588 or
Richard Motta, 372-0929.
Got a Sick Car?
V
Our 5 skilled
Mechanics have
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ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
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Robert Uhrig, dean of the
College of Engineering,
administers the largest doctoral
program in nuclear engineering
in the South.
Expected here for the all-day
meeting are William G. Pollard,
eminent physicist and executive
director of ORAU; Paul M.
Gross, professore emeritus of
chemistry, Duke University,
president of the board; Dr.
Clarence Larson, president of
Union Carbide Nuclear Co.; T.
Marshall Hahn Jr., president of
Virginia Polytechnic Institute;
James R. Lawson, president of
Fide University, and Sanford S.

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ENGLISH: Dr. Richard Dwyer, a study of the
manuscript processes by which medieval literature
was transmitted; Dr. Melvin New, establishing the
devinitive text of Sternes Tristram Shandy; Dr.
Ants Oras, Introspection and Self-analysis in
Shelley; Donald Petesch, a study of Faulkners
Snopes trilogy; Dr. John B. Pickard, an edition of
the letters of John Greenleaf Whittier; Dr. William
Robinson, a study of the modem and contemporary
Southern short story; Dr. William J. Roscelli, a
study of the tragic hero in Renaissance drama.
FOREIGN LANGUAGES: Dr. Claude Abraham,
the influence of Malherbe on the poets of his
century; Dr. Frieda Brown, a study of Montaigne
and Gide; Dr. Jean Casagrande, a study of Oranges
French phonology; Haig Der-Houssikan,
socio-economic and political factors in the dialectal
and geographical distribution of Swahili; Dr. George
Diller, a study of Froissarts literary art; Dr.

Atwood, president of Emory
University.
When the board meeting
concludes at 4 p.m., ORAU
directors will tour the
Universitys nuclear science and
space sciences research
laboratories.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will be dinner host for
the visitiors at 7 p.m. in the
Union.
I SHANNONS I
24-hour
I WRECKER I
7*5 ta 5ER W372.,379 I
|W- Univ. NIGHT 376-40091

Raymond Gay-Crosier, a study of French drama of
the 18th century; Dr. Francis Hayes, an edition of
Spanish proverbs.
HISTORY: Dr. Richard Chang, the history of
treaty revision in Japan, 1868-1899; Max H. Kele,
the development of the Austrian Nazi Party during
World War I; Dr. George Winius, prophets of doom
in Spain and Portugal, 1580-1660.
HUMANITIES: Dr. Sherman Philip Knisely, an
edition of the complete musical compositions of
Francesco Soriano.
MUSIC: Russell Danburg, a symphony for large
orchestra and chorus; Edwin Troupin, symphonic
composition.
RELIGION: Dr. Austin Creel, a study of caste in
contemporary Hindu teaching; Dr. Richard Hiers, a
series of exegetical studies entitled The Kingdom
of God in the Synoptic Tradition..

THANK YOU, GAINESVILLE!
FOR MAKING 1968
A GOOD YEAR FOR
DATSUN
\ i A\
Anyone needing a low cost first or
second car is invited to our
Datsun Dollar Days Sale.
Any accessory normally priced under
SIOO for only sl.
Lowest Prices in Gainesville for quality AIR
CONDITIONING. Including installation SIOO.
FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY
NO LOWER PRICE
NO FINER SERVICE
GODDING & CLARK MOTORS
Established 1967
378-2311 1012 South Main
Open 8 to 8 Mon-Sat.

Friday, February 7,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE |
Four month old stereo originally
slls. Want SBS. Need to sell to meet
school expense. Call Charlie, room
438 between slo pm. 372-9421.
(A-4t-75-p)
Vespa 125 cc *66 runs very well. S9O
or best offer; Raleigh five speed bikes
26 in., boys and girl's 5 mo. old. Call
378-8610 after 5. (A-st-75-p)
66 Allstate Sears Motorscooter.
White, 2600 miles. I no longer use it
enough. With helmet $125. Call
376-6558 after 6 p.m. George rm 5.
(A-st-75-p)
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines,
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-75_-p)
FLINT lock pistol S&W 22 MRF
pistol 357 Ruger 3V9 Scope 25-308
Mauser rifle franchi 12 ga 3 Mag &
extra barrel Rem XPIOO. Must sell.
372-7912. (A-st-76-P)
Mobile Home 12x60 3 bedrooms,
IV2 baths, excellent cond. SSOO
down, assume paymts. Days
376-4616 ask for Beverly/nights
481-1088. (A-st-77-P)
Fender Duosonic Guitar, very fast
neck, good condition S9O. EKO
hollow body dual pickup guitar, light
wood S3O. Call Larry at 392-8952.
(A-3t-77-P)
MAG WHEELS set of 4 keys tone
Customags 5 lug, 13 inch, NEW.
Cost SIBO, will sell for SIOO, spinner
caps included, Call 378-4772.
(A-st-77-P)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading supplies,
Custom, reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340. (A-ts-69-p)
Stereo Motorola portable. Excellent
condition, recently overhauled. Onh
$40.00. Call now, 378-2226
(A-3t-78-p)
1967 Honda 50, under 1500 miles,
good condition, SIOO. Call Burt,
376-9816. (A-4t-78-p)
1967 Honda 160cb. Low mileage,
and excellent condition. $340.00.
See at Landmark apartment 93 or
call 372-2027. (A-lt-78-p)
| FOR RENT
Female roommate to sublet
Landmark apartment spring quarter.
Contact Judy after 7 o'clock.
378-9489. (B-st-74-p)
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
apt. on Archer Road opposite Stengel
Field Airport. Married student couple
only. SSO per month for long-term
tenant. Water furnished. Phone
372-9903. (B-st-74-p)
Sublet 1 br apt. close to campus.
Nice and clean. Call anytime after 5
p.m. 372-1320. (B-2t-77-P)
f KAIM_KYMI-nVC.FR
44 Ml Production
f Theme ends
~ IsaHelle" SAT
SS* \\ I / S?!.
PERSSON \\\ CAM NOTH
("I, A Woman) \V / admittcd
\ RolMMd through
3.5.7.9
SUNDAY
Tm
Mia Farrow
In a William Castle Production
Rosemarys Baby
John Cassavetes
4:25 6:50 9:20

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7, 1969

!4. V*V.V.V*V.VAW.%VAV.VAV#%V*%V*VV?
Desperate! 1 female roommate.
Landmark no. 169, 378-7782.
(B-7t-72-p)
Need 1 male roommate 42.50 plus
half of util. 2 bdrm. on NW 19 Ave.
Call Bill 372-6278 between 6 & 10.
(C-st-78-p)
Rmmte for 2 bdrm upstrs apt, 14
blks frm cmpus on SE 4th Ave.
Kinda run down but groovy for
parties. Call Harry Tea 378-4954,
378-8686. (C-st-75-p)
Interesting & friendly grads, faculty
& staff & students over 21for
singles mixer at Lamplighter every
Friday. See Personal* for details.
(C-2t-77-P)
90S ifrKWWWg
HELP WANTED
Salesmen part time. Good money.
Call 376-1306 after 5 p.m.
(E-st-78-p)
RELIABLE help wanted, male,
mature student for 3-4 hrs early Sat.
a.m ; must have reliable
transportation; permanent job. Call
FRASER 376-4912 ANYTIME.
(E-st-77-P)
4 starving males in Village Park desire
cute liberal coed to cook 5 days a
week. Call 378-3472 for interview.
(E-2t-77-P)
Listeners Wanted Wi pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between 8 5. (E-10t-71-c)
I GATOR ADS SELL I

_ ..../ski TMr tr n ADMISSION
REITZ UNION 4 q c
JOSEPH E. LEVINE
presents
SIEVE MQUEEN
KARL MALDEN SRI AN KEITH
ARTHUR KENNEDY
SUZANNE PIERRETTE.
Jjfct NEVADA
mmk smith
co-siamng COLOR PANAVtSION
RAF VALLONE- janet marSoun
HOWARD DA SUVA PAT HINDU
MARTIN LANDAU john mibhael haves hardld robbins
JOSEPH E LEVINE HENRY HATHAWAY Alfred newmm a
A SOLAR PRODUCTION A PARAMOUNT PICTURE)
FRIDAY & SATURDAY FEB. 7 & 8 6:00, 8:30, 11:00 P.M)

SERVICES |
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Impuesto sobre ingresos lncome
tax Llame 376-8605 por la manana
y despues de las 5 pm sabado todo el
dia. Se Habla Espanol. (M-7t-78-p)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALrST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
SITTER-WEEKDAYS 2:30-5:30 for
two school boys; sls per week. NW
area 372-5885 Evenings. (M-st-77-P)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
AUTOS §
1968 VW Karmann Ghia. Radio, WW,
automatic stick-shift (no clutch),
21,000 miles (still under warranty)
Phone 392-9475 after 6 p.m.
(G-st-78-p)
1959 Morris Minor 1000 Good
condition. Only driven on weekends
by sweet young coed. Make offer.
Call 392-9072. (A-3t-78-p)
1964 T-Bird, 2 dr hdtop. Loaded
$1495. 376-1611 x 384 or 378-9130.
(G-st-77-P)
65 Olds 442. Holly 4 bbl 4 speed,
Offenhauser head and Cheaters. Wire
spinners, blue with silver top. $1650.
Call Tom, 376-0648. (G-2t-77-P)
Valiant 62. Comfortable new
upholstery. Excellent condition, low
mileage, stereo radio. Call 376-9527
after 5. (G-st-77-P)

SSi'sSwS??
r m . w. >m . \nr
1 ONE MORE WEB! j
* This is*'The Fixer |
... who didn't .know jMjJ-X j
; he had courage |JWjfc>A, |
... until courage was all |
| he had left, jp* |
*"The Fixer." Based on the Pulitzer Prize- ?
* winning novel by Bernard Malamud. I
£ the fixer ei i
J taring Aldfl DdloS *** odv "* d 2
Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman, |
aan Holm, David Warner, Carol White 1
The Toughest Hellfighter of AH!j
i jgjjlp s
I PBnowa Go lntsvllle 1
if Paxton Quigleys \
[ crime was passion and^
I his punishment fits 1
I exactly! -Hes the exhausted I
I captive of three young ladies, I
j J
3^S/



CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS I
\j,..y.y.y..£:x xs i*w x< >>>>>M tox*Ni:>x.v£
i 966 VW (Sedan) excellent
condition! Custom steering wheel &
gear shift. Cream wAed imitation
leather upholstery. Radio. $1195.
Call 378-0850. (G-3t-76-P)
BUICK 1964 Skylark Wagon heater,
air, radio, new tires very clean $1045,
utility trailer 4x6 $45. Paintings
18x22 sls each. Linesman belt
372-7912. (G-st-76-P)
1965 Sunbeam Alpine tremendous
condition must sell for school
expenses best offer will get it. Call
372-7971 nights and all weekend.
(G-st-76-P)
1967 VW low mileage, radio, sedan.
Good condition must sell $1395
Cash. Call 378-3996 for information
after 5 p.m. (A-st-77-P)
1967 SS 350 Camaro $1950,
378-2105. (G-7t-72-p)
PERSONAL 1
&:.y.NX>x*X'X*x-:-sssw*x*X'WS?wXX
Im just back from Bogota, Colombia
with ruanas, capes, silver and emerald
jewelry, Indian decor pieces in
brilliant colors. Ruana colors are
magnificent! Eunice Renshaw, The
Spanish Main, 105 W. University Ave.
372-0667. (J-st-75-p)
BIRTHDAY party for ol drunken
Rose Sat. night, at 10 B Y O B and
one for Rose. Ginny and Lucy's, 919
NW Bth Place. 376-2912. (J-3t-76-P)
A Happy 4th Anniv. My darling
Vicky, and many more will be ours.
The sth is only 147 days away. All
my love is yours, JC. (J-lt-78-p)
Ginny, I love you more than you will
ever know, but I cannot stand alone.
Love, Oth. (J-lt-78-p)

TWO FASCINATING FILMS
llilllBtjB! "WORLDS" APART NOW
MMJfriH&jflM TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME
-LlP.
ANNE WEIIES JeMMIFCR NOIITH; 9 1 10 *l*l 1
Good girl Se symbol M
the bad break* I tumad an too oftofil
-t v £E^BHBMOS9HBHBKS
fIUHLv ,K WHO KNOWS
It could be one of a thousand things. College is that kind of
life . Excitement, challenge and varied interests.
Why does she. like thousands of others, read the pages of
The Florida Alligator every morning . Looking at i s
stories, its photos, its advertising?
Because The Florida Alligator is an important part of her
college llfp- And an exciting one.

;.;v:*xx.>v.v.v.v.v.v;w:*>:.:.v.v.v.v;v>v
PERSONAL
. Friday Afternoon for the
smg |e univerjjty crowd Qver
21 will meet this & every Friday
from 5-7:30 at the Lamplighter.
Private room, pleasant atmosphere.
Drinks $.45. Come early & bring
your friends. Fridays a great day to
have fun an drink away Midterm
worries. (J-2t-77-P)
LOST & FOUND |
LOST: gold ring with script initial
S set in black oblong stone. Great
sentimental value. If found or can
give info, 392-9088; Reward.
(L-st-78-p)
LOST: contact lenses. Pale blue in
plastic vial. Lost near library or plaza.
Healthy reward offered! Call
475-2351 after 6:00 pm. (L-2t-78-p)
FOUND watch in Union Bolwing
Lanes. 378-0280. (L-3t-76-P)
Kappa Sigma fraternity pin lost
between Little Hall and Rawlings.
$25 reward for its return. Call Bert
Develle 376-9198. (L-4t-76-P)
I miidgUXl
I GQfflfflMNEL I
I SUIT TECMUCUM I
1 700 Shi* @ I
I ALSO ~****v4m
rm RlKidin BARRY SULLIVAN I
wirn I JOAN CAULFIELD g

sLu Todcu/ AHE I
__ |N.W. 13th St. at 23rd RD A T|
tor | 7*|s 9AS
good gri^ttcandy!
Robert Hoggiog, Peter Zoref and Selmur Picture* Corp.* prevent
A Christian Marquand Production
Chafles Aznavour-Marion Brando -Richard Burton James Cobum John Huston
Walter Matthau Ringo Starr introducing Ewa Aulin. I
Candy
John Astrn Elsa Martinelli Sugar Ray Robinson Anita Pallenberg- Florinda Bolter MariluTolo
Nicolelki MadtaveK Umberto Osini Joey Forman Fabian Dean and Enrico Maria Salemo ?Z?
Muik by Dow Grvsin-Executive Producers Selig J. Seligman and Peter Zoref-Based on the Novel by Terry Southern and Moon Hoffenberg
Screenplay by Budt Henry-Produced by Robert Hoggiog- Directed by Christian Marquand Technicolor
rrri RESTRICTED A Sub i -y -* Conran-,. Vk_
IH j [ORIGINAL SOUNO TRUCK ALBUM iWLABLE ON obc RECORDS] ^.f^euewoawMo.
(£££) k> w Guordien
11 CLIP AND SAVE THIS J A DIFFERENT SHOW I
AD FOR REFERENCE fath hay fop 7
AL EACH DAY FOR /
ffKUj! rm All Rlgh
J jjyjj| The Endless
1 ode to sun. sand
agCA^Sjl l Howhngly lunny"-N. Y. Times I -|
§Hk Elvira Madigan
, AIM "P erha P s the most beautiful
I -ISP movie in history.-New Yorker
Nobody n*iuu
a Nothing
great movie. A revolutioi
f ACCideilt I(^^^
IMr (.STUDENTS CAN NOW AFFORD MORE
w ,llm Newsweek II EVENINGS at the plaza in view
OF OUR SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE!

Friday, February 7,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

v The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7, 1969

Pjnye9aflns j

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Columnist
KANSAS CITY, MO.
(AP) An 18-year-old college
freshman was shot to death
Sunday night at a busy
intersection while at least six
persons watched and did
nothing.
Two of the onlookers were
motorists who locked their car
doors and would not let him in
when he ran to them for help.
The victim was shot in the chest
after what witnesses described as
a fight in front of a bar.
*** *
Your name is Michael
Theodore Altschul and youre a
freshman at the University of
Missouri and youve worked part
time for two years at a drugstore
and you got into a little trouble
out in front of a bar right there
in the heart of town and one of
the guys pulls a gun and says
hes going to shoot you. So you
run.
And this really cant be
happening to you because you
go to college and you really
never did anything that bad to
those guys for them to want to
shoot you. Youre just an
average guy running in the
middle of downtown Kansas
City running away from
another guy with a
gun running for
help running to save your
average self with people all
around watching.
You expect to feel a bullet go
into your back any minute now
but youve never felt a bullet
before so you dont know what
to expect and all you can feel is
sweat on your face and back and
you also feel like vomiting
because youre real scared and
this whole thing is crazy and just
doesnt happen.
There are people watching it
happen and then you see some
guy in a car watching and he
looks like a nice guy who might
have a son in college just like
your dad. You run to him for
help but he locks his car door
and just sits there and watches
you and you cant really believe
it. He doesnt even look sorry
about it. He just looks.
Then another guy who might
look like your uncle and you run
to him but he leans over the seat
and locks all the car doors. You
think its a mistake and try the

ALL POLAROIDS
WILL BE
SOLD
A A
A j\ ifi
|;fl)lyQ> 1232 WEST
UNIVERSITY AVE.
\ >

doors out it s no nnstaKe
those doors are locked, all right.
Hey Mister! but he doesnt
answer. Just sits there and
watches and now the guy with
the gun has stopped chasing you
because now hes right behind
you pointing the barrel that
leads to the handle that has a
trigger that, when squeezed just
enough, will release a hammer
which will strike a cartridge and
release a piece of lead which, in
turn, will travel at a great
velocity and enter your body,
thus damaging internal organs.
Hes pointing it at you and hes
going to kill you and everybody
just watches.
Its then you realize the whole
thing is a joke and he was just
trying to scare you. Yeah, that
was it just a scare to teach you
some manners.
So you face him and his gun
and stretch out your arms in a
friendly gesture like you
understand it all maybe you
even smile a little and walk
toward him. Thats why they
locked their doors they knew
it was only a joke and then you
hear this shot and expect to see
gun smoke but you are on the
ground before the smoke comes
out with lead in your chest and
blood all over you and the
street.
You dont know that the guy
with the gun drives off with
three other guys. You dont
know that the people who have
been watching just keep
watching maybe some of them
quickly walk off or drive away.
All you know is that you love
your family very much and
remember all kinds of things
that you wanted to do but never
did. Then you dont know
anything because you are dead.
Your name was Michael
Theodore Altschul and you used
to think that apathy was a
terrible thing. Nothing special
about that. Most people do.
TONY I
DOBIES
DAY
Sponsored by
MACE, MACE
& MacNAME
home for foundlings

PROGRAMS ATTRACT ENGINEERS
TV GENESYS Teaches

A Friday menu of computer
systems and metals and
ceramicsboth in-depth and
technical in nature are
whetting the appetites of Florida
engineers.
The menu comes from two
seminars on the UF campus,
being shared with off-campus
engineers through the
universitys unique
television-operated Graduate
Engineering Education System
(GENESYS).
Engineers in industry can join
graduate engineers on campus in
earning an hours graduate credit
while absorbing new information
coming from the research labs of
the world.
A noon lecture Graduate
Seminar in Operations Research
and Systems Engineering
stresses recent research in
systems analysis, computer
science and information systems.
Topics vary from biomedical
engineering to mathematical
modeling of space systems,
stressing how systems engineers
can solve both hardware
(machine) and non-hardware
(programs) problems.
The metallurgy series, a 2:30
p.m. program, covers a broad
area in the Held of metals and
related materials.
For instance, Dr. J. S.
Hirschhorn, University of
Wisconsin, recently described
how desirable properties of
surgical implants can be

TODAY
Reduced Prices from 2pm
til 6pm at the Rathskeller.
Celebrate the end of
the week!
TONIGHT
EWING ST. TIMES
the authentic folk sound
and the best show in town.
- U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc.
ftatijgkeller

obtained through a special
manufacturing technique called
power metallurgy.
Tomorrow a university
graduate student, Ramon Mayor
of Miami, will describe one
aspect of the deformation of
metals.
Research results that show
what happens during the
solidification of a metal or
non-metallic material will be
described Feb. 28 by Dr. K. A.
Jackson, Bell Telephone
Laboratories, Murray Hill, N. J.
For industries having to
recruit engineers to work in
areas isolated from a large
university, the universitys

SALESSERVICERENTALS
"Authorized
jBWW \ l Smith Corina
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Office Equipment
WjWImSHMk STYLING M
SHAMPOOING RAZOR CUTTING
LONG HAIR STYLING H
APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
Wom SIM'S BARBER SHOP
jUL 817 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. J

seminar-sharing GENESYS
program has been a solid selling
point, according to John A.
Nattress, associate dean, College
of Engineering, who is
responsible for the GENESYS
program in college.
BOWLING
SUNDAY
SPECIAL
35C per game
or 3 games SI.OO
ALL DAY
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA



PART OF SGP SEBSS
'La Mancha Here Sunday

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writer
Sunday, Student Government
will be presenting the UF with
one of the most highly
acclaimed entertainment
packages to reach this campus in
quite some time.
The package is Man of La
Mancha, a broadway musical
critics have raved about since its
first performance. The UFs
performance will begin at 8:15
p.m. in the Florida Gym.
Man of La Mancha made a
grand slam of theatrical prizes
during its first season. It earned
the New York Drama Critics
Circle Award for Best Musical,
merited the Outer Circle Award
as the seasons Outstanding
Musical, and captured five
Tony Awards including Best
Musical Play, as well as
accolades from Variety and
Saturday Review.
The play concerns the dual
>v.v.v;v;v;w;vkwwm*kk>xo:<*;^
at
v >:
!! .%
tlie
V ;
Iflicka .J
PROGRAM COUNCIL
FILMS COMMITTEE Fri. &
Sat.: Nevada Smith with Steve
McQueen, Brian Keith &
Suzanne Pleshette at 6, 8:30 &
11.
STATE Fri. & Sat.:
Therese and Isabelle with Essy
Persson at 3,5, 7 & 9. Sun.:
Rosemarys Baby with Mia
Farrow & John Cassavettes.
SUBURBIA DRIVE-IN
Fri., Sat. & Sun.: Valley of the
Dolls & Planet of the Apes
with Charlton Heston at 7,9:10
& 11:15.
GAINESVILLE DRIVE-IN
Fri., Sat. & Sun.: The Horse in
the Gray Flannel Suit, Winnie
the Pooh & Buckskin at 7,
7:23,9:36& 11:18.
CENTER I Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: Hellfighters with John
Wayne & Katherine Ross.
CENTER II Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: The Fixer with Alan
Bates.
FLORIDA Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: 3 in the Attic with
Yvette Mimieux and Christopher
Jones.
PLAZA I Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
Candy with Richard Burton &
Ringo Starr at 2:15, 4:45, 7:15
& 9:45.
PLAZA II Fri.: Im All
Right Jack. Sat.: The Endless
Summer. Sun.: Morgan.
" yvvogo&v-'"fA .y--
RICHARD BURTON
... stars in "Candy.

story of Don Quixote, defender
of the right, and his creator
Cervantes. In the award winning
musical version, Man of La
Manchas author, Dale
Wasserman, has hit upon the
idea of letting the character of
Cervantes, himself, portray the
role of Don Quixote.
The musical score by Mitch
Leigh with lyrics by Joe Darion
includes what is perhaps the
musical hit of the decade
The Impossible Dream. The
version the UF audience will
hear will be performed by a
ten-man orchestra, a unique

If
m> 1 #
CM) .i C' W*
I "-' J' \ J ,; ; C v *' MC >V I v £:
RATHSKELLER ENTERTAINMENT
Michael Mashkas, Don Hath, Billy Berosini and Don Dunaway make
up the "Ewing Street Times, featured this weekend at the
Rathskeller. Coming from the "Flick" coffeehouse in Miami, the
group does folk and rock tunes. Performances are at 9, 10:30 and
midnight.
/g£\ Whats NEW at the
'fr BOOKSTORE ?
NOT A POET?
THE CAMPUS BOOKSTORE CAN HELP YOU SAY
THAT- SOMETHING SPECIAL ON ST.
VALENTINE'S DAY. COME IN AND CHOOSE
FROM OUR HUGE SELECTION OF GIFT BOOKS
OF ALL PRICES. WARM THE COLDEST HEART
WITH JUST THE RIGHT BOOK FROM YOUR
CAMPUS BOOKSTORE.
Some suggested titles:
365 WAYS TO SAY 1 LOVE YOU'
THE GREATEST OF THESE IS LOVE
FORGET ME NOTS OF LOVE
KAHLIL GIBRAN'S SELECTIONS
HALLMARK & PETER PAUPER BOOKS ON LOVE
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
# Campus Shop & Bookstore

addition to performing
companies on the road.
Critic Joan Vanderboncoeur
of the Syracuse Herald
Journal has said of Man of La
Mancha: the company is not
just superior to those which have
passed this way in recent years,
it is superb. In general, road
companies have steadily gone
downhill, but this one contains
two stars who have played La
Mancha in New York and a
supporting cast par excellence.
Its concept is original, its staging
inventive, and its setting
ingenious.

DOUBLE YOUR PLEASURE
ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW
Do your own thing
Bring your instrument and
Swing Along wM.
SONY GRIFFIN
of one during
4-7 P.M.
, m
Hot A
Ik Hors doeuvres
jm our salad bar
University kin Itlotel
/,/ 7 v\ \ Everything Comfort Detires
'/I \ \
f I \ US. RCUJTE 441 SOUTH
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Night Club 4 Lounge
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Motorola offers the student at the BS or MS level an op opportunity
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Work and achieve a Masters or PhD Degree in an environ environment
ment environment of constant challenge and tremendous growth.
THE ENGINEERING TRAINING PROGRAM
Open to BS or MS graduates in Electrical Engineering,
Chemical Engineering or Physics with a B average or better.
While pursuing an MS or PhD degree at Arizona State Uni University
versity University each trainee is placed in a rotational program cov covering
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THE MARKETING TRAINING PROGRAM
Open to BS graduates in Electrical Engineering or Physics
with a B-average or better. Marketing trainees may work
toward an MBA or an MS or PhD degree. Rotational assign assignments
ments assignments are in the marketing area.
John Osborne and Aaron Craigo
will be recruiting on campus r
on February 10, 1969.
Direct Placement at all Degree Levels for...
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Physicists Chemical Engineers Metallurgists
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Friday, February 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7,1969

Last Time Together
'The Seekers Live!

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
Even if you aje not a Seekers
fan, you can appreciate the
emotion and nostalgia connected
with the recording of The
Seekers Live!
After five years, the Seekers
Judith Durham, Bruce Woodley,
Keith Potger and Athol Guy
are parting as a group to go their
separate ways Judith to a
recording contract and the
others to various writing
endeavors..
Conceding that this was
bound to happen, their public
has accepted their demise
resignantly if not cheerfully.
The album was recorded at
the Talk of the Town club in
London with a reserved but by
no means passive crowd. It
includes their earlier works such
as Morningtown Ride, Ill
Never Find Another You, A
World of Our Own, and their
biggest hit Georgy Girl.
Although Austrailian, Judith
Durhams voice at times gives
the impression of a gospel
background because of its
throaty quality. However the
soul is not there as
evidenced in what turns out to
be a rag-time version of We
Shall Not Be Moved.
The Seekers are obviously
musicians closer to the folk than
the rock category.
W oodley has a hand in
production of this final album
by penning one of the few
moody tunes Love is Kind,
Love is Wine.
The
sparkling
spring
fashion
issue of
MODERN
BRIDE
is at your
newsstand now!
MODERN
1 ) i> t isrv i "'i
BRIS)E
mMM, l-SSI.'K .* i

RECORD REVIEW

Although this final bow is not
very diverse, it is musically
sound with its harmony and
projection. However, I believe
that scrutiny will reveal that the
break-up must be the next
logical step, for the album

JEW J||
THE SEEKERS TOGETHER FOR THE LAST TIME
... in "The Seekers Live!" their last album.

e
,vV \
* ** 4
Sunday Feb. 9th B*ls pm
Dont Miss it!
: a .v p-
E= fcz:
% ". '* r > .
A Student Government Production

represents more of a repetition
of ideas than their innovation.
The album is good listening
and if you do care for any of
their past hits you are sure to
find them on The Seekers
Live!

Aquarium Society
Fills Campus Need
Fish rush in where dogs and cats fear to tread.
The expressed need for aquarium enthusiasts on campus has been
fulfilled by the formation of the Aquarium Society of Gainesville.
Membership is open to anyone in the Gainesville area.
UF students who maintain aquariums in their dorm and apartment
residences now have an opportunity to cultivate their hobby.
Our meetings consist of exchanging information on our fish and
hearing lectures from invited guests on facets of aquarium
technology, said Tim Anderson, interim assistant in Ornamental
Horticulture.
Future proiects include summer field trips and an aquarium show.
Fentons Pet Shop plans to give a discount to organization
members.
Meetings are held monthly. Interested students should contact Tim
Anderson at 372-5767.
HALL of FAME
& Whos Who
Certificates may be picked up
at the Seminole office between
2 PM and 5 PM



HSViB us
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CLOSE ONE
Bruce Williams, 2UC, currently rated No. 1 in the country for his
200-yard freestyle relaxes after a close match.

Seminoles Grudge Gators

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Florida States
revenge-minded Seminoles are
holding a grudge against Coach
Bill Harlans UF swim team. In
fact, they are holding two
grudges.
The first is in the form of a
UF conquest at the
Florida Pool last month. It was a
water-droplet thin win at that,
with the Gators winning on the
final relay event.
The other grudge is in the
form of one UF swimmer, Tom
Peek, whom the Seminoles
begrudge so much because Tom
use to be a Seminole.
Several vociferous folks in

HUME HALL
CASINO
PARTY
. Fri. Feb. 7th
J3jW* 9:oopm til 1:00am
> X
. ' Ih

Tallahassee shouted foul after
Peek swam against his old alma
mater last month. They hollered
double foul when he won his
event 50 yard freestyle.
Peek, a junior from Ocala,
attended FSU during his
freshman year before
transferring to the UF.
Bill McGrotha, sports editor
of the Tallahassee Democrat,
charged in a column shortly
after the first meet that Peeks
win violated a gentlemans
agreement made long ago in
which FSU, Miami, and the UF
decided not to accept any
transfers from any of the others
as eligible for any sport.
I dont figure they would
have been upset if I hadnt

FROSH BATTLE CHIPOLA
UF Hits The Road
For Auburn, Vandy

UF begins a two game road
trip Saturday night at Auburn,
Monday at Vanderbilt, and the
fact the Gators are playing their
best basketball of the season
offers some encouragement on
the possibility of a National
Invitational Tournament.
Bolstered by the continued
great play of All-American
center Neal Walk, the emergence
of Andy Owens as a steady
double-figure scorer and
rebounder and the balance and
depth shown in recent games,
the Gators have won four
straight and have looked good in
the process.
Walk is playing better
basketball than weve ever seen
him play, Gator Head Coach
Tommy Bartlett said. I thought
his first half against Georgia last
Saturday was about as much as
you could expect out of one
player. He out rebounded the
entire Georgia team, 16 to 15,
and scored 16 points out of our
35.
Owens, the strongman on the
Gator team, has hit around or
above 20 points the last five
times out and is averaging a
dozen rebounds a game over this
stretch.

won, said Peek. I just wanted
to swim at the UF.
However, Coach Bill Harlan
thinks the agreement was never
violated because Peek had never
participated in intercollegiate
swimming at FSU although he
was on the team.
Saturday, the Gator swim
team travels into hostile
territory in what should be the
stiffest test of the season.
The Gators take a flawless
5-0 record into the 2 p.m.
meet.

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An added boost has been the
return of Mike McGinnis, a
starter early in the season who
went out before Christmas with
a leg operation. He returned and
saw almost 10 minutes of action
against Georgia and figures to
play even more of this
weekends trip to Auburn and
Vanderbilt.
Well have to continue to
play good basketball this
weekend because these are two
real good basketball teams to
face, especially on their courts,
Bartlett said. Auburn is starting
to come into its own behind an
exceptional sophomore, John
Mengelt, and Vanderbilt is
always an outstanding team.
Following the Monday night
contest against Vanderbilt, the
Gators return home to host LSU
and Pete Maravich, the nations
leading scorer, on Wednesday,
and wind up the week Saturday
afternoon, in Gainesville against
league-leading, nationally-ranked
Kentucky, a team currently
making a runaway of the

Ron Jumps Town
Heads For Baltimore

It will be a lonely weekend in Baltimore for the UFs Ron Jourdan,
number one high jumper in the world this season!
Track Coach Jimmy Carnes decided to rest the two mile relay team
of Bill Ballinger, Eamonn OKeeffe, Bob Lang and John Parker.
Carnes will send Jourdan and high jump coach Don Hester to the
Baltimore All-Eastern indoor invitational meet all alone.
This will be the sixth out of seven weekends that I have been away
at some meet, Jourdan said.
Out of the five weekends Jourdan has been away he has not lost
once and has cleared 7-foot or better six out of seven times.
He cleared 7-2 in Gainesvilles Johnnie Lee Samuels Day benefit
meet in his only meet at home.
Ron is committed to all of the big meets for now through the
indoor season and until the end of the outdoor season, Carnes said.
Jourdan will be jumping until the beginning of July.
I just enjoy jumping and I want to jump well, Jourdan said in
reference to the long season ahead of him.
So Friday its off to Baltimore... all alone.

Friday, February 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Sports Editor
Southeastern Conference race.
UF Frosh team travels to
Mariana to play the Chipola Jr.
College tonight.
The Baby Gators are 8-6 on
the season after an
overwhelming defeat of Georgia,
82-58.
Gary Waddell, sporting an
22.2 average points a game, is
leading the Gator attack at
present. Dan Boe, who scored 17
points against Georgia, and Cliff
Cox, who contributed 15 points
last Saturday, lent able
assistance against the Bullpups.

Page 17



Page 18

v The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7, 1969

FSU Cagers Face Clemson,Carolina

Florida States basketball
team has the task of facing the
Atlantic Coast Conferences
leading scorer Friday night and
the countrys No. 2-ranked club
the next evening on a road trip
which will take them to the
Carolinas this weekend.
First stop is Clemson where
guard Butch Zatezale is the

Sports Trivia
1. For old-timers: What was the name of the University of
Miami center who during Rick Barrys senior year, turned to a
capacity Florida gym crowd and motioned, in response to jeers,
with the universal signal denoted by the middle finger?
2. What was the last high school to win the Florida State A A
High School Basketball Championship in successive years?
3. Who was the first professional baseball player to earn
SIOO,OOO in a season?
4. Who is the only football coach to win conference
championships in three major conferences (he passed away last
week)?
5. FOR EXPERTS ONLY: Name the four backs who played
behind The Sizeable Seven for Syracuses undefeated eleven
in 1960.
Answers appear below, upside down.
sapaMips
pjei|i9Q pue lajjeg jjy ajjajjES 9aeq siabq aiuig
ttBXyW U3pMOg -p
6P61 ui oiSSbuiiq aof *£
3961 1961 ui §jnqsj9i9j -JS jo surpoH apqa 'z
(uotp siqj jo A}[in§ osjb sbm pjbauoj
4t speqAMS S9UB3 t aqj
Gridders Protect Prez

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has a new set of
bodyguards.
The football team has decided
to show their support for
OConnell by attending the
Rathskeller Intercourse
program to make sure none of
the crowd got out of hand..
We dont care if they have

Keeping Fit For Revolution

Keeping fit for the
revolution. That was the
rationalization given by the
University of Kentucky SDS
chapter as they dominated the
annual UK Turkey Run. The
mile-and-a-half cross-country jog
is usually dominated and trained
for extensively by the campus
Greek organizations. SDS carried
off all the honors, winning two
turkeys in the process, and is in
line for the dubious distinction
of being the only SDS chapter to
overemphasize athletics.
One SDS member, a former
high school track star, finished
far ahead in the field of over 100
entrants. Other SDS members
finished well enough to give SDS
the team trophy. The turkeys

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ACCs top scorer in the Tigers
last six contests.
Clemson had a slo overall
record and Is in the
conference going into
Wednesday nights home game
against Duke.
Coach Bobby Roberts team
scored a major upset last
weekend when the Tigers pulled

long hair, we dont care is they
ask legitimate questions, we just
dont want to see our president,
who has done everything to help
us, be heckled by a bunch of
radicals who are only here to
make trouble, Britt Skrivanek,
defensive end for the Gators,
said. And few people questioned
the 6-1,200-pound gridder.

were later shared at a chapter
feast.
Asked about the failure of the
fraternities to place well in this
years race, one SDS member
said, It just goes to show you
that beer is bad for you.
Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
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REPAIRS VICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS

SEMINOLES 12-6 ON SEASON

off a 7877 surprise over North
Carolina State. While Zatezale
counted 34 points, Trip Jones
was the final hero as he counted
the Tigers last three buckets,
including the winning one with
five seconds showing on the
clock.
Up to the Duke contest,
Clemsons victories had been
recorded against Furman
(twice), Alabama, Georgia Tech
and N.C. State.
The Seminoles will step into
Clemsons new, 10,300-seat
Littlejohn Coliseum with a 126
mark. Their latest triumph was
an 84-81 thriller racked up
Monday night on the road
against Valdosta State.
Coach Hugh Durham is still
trying to find the right forward
combination. Against the Tigers
he will go with junior Jan Gies
(7.7) and sophomore John Burt
(3.9) on the wings, All-American
candidate Dave Cowens (21.2
and 17.7 rebounds) at the post
with sophomore Skip Young
(15.2) and senior Jeff Hogan
14.1) at guards.
Hogan, who joined the
Seminole 1,000-Point Club in

.
Agoodcry
cleanses the soul
\. aH* iwimmr
There was a time when you romnatihip icntrmir" cr>i.. cause its sterile, self-sanitiz self-sanitizneeded
needed self-sanitizneeded two or more different lens s a conn P at| ble, isotonic solu- ant j seD *; c
solutions to properly prepare and j' n much l,ke your eye s nat Lensine ... the sou/ution for
maintain your contacts. No more. urdl ', s \ comolete contact Ipns carp MadP
Lensine. from The Murine Com- Clea "'"9 V^ r contacts with byThe Company Trie
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last weeks victory over South
Carolina, is closing in on Gary
Schulls 1,090 points and can
become Florida States
fifth-leading alltime scorer. The
Akron, Ohio, native has counted
1,053 points in three seasons
and needs only 38 to move into
the No. 5 spot.

rjPj | UF '$ REPRESENTATIVE?: I
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PflUCp^ 1 1 Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinsoi
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This will be the eighth
Clemson-Florida State meeting
with the Tigers owning a 25
edge.
Saturday nights Florida
State-North Carolina game will
be played in Greensboros
1 5,500-seat Carmichael
Auditorium.



Clipboard B ss sss 6^
fjEW Health Ebbs!
Bill Dunn^i
During an era in which narcotics, pep pills, tobacco and alcohol eat
away at the student body, there has been made considerable mention
recently over making physical education voluntary.
Though the move seems headed for defeat, the very thinking can
not come as a shock when the entire university community has left
matters of health dancing at its bureaucratic coattails.
In an epoch in which the campus is preoccupied with the glamors
of the space age, venereal djsease rates soar, psychiatric wards fill with
students threatening suicide and violence rocks campus after campus.
The race for supremacy in science and the consequent need for
highly trained persons has perhaps placed undue emphasis on the
intellect as separate and apart from the physical, says UF Physical
Education Dean D. K. Stanley. Such a philosophy could be grave and
far-reaching error.
The young coed walking across the plaza coughs coarsely and must
stop to catch her breath. Her eyelids are hardly open as she prepares
to take a progress test. She had an hour of sleep, if that, after studying
all night for her prog.
Practically speaking, says! University Physician James
Satterwhite, the immediate impact on a student in the quarter
system, with no emphasis on big muscle recreation, is destined to have
serious effect on the student and university as a whole.
Satterwhite attributes a great deal of campus unrest to poor health
of students.
This makes all kinds of emotional and physical violence necessary
to release tension building up beyond the safe limit in young people
who have not recognized the brainwashing of our culture in this
respect and have been trapped in the rat race just when they should be
experiencing some real freedom.
Dean Stanley has tried to operate his department for years under
the ancient philosophy sound mind, sound body. But he realizes the
concept has been ignored by others.
This concept has too often been set aside as something that will
somehow just happen whether we take some directed action toward
this objective or not.
Physicians and health officials are quick to point out the effects of
the sedentary existence that the average student lives high blood
pressure, obesity, cigarette smoking, stressful occupation, abnormal
electrocardiogram and high serum cholesterol, all traits of the
coronary-weak person.
This would imply that the pressures of such fast-moving terms as
the trimester and quarter systems make it unhealthy for the student
to involve himself in extracurricular non-athletic activities.
Many people neglect giving their legs proper exercise, excusing
themselves on the basis that their schedules dont allow it, says
prominent health champion Dr. Paul Dudley White, Use of the leg
muscle is integrally related to maintainance of proper circulation as
well as a deterrent to cardiovascular disease.
On this campus, the problem rings true. It is a problem that few
people do anything about but one which some very dedicated people
are interested in.
As White sums it up: I find that there is a gross error now being
made in various places to reduce or even to omit physical education in
the rush to stuff the brains of our youths with the information that
they may never utilize to the full, because of the probability of early
death.
Its little short of criminal to educate our young people mentally
to have them die early of heart attacks and strokes for example, at
40 because of neglect of their physical health.
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Drags Hold Big Opening

Its a drag racing extravaganza
and official grand opening of the
Gainesville Dragway Saturday
and Sunday featuring scads of
national record holders from the
eastern, midwestern and
southern United States.
Burr Heishman, track
director, says the meet will be a
spectacle for the spectator.
More than 100 top cars of
national prominence have been
entered in the two-day gathering
including high performance
rail Great Expectations,
which will defend its national
record title and speed of 229.19
miles per hour.
Most of the top cars will be
on their way down to Miami
after running here but Heishman
wants to make this weekends
grand opening worth their while
with handsome purses.
Warmups and trials start at 9
a.m. with official runs shortly
after noon.
Childrens Mag
The first American juvenile
publication, The Childrens
Magazine, was published in
Hartford, Conn., in 1789.
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Sat. Feb. B,h8 ,h & Sun. Feb. 9 th
Eliminations start 1:30 PM 10:00 AM 4:30 PM
||i 104 of the Nation's Finest and Fastest Competition Cars!!
a| 16 AA/Fuel Dragsters Entered Only the 8 quickest allowed to compete Watch
them qualify and attempt to break the track record of 212.76 mph Saturday!
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4& Super Eliminators! £ 16 Competition Eliminators!
Super Stock! 16 Street Eliminators!
41b Stock Eliminators & Smothers Brothers Olds will compete!!
41b Watch a full day of qualifying from the pits Saturday only $2.00
The Greatest Show in Drag Racing Sunday only $3.00
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Friday, February 7,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 7,1969

Theres I
V S OV6f GO6S To Waist BBBhBh \jjL:£:::\ I|l
: | j : : ; : ; : : :: :£ HMEH UH
ofthc WEEK I
Creators of ibyS" -1,-rfss| An
Theres one in every crowd who didnt 8
_ m >' get s yearbook. Theres one in every
g crowd who wants a yearbook. The
M BMI IffeVPfP r B || i Seminole has a limited number of 1968
ML Jp f| Seminoles for sale in Room 330 in the I
* 13fh jk j| | I x jti l
Just South of the Underpass
225 W. Univ. Ave. YOUI" NCCCI
..,.. ARCHITECTURAL
j#l Bruce Williams equipment and supplied
ART SUPPUES
|||i|||||4 Aqua-Gator Bruce Williams is this week's Player of
MMmSSk TheweeK. STUDY LAMPS
'" e so Pnmore from Eustis is listed as the number
one swimmer in the nation in the 200-yard freestyle f+v kA SMITEITC
|S|B with a 1:45.4 clocking. OTIVI UUINID
"This is the first time a Florida swimmer has ever CUICATCUIDTC
been ranked number one in the nation," says coach Bill SWEATSnIKTS
Harlan. "Williams is having a great year and I hope he . ___ f
can keep it up." COLLEGE PETS
Williams won three individual events for the Gators in *_ . _^ p rcA
JB||||f victories over nationally-ranked N.C. State (58-55) and COLLEGE SEAL
JBBbS? Ifl North Carolina (72-39). Bruce also swam in the winning
400 free-style relay against N.C. State. The other MASCOT STATIONERY
members of the relay team were Andy McPherson, Hank
Hough, and Mark McKee. I FILM AND DEVELOPING I
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