Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

VoL 61, No. 77

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PLAYBOY
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Anson Mount, Public
Affairs Manager and football v
"expert" for Playboy j
magazine, spoke for Accent
Wednesday night. For an
S interview with this fortunate :
fellow, see page 15.

Student Senate Wants
Resolution Postponement

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate late Tuesday night
unanimously passed a resolution asking the
University Senate to postpone discussion and/or
enactment of the policy statement on student
demonstrations.
The senate asked that the demonstration policy
be delayed until the next scheduled meeting of the
University Senate the last week in February.
The request for the delay came because the
student senate representatives were not allowed in
the University Senate meetings.
Student senators will not be allowed in the
University Senate meeting Thursday because the bill
authorizing visitors had not been passed.
Student senators have not had a chance to look
over the demonstration policy as they had requested
permission from the University Senate to do.
Clyde Ellis and Charles Harris, student senators,

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The
/
Florida Alligator

SENATE VOTES TONIGHT
New Disorder Policy Proposed

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
A committee which includes Dr. John
Greenman, drafter of the controversial
Greenman Resolution on student
disorders, will come before the University
Senate tonight with a new proposal
permitting demonstrations here as long as
they do not disrupt the normal
operation of the university.
The resolution was drawn up by the Ad
Hoc Committee on Demonstrations,
comprised of Greenman, Dr. E. A. Todd,
J. J. Sabatella, Dr. G. E. Nevill, and
chairman Dr. J. F. Baxter.
The committee was appointed to
formulate a policy on campus
demonstrations after Greenman proposed
last quarter a resolution giving the
administration the right to maintain order
by all means that are immediately
available.

University Police have begun cracking down on
violators of parking restrictions, as the owner of the
motorcycle (below) should have known before
parking his transportation. Later Wednesday

MBWBBMMiJi tomaway 9
Mawi H | a ==| yof Sfig
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- DOUG CASE

had a tentative meeting scheduled Wed. night to
look over the demonstration policy.
We have to have time to analyze this thing.
There is no rush on the demonstration policy, said
Ellis.
Senator Harris agreed and the senate passed the
resolution with few objections.
Also discussed at the meeting was a change in
rules and procedure to require a roll call vote before
and after the meeting. A provedure change requires
a two-thirds vote and failed on the floor.
A bill limiting paid members of the Division of
Housing Staff to serve as elected officers of Interhall
was also passed. The bill had been in judiciary
committee since last quarter.
Three people were recommended to the Action
Conference by the senate: Bill Modlin, Bill Slypping
and Fred Taylor.
Barry Malter was appointed to the Honor Court
while Jack Schuler was appointed to the Board of
Student Publications.

NOBODYS IMMUNE TO PARKING TICKETS

University of Florida, Gainesville

An advance copy of the statement says
the objective of the new policy is to
insure that expression of dissent by
individuals or by groups remains
undisruptive to the operation of the
university and in order to protect the
rights of all members of the academic
community.
Demonstrations inside buildings would
be prohibited by the policy, but they
would be allowed anywhere on campus
so long as they do not disrupt the
normal operation of the university or
infringe on the rights of other members
of the university community.
People not associated with the
university would be forbidden to
participate in demonstrations, and all
involved university members must present
identification upon request of authorized
UF officials.
Demonstrators would be forbidden
from:

Alligator photographer Brian Goodheim caught
Officer L.H. Wilkerson in the act pf ticketing the
official cars (left) for Accent '69.

I ACCENT I
TODAY
7- p.m.
Jean Houston
University Auditorium
8- p.m.
John Finlator
University Auditorium
9:30-10 p.m
Questions
10-11 p.m.
Reception
Reitz Union, Rooms 122-
123
The seminar planned
by Louis Harris for 8
a.m. has been cancelled.

Thursday, February 6, 1969

0 Obstructing traffic and building
entrances,
0 Interferring with educational
activities, scheduled speakers, and
university events,
0 Disrupting normal activities,
0 Damaging property, including
lawns, shrubs or trees,
0 Littering the premises with leaflets
or other materials.
If violators of the policy did not cease
illegal activities after an official request,
the University Police would be called in.
They would have the power to arrest
demonstrators in violation of the law
after warning them to stop, and they
could enlist the help of outside law
enforcement agencies, if necessary.
The opinion of the committee on
demonstrations was summed up by
Nevill: Demonstrations for any purpose
are fine as long as they dont disturb
other people.

Ur Is Subject
To City Laws
Affirms Fagan
By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Contributing Editor
Gainesville City Attorney
Osee Fagan yestejday said
remarks made Monday by a
State Beverage Department
official that the UF is on
sovereign land and therefore
not subject to city ordinances
are quite incorrect.
Fagan told the Alligator that
Bill Philips, of the beverage
departments legal division, was
wrong when he claimed that the
city cannot regulate what
happens on the university
campus.
If this were true, supporters
of UF student Lavon Gentry
would have a new legal
foundation for their now dated
charge that Gentry was unjustly
prosecuted under a city
ordinance for posting Bust the
Draft posters on university
buildings.
All state property owned
within a city is subject to the
police regulations and police
powers. There is no such thing as
sovereign immunity of state
lands, Fagan said.
Fagans remarks were
diametrically opposed to
statements made by Phillips to
the Alligator Wednesday
afternoon.
A municipality is a charter
corporation of the state and a
municipality only has that
power and authority which the
state gives it. Unless the state
gives the city power to regulate
the state it cant do so unless its
charter allows it, Phillips said.
However, Phillips did note
that he wasnt sure if Gainesville
does have such powers in its.-
charter.
Id have to look iat the
phshierhe said.
(SEE 'FAGAN', PAGE 2)

America's
Number I
College
Daily



Page 2

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, Fsbniary 6,1969

Law Students
Are Sworn In

Twenty-four UF senior law
students will be officially sworn
in today as public defender
interns and legal aid assistants.
Ceremonies will be held in
the West courtroom of the
Alachua County Courthouse at
4:30 pjn.
Intercourse
Group Hears
O'Connell
'faring his chest to a full
house of questions, UF president
Stephen C. OConnell denied
there had been a mass exodus of
faculty from UF.
During an Intercourse
program at the Rathskeller,
OConnell said there are a few
vacancies, but these are partly
due to money problems.
By next week a replacement
for the vacant position of
executive vice president will be
announced he said.
He indicated that at least an
acting vice president would be
chosen if not a permanent one.
Student population could
soar to 34,000 if the rate of
enrollment increases as
predicted, OConnell said.
Although he dislikes that
large enrollment, he would
prefer it to saying no to a
college education for someone.
The UF budget is vastly
improved over last year,
OConnell stated.
We have $1 million for the
faculty. Im sure the legislature
will approve a SBOO,OOO budget
supplement request, he said.
Ed Freeman, SSOC member,
charged the UF did not tolerate
liberal professors and that
OConnell refused to talk to the
radicals on campus.
At this point, the audience
groaned, but OConnell urged
him to continue. Shortly after
the floor microphone quit
OConnell invited Freeman up to
the stage to share his
microphone.
I did listen to you,
OConnell replied to his charges.
OConnell said he wanted
every opportunity to meet
students but would not adopt
the policy of leaving the office
every time somebody says
Come down to the Plaza of the
Americas. We want to talk to
you.
In answer to why he waited
two weeks before commenting
on the Lavon Gentry case,
OConnell said he was on
vacation.
I enjoyed the program but I
would have liked more
questions, he said afterwards.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the'
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesvifle, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or S3.SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
dines. Notices!Ori correction must be givpn before next insertion.

The students are enrolled in
the legal aid and defender clinic
at the UFs College of Law.
Established last foil, the clinic
attempts to bridge the gap
between the law students
academic program and the actual
practice of law.
It also provides a
substantially increased measure
of legal representation to
impoverished residents of the
area, according to James R.
Pierce, assistant professor of law
and director of the clinic.
Pierce served as first assistant
public defender in the Eighth
Judicial Circuit prior to his
appointment to the law faculty
last fall. A 1965 graduate of the
College of Law, he established
the student public defender
program at UF in 1963 and
became its first student
coordinator.
The charter class, whose
names have been certified to the
Florida Supreme Court by RA.
Green Jr., public defender for
the Eighth Circuit, to aid and
assist him in the defense of
insolvent persons accused of
crime, includes: Robert Bruce
Carruthers, Michael Lee Bryant,
James Otto Bin, James Richard
Holmes Jr., Clyde Lester Ellis,
Craig Charles Jacobsen, Stephen
Kerr Johnson, Timothy A.
Johnson, Richard Charles
Langford, John H. Lockie,
Lawrence Dent Martin, Paul
Joseph Ansel, Gary Allen Kahle,
Steven Robert Gaines, Noel
Hewitt Nation, Norman R.
Rosenberg, Michael Smodish,
Karen Lace Vitunac, DeLane E.
Anderson Jr., Howell Lykes
Ferguson, Bennie Lazzara Jr.,
John Ryan Holmes, Robert A.
Leventhal and Stephen Gary
Hayskar.
! Martins Not |
>
I Responsible
* >;
v The former editor of the :*:
* *
>| University Report, Richard if:
if Martin, has disclaimed any iff
if fiscal responsibility for the j:f
if newspaper as of Feb. 1. if
ff Martin and his wife, if
Eunice, recently purchased a if
f: legal notice in the Gainesville if
f: Sun stating that they would if
f: no longer be responsible for :f:
f: debts incurred by the Report. f:
f: Martin served as editor of
f: the Report from its beginning f:
f: last 'year through the fall f:
if quarter. Scott DeGarmo took if:
if over as editor last month. ifi
if This is just in case the ifi
if new editors incur any debts, if:
if Martin explained. They if*
i: couldnt come to us for

if payment. The new editors if*
f: have complete responsi- : i :
if bility. if
v;*;*.*.*.*..*.*.*.*.*.*;Y

t a.
GO FLY A KITE
That's exactly what the Kappa Alpha Theta's bicycle. The pledge kite-flying is a quarterly event
did, including this unidentified KAT pledge on a prior to initiation.
Fagan Raps UF r Sovereignty 9

While Fagan did not claim
that the Gainesville City Charter
gives the municipality power
over the UF campus, he did state
that sections of the Florida
Statutes do.
The city attorney said
sections 239.53-239.58 of the
Florida Statutes contain some
specific grants of power by the
legislature regardless of the
contents of charters of
municipalities.
Fagan added: Even without

It is I Don Quixote Come to kiss your uh
Your kiss uh Snatch a kiss.
an IMPOSSIBLE DREAM?
Dont Miss
Sunday Feb. 9th University of Fla.
8:15 pm Gymnasium
o student government production

regard to those provisions (of
the statutes), the premise Mr.
Phillips has is an erroneous one
and it really is unfortunate that
he and I (or somebody) have not
had the chance to talk about the
thing.
A check of the Florida
Statute sections cited by Fagan
reveals that the statutes dea?
primarily with the power oi
adjacent municipalities and
counties to regulate traffic on
university campuses.
Phillips had cited the right of
cities and counties to regulate
traffic on university campuses as

one of the few powers delegated
to these bodies by the state
sovereign over state property.
Meanwhile, Phillips said that
regardless of the legal right of
cities such as Gainesville to
enforce their laws on university
campuses there would be no
question of double jeopardy in
instances where students were
tried in municipal courts and
then called before university
committees.
You have to have two
judicial proceedings on the same
charge for double jeopardy to be
a factor,* Phillips said.



UC Curriculum
Change Studied
By SUZI WHALEY
Alligator Staff Writer
A proposal to spread the academic requirements of the two-year
University College over a period of four years has been issued by the
Action Conference Task Force on Curriculum.
This proposal will be voted on by the members of the Action
Conference at its meeting Feb. 12 or Feb. 26.
Since the college was started in 1935, a number of changes have
taken place calling for the revision of the system, according to Corbin
S. Carnell, chairman of the Task Force on Curriculum.
Originally, the college was designed so that all graduating students
would have completed the general education requirements in the
University College. A majority of the students now earn these
requirements at junior colleges, Carnell said.
Another major problem is that some upper division colleges which
are accepting junior college transfers are not accepting students from
the University College even though they have a 2.0 average, he said.
The proposal on curriculum consists of the following points:
i Procedures by which a student can complete the general
education requirements should be liberalized since the separation of
general education and upper division is no longer common and seems
counter to the concept of a unified institution.
All freshmen should be selected and treated as four year rather
than possible two-year terminal students.
A student fully committed to a major field could fulfill half of
the general education requirements (optionally) in a contrasting field
for example, humanities or social science for a science major or
vice-versa.
The administration should consider the need for organization of
separate faculties for general education. However, the proposals
mentioned should be implemented without the usual delay in
consideration of a major administrative reorganization.
The revised system should encourage experimentation and
innovation. It will make possible a four-year honors program and an
experimental college within the structure of Liberal Studies.
The advantages of the revised system to the students would be the
opportunity to explore a major earlier, some general education work
with the larger perspective of junior-senior years, some interrelation of
his major with larger areas of concern in a senior seminar, and greater
flexibility in tailoring these requirements to his special needs, Carnell
said.

PE Elective System Clarified

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
The College of Physical
Education and Health will be
using the newly implemented
sa t is factory-unsatisfactory
system for electives next year,
Curriculum Department
Chairman Wayne T. Sandefur
said Wednesday in correcting an
Alligator story of the same day.
Sandefur said the college did
not request exemption from the
free elective system and its
representatives to the university
senate votes unanimously to
support it.
Physical education majors
enrolled in intern teaching will
be exempted from the system.
When they were polled on the
matter, pre-intern students
indicated an almost unanimous
desire to continue with the
traditional five point grading
system, Sandefur said.
Sandefur said the College of
Education had been granted
permission to use the pass-fail
system for 16-hour blocks of
required course work in intern
teaching.
Normally the undergraduate
student would have the option
to take courses under the new
mmmmmmm
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL
376-4552 AUTHORIZED
dealE

system only in subjects outside
of his major field.
Physical education majors
enrolled in intern teaching are
supervised by the faculty of the
College of Physical Education
and Health, Sandefur said.
The college requested that
the five-point system be
continued for such students,
Sandefur said, because it gives

DOWN
WITH
SOILED
SUMMARIES!
Up with Eatons Corrasable Bond Typewriter Paper!
An ordinary pencil eraser picks up
every smudge, every mistake. The special
surface treatment lets you erase / I
without a trace. If Eaton's Corrasable / WT! o /
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what are you waiting for? Get it in light, / I
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Skin. In 100-sheet packets and 500- EATON'S CORRASABLE I
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Only Eaton makes Corrasable.
EATONS CORRASABLE BOND TYPEWRITER PAPER
Eaton Paper Company, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 01201

DR. ALFRED ROMER
... expert on fossils
Y.;.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.;.v.y.v.;.v.:.;.y.v. l

.* V
l Fla. Quarterly jij
| Wants Help
/ V

.

ij Delay in publication of the jij
ij Florida Quarterly was jij
ij attributed Monday to a jij
: change in editors and a lack :jj
j: of technical and secretarial
j: hel p by Jessica:-:
.j: Everingham,, acting editor. :ji
: The Florida Quarterly, iji
ji supported by the Board of iji
: Student Publications, was to >

j: have been released in January iji
> but will not be released until >
* '*
late February, Mi s s j:j
ij Everingham said. j:j
Students interested in jij
ij working on the Quarterly jij
j: should call 392-1681 or go by :jj
ji room 336 of the J. Wayne :j:
i Reitz Union from 3:30 to :-i
ji 5:30 daily. iji
iji This edition of the iji
iji Quarterly will feature poetry, iji
iji prose, art and reviews by iji
j:j students, faculty members, iji
jij and nationally known writers, :j
iji Miss Everingham said. iji
:.%%V.%V.%%V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V'

them a chance to bolster their
academic record in their senior
year, which could be important
to one seeking a scholarship,
fellowship or grant f6r graduate
work.
o
The truly interested and
dedicated person has a chance to
finish his undergraduate work
with a 16-hour block of
excellent marks, Sandefur said.

Harvard Prof Speaks
Dinosaur fossils from Argentina will be described by Harvard
professor Alfred S. Romer Monday in a program sponsored by the
Florida State Museum and Department of Zoology.
Romer will show the bearing of fossil evidence from Argentina on
the theory that continents of the earth were once connected.
This continental drift theory notes that the shapes of the South
American and African coasts are similar and the two bodies may have
been one during the formation of the earth, later drifting apart.
The title of Romers address is South American Triassic Reptiles,
Gondwanaland? and it will be given at 4 p.m. in room 109, Little
Hall.
20 % Discount on ROOMS
I We cooperate NOW
Private, Comfortable & Peaceful
I Discounts for Students use
I Only Must present ID card
I "-University Inn Ulotel
l tr*r\ihin/[ t ttmfttri Dram I
I / f y 101 Rooms
-WiMMimJKKF ,S: : A. v vv.
hWj I? f
it 1
i f HraiSilgl, |V

Break Away
from the Traditional!
There's now a store for
The Un-Conventional
Mr. Anthonys is the
Big Town Store
And its right here in Gainesville.
M.K. jA'itfhjHty \
ORIGINALS
1710 S.W. 13th. STREET ,7
Across from University; JbrErH;

Thursday, February 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

L Ths Florida Alligator, Thunday, February 6,1969

p ar adeofTbUscv&[uesaroar
Jamboree Parade. See it in any of the big V
Florida parades still to come!
GB a II I r^HHHjgK
F & P Whole Kernel
Golden Corn . /%. 6 SS *! GP=-
Detergent Special I j IS^^^BI
Cold Power *? 49c J flHB;
(limit 1 with $5 or more excluding cigarettes) m a. *T6a
With Pure Lemon Juice I Kraft's (7c off)
Mayonnaise T 49* 1 j+SQ&isel
Plain or Self-Rising Flour J
Gold Medal 5 49* {K£ BB Jf
(plus 50 Extra S&H Green Stamps with coupon) e^BSH[^^^B|
Assorted Flavors Betty Crocker
ei B || G rT $V Lady Betty Delicious, Healthful
Cake Mixes 3 n Prune Juice 3££ *L
, y=> /TV /? A Dole Tasty Hawaiian Pineapple
:>%/?? F & P Slices or Halves Yellow
s£ ' s "t p l ea Bartlett
Finsbury's Sweet Milk or Buttermilk J1I 1 I I U- i m #303 m
Biscuits 4 dins 39 Pea Halves 4 ca s n#
PjlUbury'. Crescent f Wl I Cocktail SSS *L
Dinner Roll* £f, 39* t , .
Cool Weather Treat I Heinz Tomato
Miss Wisconsin Cheese #._ ia tall m
Ckfcm fluMldce 14- Ttr UOUp 1U cans
Sharp Cheddar * 75* e H .iT.nt.
fcl^Lf *' SUC,d x, ITI Ketchup 2 IS; 49
9Wi vnee*e F & P Meal-Maker Sliced
Kraft's Individually Wrapped Sliced ttaa#e ft #303 $1
American Chesta A9c Beets cans
American cneese . pkg ¥ f& p Delicious cut
Green Beans 8 ££ s 3*
)3faym ctodJJfL Tomatoes 5 S 5 *L
Minute Maid Frozen Florida Prices are effective F & P Tender Green
Orange Concentrate Thurs, Fri, Sat, Feb. Swr#t Pone A #303 sl.
i llS A qq. 6,7, 8, 1969 weef o cans
Orange Juice . 4 cans 89c v F& P Cream Style
Morton's Tasty Frozen / \ s*.ij-_ #303 h
Honey Buns ... JjJ 29c Ui4m'* Am*. FWon <* i plmm>
Banquet Time-Saving Assorted jUML yA. \
Frozen Dinners JJJ 39c #CV mUK X.
Pet Ritz Delicious Frozen A# k^jy. \
Pumpkin Pies. 3 Js£ *l. *-> Pictsweet Frozen Cooked
Birds Eye Frozen Nabisco Chocolate-Chip Cookies
Green Peas .. 6 pkp 1. chips Ahoy .. Bi 111 d H
Sole .... 59c p ecan Sand 49<
Mr.. Paul'. FMnily-Slre Frozen Kraft Pur. W
Fish Sticks .... ,*,. 69c Grape Jelly .. (2* 29* V\ A iH
* health A bemutH aids LuckyLrerf Delicious TV M>W V
Apple Sauce. 3 J £? s l. >ABr A JlBBl
Gleem Mrs Be i* s Os B -^fflHlfMH^r
Tooth Paste tub* 59c Butter e 2 ji?- 69c
ScoP Green Giant Delicious
Mouth Wash Sweet Potatoes
EXTRA P S^W?aT7l EXTRA EXTRA 1- OP IV I e XTRA _4G
J^GreenStamps^lllllHWGreenStampsL^llllM^GreenStampsLaillllUwfireenStamnsMLlllJwcmpn^ninsM
with tmii coerea am* pvicnaii or ritr tnii coitor asb rviCNAti of hfiMwt this coupon am* rvicsAii or with this coupon and J I, B l i W
I Mat mx 9l fa Ai Os lit* INIS CORMR ARB MICCAH W BB^
ji> 4ny Size m Sff Sft 1
. er more of any || Head & Shoulders B || Kmth '* Btack "* SoneleM Premium LabeL AN Meet 1
Candles 8 Shampoo S *">" 8 Canned Hams 1
(Coupon expiree Set. February A IMS) || (Coupon expiree Sat. February S, ISSS) ( >P


t Florida State Jy Faativ^^^^^l^y
6 Tampa. F* 7*6 Winter Haven. Fab. 14-22 w jy St. Pe.erd.org 7
Gun. Pin luto Rir.i M..C. J.-A..M3
f*T ,r" Ybor CHy^Flbl*3 NV C rt B-'h* ***Grcrwrti F.ttiv.l Fun n Sbb Fbbilvbl
V New Port R,ch v* M r 22 Hollywood. March 10-23 Boynton Beach. Mar. 12-15 Dunedin. March 13-15 Clearwater. March 22-30 Eaaler Sunriee Service
Lake Wales. April 6
down produce lane
Fresh Pork Tasty
Pork Steaks lb. 59c Firm Western Iceberg
Lettuce .... 2 as 49*
Pork Roast lb 49* Golden
Fresh Pork Shoulder Cut DeiaeMaeMM .. U
79c Bananas , , 10 c
siiced'aotoena ITS Sweet Yams .. 12'
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a 25 ~ 45< ,p 59c Tomatoes .... w 49*
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Short Ribs . 49*
Swift's Premium Sausage Herman's Orange-Band Pork
Brown N Servo 59c Bag Sausage . ? b r 49c 1 f I
Swift's Premium Tru-Tender Sliced Seafood Treat, Standard Carolina
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Tamow's Cooked or Baked Seafood Treat, Ready to Cook
Sliced Ham ... K£ 59c Shrimp (peeled & deveined) K. r 99c judStS** "2'**
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Tasty Old-Fashion
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(Coupon expires Sat. February B, ieS9) | | (Coupon expires Sat. February B, 19C9) | | (Coupon expires Sat. February B, 1969) | j (Coupon expires Bat- February B, 1969) | IV/I*T Ite |VIM IINJ |

Thursday, Fsbruary 6,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 6,1969

Page 6

EDITORIAL
Stall Resolution And Hear Students

The Student Senate, demonstrating its
newly-found consciousness of important
student issues, respectfully requested
unanimously Tuesday night that the
University Senate stall action on a revised
version of the Greenman resolution.
At least until the upper house is
dragged, kicking and screaming, out of its
own enactment of the Dark Ages and lets
the public including students see
first-hand the workings of its democracy,
currently conducted behind closed doors.
The Student Senate's respectful request
was in actuality no more than a demand
couched in highfalutin language.
Its demand or request, if you like
that better is a just one.
The students of this university
have ... or should have .. the right to
express their opinions to the universitys
policy making body before policies are voted
on.

Dissenter

Ladies and gentlemen, boys
and girls, rejoice. We have found
the answer 'to the problems of
America, and more especially its
educational institutions. It has
been proclaimed by Larry
Benin, chairman of Accent 69,
that his show is the panacea for
all the problems of the
universities.
V
UFs Accent Symposium,
hopefully, is the counter-effect
of thoughtless student
radicalism, Mr. Benin claims.
Now, if he or anyone else had
taken the time to give radical
literature even a cursory glance,
he would certainly have
discovered that radicals are far
from thoughtless. They are, in
fact, among the most intelligent,
thoughtful, and articulate people
on any campus. Their actions
are, in most cases, the result of
well-thought-out principles and
beliefs.
Accent will also allow the UF
student to present his view no
matter what it might be, Berrin
continues. Great. You mean we
cant do that the rest of the
year? Has the ban been lifted on
certain political ideas just for
this occasion? Perhaps Marshall
Jones could come back and
teach and Lavon Gentry could
put up posters to his hearts
content.

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Budn. Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
382*1881,382-1682 or 382-1683.
?OptoiMU expressed in the Florida AUfcator are thoas of the editors or of
the eriter el the article md not those of the University of Florids.
j i: ' i :.[")!

Radicals Are Far From Thoughtless

Mr. Berrin also claims Accent
as a constructive alternative to
violence. Man, thats beautiful.
Now, I want you to pile Julian
Bond et al into a plane and tly
them out to the campus of San
Francisco State College and see
what kind of reaction you get.
Watch as the militants march
demurely into the college
auditorium to listen to all the
speeches.
Mr. Berrin is playing a ghastly
joke on himself and the student
body if he thinks the purveyors
of change by any means will
look upon an exchange of
speeches as a valid alternative to
their own means.
Along the same lines, Accent
will supposedly open the
channels for the presenting of
divergent views. Certainly Strom
Thurmond and Michael
Harrington have divergent views.
But they also have one thing in
common. They are both
committed ic working within
the establishment, as are the
other speakers. Where, I ask you,
is the loyal opposition? Why
dont we have Dick Gregory,
Rap Brown or Wilfrid Burchett?
If representatives of the
mili ta n tly anti-establishment

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
PftCl/toflil/V Dave Doucette
. mu Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
y\HWUWL Executive Editor News Editor
At the same time, those members of the
senate who are interested in student opinion,
few of them as there are, have a right to hear
the expression of student views before they
are required to vote on policies which affect
the students.
Particularly in an area of heated
controversy and widely diverging views. The
proposed policies on student
demonstrations, a revision of a resolution
introduced last quarter by Agriculture
Professor John Greenman, fall into such an
area.

faction were invited to come and
speak, then it might truly be said
that Accent presents a
divergency of views.
The impotence, indeed the
irrelevance, of the symposium is
well pointed out in another
statement by Berrin. To wit ...
no actual policies or principles
are established for application ..
. That, one and all, is the crux
of the whole matter. You can
expound and on your ideas until
you drop, but if they arent
implemented, of what use is

Staff Writings

Better Reading Glossary

Your local edition of the friendly Florida
Alligator sometimes uses terms not always familiar
to UF students. In an attempt to further public
relations, your local edition of the friendly Florida
Alligator presents a glossary to the Alligator.
Albert UFs perpetually horizontal friend; UF
mascot.
Century Tower A building closely akin to the
tower a University of Texas student used to shoot
16 people a few years ago.
Dissent Failure to adhere to what is expected.
Ethics The Alligator really doesnt know.
FSU The only girl college on UFs football
schedule everv year.
Gainesville Where its not happening.
Gator Ray A mythical creature of the UF
Athletic Department.
Gator A funny looking creature that lies on
the ground; a drunk; UF mascot.
J, Wayne Reitz Union Glamorous pool hall.
Neal Walk Fictional giant of the UF basketball
team.

having them in the first place,
aside from any personal pleasure
derived thereof? Those who
desire change have been
attempting it by various
non-violent means and by yelling
it and screaming it until they can
stand it no more. So they are
driven to violence to make a
voice for themsleves. They
dont, as Berrin claims, want any
part of the establishment. They
want complete structural change
of the existing order. And they
know they wont get that by
listening to speeches. Still, most

The new policies still have the get
tough flavor of Greenmans resolution.
(Greenman is a member of the ad hoc
committee which drafted them.)
Many students and their leaders were
shocked by the language and intent of the
former resolution. The new statement is no
better.
And if students will be expected to uve
under the policies, they should be given at
least the opportunity to express their
opinion of them.
In fact, students should have played a
role in drafting them. With that little bit of
reasonable fairness by the boards, though,
they should now be granted a chance to
praise or condemn.
Denied that chance, they should feel little
compulsion to honor the policies.
We add our stamp of approval, then, to
the Student Senate resolution:
Table the policies.

By Lee Hilliker

The Pill A means of attracting the attention of
a UF student.
Rathskeller UF local bar.
Richard M. Nixon ?
SEC A highly valued trophy UF seldom wins.
Servomation Also starvomation. experimental
program for study of internal consumption.
SG An undefinable term referring to
power-seeking campus politicos.
SSOC Sixty Sick Outcast Creatures.
Stephen C. OConnell Or SCOC. (See SSOC) A
fine example of what happens to a State Supreme
Court Justice after he retires.
Tigert Hall A computerized building of
leadership.
UF Where its happening.
- University Report Alligator competition
modeled after Playboy.
Zwieback Last word in Alligator glossary.

radical and liberal students are
opposed to violence as a valid
means of change. But they are
coming more and more to realize
that after all the fine words
spoken at programs such as
Accent, things are inevitably the
same afterwards. Their voices
and their beliefs are still stifled.
And they are a growing restless.
If change cannot be brought
about non-violently, then what
is left? The answer is obvious.
You must heed their words,
good people, for, as Dylan says
the hour is getting late.

By Bill King



Fraternities, Gentry:
Any Difference?

MR. EDITOR:
I have noticed, with some
puzzlement, the apparent
discrepancy between the
treatment of the Lavon Gentry
case and the handling of the
recent Social Fraternity
incidents.
Gentry, arrested for
defacing a University building
(with Scotch tape and paper)
was referred to City Courts
before being acquitted, with a
possibility of being punished
through University disciplinary
channels as well.

Dissenter

A Balance Os Terror

I see by the papers where there is some argument
over the policies of nuclear superiority vs. nuclear
sufficiency.
On the one hand we have those who argue that
we must continually strive for superiority in both
the quantity and quality of our nuclear destructive
power.
On the other hand there are the people who
insist all we need do is keep pace with our
adversaries in the destruction department.
There have been many pros and cons thrown
back and forth, but the general feeling is that the
Nixon administration will favor the policy of
nuclear superiority. Both views, however, have a
common unifying element. They are both products
of an insane mentality.
The belief that a balance of terror is the surest
way to peace is somewhat incredulous to say the
least. Both Russia and America have the capacity to
destroy most of the worlds population many times
over.
Yet each insists upon increasing its destructive
forces as much as is economically feasible. And the
leaders of each country have the audacity to
proclaim that through more armament they are
furthering the cause of peace.
This is but the most recent example in the long
history of mans justification of criminal acts in the
name of certain sacred ideals and values.
Some of the most heinous crimes and destructive
acts in history have been carried out in the name of
the ideas of religion and, more contemporarily,
so-called patriotism.
Overt nationalistic feeling, under the guise of
patriotism, is the greatest deterrent to world peace

They Enjoy
Tower Chimes
MR. EDITOR:
Please advise the good folks
who bewailed, on Jan. 30, the
fact that they know of no one
who actively enjoys the tower
chimes, that there are at least
two of us.
BRIAN E. MICHAELS, 7AS
TERRY BECK, 7AS
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

The fraternities were
involved, according to printed
accounts, in what must be
termed as violent
confrontations. The participants
alledgedly were armed with
sticks, a crutch, pipes, chains
and other dangerous objects.
In one encounter, police were
forced to use Mace. And in still
another, they admitted being
outnumbered and had difficulty
quelling the incident.
However, the disciplinary
action here was through the
Inter Fraternity Council which
suspended the social activities

Q | M

Even Paranoids Have Real Enemies

Before I am run out of town by a group of tired America Firsters, I
would like to relate the story of the exasperation I encountered last
quarter in my futile, but unsuccessful attempts to drop an English
coarse, EH 371.
I first petitioned to drop the course around the middle of October;
I showed my petition to Dr. Wallace of the College of Arts and
Sciences. He refused to believe my story, probably because it was the
truth.
Moreover, he told me that I was spending too much of my time
trying to tear down the Establishment, as though I were Cool Hand
Luke, Mark Rudd and Spiro T. Agnew rolled into one. Dr. Wallace
obviously considered me a raving radical, and I was defeated before I
opened my mouth.
I dont know why a harmless liberal like me is stereotyped farther
to the left, but what can I expect from a man named Wallace?
At any rate, the Arts and Sciences committee, slightly to the right
of HUAC, rejected my petition as expected, and several weeks later,
after injuring my left knee, I signed another petition (as men are wont
to do in the course of participatory democracy), giving this one to
Dean Cox himself.
He felt that the crutches and my having missed two weeks of
classes were not good reasons to drop the course, since, after
all, I was still alive and alm6st well. I then got a doctors note from

today, and is the potential destroyer of the world.
National pride of some degree is perhaps
desirable. But to argue the sanctity of ones own
country above the welfare of humanity is morally
untenable. It is a tragic fact that man is today so
rooted in nation-clad idolatry that he recognizes no
goal other than the survival and perpetuation of his
own way of life over and above, and indeed at the
expense of, the rest of the world. Is the destruction
of the human race worth the vindication of any
ideology or value systemm?
Probably no one would be so bold as to answer
this question affirmatively. Empty words, however,
we must not take at face value. We must judge those
in power by their actions. And they are guilty.
Guilty of leading mankind careening down the road
to destruction in the name of peace.
But we who are blindly apathetic and we who sit
in judgment are also guilty by complicity. The
burden rests as much on our shoulders. If we truly
value peace between nations, allowing the insane
arms race to continue will constitute a simple case
of guilt by inaction.
The solution to this seemingly endemic problem
does not lie in the slogans and platitudes of the
politicians. It lies in the creation and socialization of
values that uphold the sanctity of Man above
individual men and nation-states and their various
systems.
And it lies in the creation of a truly international
governing body which would have the power to
prohibit any and all aggressive acts between nations.
Whether this will come about before the world
lies in burning ruins is a moot point. The fanatic
my-country-right-or-wrong attitude must be
destroyed before it destroys mankind.

(parties and in-house women) of
these organizations for the
remainder of this term.
While this may be termed
disastrous in some quarters,
many students think the
punishment involved here was
much less severe than the type
of punishment attempted with
Gentry.
I wonder if anyone could
define, clear-up or in some way
rationalize the legal . and
moral . questions involved in
this discrepancy.

STEPHEN W. McGUIRE, 3ED

By Lee Hilliker

OPEN FORUM:
Jkibjui ml ViA&wt
"There is no hope for the complacent wan." |
Heavenly Answer :
Let Her Be Heard
MR. EDITOR: I
Re: Mrs. Lyons letter imploring God to manifest His power I
to answer prayer by intervening ... that she (Madalyn Murray,
professed atheist) not be permitted to speak, in the Feb. 3, I
edition of the Alligator. j
At the risk of seeming patronizing, I would like to remind j
Mrs. Lyons and those, who may have felt constrained to join her 1
heavenly plea, of such things as the Greek concept of the sin of |
hubris and the parable of the Publican and the Sinner. Did yall j
ever stop to think that God may be a little more democratic j
than your concept of Him. God could give an equally valid and
effective answer to Mrs. Lyons prayer by saying Let her be
heard. l have nothing to fear. As a matter of fact silence |
might be His best answer. f
ANTHONY GREER I
* *
Speak, Mrs. Lyons
MR. EDITOR: the same place that allow her
to have her precious religion. 1
Mrs. Lyons would do well §
to remember that the same NAME WITHHELD J
rights she seeks to deny I dont like what you say but
Madalyn Murry stem from I defend your right to say it. j
The Facts Reversed
MR. EDITOR:
Your columnist Allen Pierleoni is at it again reversing the facts to
make his journalistic point.
In his impressions column he fabricated the fiction of the achiever,
who had everything to live for, finally blowing his brains out because
he wasnt sure who he was.
Lets not forget the lesson of poor UF activist leader and politician,
Harmerling, who never experienced success in academics, in school
politics or in civil disturbances. Marriage could not help him. An
aborted tour in the Peace Corps did not help him.
Harmerling took his own life in his middle twenties. Few people
remember him outside of his saddened family.
No, Allen, the happy, healthy achiever is still very much alive in
every village and hamlet and town in the world and he is getting
constructive things done for his community and country.
I could get you a gun, Pierleoni.
K.E. JONES, 7AS

the Med Center and attached it to a third petition, only to have the
third one rejected, too.
I was then developing a somewhat severe case of paranoia,
convinced that political reasons were responsible for the rejections.
After all, even paranoids have real enemies.
I figured that I might as well capitalize on my undeserved radical
reputation, since I was being persecuted anyway. Therefore, in accord
with Dr. Wallaces fears, I announce my plans to bum down the
College of Arts and Sciences (Today Arts and Sciences, tomorrow
Tigert!) in the near future.
However, I am undecided as to when I should perform said deed;
once I arrive at a date, I can place notices in Whats Happening and
Orange and Blue Bulletin.
So, kind readers, I humbly ask your aid: Please call me (378-7550)
or write (1216-12 SW 2nd Ave.) if you have a date in mind.
I can get to work in a most destructive manner once I find an
appropriate date, like maybe Third World Appreciation Day, Che
Guevaras Birthday (Che Day), or the middle of National Code of
Hammurabi Week.
. T y i j cn I need all the help I can get in this gragd and glorious quest.
Remember: Only you (with a little help from me) can start campus
fires.

Thursday, February 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

By David Miller

Page 7



Page 8

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, Fabruary 6,1969

Lrtil 1
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Thursday, February 6,1969, Thu Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

;;;x*x*x*x*xx*x*x*x*NSssrxxKvx*x*x*x*x*;j;
FOR SALE
:x.v.v;-.vx-X:*x-x-:-n%svx-xvX-x-x*x.v.'
Four month old stereo originally
slls. Want SBS. Need to sell to meet
school expense. Call Charlie, room
438 between 5 lO pm. 372-9421.
(A-4t-75-p)
Vespa 125 cc '66 runs very well. S9O
or best offer; Raleigh five speed bikes
26 in., boys and girls 5 mo. old. Call
378-8610 after 5. (A-st-75-p)
66 Allstate Sears Motorscooter.
White, 2600 miles. I no longer use it
enough. With helmet $125. Call
376-6558 after 6 p.m. George rm 5.
(A-st-75-p)
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines,
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-75-p)
FLINT lock pistol S&W 22 MRF
pistol 357 Ruger 3V9 Scope 25-308
Mauser rifle franchi 12 ga 3" Mag &
extra barrel Rem XPIOO. Must sell.
372-7912. (A-st-76-P)
1967 Triumph TR6, 650 cc. Excell,
condition, only 5000 miles. Call Ken
Fowle at 372-9307 anytime and
make offer. Must sell immediately.
(A-2t-76-P)
1968 BMW R-69US 6 gal. Sport
Tank, locking gas cap, luggage rack.
Excellent condition. Call Pete Swan
372-9307. (A-2t-76-P)
Mobile Homel2x6o 3 bedrooms,
1V? baths, excellent cond. SSOO
down, assume paymts. Days
376-4616 ask for Beverly/nights
481-1088. (A-st-77-P)
Fender Duosonic Guitar, very fast
neck, good condition S9O. EKO
hollow body dual pickup guitar, light
wood S3O. Call Larry at 392-8952.
(A-3t-77-P)
MAG WHEELS set of 4 keys tone
"Customags 5 lug, 13 inch, NEW.
Cost SIBO, will sell for SIOO, spinner
caps included, Call 378-4772.
(A-st-77-P)
HONDA 450 good condition, fast
dependable, will consider trade SSOO.
Call 376-9440. (A-lt-77-P)
1967 VW low mileage, radio, sedan.
Good condition must sell $1395
Cash. Call 378-3996 for information
after 5 p.m. (A-st-77-P)
: :;>^ssw^*x\xX>x<-. -x.:.ss-;X'Xx*frw-x^xg
I FOR RENT
Desperate! 1 female roommate.
Landmark no. 169, 378-7782.
(B-7t-72-p)
Female roommate to sublet
Landmark apartment spring quarter.
Contact Judy after 7 oclock.
378-9489. (B-st-74-p)
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
apt. on Archer Road opposite Stengel
Field Airport. Married student couple
only. SSO per month for long-term
tenant. Water furnished. Phone
372-9903. (B-st-74-p)
Quiet offices for the work-minded.
Plenty of parking. Walk to campus.
Computer Management Corporation.
Ph.: 378-1615. (B-st-73-c)
Sublet 1 br apt. close to campus.
Nice and clean. Call anytime after 5
p.m. 372-1320. (B-2t-77-P)
| WANTED I
Rmmte for 2 bdrm upstrs apt, 14
blks frm cmpus on SE 4th Ave.
Kinda run down but groovy for
parties. Call Harry Tea 378-4954,
378-8686. (C-st-75-p)
ROOMATE(S) wanted for immediate
occupancy two bedroom Village Park
Apts. Phone 372-7538 after six.
(C-2t-76-P)
Male roommate to share 2 bedroom
Gatortown apt. 42.50 per month plus
'/ utilities. Call 376-2234 after 4:00
p.m. Feb. rent paid. (C-3t-75-p)
Female roommate for 2 bedroom 2
bath apt. with fireplace 50.00 for
own bedroom 25.00 to share if
desired. Call 378-2184 12:00 1:00
or evenings. (C-3t-75-p)
Interesting & friendly grads, faculty
& staff & students over 21 for
singles mixer at Lamplighter every
Friday. See Personal for details.
(C-2t-77-P)
I UMQT' 'i'' I
I aprmML I

;;X< X:^:NXW.XWXS I W I X HELP WANTED 1
i l%v.vx*:*x*x X"X.v. .s ; x*x*x*X"V.Ns x*x 4 \
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between 8 5. (E-10t-71-c)
MAN OR WOMAN, 18-35 to manage
showroom in Miami International
Merchandise Mart. Start
Immediately. References desired. See
Bill Killeen at the Subterranean
Circus, 10 SW 7th St., Gainesville.
(E-21-76-P)
RELIABLE help wanted, male,
mature student for 3-4 hrs early Sat.
a.m.; must have reliable
transportation; permanent job. Call
FRASER 376-4912 ANYTIME.
(E-st-77-P)
4 starving males in Village Park desire
cute liberal coed to cook 5 days a
week. Call 378-3472 for interview.
(E-2t-77-P)
.vs-x*^x-:-xx*:^x-x-x-:-x:w*!Wx4X4 AUTOS
v jA
XxsvXX-x*x-:*x*xxvx*x*X"X'Xx.s:x*x*X>.'
19 59 Jaguar sedan, new tires,
battery, air-conditioned, overdrive,
state ins. $450 or best offer. Cass
376-9554. (G-3t-76-P)
1965 Comet low mileage, V-8,
R&H, very clean, $895, call Larry at
378-5769, hurry! Uncle Sam calls.
(G-3t-75-p)
4-4-2 1966 metallic gray black top
r&h good tires clean interior
excellent condition, SIBOO. Call
372-5463. (G-st-73-p)
1966 VW (Sedan) excellent
condition! Custom steering wheel &
gear shift. Cream w/red imitation
leather upholstery. Radio. $1195.
Call 378-0850. (G-3t-76-P)
BUICK 1964 Skylark Wagon heater,
air, radio, new tires very clean $1045,
utility trailer 4x6 $45. Paintings
18x22 sls each. Linesman belt
372-7912. (G-st-76-P)
1965 Sunbeam Alpine tremendous
condition must sell for school
expenses best offer will get it. Call
372-7971 nights and all weekend.
(G-st-76-P)
1967 SS 350 Camaro $1950,
378-2105. (G-7t-72-p)
1964 T-Bird, 2 dr hdtop. Loaded
$1495. 376-1611 x 384 or 378-9130.
(G-st-77-P)
65 Olds 442. Holly 4 bbl 4 speed,
Offenhauser head and Cheaters. Wire
spinners, blue with silver top. $1650.
Call Tom, 376-0648. (G-2t-77-P)
Valiant 62. Comfortable new
upholstery. Excellent condition, low
mileage, stereo radio. Call 376-9527
after 5. (G-st-77-P)
r ""personal I
X S
&;.s!ssx4*x*x-x-x.ss*wx'x-xttsywx-x
Need work on your car? Call Bill,
4 EG, 12 yrs. experience. Very
reasonable rates. 372-4921 after 6
p.m. (J-3t-75-p)
Im just back from Bogota, Colombia
with ruanas, capes, silver and emerald
jewelry, Indian decor pieces in
brilliant colors. Ruana colors are
magnificent! Eunice Renshaw, The
Spanish Main, 105 W. University Ave.
372-0667. (J-st-75-p)
BIRTHDAY party for ol drunken
Rose Sat. night, at 10 B Y O B and
one for Rose. Ginny and Lucys, 919
NW Bth Place. 376-2912. (J-3t-76-P)
/f 2/7j !*** THE FOX like a milk-fad puppy.
vimaoio
B BV BV / MHSOHS
v* Bl wi ImTi/rB umtanH
AT7/I I [ CAM ot T
smSn

KllHitfflmiTrfi "WORLDS" APART-NOW
PMimUMBHam TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME!
(fit ipk' cMION
II felON
4 L i- WKsi
I muc wet Lift MOm 9:10 'll, ZL.-'S
ciood air' wit* ' I* <*'&>' IWI 1 A

Page 10

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 6, 1969

:^x*x*x*sss?*x*x*x*xxx*x-x*x:*x*:*sx
PERSONAL
8
:*XX*%SVX*X*X*X*X4*X*XX.X*V.SS!XX*
Interested in becoming a Bunny at
the Miami PLAYBOY CLUB. See Lee
Klein at the AEP house Thurs. 3-5
p.m. (J-lt-77-P)
The Friday Afternoon for the
single University crowd over
21will meet this & every Friday
from 5-7:30 at the Lamplighter.
Private room, pleasant atmosphere.
Drinks $.45. Come early & brmg
your friends. Fridays a great day to
have fun an drink away Midterm
worries. (J-2t-7 7-P)
LOST & FOUND |
FOUND watch in Union Bolwing
Lanes. 378-0280. (L-3t-76-P)
Kappa Sigma fraternity pin lost
between Little Hall and Rawlings.
$25 reward for its return. Call Bert
Develle 376-9198. (L^t-Tfe-P)
LOST: one suede fringed Indian
jacket. Squaw unhappy! If found call
Deanna 392-9659. Reward: ten fish.
(L-3t-74-p)
>.. , >X£!X*X*XX%VX*X*J X X X X X! SERVICES
J*
X*X.!.!.VXX X S*!W!*AV. ;*W*X*>X*MVVW*;*V
ALTERNATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
SITTER-WEEKDAYS 2:30-5:30 for
two school boys; sls per week. NW
area 372-5885 Evenings. (M-st-77-P)
Your problems are all solved. OM is
finally on campus. OM will answer
any problems &/or troubleshoot. Call
372-5457 or 372-1360 or 376-1587.
(M-st-73-p)
Nitro was their %
t weapon against
five blazing S
oil infernos! \
JOHN WAYNE I
m KATHARINE ROSS /
'Klfl that uiAPii Air cmu. M
+ Tel
.L the \
fixer J
Based on the Pulitzer
-jr Prize winning novel
by Bernard Malamud
Cowittcw* OfiiviMt |
How much
/ *ve con a 81l
. young man stand?
h Sal
7 :
CnriSopwecJoNES .*
feATHC


SERVICES i
_T ENNIS racket restringing,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call Mand R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-P)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)

an
II MW 13 hSt a I 23rd RO/ hi
| Tf*p or,# .1 ? 2434 fcr |

is candy faithful?
...only to the book
Robert Hoggiog, Peter Zoref and Setmur Pictures Corp.* present
A Christian Morquand Production
CftaiHes Aznavour- Marion Brando-Richard Burton
James Cobum -John Huston Walter Matthau
Ringo Starr introducin' Ewa Aulin
Co StW'inf
John Astin Eka Martinell'i Sugar Ray Robinson Anita Pallenberg
Florinda Bolcan Marilu ToJo Nicoletta Machiavelli Umberto Orsini
Joey Forman Fabian Dean- and Enrico Maria salemo:
Musk by Dave Grusin- Executive Producers Selig J. Seligmon and Peter Zoref
Based on the Novel by ferry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg Screenplay by Buck Henry
Produced by Robert Hogging-Directed by Christian Marquand Technicolor
*A Subwdmry of the American Broodcoshng Companies. Inc.
RESTRICTED
Persons Under 16 Not An Holton-French Co Production room Cmkmama MUM COMORenON
AdrndSadUnless Accompanied D. SJtA.. MmCoro*. Pom .V#
..nm.. by a Parent or Guardian
I. 13th St. t 23rd HD f
| Telephone 378 2434 I, i J \ \ ffl 1 rVUWW^
A DIFFERENT J
SHOW EACH DAY! V
FRIDAY TUESDAY
Im All Right Nobody
Jack Waved Goodbye
"Devastatingly funny. "A marvelous movie.
-N.Y. Times -The New Yorker
SATURDAY WEDNESDAY
The Endless Nothing
Summer But A Man
"Dazzling ode to sun, sand A great movie. A revolution
and surf. -Time | in the cinema.Life
SUNDAY THURSDAY
Morgan Accident
Howlingly tunny/-N. Y. Times "Like a punch in the chest
urtk.m77 1 A compelling film.
MONDAY -Newsweek
mmmm >
Mm ELVIRA MADIGAN
"PERHAPS THE MOST
rjp mmm BEAU TIFUL MOVIE IN
I m - 11
ENDS TnnAY! "CCGD BAu UGLY"& "HANG EM HIGH"

-
WANT
APS 1

ends today "BULLIT



TO BEGIN IN FALL
Biochemist Joins Faculty

The UF marine science
research program will be
bolstered next fall by the
addition of a noted biochemist
to the faculty.
Dr. Samuel Gurin, an expert
on protein structure who was
awarded the First sample of
radioactive Carbon 14 released
for biological investigation by
the Manhattan Project, will join
the UFs Division of Biological
Sciences and the Department of
Biochemistry Sept. 15 as
professor of biological sciences.
Dr. Gurin recently stepped
down as dean of the School of
Medicine at the University of
Pennsylvania. He is spending the
current year visiting the
principal marine science research
institutions on the Atlantic, Gulf
and Pacific coasts, developing
resources for his program at UF.
He will devote his talents to
developing the biochemistry of
marine organisms on a
systematic basis.
A member of the team which
isolated and identified
crystalline Vitamin B1
(thiamine), Dr. Gurin later
isolated and identified the
Greek Week
Planned For
Next Quarter
A week-long series of games
and seminars and a collective
service project for all Greeks is
being planned for the week of
Spring Frolics next quarter.
Greek Week will serve to
make the university and the
outlying community aware of
the fraternity system as a
whole, Greek Week Chairman
John Cosgrove said Wednesday.
We want to show that even
though we are all in different
houses we can work together in
the Interfraternity Council, he
said.
Cosgrove said he is organizing
a series of committees that will
be responsible for the various
activities of each day. Thirteen
positions are now available.
Greek Week is the realization
of a campaign promise by Steve
Zack, IFC president, to re-create
an old tradition at the UF,
Cosgrove said.
Plans include theme contests
for Frolics parties, seminars,
sports contests and races,
sorority participation and an
IFC party at the Florida Gym.
Meetinge Scheduled
The Association of Women
Students meets tonight at 8
in room 361 of the Reitz
Union.
MENSA meets tonight at 8
pjn. in room 362 Reitz
Union. Officers will be
elected and all members are
urged to attend.
WANT
ADS

thiazole component of Vitamin
B1 in cooperation with Dr. H.T.
Clarke. His work on protein
structure demonstrated the
position of free amino acid
groups during graduate work
with Dr. Roger Adams at the
University of Illinois.
He is noted for his studies of
isotopically labeled metabolic
substances. Because of his work
with tritium, he was awarded the
first sample of highly radioactive
Carbon 14 released by the
Manhattan Project (atomic
energy) for biological
investigations. The sample was
JAB.
JB
DR. SAMUEL GURIN
.. .biochemist

mam mS Rif r, I W m w-mk J
if mmm&mk
% v..
. Mb '*" -#ir

Beth Graves Marti Cox
KAO A 0 n
Selling at the Service booth from the Hub Selling at the library
MondayFriday 10am X pm
S I £ r \ v
pig I g

used to label acids and to study
their metabolism in whole
animals.
More recently, Dr. Gurins
research has been on the
chemical nature of blood plasma
lipoproteins (large molecules in
the blood which carry fatty
materials).
Dr. Gurin served as dean of
the University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine from 1962
until his retirement last July. He
joined Pennsylvanias
Department of Biochemistry in
1937 and served as department
chairman from 1955 until his
appointment as dean.
Active in many professional
national committees and
councils concerned with
biochemistry and medicine, he
served on editorial boards of
Journal of Biological
Chemistry, Proceedings of
Experimental Biology and
Medicine and Metabolism.
Dr. Gurin is a native of New
York. He received his bachelors,
masters and Ph.D. degrees from
Columbia University and his
doctor of science degree from
LaSalle College.

ALIBI LOUNGE I
Entertainment 6 Nights A Week I
Richard Parker Trio Thurs.-Fri.-Sat. 1
Chuck Conlon guitar soloist- 1
Mon.-Tues.-Wed. f
( ROBBIES I
Best In
Meal QBSandwiohe a
[COLOR TV & BILLIARDS
EL7IB W. University Ave.
I On The Gold Coast'
, '* ~\ it*-*. * **< > W**M:: C $
> V v -" v TV
t/.4 \ \
l&!r-v Mh£r*> vvriv^i
W..***v MBr # t9k
> i Jt
u-r**'
J>! ,'~U{£ ', -v?* '; # ;ji'V- ,i ;^J->-'' * v ,.-

Thursday, February 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, Ttw Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 6,1969

I impressions j
By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Columnist
In case you havent
heard and you probably
havent heard because you
probably dont care but just in
case you havent heard then this
column will tell you. In case you
have heard then you neednt
read any more just turn to the
editorial page and read
something about various things.
But before this column tells you
and informs you, thus enabling
you to say, Yes, I have heard,
this column wants to say
something first.
The supplement to the
Alligator The Campus
Thing tried to do several
things for you. First, it tried to
amuse you. Second, it tried to
be an outlet for students who
had something to say and no
place to get it published. This is
an extremely vital point there
are many students who write
poems, opinion or short
stories most of these students
dont think their efforts are very
good, so they never submit them
to the big-time publications.
Thus their efforts find their way
into trash cans, manila
envelopes, or old shoe boxes.
And there they remain, unseen
except by friends or family of
their author.
Now this column will tell you
what you haven't heard: The
Campus Thing will no longer be
published because the money it
cost to print it is now needed for
a 10 percent pay hike for
Student Publications personnel.
This news will bring joy to
many, yet 1 hope it will be a
disappointment to some.
Now another point: this
column is sort of a bastard and
really has no home in the
Alligator. It doesn't appear on
the editorial page -it doesnt
appear on, the entertainment
pages it appears wherever
there is room for it. It is a
lonesome column, surrounded
by news stories, photos and ads.
But it is still a bastard.
Because it is a bastard it is
able to print most anything, so
Ive decided to put an occasional
poem in it poems which didnt
make the Thing because of its
death. And I will start with a
poem by a girl named Kenna
Murray. From time to time
youll see poems by different
people in this column, so dont
be surprised if the poem is just
there with no word of
introduction. Here is a poem by,
I repeat the name, Kenna
Murray:
I leave you now, before the
beginning of this
thing I cannot finish.
To touch you because I must
and pull away because I cant.
Your soul is naked in the gas
light of
the lamp
and your essence flows over
Papa
Hemingway
and into the bed where we sit
and
pick our nerves
with silver tweezers dipped in
akohol.
Your hand is cupped around
the fire
as my face draws down.
Smoke drifts up and I know
where it
I mi£ befdri \ fSlirn.

DROPOUTS
<
, WHAT'S ON THE
I MENU THIS WEEK. 1
l^p-
C 194* by United Fn*vra Syndknte. Inc. j

Funny bow big you can get and still You may even live in one of our telephone
remain virtually anonymous. company areas. We operate in &3 states.
Somehow we ve managed to do it. So here we are, 5 billion dollars strong,
WeYe a group of over 60 companies, growing all over the place, and looking for
making everything from microwave integrated engineers and scientists to grow with us.
circuits to color television. And we rank num- Why dont you think us over with your
ber 9in the top 500 corporations in the nation. Placement Director?
Pretty hot stuff for a nobody. Incidentally, we are known in the com com,
, com, But though you may not recognize our munications field as General Telephone &
name, maybe the name Sylvania rings a bell. Electronics.
Its one of our companies. Pssst. Pass it on.

Equal opportunity employer.
.

'
BLUBBER ...THREE
MEALS A PAYS
COFFEE BREAKS,
ANP MIPHISHT
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ZMr,
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BY HOWARD POST
TSwsssrAs, A \ji i 1,



DON QUIXOTE AND SANCHO (HIS SIDE-KICK)
... try to obtain a "magical" hat
SGP Series Plans
'Man Os La Mancha 9

Sunday at 8:15 p.m. Don
Quixote will live again in Florida
Gym. The smash-hit broadway
musical, Man of La Mancha, is
being presented as a part of the
SG Production Series.
Man of La Mancha is a play
within a play. Don Quixote, a
knight from La Mancha, is the
subject of a bode written by a
medieval rebel. The author,
Cervantes, is thrown into the
dungeon by the Inquisition
because of his book.
Through defending his book
to his inmates,, Cervantes leads
the audience in a wild, musical
adventure about a knight with
The Impossible Dream.
Don Quixote and Cervantes
are both wrapped up in the
person of David Atkinson, one
of Broadways most popular
leading men who won raves from
show-wise Broadway critics
when he played the role in
Gotham.
Co-starring with Mr. Atkinson
will be Miss Patricia Marand who
also appeared in New York
under the producing banner of
Albert W. Selden-Hal James.
Other popular players include
troupers such as Louis,
Criscuolo, Seymour Penzner,
Ronn Carroll, Mark Ross, Lynn
e DELICIOUS
STEAKS
FINE FOOD
?
student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

Carroll, Marise Counsell and
Edmond Varrato.
There is a rich score by Mitch
Leigh with lyrics by Joe Darion
and includes such a popular song
as The Impossible Dream
which has become an American
classic. Other musical hits
include, Dulcinea, Aldonza,
What Does He Want of Me,
and Its All The Same, all
conducted by Robert Brandzel.
The exciting choreography is
by Jack Cole with scenery and
lighting by Howard Bay. Bay
and Patton Campbell are
responsible for the costumes.
The book and musical staging
are by Albert Marre.
The Man Os La Mancha
tour is under the direction of the
National Performing Arts.
Tickets are now on sale at the
Reitz Union Box Office.

I J-Boy I
Sig Sandwich I
I MBSs 'French Fries, Cole Slaw 1
I Regular SI.OO Value \
f 9?msw 13th St. & 1505 N.W. 13th St.M
m Mr

HIGHLY-PRAISED FILMS TO BE SHOWN
Seven-Day Film Festival
Planned By Plaza Theatre

The Plaza II Twin Theatre is planning a Film
Festival of seven films to begin Friday. According to
the theatre manager, the festival is being shown at
this time because students need a mid-quarter break.
Although regular admission prices will be charged
during the festival, the special student prices (25
cents off) available every day will still be good.
Released by Cinema V, the films share no
common link except the unusual praise they
have garnered from critics and numerous festival
awards. Ranging from Morgan considered by
some a forerunner of The Graduate, all the way
to The Endless Summer Bruce Browns highly
enjoyable and critically acclaimed documentary
about two surfers search around the World for the
perfect wave.

Motor Company
wants to talk with
JL^ctLvJL ULci I*JLJL Ijfr CJL JL
February 13-141969
Become a part of the better idea company in the following fields:
Design Engineering Manufacturing Engineering
Design implementationpackagingcost manu- Process engineeringplant layouttool design designfacturing
facturing designfacturing feasibilityvendor consulting. material handlingindustrial engineering.
Development Engineering Plant Engineering
Vehicle systems and component development Maintenance control and schedulingequipment
engineering evaluation. installationstructural changesutility services.
Test Engineering n itw r
Program, facilities, and methods development uuawy
vehicle systems and component testing. In-process inspection and material testing-sup testing-supplier
plier testing-supplier quality controlmachine capabilityproduct
Technical Computer testing.
Systems Engineering p . r
Hardware/software developmentsystems appli- rroOUCtlon OOntrOl
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Research Engineering supplies and production materials.
Applied engineeringhuman factorsvehicle, sys systems,
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Positions for the following disciplines:
M.E., E.E., 1.E., Ch.E., Met.E., Cer.E., Comp. Sci., Math, 1.M., either B.S. or M.S.
Register with your placement office for a personal interview.
We are an equal opportunity employer.

Thursday, February 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Nothing But A Man has been adding new
admirers with each showing. The comedy classic,
Im All Right Jack, Losey & Pinters Accident,
the Canadian Film Boards fine Nobody Waved
Goodbye and Elvira Madigan, new precedents
for sights and sound will also be shown.
FILM FESTIVAL SCHEDULE
Friday lm All Right Jack
Saturday Endless Summer
Sunday Morgan
Monday Elvira Madigan
Tuesday Nobody Waved Goodbye
Wednesday Nothing But A Man
Thursday Accident

Page 13



i. The Florida Alligator. Tliursday, February 6.1969

Page 14

Jourdan s Form: Kick. Tuck And Koll

v j-x " * V..

' Mu'
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AT NFL INJURY WORKSHOP
Gator Docs Tell Whats Up

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
The UF has a good chance of
becoming recipient of private
grants for research in the field of
sports medicine.
University physician Dr.
Ewen Clark and Chief of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center
Orthopedic division Dr. Bill
Enneking will depart for the
National Football League's
Injury Symposium Thursday in
St. Louis to present a years
worth of findings on athletic
knee injuries to a select group of
doctors, therapists and trainers
associated with professional
football.
There is a good chance that
private concerns will become

iM*
Where burger | 11 I I I I I Fjfl
eating cant be 1 II IJB I 1 I IB / assortment.
Giant Burger pf^H
Giant Cheese Vi \>l
Deluxe Burger p
Burger "~
|p Coupon 1 \F JmimmflM \
4c off on Giant Burger |j j9kAS ?|* §
|| Jack's Hamburger, Inc. 11 | | |
1515 S. W. 13th JBII BHPBS \lj| S// J/ i
Gainesville, Fla. | | I Jtf I Vs |
, Only one per customer Thur. only j j \ \g\ J LmmmJmmmmmJ VwA. S.ty
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RON JOURDAN SHOWS WHY HE'S BEST
.. .it's all a matter of trajectory

intrigued with the study, says
university physician G.O.
Thomasson. We hope to get a
few grants to continue our
research in this wide open field
of athletic medicine.
Thomasson and Clark are
both caretakers of hobbling
Gator athletes.
The pros are very interested
in our study because of the
rising number of injuries in their
league. In the pros, an injury is
costly in more ways that one,
said Thomasson, who considers
athletic injuries his specialty.
In Europe, sports medicine
has been considered a separate
specialty. And in a few years it
may be in the U.S. too. Up til
now, its been more of a
sideline.

Also speaking at the
workshop with a Baltimore Colt
Head Coach Don Shula. His
topic: Relation of Pro Coaching
to Team Injuries.
New York Jet head physician
Dr. James A. Nicholas will
review professional football
injuries in relation to position
played.
It should be a very
informational meeting, says
Clark. We hope to come back
with some new ideas to apply on
our athletic teams.
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The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Sports Editor
sales A services TV
(Uiti M'Clui)
% wig salon J
\ 1013 w. university ave. J
(jk 2 blocks from campus
72-11 69



Its No Bull: Williams No. 1 In Nation

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
The Baby Bull is Number
One!
Coach Bill Harlans swim
team got word Wednesday that
freestyler Bruce Williams, a
sophomore from Eustis, is
currently rated the number one
swimmer in the country in the
200-yard freestyle with his
clocking of 1:45.4.
I trained heavily this
summer, says the muscular
tanker Actually, Im
surprised by my progress. Im
about two months ahead of the
schedule time-wise that Id
anticipated.
This is the first time a
Florida swimmer has ever been
ranked number one in the
nation, says Harlan. Williams
is having a great year and I hope
he can keep it up.
Im looking forward to the
NCAA championships in late
March, says Williams whos
been given the nickname Baby
Bull by his teammates. I am
real encouraged by this. Im

The Insur-Mount-able Task
FacesPlayboysGridProphet

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
In August of 1968, one of the
UF Gators were billed as the No.
3 football team in the nation by
one of the pre-season predictors.
Head Coach Ray Graves was
concerned. In fact, he insisted
that the Gators were ranked too
high. But in Gatorland, plans
were underway for proclaiming
that Were No. 1.
Anson Mount, Playboy
Magazine Public Affairs
Director, was responsible for this
consternation as well as joy. He
predicted that UF would finish
third in the nation, and, coming
from the No. 1 pigskin previewer
in the country, this meant
something.
Mount, the 43-year old
director of the leading magazine
for men, was rated No. 1 for the
last three seasons by the Wyatt
Survey, an independent study of
the nations grid forecasters.
My system of predicting
involves very complicated
research, Mount said. You
dont have to know anything
about football, you have just got
to be a good writer, then you
can be an expert on anything.
Anyone who has avid
appetite for football and follows
every little angle knows more
about the sport than he does,
the youthful looking executive
maintains.
We have a formula we use,
but the most decisive items, it
probably accounts for 50 per
cent of the success of a team, are
intangibles, Mount siad. I
mean things like luck, weather,
injuries and psychology.
The formula also includes
material quality, such as speed,
depth, size, quickness, coaching
and the schedule.
I have a very serious interest
in this, but the rating is very
subjective. It has to be because
my determining factors depend
on what coaches and sports
publicity men tell me about
their teams as well as other
teams.

convinced I can do well out
there.
The NCAA championships
are scheduled for March 27-29 at
the University of Indiana.
But Williams and the Gator
team are not looking past this
Saturday when they will face
Florida State in Tallahassee.
Harlan and Bim Suits of
Florida State wont have to
worry about getting their
mermen up for the meet.
The Seminoles hold a 9-17-1
over the Gators but Florida has
claimed victories in the last three
outings. The two schools met
earlier this year as the Gators
won the last relay to claim a
63&49V£ victory.
Both schools warmed up for
the meet by swimming North
Carolina and North Carolina
State last weekend. The Gators
won both meets while the
Seminoles beat the Tarheels but
dropped a narrow decision to
nationally ranked State. The UF
is currently 5-0 on the season.
Florida State is improving
every day, says Harlan. They
have excellent overall depth and

Mount, a graduate of
Suwanee University in
Tennessee, explained why he
ranked the Gators and what he
thinks contributed to the
non-spectacular performance.
Florida had what should
have been an a good sophomore
passer (Jackie Eckdahl), the best
fullback in the country (Larry
Smith) and a favorable
schedule, Mount said. But
then one of those intangibles
entered in Air Force gave them
a tough fight and North Carolina
played great in the rain.
That cloudburst in Raleigh
had to be a humiliating
experience, according to Mount.
Then Smith was injured and
morale suffered because of these
breaks.
Some people maintain that a
winning tradition is
but you have a winning tradition
after just one game, Mount
said. Look] at Indiana, they
now have a winning tradition, or
Alabama, 15 years ago they
didnt know what winning was.
Mount calls Graves a great
coach, who had some excellent
material to work with this
season. But he adds that when

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McKEE RANKED FOURTH

M I Im k
fj

we will have to have an extreme
effort by our boys if we expect
to win. Any way you look at it,
it will be a great one for
swimming fans.
Sophomore Mark McKee has
been swimming at a record
setting pace. He is listed fourth
in the 200-yard breaststroke
with a time of 2:16.8. In the last

the breaks dont come morale
goes down.
The process Mount employs
which also includes his
All-American selections involves
the collection of information
through the answers to
questionnaires sent to the
coaches, digesting of this
material and a series of phone
calls to coaches.
This all takes about two
months. The final stage is the
writing which takes about
one-two weeks.
With all his recognition as the
leading prognosticator comes
some trouble. Mount is often
called and asked his opinion on
an upcoming game which he
readily gives.
I never bet on games, but if
someone asks my advice I give it.
The Pigskin Preview does
not come from a sports activist,
in fact Mount does not like
physical exercise for
entertainment. His physical
activity involves mowing the
lawn, doing home repairs or
building fences, but he
nevertheless considers himself a
physical person. He would rather
watch.

meet with the Seminoles he
captured two firsts and led the
Gator freestyle relay team to
record setting 3:13.5
The 400-yard freestyle relay
team of Williams, McKee, Hank
Hough and Andy McPherson are
currently ranked sixth in the
nation.
The Seminoles will have the

Jt§S. iM
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MITRE %
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Or write for more information: Mr. L.J. Glinos, College RelationeCwngiw Si
nator. The MITRE Corporation. 4000 Middlesex Turnpike. Bedford. Mass.

Thursday, February 6,1969, The Florida AMgrtor,

edge on the Gators in diving
with Phil Boggs. He captured
both the one and three meter
diving events in the first week
Harlan is counting on Tom
Peek and Skip Voves to put
pressure on Jetger in the short
freestyle races.
Another standout for the
Gators will be butterflyer Barry
Russo. The all-American senior
has been lowering his time each
week and should reach top form
this weekend.
The meet gets underway at
1:30 p.m. at the Seminoles Pool
in Tallahassee.
m ' " 1 11
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS

BALES-BERVICE BALES-BERVICEREP
REP BALES-BERVICEREP ADM
CRANE IMPORTS
SQgE.PutT.Av. m-UTO

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 6, 1969

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