Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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NICK ARROYO
BUT OFFICER, I DIDNI SEE IT
University Police should be taking a dim view of drivers exceeding
the speed limit in the Flavet area of UF's married housing. Anyone
who can't read this sign should have his eyes checked or replaced.
Panel Looks At
Power Structure

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Accent 69 moved into its
second day of exploration and
talk Tuesday with a panel forum
on the distribution of power
within the state university
system.
Speaking at the afternoon
session on the Plaza of the
Americas were moderator Skip
Livingston, 7AS, president of Pi
Sigma Alpha political science
honorary, and Dr. Sidney
Jourard, professor o"
psychology.
Also participating were Dr.
Corbin Carnell, associate
professor of comprehensive
English; Robert Young, 4LW
and Student Government
Ombusdman; Arts and Sciences
Dean Harry Sisler, and Steve
Hull, managing editor of the
University Report.
Livingston opened the
meeting with a summary of the
complaints most often lodged
against the University in terms
of power structure.
t Good teaching is a lost art.
Instructors advance in the
university through research and
writing rather than instructional
quality.
9 The present curriculum is
not relevant to todays society,
particularly in the social
sciences.
9 Persons outside of
education run the university;
they make decisions for, and not
with, the university.
9 Instructors hide the values
they hold from view of the
classroom.
9 Universities are conveyor
belts turning out technicians
rather than educated students.
Commenting on the first
complaint, Sisler said that the
responsibility for good or bad
teaching rests primarily within
the individual instructor.
Every university strives to
give its students a liberal
education, Sisler said. A
liberal education emphasizes to
the student the idea of
alternatives.

Every instructor is aware of
what a good teacher is. Whether
the instructor takes the advice is
up to him. No dean or other
group of faculty members can
change the makeup of a person.
On the second problem,
Young agreed that research
outside of the classroom had too
much influence o n
advancement, but he contended
(SEE 'ACCENT', PAGE 2)

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A 7:30 8:30 p.m. Anson Mount
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j| #\V* v\s 111 f 8:30 9:30 p.m. Louis Harris (keynote speech) ji
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l| IQ Q 9:30 -10 p.m. Questions |
| f! J\ f 10-11 p.m. Reception |j
.// Reitz Union Rooms 122-123 |
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. jMSfeL '^ T 7 Vw 'Xk/fy
ffrirrTS^ffy ~
. $ ? *zjMt: *-* WEDNESDAY'S ACCENT PANEL AFFECTED EVERYONE DIFFERENTLY TOM KENNEDY
... Dr. Manning Dauer, political science department head engrossed in Tuesday's forum on the Plaza.

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

l ot 61. Xo. 76

GETS PROPER LICENSE
Rathskeller Shakes Off
Threats Os Shutdown

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Governments
problem child, UFs Faculty
Club Rathskeller, Tuesday was
given its final birthright.
Rathskeller now operates
with full sanction of the State
Beverage Department, after
being shrouded in threats of
illegitimacy since its debut Jan.
16.
Previously operating with a
beer only, for consumption on
the premises (1-COP) license
since its opening, Rathskeller
obtained an 11-C club license
from the beverage department
Tuesday afternoon.
The 1-COP license was
initially thought adequate by
Rathskeller planners, but the
beer halls attorney, David West,
explained that Gainesville City
Atty. Osee Fagan objected to it
because it possibly violated city
zoning ordinances.
City zoning laws say that no
establishment serving alcoholic
beverages can be located within
400 feet of a school.
In a meeting Tuesday, West
said state beverage officials and

University of llorida, Gainesville

University System Chancellor
Robert B. Mautz concluded
Rathskeller was operating
lawfully under the 1-COP
license.
However, since Fagan felt
strongly that zoning laws would
prohibit operation under this
license. West said,. I agreed to
avoid a court fight and purchase
the more expensive license.
West explained that
Rathskeller initially applied for
an 11-C license last May, but
because the Board of Regents
approved beer only the
beverage department said it was
a lawful license.
The 11-C license under
normal circumstances would
allow serving hard liquor, but
under a separate agreement
between UF and the regents
only beer will be served.
Two points were raised by
the regents concerning the
conflict with city law:
9 Did zoning laws apply
since Rathskeller was operating
as a club?
9 Could the city enforce the
laws since Rathskeller was on
state property?

Wednesday, February 5,

j||j 9
STILL FLOWING
... beer taps remain open
According to a State Supreme
Court decision the 400 feet
zoning ordinance does not apply
to private clubs.
West cleared up a controversy
about the Faculty Clubs
incorporation referred to in an
article in Tuesdays Gainesville
Sun.
The article said the Faculty
Club, of which Rathskeller is a
part, was just chartered in
December, which meant it could
not get a license for two years
under the law.
West said the club was
incorporated in the early 1950s
and recorded in Alachua County
circuit court then.
But because a new statute
called for all non-profit
organization charters to be
recorded by the State Secretary
of State, they filed a charter for a
UF Faculty Club, Inc.
This led to confusion over the
possibility of two clubs.
We were just complying
with the new statutes, he said.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 5,1969

UF To Implement
Pass-Fail System

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Franklin A. Doty, who
introduced the recently
approved undergraduate pass-fail
grading system, Monday
expressed hopes that students
will use the opportunity to
experiment in courses outside
their major.
The satisfactory satisfactoryunsatisfactory
unsatisfactory satisfactoryunsatisfactory grading system
was passed by the university
senate last week and will go into
effect next September.
My only reservation is that
first quarter freshmen should be
exempted from the new
system, Doty said. The original
proposal did exempt them but
the clause was dropped before
the proposal was approved.
Doty admitted that under the
system a number of students
would take advantage of the
system by just doing a minimum
amount of work.
Under this system, an
undergraduate student will have
an option to take courses
outside his major field without
worrying how the grade will
effect his average.

PA6E ONE
that the problem exists because
of external pressure on the
university.
I feel that the power
structure of this, and other state
universities is split between the
pro-research and the pro-service
factions, Young said.
On the relevancy of the
university curriculum, apathy of
students was listed as the most
important reason why changes
are not instituted.
Students get disinterested in
the legalistic aspects of
education, Carnell said. Once
the direct confrontation is over,
the student backs away.
To shout for change is one
thing, but to direct how the
change will come about is
beyond the scope of the
student.
There is no better example
of this than the' Action
Conference. Here, the students
have the poorest record of
attendance, yet the Action
Conference is the best
instrument for change this
university has ever seen.
The apparent control of the
university by persons outside of
educatio was strongly criticized
by Hull.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before ne>. t insertion.

Accent Forum Views University Power

The Cu rriculum Committee,
headed by Dr. Roy L. Lassiter,
associate dean of Academic
Affairs, developed the system
incorporating features of three
different proposals.
Doty, dean of University
College, the Action Conference
and the Council of Deans
submitted the proposals.
Under the provisions of the
new system, there is no penalty
for earning a failing grade. The
proposal submitted by Doty
suggested a failing grade be
recorded as an E.
The other proposals also
suggested that a student be
restricted in the number of total
hours he could take under the
system, as well as a restriction of
only one course per quarter.
The resolution passed by the
university senate set a limit of
one S-U course per quarter.
First quarter freshmen will be
allowed to take S-U courses,
although several of the other
proposals limited the program to
second quarter freshmen and
higher.
There will be no minimum
grade point average required.
The only stipulation is that a
student not be on probation.

OConnell has been in
policits most of his life, and only
now is he beginning to find out
that what students want
counts, he said.
OConnell used to call me
into his office when I was editor
of the Alligator and present me
with a list of what he didnt like
in the paper. He said I was
wrong to be criticizing so many
things.
He would point out to the
campus and tell me to look at all
the new buildings, and write
about them instead. To me, this
was the action of a man who was
looking only at the surface of
education, not the part that
counts.
Hull went on to point out
that students are actually the
persons closest to the problems
of education.
OConnell says; we shouldnt
complain, Hull said. There
seems to be the motion that
with age comes experience and
wisdom, regardless of the subject
matter. In this case, it is the
students that are closest to the
problem.
Speaking in reply to the
charge that instructors hide their
own feelings inside themselves,
Jourard explained that the role
of the university was to open

fl b
DEAN FRANK DOTY
... high hopes for pass-fail
The course must be a free
elective, a course clearly
designated an elective in the
students curriculum.
In the case where a student
has changed majors and wants to
use the S-U course as a
requirement, the final decision
will be made by the college in
question.
When a grade of satisfactory
is earned, appropriate credit for
the course will be entered on the
students permanent record, but
no grade points will be attached
to the grade.
The College of Physical
Education and Health was
exempted from the new grading
system at the request of Wayne
T. Sandefur, chairman of the
colleges curriculum department.

doors for students, rather than
drilling them with opinions.
I look on the university as a
place for pre-professional
training, Jourard said. The
role of the instructor is to open
as many doors as possible to the
student. Whether personal
opinion is a valid part of
awareness is doubtful.
Several members of the group
offered alternatives to the
present power structure. Among
them was Hull, who proposed
both student unions and a
super-government to better
represent the needs of students.
At the Action Conference,

WHATS HAPPENING AT
DUBS
5-9p.m. 11 (£
9p.m. to 2a.m.
No cover for
unescorted
ladies

The Younger Men thru Feb. 15th
SPECIAL EVENTS
Mini-skirt contest every Thursdsy
JAW SESSION FRIDAY 5-7 WITH THE YOUNGER MEN
NO COVER FOR JAM SESSION

Campus To Get
Traffic Signals
By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Students walking or driving to classes will have an easier time
crossing North-South Drive, Radio Road, and Stadium Road when
three traffic signals are installed on the UF campus.
The program was proposed about two months ago and the signals
will be the first to be installed on campus.
Operation is expected within the next few months.
Audie Shuler, Chief of University Police, waid the three-way traffic
lights will serve three intersections where there is a heavy influx of
cars entering and leaving the campus.
Heaviest concentration of traffic is at the intersection of Newell
Drive and Radio Road which is the main thoroughfare between the
campus and the J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
The lights are the three-way type and will not include an advance
green turn arrow, Shuler said.
Officers direct traffic at these intersections when we have them
available, he said.
The peak times of traffic are 8 a.m., noon, 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. It
might be necessary for officers to direct traffic at peak times even
after the lights are installed and to operate them manually, Suler
said.
Shuler expressed hope lights will cut down on the number of
accidents in these areas.
Plans call for the lights to alternate colors until 10 or 11 at night. It
might be feasible then, for the lights to be set to blink red on one
direction and amber on the other, Shuler said.
This plan will have to be evaluated after the lights have been in
operation awhile, he said.
There are flashing red stop signs at the intersections now and
Shuler said he would plan for these to be inoperative while the traffic
signals are working. The stop signs could be operated when the traffic
signals were not in operation.
He plans to look and evaluate other areas where these stop signs
could be installed to relieve other traffic problems around campus.

there was supposedly an equal
representation of faculty,
students, and administrators.
Why cant the university be run
on this kind of basis all the
time?
With a single
super-government, there would
be eliminated the present veto
powers over student government
which makes that body
powerless.
On the ability of students to
communicate directly with
administrators, Sisler said that
his office has been
experimenting with an open
door policy.

One day a week, I leave my
door open to any student who
cares to come in, Sisler said.
At first, it seemed that it was
going to receive no response, but
lately, Ive been encouraged by
the results.
The concept of separate
student and faculty governments
was also criticized by Carnell.
When you separate students
into their own little caucuses
and governments, you are
automatically polarizing them
from the big, bad
administration. If we intend to
work together, we cant keep
each other in the dark.



Poll Predicts
Little Change
Under Nixon
By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
The next four years under
Richard Milhouse Nixon will not
be dynamic, probably a
continuation of the Johnson
programs. That seems to be the
consensus of a small random
survey taken by the Alligator
Tuesday on campus.
Most hesitated to make a
final decision because they
thought it was too soon after
Nixons inauguration.
I think we should give him a
chance, was a common remark.
Ask me four years from
now, Elba Casgrillo, lUC said.
Two out of the 21
interviewed saw an
administration almost like
Eisenhowers.
Well come to a standstill,
instead of going backwards, Les
Thomas, SAR said.
Descriptions of Nixon were
mixed: Ultra conservative,
Good man, sincere, nice
vice-president, mediocre, and
Nixon Who? were typical.
The common man elected
him, he wont have to bow to
special interests like Johnson
did, Kenneth Stevens, 4ED said.
Hell try to stick to his
promises of law and order and a
draft change, he added.
I dont like him but hell
bring law and order. Agnew beat
the hell out of demonstrators
and Nixon will take the same
attitude, Richard Frank, 4AR
said.
Most thought Nixon wouldnt
be able to push through his
voluntary draft law whether
through opposition from
Congress, or because he is just
talking.
Another thought the draft
proposal would have to go
through because public opinion
was high in its favor.
He has good motives, but
the odds in Congress are against
him, Terry Watterson, lUC
said.
Nixon has made some good
appointments, and he will
probably follow up Johnsons
programs, Robert Skelly, art
instructor said.
But I dont think he is his
own man, he is just an image,
he added.

ALL POLAROIDS
WILL BE
*
SOLD
fliUNufr 1232 WEST
UNIVERSITY AVE.

I j "M Ur I
STEVE ZACK ADDRESSES THE GUESTS
... dinner held in honor of foreign students.
Fla. State Museum
Key Official Retires

By ALAN JACOBSON
Alligator Correspondent
Niles Schaffer, who has
served the Florida State Museum
for more than a quarter of a
century, will retire this month.
A 27-year veteran with the
Museum, Schaffer worked as
housekeeper, acting director
and chief preparator, his
current position.
I had promised my parents
to quit while there was still time
to do things I enjoy, he
explained. Ive watched too
many men exhaust their reserve,
and die shortly after
retirement.
Schaffer, 67, will not be
leaving museums. He will
continue as chairman of the
Grand Lodge Masonic Museum
in Jacksonville.
Museums are not Schaffers
only interest. He is a chef,
photographer and landlord. He
still does his own cooking,
including fresh bread and
handles all repairs on his home
and on other properties he owns.
His spare time interests
include photography for
historical records, much of it
published in archaeology
magazines, and jEm exhibits at
the Jacksonville musetim. In one
year, he made 17 trips to aid in
the completion of that museum.
A resident of Gainesville,
Schaffer has lived here since
1925, when he left the hills of
West V-rginia. He intends to
keep his residence in Gainesville,

though his future plans include
more of everything, especially
travel.
He will be on hand for the
groundbreaking Feb. 22, of
Floridas new state museum,
located on the UF campus.
When the museum is completed
in 1970, he plans to compare it
to the makeshift quarters,
located in the Seagle Building on
University Avenue.
i;* : *** :,: : : *-*-* **:*:*:*:*:<*:*:*:*>;*:*:-
Discussion
: : : :
j: Louis Harris, nationally
: known pollster and Accent fj
> speaker, will hold a :
if previously unscheduled j:
if seminar discussion for :j:
j journalism and political :j:
if science students Thursday at :f:
j: 8 a.m. :j
f: The one-hour seminar will
j: be held in the Reitz Union if
j: Theater. Profs. H.G. Davis
f: and James L. Terhune from
: the College of Journalism will |:f
: moderate the discussion. $
*
v.vv.vv.

QBeCk Lindsey
PEWTER MUGS
with a Free Interlocking Monogram!
see-through glass bottom . /T> r*
a beautiful gift! tD C/
a $13.00 value
i
Quantity Discounts
Gainesville Shopping Center 1302 N. Main

International Week
Project Launched

International Week was
previewed Monday night at the
Delta Upsilon fraternity house.
The DU house entertained 13
students from all over the world
at a formal dinner with an
address by Interfraternity
President Steve Zack to set off a
new international-Greek
exchange program.
The dinner was given in
response to a project initiated by
Zack and Jose Sarasua, president
of the Council of International
Organizations.
The idea of the new program
is to have fraternities invite
international students to their
houses to promote
communication between the
Greeks and visiting foreign
students.
Its hard for the Greeks and
the foreign students to get to
know each other. Often the
foreign student is in this country
only a year during which time
they study and generally
associate with their former
national groups, Zack said.
Living in Gainesville we
often forget there is an outside
world, Zack said.
We want these foreign
students to know they are
welcome to any of the Greek
houses. Just drop in and visit
anytime, he said.
DU President, Henry Adorno,
presented the official guests and
led the DU brothers in the song,
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
Cars, T rucks, 4-whed I
drive.
No. 1 in Japan 8
Godding fir Clark I
Motors
1012 SOUTH Main St. 8
Open 8 A.M. 8 P.M. 1

Wednesday, February 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Hail Delta Upsilon, Eternal
Soul. Adorno termed song as
an international language a
way to communicate.
International week will be
held February 17-22.
On Feb. 18 all the Greek
houses will formally invite
foreign students to their houses
for dinner and an opportunity to
meet the brothers and to
interchange ideas between
different lands.
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Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 5, 1969

MfaaVaVfn rfo e fi uiiiri um.ti e reYjYtVYoVYtYjYY -*-*-* w
Honor Court Taos Three For Positions

Chancellor of the Honor Court, Pete Zinober,
announced the appointment of three new positions
Tuesday.
The position of vice-chancellor was given to
Elliot Zack, 4LW.
Currently president of the Honor Court, Zack
will vacate his post as chief defense counsel upon
assuming the vice-chancellorship.
Craig Lawrence, 3LW, will leave his position of
assistant chief defense counsel to assume Zacks
vacated position of chief defense counsel.
Lawrence is a graduate of FSU.

Pi Beta Phi Sorority
Colonizes; 19 Pledged

UF has a new sorority
Pi Beta Phi, one of the
nations oldest sororities,
colonized here Jan. 19, bringing
the number of sororities at UF
to 15.
The Florida Delta chapter,
the 113th in the nation, has 38
pledges and one active member,
a transfer from FSU. The girls
pledged in a special rush held the
weekend of Jan. 19. National
officers, local alumnae, and
sisters from chapters at Stetson,
Rollins and FSU rushed the girls.
Pi Phis pledge class has many
upperclassmen, which gives the
group the balance of a sorority
with both sisters and pledges.
Most of the girls are juniors. The
overall average of the pledge
class is 2.87.
Martha Pettry, an alumna
from Millikin University, is
currently Pi Phis graduate
counselor-a combination pledge
trainer and chapter president.
She will be assisted by the
pledge class officers, who will be
elected tonight.
At present, Pi Phi meets on
Wednesday nights in the Reitz
Union. Miss Pettry said
arrangements are being made for
the girls to get together between
meetings, since they only see
each other as a group once a
week.
Pi Phi is looking for land for a
permanent house, but definite
plans have not been made. By
next fall the sisters will be able
to live together, either in an
apartment complex or in an old
fraternity house.
LAV AUERS
10K Gold
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WE CARRY ALL
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Miss Pettry said other
sororities have been very helpful
in getting Pi Phi established.
They relaxed rush rules to allow
the new sorority to have its own
special rush, and several have
offered the use of their houses
for meetings.
The local alumnae group with
60 member, has been helping the
Pi Phis with their problems. As
Miss Pettry said, There are a lot
of Pi Phis around, just not many
in school,

Markets nobody
else knew were there
made Mustang and Thunderbird
a success.
Help wanted:
Does the growing
youth market offer
a new potential?
Situation: By 1972, 46% of the U.S. population will he
under the age of 25. If this is a new market with
substantial potential, should we base our product
concept on economy or performance characteristics ?
Consideration: The under 25 market poses some interesting
opportunities. For one, today 142% more young
people work toward advanced college degrees than
did the youth market of 10 years ago. That would
seem to indicate a need for a new car based on
economy of purchase and operation.
But, market affluence and the increasing number of
multiple car households could indicate that a
new vehicle should be developed around high style
and high performance.
Need the facts and your analysis of this
assignment for a meeting with management
next month. Thanks.
Want to work on a challenging assignment like this? company. See our representative when he visits your
A new member of the marketing team at Ford Motor campus. Or send a resume to Ford Motor Company
Company does. Today his job may involve probing for College Recruiting Department. The American Road'
new markets. Tomorrow it might be discovering a new Dearborn, Michigan 48121. An equal opportunity employer!
basis for segmented marketing.
To help solve problems like these, our people have a
giant network of computers at their service. Complete
research facilities. The funds they need to do the job right.
If you have better ideas to contribute, and you're look looking
ing looking for challenging assignments and the rewards that
come from solving them, come work for the Better Idea

The position of Clerk of the Honor Court,
vacated at the close of the fall quarter by Steve
Wood, will be filled by Barry Malter.
Malter, 4AS, is presently personnel director of
Accent. Makers term of office will run through
spring elections.
On Jan. 30, Honor Court heard the following
three cases.
Linda M. Hilsenrad, Doris A. Hachmuth and
Judith Ann Knight pleaded guilty to the charge of
stealing. They received a penalty of three quarter
hours and will be placed on Honor Court probation
for one quarter.

Pi Phi will be rushing girls
throughout winter quarter and
will be pledging at the beginning
of spring quarter.
sales & services sP)
( M'Ok)
wig salon JJ
1013 w. university ave. V
CA. 2 blocks from campus
C- 3 72- 118

Pedro P. Cabrera, Jr. pleaded guilty to the charge
of cheating and received Honor Court probation for
the remainder of his attendence at UF. Cabrera also
has to write an essay concerning his obligation as a
student under the honor system.
Roy Harold Deloach, pleaded guilty to the
charge of cheating and received five penalty hours
and one quarter of Honor Court probation.

WEDNESDAY SEAFOOD SPECIAL
11 AM 9 PM
BLUE WATER
CLAM DINNER
Served with
FRENCH L
COLE SLAW C
ROLL & BUTTER T
1225 W. UNIV. AVE.

, ZINOBER
L



'La Mancha Seats
Still Available
About 250 seats at the back
of the main floor of the Gym
have opened for the
performance of Man Os La
Mancha Sunday February 9, at
8:15. Tickets will be sold at the
Reitz Union box office. They
are $2.25 for the general public,
faculty and staff and $1.75 for
students. Tickets are also
available in the bleachers.

FOR MONDAY
PE Hearing Rescheduled
By Special Senate Board

The special Student Senate
committee on physical
education rescheduled its open
hearing on mandatory, pass-fail
PE to next Monday.
Chairman Joyce Miller was
informed by Physical Education
Dean D.K. Stanley this weekend
that the faculty generally
approved of the three specific

New VISTA Program
To Enlist Lawyers
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Is it possible for UF law school graduates to become circuit rider
lawyers, to dispense legal aid to Indians by riding horseback between
far-flung Montana villages?
VISTA lawyers can do just that. A recruiter from the domestic
Peace Corps is on campus this week to tell senior law students of
such opportunities in VISTA.
Richard P. Doyle, general counsel for VISTA, said the corps
started recruiting lawyers about two years ago, as part of a drive to
enlist graduate school alumni in the volunteer program.
Lawyers in VISTA work in legal aid societies around the country,
providing assistance in such projects as housing grants and medical
facilities for the poor.
The 210 lawyers now working in VISTA are scattered in such
diverse areas as Navaho Indian reservations in Arizona, slums of San
Francisco and the Bedford-Stuyvestant section of New York.
At UFs law school, response to the program has been enthusiastic;
We ran out of applications, Doyle said.
It is hoped there will be 600 lawyers working for VISTA by next
fall.
VISTA, a program designed to help poor people help themselves,
was a plank in President Lyndon Johnsons War on Poverty.
The volunteers, who serve in a 6-weeks training period and then a
1-year term, receive living allowances but no salary.
About a third re-enlist for an additional term, while many others
eventually pursue careers in the social sciences.
Recruitment in law schools is part of a campaign to upgrade
VISTA with graduate school volunteers who practice their profession
in the program.
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recommendations her committee
had adopted.
Those recommendations
include: PE should remain
mandatory for freshmen and
sophomores for six quarters with
one credit given per quarter; PE
should be graded on a
satisfactory or
unsatisfactory basis; and
students should be advised prior

to registration as to what sport is
offered so that scheduling will
be easier.
Before we officially submit
these proposals, Miss Miller
said, we want all students to
get a chance to be heard so that
we feel we are representing their
feelings.
The main point of
difference now, is whether PE
should be given a letter grade or
whether it should be pass-fail.
We would like to hear how the
students feel on this.
Next Mondays meeting will
be held at 3:30 p.m. in the
conference area of the student
government complex on the
third floor of the Reitz Union.
MIAMI HERALD
Will have editorial and
advertising representatives on
the campus February 11 and
12, seeking summer interns
among juniors and permanent
employees among seniors. Dr.
Glenn Butler is arranging
appointments at School of
Communications.

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1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE UNIVERSITY PLAZA

BY HOWARD POST
f THE THEORY IS- IF WE |
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ACROSS FROM g-g f*<|*
UNIV. CITY BANK >fO 1, l i tyX

Wednesday, February 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 5, 1969

The Florida Alligator
"Th* price of freedom
;yy 'Ajfepj is the exercise of responsibility/'
Harold Aldrich
X/Hbl/ Editor-In-Chief
T?tU/ktfo/v Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez James Cook
./HiMMifAM. Executive Editor News Editor
Kwr

The American Dream

History Will Be Our Mortician

There seems to exist, within the race
of man at any given time, some group of
innocent people who popular wisdom
brands as monsters.
There are thousands of
conscientious, hard-working individuals
in American today who are disparaged
by every tongue, from the most to shc
least respected, in their society. They
are spied on, surveyed, penalized,
harassed, and degraded in every
conceivable way.
Abroad are millions more who, in
our names, are being kidnapped,
robbed, beaten, bombed, poisoned,
tortured, raped and killed.
These people are Communists. Their
continual persecution is being carried

out in the name of democracy.
Surprisingly enough, the terms
f communism and democracy are
not mutually exclusive but seem rather
to correspond.
The only thing that all of these
people have in common is an economic
philosophy. Otherwise they vary in
every sense from religion to race.
Every American citizen knows what
is happening to them, but most imagine
that there is some compelling reason
that the terrorism must continue.
Still there is no sane, intelligent man
alive in the United States today who is
not capable of realizing that the concept
known as The Communist Conspiracy
is a giant lie.

EDITORIAL
SG Study Needed

There has been considerable debate in
Student Government in recent weeks over
the upcoming referendum on the future of
Student Government.
Some politicos are said to favor reneging
on the promise to offer students an
opportunity to abolish SG if they find it
ineffective and unnecessary. The promise
was made by Student Body President Clyde
Taylor during his successful bid for the
presidency last year.
A majority of SG leaders, however,
apparently still advocate the referendum, the
main issue being when to hold it.
Some believe it should be at the same
time as the main election in April. Others
would hold it before this quarter ends, some
time this month.
We find the latter proposal superior. The
students should be allowed to voice their
opinion not only on the future of SG, but
also on the Honor System in an election
unfettered by the usual emotionalism which
accompanies a presidential election.
We suggest, therefore, that the Secretary
of Interior-designate Bill Modlin begin today
to make arrangements for a special
referendum election late this month.
Selection of what to put on the ballot,
though, should not be left to the discretion
of Taylor or the Student Senate. There are a

off Writings
Os Cabbages And Kings


Kathie Keim .***,!

Seen in the Daily News: a
Pennsylvania newspaper, the
Pottstown Mercury, has
announced it will underwrite the
entire military budget of the
tiny Principality of
Andorra all $5 of it.
The $5 will be used to
purchase ammunition to fire
ceremonial salutes on major
holidays and for visiting
dignitaries.
Its interesting to note that
even poor little Andorra is hit by
the rising tide of inflationa
few years ago, the annual
military and defense budget was
only $4.90.
*** *
The funny part of the above
news item is that a U.S.
Congressman raised the question
afterwards of whether a private
organization can underwrite the
military budget of any foreign
power, regardless of the size of
the country and its military
costs.
*****

The motive for the lie is essentially
the same as that behind the persecution
of Christians in Rome, heretics in Spain,
witches in England, and Jews in Russia
and Germany. It is our apology for
moral weakness and greed.
Its proponents, for the most part, do
not realize that it is a lie. Someone long
ago at its birth realized it and forgot.
Since then it has covered for opposition
to labor unions and foreign trade,
suspicion of immigrants, racism, distaste
for progressive legislation, desire for
influence over foreign resources, and
stifling of political dissent.
It has become a prima facie case
against any man, nation, or idea to
which it is applied.
It is a weakness that will kill us.

Another hot news tip is that
comedian Art Carney, who has
protrayed sewer worker Ed
Norton on the Jackie Gleason
Honeymooners show for 10
years, has turned down an
invitation to the dedication of a
sewage disposal treatment plant
in Chandler, Ariz.
According to Carneys
business manager, the invitation
was rejected because Carney
wants to dispel his association
with the sewerman image.
And the mayor had even
offered to engrave Carneys
name of all the manhole covers
in Chandler...
*****
In the weve-had-less-unusual
-places-to-park department, the
staff of the county prosecutor in
one particular Michigan county
ran out of office space before a
newly-appointed assistant
prosecutor could be
accommodated. He has a
temporary office in a
reconverted bathroom.

number of possible alternatives which could
be placed on the ballot, in addition to
complete abolition of SG as it presently
exists.
Discussion and selection of alternatives
which mipM help ameliorate many of the
problems SG presently faces such as
structural deficiencies, ineffective leadership
recruitment, unclear lines of authority and
responsibility should include as many
divergent views as possible.
We further suggest, therefore, that Taylor
appoint a five or seven-man commission to
study SGs problems and select two or three
possible alternatives to place on the
referendum ballot.
Hopefully, while encompassing a wide
range of opinion, the commission would not
also be bogged down by power-hungry
politicos more interested in furthering their
own ends than in suggesting realistic,
workable alternatives.
At the same time, appointees should be
knowledgeable of SG, its operations and its
shortcomings.
It is imperative, if Taylor is going to keep
his word and really give the student body an
opportunity to vote for meaningful change,
that the study commission be appointed and
get to work as soon as possible.
Like this week.

By Uncle Javerneck-

If, some day, the lie is re-discovered,
we can again become a great nation in
our own right. If it is not discovered in
time, we will die in the blinding light of
our own awful realization.
We will die as a people and as a
nation just as we are awakening from
the American Dream. AVe will die, our
prayers unsaid, our reconciliation
unmade.
We will be judged by our own
standards and executed by our own laws
with the weapons we helped to create.
History will be our mortician unable
and unwilling to save us from the foul
stench of our decay. Our victims will be
our pallbearers and in the whole endless
procession of man, there will be not a
single mourner.

The prosecutors office is now
busy partitioning a larger room
into several smaller offices.
Meanwhile, our poor assistant
prosecutor may not be the
worlds classiest prosecutor in
terms of office space, but he
should be one of the cleanest.
*** *
For those who wonder about
what our world is coming to,
theres another little tip that the
Pinellas County school system
flunked spelling.
Last Wednesday was repon
card day, and county school
students took home report cards
in folders reading, Pinallas
County Public Shools.
*** *
We wouldnt lie about all
this these stories are too
funny to make up. We just want
to show how funny life really
looks when its down in print.
Peace and read your daily
newspaper.



Speaking Out

The new law building was dedicated last
Saturday. Most will agree that the dedication
brought the largest assemblage of dignitaries to our
hallowed halls in some time.
It seemed to me that the leading state dignitaries
in this group were the living examples of why the
state of Florida can not compete on a national scale
in attracting educators to our schools.
They also symbolize the antiquated southern
reaction to popular reforms.
For these general reasons and for the specific
reason that the law school was being dedicated to
Sen. Holland, Mike Hittleman and I decided to
exercise our constitutional rights of free speech and
dissent.
We appeared at the dedication bearing placards
which we felt showed our feelings concerning the
issues.
At all times we conducted ourselves in an
appropriate manner, in no way discrediting the
university. In fact, our purpose was to show this
gathering of lawmakers and dignitaries that their
actions are being followed and that there is
disagreement with their general policies.

Students Must Halt
Drop of Youth Fare
MR. EDITOR:
I am a junior at the University of Houston and also one of several
hundred thousand college students who hold an Airline Youth Fare
Card.
I am writing you and many other college newspaper editors in the
hope that fellow students may be alerted through the editorial column
of their newspaper about the recent happenings concerning youth
fares. Several days ago a Civil Aeronautics Board examiner ruled that
youth fares should be dropped.
I dont think that many students know of this and I urge them to
rise to protect their youth fares. Most of us have limited budgets and
receive our spending money from part-time jobs. I urge every student
to contact the Civil Aeronautics Board, 1825 Connecticut Avenue,
N.W., Washington, D. C. 20009 and voice their protest against this
unfair decision against youth fares. It is important that this be done
within the next 30 days so that a new hearing will be set, otherwise
the ruling will automatically become law.
I am told that Western Union has a new opinion telegram and for
90 cents, which can be charged to a students telephone, als word
telegram could be sent from anywhere in the U.S. to your own
congressman, the President and Vice-President. If a student doesnt
have time to write his opinion, I recommend that he call his nearest
Western Union office and send the wire.
I hope that you will print the above letter in the editorial section
of your paper, since I feel students should be informed of this
injustice and that this issue is one that you are obligated to present to
your readers.
STEPHANIE SOUTHGATE

Non-Violence Doesnt Justify
The Means And Goals Os SSOC

MR. EDITOR:
In the hassle over whether to
grant recognition to the
Southern Student Organizing
Committee on the UF campus,
there will be those that will
swallow the non-violent tactics
bait without the first thought.
To believe that an organization
is morally and ethically justified
in its means and goals for no

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the Unhfersity of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Burine*, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1881, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opfaioiu expressed fa the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the ticle and not those of the Univcnitv of Florida."

Dissent At The Law Dedication

reason other than its
non-violence is to flirt with
anarchy.
The issue here is the
distinction between force and
violence force being what the
radical left practices, violence
what it incurs. An example:"
With the provision that you
cooperate, a man with a gun at
your head commits no violence,

The point I wish to bring up now concerns the
actions of the dignitaries toward Mike and
myself. It is encouraging to mention that the
majority of young people who came up to us were
sympathetic and understanding, even if not agreeing
with our views.
The alarming fact, however was the number of
prominent people (mainly elders but some students)
who could not accept our right to dissent.
On the positive side, many law students and
faculty expressed their agreement with our views.
One prominent northern educator commented that
he was glad to see some evidence of student power
on this campus.
These people understood our purpose, that of
showing there are responsible students who do
question existing policies and who do voice dissent
in a responsible manner.
To our disappointment we met with many
remarks as obnoxious, disgraceful, and
shameful. One state leader tried to associate us
with communism. Many attempted intimidation in
the forms of physical violence and not so subtle

OPEN FORUM:
Aiaiami ViAAut
There is no hops for the complacent m on."

Alligator Cant Be Trusted

MR. EDITOR:
Isnt it a pity that Alligator
staffers have not proven
themselves responsible enough
to be admitted to University
Senate proceedings! It must be
that you cant be trusted with
the Truth in university affairs.
Some reasons would become
evident if youd just step back
for a moment and take an
objective view of your
performance so far this year.
One neednt look through many
back issues to find damning
evidence of slanted stories,
colored facts, created issues,
false accusations, misquoted
statements, misinterpreted
problems, deliberate
insinuations, and unfair

yet in his act perpetrates a
crime.
If you retaliate to preserve
your rights, and in the process
disable your assailant, you have
initated violence but committed
no crime. To say that the
criminal was non-violent, but
that you were because you chose
self-defense against the exercise
of force, is misleading. You
cannot be condemned for the
use of force to protect your
rights and neither can the
criminal be justified in violating
them.
These are the tactics
practiced by the new left the
use of force to obstruct the
rights of others, and then the
moral indignation when their
victims move to guard freedom.
This is the reason for which
SSOC should not be chartered.
WAYNE MOORE, 2UC

innuendoes.
Well, perhaps thats how
Journalism majors learn how to
be news analysts, but why do
readers who are trying to be
intellectually honest have to be
the guinea pigs?
In the time-honored tradition
of student publications, the
Alligator is playing to the
galleries with sensationalism. Its
no wonder that you are ignored
by some and held in contempt
by so many others in the
university community. Can you
honestly believe that youve
been making a constructive
contribution here?
You have every reason to be
touchy about your status with
administrators, because you
know that their considered
assessment of your activities
often reflects a true picture of
your own maturity. Its just too
bad that you have to be on the
outside looking in, because it
can only give rise to further
suspicions and editorial
intensification of your typical
students persecution complex.

Rathskeller Laurels
MR. EDITOR:
It is almost impossible for anyone to achieve something truly
significant by himself. So it was with the Rathskeller. Had it not been
for the constant assistance and advice of the Rathskeller Committee,
the Rathskeller could not have become the reality it is. It is
unfortunate, however, that with such things, the laurels tend to rest
only with the chairman.
It is the purpose of this letter to express my deep and sincere
thanks to all the members of the Rathskeller Committee, and the
many others who have made the Rathskeller possible, I hope that I am
doing this not only for myself, but for the entire university
community (including The Outsider, after all, it gave him something
to gripe about).
I would like to thank, in particular: Joe & Elisabeth Mullen, Bob
Allison, Gary Schaffel, Rusty Skinner, Ed Olowin, Alan Vengle, Fran
Belous, Vicki Mandell, Eric Williams, Hardy Pickard, Kathy Spellman,
Cynthia Dauksch, and Paul Van Lengren.
JOE HILLIARD, 4AS

Wednesday, February 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

By Alan Jacobson

hints that we should not consider law as a
profession.
The most interesting event, at the same time
unfortunate and encouraging, took place as the
procession entered the law auditorium.
Mike and I were standing by the entrance
displaying our signs. Gov. Kirk and President
OConnell passed by and commented to us. On the
one hand, Gov. Kirk attempted to intimidate Mike
and in general exhibited a rather unreasonable
manner. President OConnell, on the other hand,
greeted us in a normal manner and in no way
showed any hostility toward us.
What I believe this points out, if only in a minor
way, is that President OConnell is a reasonable man
and can work with the students in ironing out
problems.
Gov. Kirk demonstrated the hostility of those in
the state government toward student rights. And it
could be that President OConnell is caught in a
squeeze between his own rationality and the static
and hassle created by those in political positions.

And then when they throw you
a bo no, youll think you
deserved it.
For example, youll probably
write headlines taking noicy
credit for a victory when, in due
process, they allow a reporter to
sit through routine Senate
meetings. Big deal!
Thinking objectively, now,
you shouldnt really be surprised
that the permanent cadre whose
responsibility it is to build and
maintain a durable institution
here is reluctant to commit its
policymaking to a somewhat
unseasoned group of transient
students with short-term goals
and little care for the
universitys future after wresting
that diploma from its
ivy-covered grasp.
I dont doubt that personally
each Alligator staffer has an
honest sense of mission, but it
surely is misdirected. Youll have
to change your attitude before
deserving sufficient respect to be
let into their confidence.
808 FALZONE, 6BA

Page 7



Page 8

l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Febniary 5,1968

*\.
' I mpi
STAG AND DRAG
Pants!! Pants!! Pants!! Thats
the In thing. And Pams outfit
is even more than that white
rayon and silk elephant leg.
Tunic top makes a very
sophisticated city slicker look.
1 MAAS BROTHERS /
1 More of the looks that make this /
' l the year for soft dressing. /
l Tunics, jackets, and vests are the /
1 fashion for Spring. Mara by /
I Romay gives us this ensemble /
l with its very own crepe blouse. I
- l Modeled by Linda. /

ACCENT
ON
SUSAN SCOTT I
Sweet and a wee-bit SASSY is I 4/
the impression youll leave I \/
behind when you play in the sun I fc y
wearing this Beach Party swim I V
suit. The white top is off-set by I
an apron skirt with aqua bikini I
pants and tie. Sizes 5-13. About
sl9. Modeled by Joyce. I
SBBi W
' '-v"jfe;
the university shop
For his kind of girl, completely
feminine. All cotton ruffles in
light blue and white. Modeled by
Sally.



* T*%^
\ TWIG
I SM A navy and white print
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/ill 1 features a rib-tickler top with
JUttfflA ) bell bottom pants. Modeled by
(SILVERMANS
A two piece outfit of silk
features a tunic dress which can
be worn as a cocktail dress, and
elephant leg pants which make it
an evening or hostess outfit. The
outfit comes in kelly green,
white with black circles. Note
that the belt buckle is the same
is in the pattern of the material.
Modeled by Carol.

\^par^' 'r^'^jk
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(COLONY SHOP
Byer of California designed this
wild psychedelic print swing
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l DONNIGAW S I
I For spring a delicate, pale, blue I
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PHOTOGRAPHY 8Y... QuA'
FASHION LA YOUT BY ...

Wednesday, February 5,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 9



* G ATOR CLASSIFIEDS

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White, 2600 miles. I no longer use it
enough. With helmet $125, Call
376-6558 after 6 p.m. George rm 5.
(A-st-75-p)

ALIBI LOUNGE
EVERY WEDNESDAY
DOUBLE FOR THE
PRICE OF SINGLES
3334 W. UNIV.
DOUBLE YOUR PLEASURE
ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW
Do your own thing
Bring your instrument and
Swin Along with
BOBBY GRIFFIN
of one during
hours
,; Jliillr
Hot Cold
Hors doeuvres
from our salad bar
\ \ /> /
N % \ / ,/ y
' '/:' -, ''
University Inn ttlotel
' ~*.' r A v-
S Everything Comfort Desiren
A* /.-/
j \
f t U S ROUTE 441 SOUTH
\ GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
Phone FRanklin 2-6333
Night Club A Lounge

FOR SALE |
> >.
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines,
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-75-p)
FOR a job well done feeling clean
carpets with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer. SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-76-C)
OLD PIANO upright $25. Also
light-weight hammocks, support 250
lbs only $6.99. Call 378-9144 after 5.
(Alt-76-P)
FLINT lock pistol S&W 22 MRF
pistol 357 Ruger 3V9 Scope 25-308
Mauser rifle franchi 12 ga 3 Mag &
extra barrel Rem XPIOO. Must sell.
372-7912. (A-st-76-P)
1967 Triumph TR6, 650 cc. Excell,
condition, only 5000 miles. Call Ken
Fowle at 372-9307 anytime and
make offer. Must sell immediately.
(A-2t-76-P)
1968 BMW R-69US 6 gal. Sport
Tank, locking gas cap, luggage rack.
Excellent condition. Call Pete Swan
372-9307. (A-2t-76-P)
4 FO R RENT 1
s
Desperate! 1 female roommate.
Landmark no. 169, 378-7782.
(B-7t-72-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apartment near campus.
Available now or for next quarter.
$ 180/quarter. 372-1036. (C-3t-74-p)

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 5 1969

Page 10

FOR RENT
j
Female roommate to sublet
Landmark apartment spring quarter.
Contact Judy after 7 oclock.
378-9489. (B-st-74-p)
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
apt. on Archer Road opposite Stengel
Field Airport. Married student couple
only. SSO per month for long-term
tenant. Water furnished. Phone
372-9903. (B-st-74-p)
SUBLET: One bedroom furnished
apartment at Tanglewood Manor.
Available February or March 1. You
may use' our security deposit. Call
376-1412 after 6 p.m. (B-st-72-p)
Quiet offices for the work-minded.
Plenty of parking. Walk to campus.
Computer Management Corporation.
Ph.: 378-1615. (B-st-73-c)
| wan~~l
Rmmte for 2 bdrm upstrs apt, 14
blks frm cmpus on SE 4th Ave.
Kinda run down but groovy for
parties. Call Harry Tea 378-4954,
378-8686. (C-st-75-p)
ROOMATE(S) wanted for immediate
occupancy two bedroom Village Park
Apts. Phone 372-7538 after six.
(C-2t-76-P)
Male roommate to share 2 bedroom
Gatortown apt. 42.50 per month plus
V* utilities. Call 376-2234 after 4:00
p.m. Feb. rent paid. (C-3t-75-p)
Female roommate for 2 bedroom 2
bath apt. with fireplace 50.00 for
own bedroom 25.00 to share if
desired. Call 378-2184 12:00 1:00
or evenings. (C-3t-75-p)
wwwww y u y .AWK
HELP WANTED 1
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between 8 5. (E-10t-71-c)
MAN OR WOMAN, 18-35 to manage
showroom in Miami International
Merchandise Mart. Start
Immediately. References desired. See
Bill Killeen at the Subterranean
Circus, 10 SW 7th St., Gainesville.
(E-2t-76-P)
.vc<'X3-x*x-x*x*x*x-x-x-x<-j>SZ^ox<*x-!£
| AUTOS |
3^<*X<*X<*X*XW< 19 59 Jaguar sedan, new tires,
battery, air-conditioned, overdrive,
state ins. $450 or best offer. Call
376-9554. (G-3t-76-P)
1965 Comet low mileage, V-8,
R&H, very clean, $895, call Larry at
378-5769, hurry! Uncle Sam calls.
(G-3t-75-p)
4-4-2 1966 metallic gray black top
r&h good tires clean interior
excellent condition, SIBOO. Call
372-5463. (G-st-73-p)
Hg
xAi%; Nitro was their \
weapon against
mr five blazing %
oil infernos! %
# JOHN WAYNE!
m KATHARINE ROSS /
that oiADUAiroiti m
r wi *. w.im s~\fmn
the \
'jjfljjl fixer
Based on the Pulitzer £
+ Prize winning novel
% by Bernard Malamud
**4au***
( Downtown Go ktsviMn |
7VXfl|VSUii|W
* How much
young man stand ?
Wmutfc


VOV4V4W.*.*-* v
AUTOS
S*X*XXV-:vX*X*X X'X*X X*XsX*X-!-X:X*X- vv
1966 VW (Sedan) excellent
condition! Custom steering wheel &
gear shift. Cream wAed imitation
leather upholstery. Radio. $1195.
Call 378-0850. (G-3t-76-P)
BUICK 1964 Skylark Wagon heater,
air, radio, new tires very clean $1045,
utility trailer 4x6 $45. Paintings
18x22 sls each. Linesman belt
372-7912. (G-st-76-P)
1965 Sunbeam Alpine tremendous
condition must sell for school
expenses best offer will get it. Call
372-7971 nights and all weekend.
(G-st-76-P)
1967 SS 350 Camaro $1950,
378r2105. (G-7t-72-p)
PERSONAL I
Need work on your car? Call Bill,
4EG, 12 yrs. experience. Very
reasonable rates. 372-4921 after 6
p.m. (J-3t-75-p)

iiKTilkUira BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
QlllSlli9SlK9 SHOW STARTS 7:00
EXCITING ENTERTAINMENT!
STARTS TODAY!
PLANET OF THE APES
f CUIVJ IS A BLOCKBUSTER.
d FASCINATING I
Q Liz Smith, Cosmopolitan
Ul IIIC u
Dolls; fa
i WWmmMMD # Ri 20TH CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS
1 CHARUON HESTON
W I ,n an ARTHUR P. JACOBS production
M 1 **..# la 7:00
f I pIANET :ls
20th CENTURY-FOX Presents I TRADES
showing 4 MARK Rflfffl I
DAVID WEMT PRODUCTION |
p^^^SP^jjsTARTS FRIDAY!
good grief its candy!
ond StLwr Picture Corp.prewnt
A Oration Manqwid Production
CfofeAznavouT'Marion Brardo-Rchard fkirton -James Cobum
John Huston Walter Matthau Ringo Starr rtrcdaig EwaAulin.
16 ** Candy Technicolor* CR :
Admitted Unless Accompanied
dJTZSi ** or Guardian
[hurry loti Two Days "BULLITT"|
BPE!BHSCBP
TODAY & THURS.
U^-.^"J=I. THE good, BAD AND UGLY __
and "HAND 'IM umu 1~1
FRIDA Right

|~ PERSONAL |
Im just back from Bogota, Colombia
with ruanas, capes, silver and emerald
jewelry, Indian decor pieces in
brilliant colors. Ruana colors are
magnificent! Eunice Renshaw, The
Spanish Main, 105 W. University Ave.
372-0667. (J-st-75-p)
BIRTHDAY party for ol drunken
Rose Sat. night, at 10 B Y O B and
one for Rose. Ginny and Lucys, 919
NW Bth Place. 376-2912. (J-3t-76-P)
POI' like mill fd puppy 1
sS^r



| GATOR CLASSIREDS J
| PERSONAL *1
CONGRATULATIONS new Delt
Brothers. Love, The Sisters.
(J-lt-76-P)
| LOST & FOUND |
$-:*:*:*x-x-:*:*x-x-x*Xv*x-v*x-:>x-v*v.v.v;';<&
FOUND: Girls prescription glasses
and case. Pick up in room 126
McCarty. (L-3t-75-nc)
LOST: one suede fringed Indian
jacket. Squaw unhappy! If found call
Deanna 392-9659. Reward: ten fish
(L-3t-74-p)
FOUND watch in Union Bolwing
Lanes. 378-0280. (L-3t-76-P)
Kappa Sigma fraternity pin lost
between Little Hall and Rawlings.
$25 reward for its return. Call Bert
Develle 376-9198. (L-4t-76-P)
SERVICES |
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-st-72-p)
Your problems are all solved. OM is
finally on campus. OM will answer
any problems &/or troubleshoot. Call
372-5457 or 372-1360 or 376-1587
(M-st-73-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want your child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyn's Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center, 5240 NW Bth Ave., ph.
372-6667 ir 376-6495. (M-st-66-p)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
My office is small, my business is
new. Parking is terrible but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next eye
glasses at University Opticians,
516 SW Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-C)

ix*w*Nrw

jo wfr..
L i?&mn mm.
|||L fe; .mm %WMMTiSMMiW \

SPACE AGE PURCHASE OKD BY REGENTS
UF Gets $68,000 Electron Scope

Research at the UF received a
healthy boost Monday when the
Board of Regents authorized the
purchase of a $68,000 scanning
electron microscope.
The instrument, with the
power to magnify a direct image
100,000 times, will bolster
research in all areas from
engineering to medicine.
Although approved for the
Department of Metallurgical and
Materials Engineering, Dr. F.N.
Rhines, department chairman,
said it will be made available to
all researchers.
It particularly will enhance

Undergrads Slated
For Grad Chem Study

Undergraduate students are
slated for a taste of the graduate
research program at the UF this
summer.
An $18,400 grant from the
National Science Foundation
will support the participation of
15 juniors in the summer
research program. Stipends of
$720 will be awarded.
Dr. William R. Dolbier Jr.,
assistant professor of chemistry
and program director, said the
12-week project between June
16-Sept. 6 is intended to
acquaint undergraduates with
graduate school and stimulate
interest in chemical research.
Supervised research will be
available under 25 possible
research directors in any area of
analytical, inorganic, organic,
nuclear, physical or quantum
theory chemistry, Dr. Dolbier

research in metals, permitting
eye views for the first time of
their actual surfaces.
Existing microscopes allow
metallurgical engineers only to
construct a model of surfaces by
the transmission of electrons
into the various sides of the
metals. Thus, the surface can be
inspected only indirectly.
Dr. Ellis Verink, professor of
metallurgical and materials
engineering who will direct the
microscopes use, said 29
research professors in 14
departments are eager to use the
instrument for their projects.

said.
Weekly seminars
encompassing all areas of
chemistry also are planned, he
added.
Approximately 50 per cent of
the participants wiil be selected
from the University of Florida.
It is expected they will continue
on their chemical research
projects through their senior
years.
The other participants will
come from small colleges
throughout the state.
Applications may be obtained
by contacting Dr. Dplbier or
writing to him at the
Universitys Department of
Chemistry.
Appli cations must be
submitted to Dr. Dolbier by
Feb. 28.

The instrument is expected to
shed new light into research on
corrosion, the fracturing of
metals and non-metals and
tissues animals and plants
according to Dr. Verink.
Two other projected uses are
in atmospheric pollution and
micro-clectronic circuits.

FLORIDA. ENGINEERING
\£V> SOCIETY
\j TONIGHT 7:30 pm
The Student Chapter will meet:
in Room 347, Reitz Union
all ENGINEERING students invited
FRESHMEN SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS
f isbr v
J Climb aboard C
/The S.S. Winnjammer jt
Luncheons served from 1 1:00 A.M. Wl
j Dinners to 12:00 P.M. ij
) Bernie Sher at the Organ A\
n r#
Thursday, Friday & Saturday Mi
Oysters & Clams on the half shell M
Michelob on draft wf/
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty Hi
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. V*
, Reservations accepted / sft l
i Harry M. Lanton, Manager
closed Sundays

Wednesday, February 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

We can look directly at the
ingredients in smoke and fly ash,
and microelectronic circuits can
be constructed and examined in
the microscope, he added.
He also expressed the opinion
that the scientific apparatus,
expected in the next 60 days,
will attract new research projects
for the University.

Page 11



:, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 5, 1969

Page 12

Rathskeller Features Ewing Street Times

ByTEDREMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The Rathskeller
entertainment bookers both
local and professional have a
knack for appropriateness.
Starting out with a bang, the
opening of UFs first
beer-serving establishment
featured the nationally-famous
Your -Fathers Mustache.
Ideally suited for the festive
occasion, the group marched
through the audience generating

L, y? jj
WBm'2K r Wx
!a Dl V Lhb
IfalLP
Hy|H JS H|£i^|||H
y I
DIRECT FROM "THE FLICK" IN MIAMI
..."Ewing St. Times" performs nightly at Rathskeller

.1 r#### ''*''***
* l^
| Registration Set |
:: Advanced registration for:*:
:: the spring quarter will begin ::
:: Fe. 18-28. All colleges and:*:
:|: departments will supply :|:
: counselors for students whox
: need to plan programs.
i; Feb. 28, at 4 p jn. is the last :;
: day for withdrawing without :
:. receiving failing grades in all :
j courses. $
'VXvXWwX^.xvX'Mwy.y.y.sy-y'

\M V #- A\ M
WED. NITE SPEC I Air*
F R ESH G SEm SQUAB
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
Including CHILDREN sl.ool
H 5 ADU LTS $1.50
PIRATES COVE LOBSTER HOUSE
SEAFOOD FRESH FROM THE SEA
SERVING DAILY FROM 5 P.M.
OCALA GAINESVILLE
HWY. 301 441 OPEN SUNDAY 4-10
ASd ONV*NiLi T
of Holiday Inn BIVAN ARM LAKE
PHONE 622-6556 PHONE 378-2931

the/ spirit promised by
forbidden beer.
The same weekend The
Seventh Chord, a local
folk-rock-soul trio, provided a
welcome respite from the hustle
and bustle of opening night.
Now, from The Flick in
Miami, comes a group with a
coffeehouse atmosphere. Ewing
Street Times, plays songs made
to groove by. But since
grooving becomes monotonous
in large quantities, the group

:*" Hava
p- Your Gonorator \
f OVERHAULED Sooriil 1
VSASO /
IMCLAIW/
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
90S NW Sill A VS. OAMCSVIUf
MOM.-MI. AM-7FM SAT. IK S Ml
971-4011

HERE THROUGH SATURDAY

also has a few humorous and
off-beat selections.
Since Gypsy Rose Lees time,
to get ahead ya gotta have a
gimmick in any type of
entertainment endearvor. The
Times gimmick is simple
enoughdiversity.
Each member of the quartet
has his own speciality ranging
from hard rock to country and
western styles. Along with the
electrical folk songs, the group
occasionally treats its audience
to a ragtime or country and
western number.
Ewing Street Times is
composed of Don Hath lead
singer, Billy Berosini electric
bass, Michael Mashkas lead
guitar and Don Dunaway Dunawayrhythm
rhythm Dunawayrhythm guitar. The group
originated in California. They
say the reason they left is that
no one could stand the harsh
sounds they made.
This ensemble was booked
through the coffeehouse circuit
booking agency, of which the
Rathskeller is a member.

Join a /eac/er^^ I
in growing^^^^^^^M
field of rocket
and missile propulsion
EXPLORE the potential for professional achieve- Located 25 miles south of Washmqton D C
ment at the Naval Ordnance Station. Indian Head. Indian Head -is close to the cultural, social, and
-V an scientific advantages of the Nation's Capital offering
Few technical fields offer you as many oppor- opportunities for pleasant suburban or country life
tunities for an exciting and rewarding career as the near mountain and shore esorts
rapidly growing field of chemical propulsion. Indian L1 .'
Head is a recognized leader in research, develop- £ ro,ess,onal Positions --va 'able in:
ment. production, and evaluation of propellants and engineering Science
rocket propulsion systems and has advanced the er ospace Elec f romcs Electrical Chemistiy
state-of-the-art of chemical propulsion through Chemical Industrial Mechanicak Physics
participation with the Department of Defense and Liberal career Civil Service benefits include
NASA. Indian Head has made important contribu- graduate study at nearby universities with tuition
tions to the Polaris, Poseidon, and Sidewinder expenses reimbursed. A
propulsion systems as well as virtually every missile Naval Ordnance Station fMk
system in use by the Fleet today. Indian Head, Maryland 20640 yfcT#
Representative on Campus Tuesday February 18
For interview, contact your placement office . .

Through this concern, UF
should be able to provide some
of the best entertainment
available to establishments such
as the Rathskeller.
Ewing Street Times will be

UFS REPRESENTATIVES |
a clCt Dan Sapp Bill Worsham
Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
Vs -- George Corl Harold DeVane
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
I *NO WAR CLAUSE I
I#deferredpremiu^aymenuJ
I fuNCH ONLY ]
SPECIALS
0 I }
| lii 313 W.UNIV.AVE. j

playing at the Rathskeller
every night through Saturday.
Performances are at 9 and 10:30
on weeknights with an added
midnight show on Friday and
Saturday.



w m mm
:||Ha j.,, j*g2Bte& siMi
-"k '& 9h§k * wmm..£Bmm
a
ALWAYS A WINNER
Miss UF Karin Ostlund, Tri Delt Sorority, won the C/SA trophy
dash Saturday at the Gainesville Dragway. Miss Ostlund docked 13.01
in her maiden voyage, which was better than any experienced driver
had done in the same car. Dick Griffin, former N.H.R.A. record
holder, was beaten in three straight passes by Miss Ostlund.

SPORTS IN BRIEF
Wrestlers, Women Gymnasts Win

The UF Wrestling Club
defeated the University of
Tampa Saturday by a score of
31-8.
Leading the way for the
Gators were Bill Peeples, Bill
Northup and Jeff Shaffner.
Peeples and Northup pinned
their opponents in the second
period. Shaffner continued to
remain undefeated and stretched
his record to 6-0.
Northup has suffered only
one defeat in six outings. The
Wrestling Club now stands 3-3
on the year.
The UF Womens Gymnastic
Club won their second straight
meet Friday by outscoring
Georgia College for Women
56.60 to 42.90.
Mary Bates Feltham was high
scorer for UF by totaling 28.00
points. She placed first in the
All-Around event and Uneven
Bars.
Kim Smallwood and Rosa
Knight also placed first in Floor
Exercise and Vaulting
respectively. The only other first
place was earned by Jo Ann

| WONDER i
| HOUSE 1
I RESTAURANT 1
(GOOD THROUGH SATURDAY!
{ PORK CHOP W/ITALIAN 1 ' J I
SPAGHETTI 1
K.C. STEAK $1 -50 |
W/BK. POT., SALAD I
BAR B-Q RIBS 1O C )
& CHICKEN I
W/SAUERKRAUT OR BAKED BEANS I
HOT ROLLS AND BUTTER 1
14 SW Ist ST \

Aaron of Georgia on the Balance
Beam.
The Gymnastic Club will
travel to Georgia Friday for a
return match with Georgia
College.
***
The 1968-69 UF Campus
Games Tourney came to an end
on Monday. It lasted eight days
and saw some stiff competition
in all the featured events. Over
Cage Tickets
Basketball tickets for the big
game with LSU Feb. 12 and the
nations leading scorer Pistol
Pete Maravich, can be picked up
by students Thursday at Gate 13
on the eastside of the stadium.
Students must present their
I.D. and fee cards for purposes
of identification.
This game is expected to be a
sellout, a large out-of-town
crowd anticipated with Maravich
making his first visit to the state.
Tickets can be picked up
between 2:30 and 8 p.m.
Thursday.

AT AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Legislature Funds Coliseum

(Editors Note: Due to increased
enthusiasm over a new UF
activities coliseum, this is the
first of an Alligator weekly series
of articles describing the
facilities at the other
Southeastern Conference
Schools.)
For the first time in its
history, Auburn University will
be able to adequately
accommodate the student body,
in relation to student-seat ratio,
under one roof.
Capacity of the new
Memorial Coliseum is 13,000
plus and the 13,236 Auburn
undergraduates currently
enrolled will conceivably be able
to attend the varied functions
that will take place in the
coliseum in 1969. Naturally; the

200 students participated in the,
five major areas of competition;
mens and womens bowling,
bridge, chess, mens and womens
singles and doubles table tennis,
womens pocket billiards and
mens pocket and carom
billiards.
Some of the high finishers
will be selected to attend the
Region VI American College
Unions International (ACU-I)
tournament in Tallahassee, Feb.
13-15.
Bowling: Men Mike Popp,
Mark Jones, Joe Zappia, Rex
Wallin, Manny Fernandez
High Game tie Billy Owens,
Rex Wallin 245
Womens Mary Jane Noll,
Suzanne Wollner, Peggy
Morrissey, Carol Anne North,
Gail Porter
High game Karen Kinnen
226

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. / II
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3 SATURDAY WESTSIDE If
I 9 AJVL* NOON SHOPPING CENTER ||

Wednesday, February 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

general public will be allotted a
majority number of seats for
basketball games.
The Auburn basketball team
officially opened its new home
on Jan. 11, against LSU, after
playing 10 straight games on the
road.
The building faces north and
is located on Roosevelt Drive.
Team entrances are on the east
side. Varsity and freshman
practice fields are located at the
back of the new building
(south) while a new swimming
pool and auxiliary gym are
located on the west side of the
coliseum.
The basic design of Memorial
Coliseum is that of an arena.
Curtain partitions will close off
the main floor of the arena for
plays, concerts and other
University functions. Seating
capacity will be 8,000.
The coliseum will house both
the Athletic Department offices
and Physical Education offices
and facilities. The main entrance
is located on the second level of
the building and gives access to
the main section of the arena.
The Athletic Department is
located on the first level, with
entrances under the main
concourse outside the building.
Dressing and equipment
rooms and training facilities are
DELICIOUS
nf) I In STEAKS
felony j FINE FOOD
EHOUSE^
student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

below the Athletic Department
"offices and are on the same level
as the arena floor. The PE
department occupies the
remainder of the building.
The Board of Trustees had
recommended to the Legislature
that its appropriation for
Education include money for
this badly needed multi-purpose
building, and because of hard
work by countless Auburn
people these hopes for a new
basketball arena have reached
reality.
Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL MW
376-4552 AUTHORIZED
DEALER
WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIR
oiAuowo imoNAm 09 ammha
GORDONS
GAINESVILLE Center
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM--9:00 PM Mon-Fri
.

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 5, 1969

wH&jjEl||HppHp^

Basketball recruiting is in full swing even though the season is just
into its second half. Unfortunately seven or eight of the states top
recruits cant get into school at UF.
Two black high schoolers, St. Petes Norman Stephenson and
Tampas Charlie Green scored less than 100 on their senior
placements. But look for the Gators to sign a black eager this year.
With seven basketball scholarships to fill this year, it looks like
three or four will be going to out-of-state students.
* *
One basketball player who couldnt get into the UF last year was
& Doug Gamble, a Winter Garden product. He is now a freshman eager at
Alabama. Gamble, 6-foot-10, 235 center, will be competing against
the Gators next year.
* *
The sparkplug of the Gator cagers is Tony Duva. Duva hasnt seen
much action but he always is cheering the other guys on the
court. Duva keeps working hard, according to Coach Bartlett.
* *
Boyd Welsch had his string of free throws broken at 20 straight in
the Georgia game. Boyd is now 40 for 48 in free throws, an .834
percentage. That should make him eight in the SEC in free throw
shooting, but the SEC stats dont even mention Boyd.
* *
According to Gator Coach Tommy Bartlett, this boy has the
strongest wrists Ive ever seen, he has a nice and easy outside shot

SOUTHERN COACHES AGREE
Black Athletes Missing In South

By DAVID MOFFIT
ATLANTA (UPI) The bowl
games, all-star games and pro
draft are all witness to the
decline in Southern college
football, a decline apparently
caused by one missing
ingredient: the black athlete.
The Southern coaches are the
first to agree with this. They say
the trend is toward the black
athlete just as a generation ago
the sons of Polish miners
dominated football and that
until the South gets in step, it
will continue to fall behind.
But dont blame the coaches
most of them, anyway. They
wouldnt care if an athlete was
purple if he could get the job
done. And, although a lot of
people think its a put-on, its
true that many Negro athletes in
the South havent been able to
meet the academic standards set
by Southern athletic
conferences.
You would get a clearer
picture of the caliber of football
player who comes from the
South if, in the pro draft, we
listed them by hometown rather
than school, said Atlanta
Falcons player personnel
director Tom Braatz.
Reasons aside, Southern
schools arent actively recruiting
Negro players in their area but
a lot of schools from outside the

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Gator Basketball 'Blurbs

RON COLEMAN
. .UF's first black athlete
South are.
On this point, another Falcon
official, presidential assistant
Bud Erickson, said:
I dont want to appear to be
criticizing any school. But there
are a number of outstanding
athletes here in the South,
expecially Negro ones, who are
unable academically to get into
the big conferences like the
Southeastern Conference but
who are able to get into some of
the lesser known schools.
There is absolutely no doubt
that the Negro athlete is making
the big difference, said Georgia
Tech coach Bud Carson.
The trend is with us,
Carson continued. There can

from about 30 feet. Tim Dominey is the boy, but he has been sitting
out his freshman year because of an injury.
* *
The coliseum is finally getting underway and with it many needs
will be filled. It will be good to have facilities large enough to hold all
the students who like to watch basketball.
One fortunate aspect of being last in the SEC is that we can learn
from others mistakes, such as Georgia which must have 1000-2000
seats that are at right angles to the stage and so far from the court that
they are never filled.
* *
I can remember a few years ago when the UF fans were really
vociferous at basketball games, but it seems nowadays they are
complacent about cheering. Those Bulldogs didnt let up on the
Gators for one second Saturday afternoon.
One guy didnt let Walk have it until he realized you cant razz an
All-American.
* *
Boyd Welsch tried a little psychology in Saturdays game with
Georgia. Bob Lienhard was at the foul line waiting for the ball when a
couple of his teammates gathered around him in a huddle.
Boyd stepped into the group and listened for awhile before
Lienhard noticed him and started shoving.
Boyd held his ground, after all he had as much right to be on the
court as anyone. The group broke up and Lienhard missed his shot. I
was just trying to psyche Lienhard out, Boyd said afterwards.

no longer be any opposition to
the Negro athlete for racial
reasons. People realize that its
getting tougher than ever to win
with Anglo-Saxons.
If you would take a 10-year
survey, Im sure you would find
that this decline has been a
normal trend, said Georgia
coach Vince Dooley. Boys
from this part of the country,

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cy Marc Dunn

expecially the white boys,
simply arent as big. Blame it on
climatic conditions .. its a fact
of life.
The situation is really the
same today for the black athlete
as it was 30 years ago for the
Polish boys who came out of
western Pennsylvania. They are
hungry and athletics is their
best way to ease that hunger.

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V



Me
BJR
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Its not that Im against
favors afforded athletes by the
university, but I am against them
when the average student does
not have the same, in other
words, when I cant enjoy such
goodies too.
I dont know how long its
been a practice here but
University athletes that is,
intercollegiate athletes have
had their required physical
education courses waived, not
deferred but waived, during the
season of their intercollegiate
competition.
I dont deny that they
deserve this break for putting
out for hours every afternoon
during the season.
But what about you and I
who may be putting out
physically every afternoon on
the intramural field? We dont
get such a waiver. We must take
a full six quarters of physical
Baseball
Taps Kuhn
MIAMI BEACH (UPI)
Bowie Kuhn, a National League
attorney who has remained
generally in the background
since entering the game, was
named baseball commissioner
for only one year Tuesday in a
surprise move by the 24 baseball
owners.
Kuhn, a member of a New
York law firm, replaces William
Eckert, who was fired by the
owners at the conclusion of the
winter meetings in San Francisco
last December. Kuhns salary
will be SIOO,OOO in contrast to
the $65,000 which Eckert had
been paid.
Cincinnati Reds President
Francis Dale introduced Kuhn as
baseballs new commissioner
even though Kuhn was named to
the job for only one year as
commissioner pro tern.
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Phys. Ed. No Policy Discriminatory

education or else we dont
graduate.
A champion of the
educational goals of P.E. told me
this week that the UF
departments philosophy is not
to see freshmen and sophomores
excel in one sport at any depth
but to give them a well-rounded
education selected from a broad
spectrum of athletic endeavors
including bait casting, handball,
Gatorball and weightlifting.
For this reason, the same
person argued, the UF P.E.
department would not favor the
substitution of intramural
competition for a P.E. course.
Poppycock!

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The Clipboard

They make the exception for
the athlete so that he dm excel.
The present system is a
discriminatory one. It actually
hurts the image of the
intercollegiate athlete when his
classmates view him in the
traditional pampered light.
But what would be wrong
with offering all students this
option intramurals or required
P.E. courses?
A study made by our own
P.E. department shows that this
trend is growing across the
country, though still in its
infancy. Ten percent of the
nations largest 1,000
institutions give this P.E. waiver

to any student who participates
in an official university physical
activity.
If the P.E. department has an
education reason why athletes
are allowed to substitute a
seasons competition for a
quarter or so of required classes,
then we would like to hear it.

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Wednesday, February 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

By Bill Dunn

The argument that
intercollegiate athletics is much
more demanding than
intramurals is truly a weak one.
Ask some anemic engineering
undergrad whos putting his
heart into his independent
intramural team just how weak
that argument is.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday. February 5. 1969

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I have enclosed $ ($5.00 per copy)
of a GATOR You will be notified in the Alligato when the |pj|
yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole,