Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
IN ACCENT DIALOGUE
Activists
Set Pace

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Accent *69 began
Monday afternoon with
representatives of the far
left, far right and
middle-of-the- road speaking
on the role of youth in
politics.
An audience varying between
200 and 250 listened and
reacted to statements by such
diverse individuals as Jimmey
Bailey, leader of the Students
for Wallace movement on
campus, Dr. Manning J. Dauer,
Chairman of the Department of
Political Science, and Dr.
Kenneth Megill, assistant
professor of philosophy and an
advocator of student power.
Dauer led off the discussion
at the Plaza of the Americas
with a talk on the state of youth
and their political alienation.
There are pressures for
change in our society today,
Dauer said. These are both
violent and non-violent, but
regardless of what their method,
they must be heard.**
Dauer attributed the
alienation of youth from politics
to the generation gap and
especially the laws pressed upon
youth.
There is a divergency
between the past and present,
Dauer said. There is a need to
re-appraise our social values,
especially those prescribed by
law.
Thomas Jefferson was a man
aware of what impressment of
laws could do to youth. He
wrote that' laws should not last
for more than a generation.
Every few decades, the laws
should be brought up to
date to meet the changing
times, Dauer said.
Following Dauer was Dr.
Robert Sherman, assistant
professor of education. He
blamed youths alienation from
politics on the failure of the
educational system to teach
politics in the classroom.
There is no doubt in my
mind, Sherman said, but that
the youth of today despair of
politics because they do not
understand its workings.
What you do not
understand, you cannot
appreciate, and what you cannot
appreciate, you will grow to
(Mike. This is the case of youth
today, who see only the
monolithic machinery of this
nation, he said.
The third speaker was Megill,
who refuted that the opening
meeting of Accent was even a
panel discussion.
Today, we are at a teach-in,
and I will treat my discussion as
such, Megill said. I feel that
the only people in this country
who are talking in a relevant way
are the radicals.
The radicals know where its
at, and Im not neccessarily
talking about the campus
radicals. Look at the strides in
politics. They havent come
from the universities, they have
come from the radical left in
politics.
Megill went on to call Black

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ACCENT SYMPOSIUM DIALOGUE AT PLAZA TOM KENNEDY
... opens issues for coming weeks

1 ACCENT
11 969
fl /' m 'Jfj
II it u
0 Drugs, sex, war and
civil disobedience are some
of the topics that will fill
the issue-packed week
called Accent.
0 Poster-pasting, a la
Gentry, is coming back to
UF. Presently most of the
posters advertise Accent.
For both stories, see
page 3.
Power the most significant
political development of the
20th century.
The Civil Rights movement
is dead, thank God, Megill said.
Today, people see unjustness
and they are not afraid to use
radical means to aid in change.
Os course, we cannot create
a utopian system overnight, but
at the same time, that doesnt
mean we must live within the
system which cages us, Megill
said.
When asked why more people
do not join the militant
movements, Megill said the
majority of Americans had not
yet found what they wanted in
life.
The same applies to this
university,* Megill said.
Students dont know why they
are oppressed, so they do
nothing. I feel that they are
oppressed, and I know why.
I feel that present grading
systems should be abolished,
that this university should
develop a more relaiont
curriculum and that studenfe
should have the right to pass
judgement on the faculty, he
said.
To me. grades are a means
(SEE ACCENT '69, PAGE 3)

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol 61, No. 75

UF Takes 'Baby Step
On Activities Coliseum

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
UF took the first baby step
toward an activities coliseum
Monday.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell directed campus
planners to proceed with a cost
estimate for advanced planning
on the entire project, said Walter
Matherly, new director of
physical planning.
The directive came after
Fridays joint meeting of
university and city of Gainesville
officials to discuss the possibility
of a coliseum jointly built and
operated by both.
For years, the Gators
basketball teams have played in
the Florida Gym, smallest in the
Southeastern Conference in
comparison to university
enrollment. Only Mississippi
States gym has a smaller seating
capacity (5,000) but the school
has a student body of 9,000
compared to the UFs 20,000.
Florida Gym holds 5,500.
The Gator swim team,
conference champions 24 times
in the past 28 years, has never
had an indoor pool. UF is the
only SEC member that can make
that claim.
The UF track team, despite
holding its own in conference
indoor track, has never had
indoor running facilities.
The coliseum, however,
would not be completely
devoted to athletics, said
Matherly. There is a dire need

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ACTIVITIES CENTER
... has a seating capacity of more than 13,000

University of Florida, Gainesville

here ot space for academic
facilities. This must be our prime
objective. The only basis on
which we could build such a
complex would be an
educational one.
Matherly said that depending
upon the magnitude of the
educational activities a coliseum
here would have to contain, the
cost of the construction could
range from $340 to $6,000 per
fixed foot.
Athletic Department
estimates earlier this month
indicated that once the first
ground was broken for
construction of the facility, it
would take conservatively 2Vi

IFC Frolics Seating
Open To Non-Frats
Tickets to the IFC Winter Frolics will be available to UF
independents, Steve Zack, IFC president, said Monday.
Zack said the 5,500 person fire limit set on Florida Gym had cut
down the number of available seats by 2,000. He said that in the past
up to 8,000 people had attended Frolics.
An article in last Fridays Alligator incorrectly quoted Miles Wflkin,
IFC treasurer, as saying that no tickets would be sold to independents.
Two steps will be taken to make tickets available to independents,
Zack said. First, all unused tickets at each fraternity house will be
collected and made available to independents and the number of
complimentary tickets given out will be cut in half and will also be
made available to independents.
Zack said the tickets will cost five dollars per couple. No individual
tickets will be sold.
Winter Frolics will feature the Vanilla Fudge.
According to Zack, Spring Frolics, which will star the Four
Seasons, will be held in Florida Field so there will be no seating
problems.
Cold weather was the reason Zack gave for not holding Winter
Frolics at Florida Field.

Tuesday, February 4, 1969

years before it would open.
Last spring, the
Interfraternity Council
established a coliseum fund
which it hoped to expand
through numerous
entertainment promotions.
But after one program in
Florida Field featuring the
Beachboys and the Strawberry
Alarm Clock, no other shows
were promoted.
Present seating capacities of
other SEC coliseums are:
Alabama, 15,000; Georgia and
Auburn, 13,000; Tennessee and
Kentucky, 12,000; Vanderbilt,
9,200; Louisiana State, 8,800;
and Mississippi, 8,500.



Page 2

i. The Florida Alligator, Tutday, Ftbruyy 4,1969

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SLEEP IS WHERE YOU FIND IT arroyo

There is no rest, generally speaking, for the
wicked or the UF student. But when it comes it
can't be ignored. Long nights of proverbial oil

Youth Dies As 6 Watch

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (UPI) While at least six
persons watched and did nothing, an 18-year-old
college student was shot to death Sunday night at a
busy intersection.
Two of the onlookers were motorists who locked
their cars and would not let him in when he sought
refuge from his pursuers.
The victim was identified as Michael Theodore
Altschul, who was shot in the chest after what
witnesses could only describe as some kind of right
outside a tavern.
Officers said that when Altschul was unable to
enter the second car, he turned to face the men who
had been chasing him and walked toward them,
hands outstretched. One of them fired a single shot

12th Plane Hijacked,
Later Try Squelched

MIAMI (UPI) Four persons
skyjacked a Newark-to-Miami
jetliner with 92 persons aboard
to Cuba Monday, the 12th
skyjacking this year, and a few
hours later a young New York
student and his girlfriend were
bluffed out of skyjacking
another big New York-to-Miami
jet.
The four skyjackers were
tentatively identified from a
passenger list as three members
of the W. Hernandez family, a
man, wife and daughter, and
another man, J. Babin.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials Represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at GainesviUe,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

The four, skyjackers of an
Eastern Airlines jet, were not
further identified.
The FBI said Michael A.
Pepard, about 20, a student at
Duchess Community College in
Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and his
unidentified girlfriend tried to
skyjack National Airlines flight
11 with 66 passengers and a
crew of seven aboard.
Pepards home town was
given by the FBI as Cold Spring,
N.Y.

burning has conditioned this student to take his
naps when they come.

and the two men returned to a parked car, where
two other men were waiting.
There were unconfirmed reports that before he
died Altschul named one of the killers. But police
declined comment. They said they had no theories
regarding motive, and that no one was in custody
today.
Altschul was pronouced dead at a hospital where
he was taken by the driver of a passing tow-truck
who found the youth lying in the street. Police
reported an anonymous caller to the filling station
owning the tow-truck tried three times to learn the
name and whereabouts of the driver.
Altschul was a freshman at the University of
Missouri at Kansas City and had been employed
part-time for the past two years by a drug store on
the Country Club Plaza.

Senate Meets
Student Senate will meet
tonight at 8:15 in room 349
of the Reitz Union.


SALE CONTINUES EVERYDAY
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WITH THIS NEWEST & MOST ADVANCED METHOD
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WERE HOLDING THIS SALE FOR THE STUDENTS
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Phi Delts Penalized

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
Phi Delta Theta fraternity
was placed on social restriction
for the rest of the quarter by the
Interfraternity Council Sunday
night following an investigation
of a skirmish between members
of the Phi Delt and Sigma Alpha
Epsilon fraternities.
The fight took place when a
group of approximately 60 Phi
Delts traveled to the SAE house
and were met by SAEs carrying
makeshift weapons.
Police reported that verbal
insults were exchanged and small
group fights erupted. Police said
they were unable to determine
which group initiated physical
contact.
Steve Zack, IFC president,
said the police officers who
witnessed the event and the
presidents of Phi Delt and SAE
were invited to come before the
IFC executive council to give
their versions of what happened.
Zack said the basic guilt lies
with Phi Delts, because they
werent supposed to be on SAE
property.
The Phi Delts put themselves
on social restriction immediately
following the incident.
Social restriction means the
fraternity can have no parties
during the quarter or have any
women in the house.
We have also placed the Phi
Delts on social probation for the
rest of the school year, Zack
said.
At the end of this quarter the
Phi Delts must come before IFC

EWING
St. TIMES
Eats) steelier
FEB. 3 .hru 8

executive council and explain
what they have accomplished
this quarter and why they f ee l
they should be taken off social
restriction, Zack said.
Zack said the IFC also passed
a resolution saying we feel that
anyone carrying a dangerous
object is acting in a manner
unbecoming of a fraternity man
and in the future action will be
taken against him.
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Local Quaker Youth Returns Draft Card

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
A 19-year-old Gainesville youth,
member of the Society of Friends, has
turned in his draft card in protest of the
Selective Service System.
In a statement sent with his registration
card to the local draft board on January
26, Carl Stanley Home explained his
actions.
If I accepted an I-O, conscientious
objector classification, this would express
my opposition to war, but would not

A Week Os Issues Hits UF Campus

Accent '69
Topics Run
The Gamut

of preventing the learning
process from going on. Students
spend so much time studying
irrelevant knowledge to get past
exams that they never have time
to develop themselves as human
beings..
From Megills views the
program went to Bailey, who
stated that the country was
basically conservative despite the
loud cries of change.
When you total the vote for
Gov. Wallace, who was a
conservative, with that of Nixon,
who was more conservative than
Humphrey, you must conclude
that there was a calling for a
conservative voice in
government, Bailey said.
Dr. Rene Lemarchand,
assistant professor of political
science, attributed student
disintere:t in politics to the
apparent differences between
ideal radicalism, the realities of
radical behavior and an inner
fear of the future.
Youth identify with the
Black Power movement. They
see it as away out of their own
problems.
No doubt, one of these
problems is the growing concern
that there will be no
employment after college, with
automation replacing many jobs.
This insecurity and a need for a
new system of values cause
unrest.
Next to speak was Father'
Michael Gannon, who pointed
to voting as the key to change.
Poor people, blade people,
and young people dont vote,

Poster Pasting Begins Anew With Accent

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Its plaster the campus with
posters time again, and UFs
Accent 69 Symposium is not
denying that its leading the
way.
In fact Accent officials have
gone so far as to pose a poster
pasting on a UF building.
Sunday s a*.

express my opposition to the coercing of
other young men into the armed forces.
The only way my actions can express
my opposition to conscription is by a
refusal to remain a registrant of the
Selective Service System, Home said.
Home said he realized that it was a
serious decision and would be
misunderstood by many people.
As a member of the Society of Friends
he objects to war and says it is doubly evil
because it both snuffs out so many lives
and damages so many survivors* lives.

Gannon said. We have to build
on what we know and voting is
the best way to let your beliefs
be known.
There is no reason to
polarize to either the left or to
the right. Rather, each person
should be his own party, voting
for the man that fills his own
qualifications, Gannon said.
Bill Sadowski, 4LW, spoke on
how students who saw a need
for change could speed the
transformation.
The best way you can
change politics is to be in it,
Sadowski said. First, educate
yourself in politics, then use it
to you own satisfaction. Where
you go is up to your own
initiative.
The final speaker on the
panel, Donald Aiesi, a graduate
student in political science,
warned students of the danger of
hopping on bandwagons.
Too many students
immediately jump to whatever
belief is prevalent on campus,
Aiesi said. At UF, the trend is
Democratic liberalism a la Gene
McCarthy.
We should also be concerned
with who the leaders of these
movements are. They always
seem to be a Carol Thomas, who
is well over thirty, or a Marshall
Jones, who is closer to forty
than he is to thirty, Aiesi said.
I dont think we have
anything to fear from the
under-25 radicals because all
they ever seem to do is march.
They are never the ones with the
ideas.
Today, a panel discussion will
take up the issue of the division
of power within the university
structure.

Times carried a photo of
Accents executive secretary,
Nancy Register, pasting an
Accent poster on the brick wall
of a campus building.
Last August, a UF student,
Lavon Gentry was arrested by
campus police late one night for
doing the same thing.
Although Accent Chairman
Larry Berrip admitted the
photo was posed, he qualified

II I
jmIIMw? Wk Mmmmm
MANNING DAUER
... close the gap

Program Trys To Define
'Dimensions Os Freedom

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
Is freedom a right, a privilege or a legal
phenomenon? Does civil disobedience threaten
freedom?
These and other questions concerning the theme
of Accent 69, The Dimensions of Freedom, will
be analyzed and investigated during the week-long
symposium.
The program will encompass speeches and
discussions on Vietnam, drugs, civil disobedience,
sex, religion, due process, the cities, legislation and
the political process.
A mixed media presentation to be held 7
p.m. Wednesday in the University Auditorium will
kick off Accent 69s week-long activities schedule.
Immediately afterward, trends in sex and politics
will be covered by Anson Mount, Playboy magazine
public relations manager and political pollster, Louis
Harris speaking respectively at 7:30 and 8 p.m.
A reception will follow in rooms 122-123 of Reitz
Union.
John Finlator, Bureau of Narcotics associate
director and prof. Jean Houston, director of the
Foundation for Mind Research in New York join in
a drug symposium at 7 pjn. Thursday. Again, a
reception will follow in rooms 222-23 of the Union.
Georgia legislature renegade Julian Bond and
atheist, Madalyn Murray will speak in the Plaza of

his statement saying, There was
a campus policeman standing by
and the poster was never
actually pasted on the wall.
Later, after being confronted
with a statement by University
Police Chief Audie Shuler
claiming no knowledge of the
incident, Berrin said, I was just
kidding.
Berrin then said he wanted

Home .believes a great deal of valuable
freedom has risen in America and anyone
who accepts the benefits of a society
would want to serve it.
I hope and plan to perform service in
the manner of conscientious objector
alternative service, but I cannot cooperate
with the governments coercing of young
men into service, Home said.
When a mans actions are coerced, they
become not service but servitude, he said.
Members of the Gainesville Society of
Friends join Home in his opposition to the

mm
Is
KENNETH MEGILL
... radicalism relevant

the story written up because
Accent needed the publicity.
Accent posters have been
proliferating at an ever
increasing rate since last week,
and campus buildings, trees and
sidewalks have been inundated
with them, despite the fact there
are also signboards for this
purpose at strategic areas.
Campus regulations forbid

Tuesday, February 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

selective service system.
Members said that for many years they
had been given a privileged status in the
system and this may have blinded them to
the evils of the draft itself.
They object to conscription saying it
threatens the right and responsibility of
every person to make decisions in matters
of conscience.
.Jn their statement they said, We call
for the abolition of the Selective Service
System and commit ourselves to work with
renewed dedication to abolish it.

the Americas from 2 to 4 pjn. Friday. That
evening at 7:30, Vietnam specialist, Fredrick Flott
and leftist author Michael Harrington will speak in
the Florida Gym. A reception will be held in rooms
222-23 of the Union.
Both will hold separate seminars from 9 to
10 a.m. Saturday. Harrington will be in rooms
122-23 of the Union while Flott presides in room
349. A delegate luncheon at the University Inn
following the seminars is restricted to a high school
and non-UF audience.
A panel discussion on civil disobedience featuring
attorneys Melvin Belli, William Kuntsler, Tobias
Simon, and UF law prof. Fletcher Baldwin is
scheduled from 2:30 to 3:30 pjn. Saturday in the
Union Ballroom. Larry King, Miami radio-TV
commentator and journalist, will moderate.
A guest banquet Saturday evening will feature
Ray C. Osborne, Floridas new lieutenant governor.
The finale of Accent week will feature Sen.
Strom Thurmond, former Sen. Wayne Morse and
Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas.
Thurmond will speak at 7 pjn. Saturday in the
Florida Gym, Morse at 8 p.m., Douglas at 9:15 pjn.
A deluxe mass media film presentation will be
viewed prior to Douglas speech.
A reception at 10 in rooms 122-23 of the
Union will conclude the evening.
Accent 69 is here! Need we say more?

fl IhL.
JIMMEY BAILEY
... conservative mandate

posters pasted to building walls
and nailed to trees. Posters on
trees must be tied on or taped.
After attempting to quiz Miss
Register about her actions in the
Times picture, an Alligator
reporter was told by Accent
Public Relations Chairman
Ronnie Bloom, You dont need
to ask any more questions. I
already told you what the deal
was.

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 4, 1969

UF Foreign Students
Honored At Mall

Gainesville Mall takes on an interantional flavor this week with an
arts and crafts display honoring UFs 700 foreign students.
Native items, provided by International Students Organization,
will be displayed in each store until Friday.
International Week on the campus will begin Feb. 17 with a
banquet for 150 students and dignitaries at the Baptist Student
Center. It will be a buffet and will feature foreign foods provided by
the member clubs of the ISO. Member clubs are the: Arab, Brazilian,
Chinese, Indian, Latin, American, and Persian, clubs.
An international beauty contest will be held in University
Auditorium Wednesday, Feb. 19. A feature film will be shown
Thursday night and a talent show will be held Friday.
Concluding the week will be a dance in the Reitz Union ballroom
Saturday night. All events except the banquet are open to all students.

UF Staff Employes Get
New Overtime Pay Scale

UF staff employes will
receive time and a half pay for
overtime work beginning this
week, if they work in excess of
40 hours.
As yet, UF has not paid
anyone time and a half for

UF Housing Sanctions
Psychedelic Decor

Psychedelic vandalism has
been sanctioned by University
Housing. Mallory Hall residents
now have a contemporary
recreation room instead of four
grey walls.
Students led by Tom Staley
complained that the rec room
looked more like a dungeon than
anything else and told
dormatory counselors that they
needed a place for students to
get together.
Residents wanted to decorate
the room themselves and create
a place a little more private
than the Rathskeller.
Dan Rousseau, assistant
superintendent of housing, was
contacted and he liked the idea
of students taking care of their
own areas.
The university cooperated all
the way and even contributed
red, pink, purple and yellow
paint.
Its the institutions paint,
Rousseau said, but it didnt
turn out looking like
institutional colors.
Area residents pitched in and
painted one night from 11:30
pm to 1 am
Their creative graffiti includes
such phrases as Superman
wears mini-pants, and

EWING
St. TIMES
ftatfj steelier
FEB. 3 ihr U 8

overtime, said Director of
Personnel Division, R.A. Button
Monday.
This is the end result of a
long fight for minimum wages
and overtime pay for employes
of state institutions. In Feb.

virginity is curable.
A large Jewish star decorates
the front of the piano and
Alfred E. Neuman grins from a
comer wall.
Painted flowers and animals
grow from the baseboards.
Rousseau also got rid of the
old furniture and replaced it
with round tables with oil cloth
covers and gas lights.
Tom Staley, Brad Richard
and Steve Rogers, who
brain-stormed the idea, say there
probably will be parties and
informal gatherings planned for
the future.
Student Senate
Posts Open
There are Student Senate
vacancies in Diamond Village,
Murphee area and two in Twin
Towers.
Interested full-time students
are urged to fill out an
application for the posts in the
Student Senate office on the
third floor of the Reitz Union.
Senators meet weekly on
Tuesday nights.

m* l
TWO JUST MEN

Former State Supreme Court Justice UF
President Stephen C. O'Connell is formally
introduced to Federal Supreme Court Justice Earl

1967 Congress amended the
1938 Federal Wage and Hour
Law and applied the law to state
universities and hospitals.
Twenty-five states, including
Florida, appealed the law before
the U.S. Supreme Court. The
law was ruled constitutional in
1968 and state institutions
were ruled non-exempt.
The standard work week for
staff employes was 44 hours
until last year when it was made
42 hours, Button said.
This year the standard work
week is 40 hours for UF staff
employes, he said.
All professional people,
administrators and managing
personnel of UF are exempt
from the law.
lt makes us happier,
because now we can compete
with industry and business for
employes, Button said.
Viet Mountaineers
The Montagnards, or
Mountaineers of Vietnam
account for 15 per cent of the
population.

@[selk Lindsey
best dressed..
and he rents his formats from
Lindsey
Smart young man ... he knows the easy way to perfect
grooming. He rents his formal attire for every occasion. 1 r
That's the way he always dresses in up-to-the minute styles.
Every garment is fitted to his individual requirements. Then
carefully cleaned and pressed. Accessories too, are right in jHH r 41
fashion. Next time you have a "black tie" date ... discover M m :f
the convenience and economy of renting distinguished /Us m I
formal attire. MI
White d* 1 Q
complete with accessories | £
Black Tuxedo £ % A BIaSHE|
complete with accessories yh | /
Black Double Breasted Tuxedo d*l A
Complete with accessories |

ITS LADIES NIGHT
AT THE ALIBI LOUNGE
EVERY TUESDAY
LADIES DRINKS
ONLY 19<
3334 W Univ.
t f a. -~~ ~
TUESDAY STEAK SPECIAL
11am spm
LONDON BROIL STEAK
SERVED WITH
CHOICE Or POTATOES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
HOT ROLLS A BUTTER
7r
1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Vi BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Warren by U.S. Sen. Spessard Holland during the
dedication of the new Spessard Holland Law Center.



WUFT Presents
Documentary
American Samoa: Paradise
Lost, a Public Broadcasting
Network broadcast will be
carried over WUFT, Channel 5 in
color at 9 tonight.
This one hour documentary
will look into the problems that
progress has created for the
naive Samoan islanders.

Engineers Memorandum
Slams Parking Charges

The parking fee planned to go
into effect spring quarter at UF
has been described, as a
discriminatory tax by the
Benton Engineering Council.
A memorandum by the
Councils Special Committee on
Traffic and Parking was

FEA Scholarship
Rent-Free Living

Rent-free scholarship houses
for students who qualify
scholastically, show leadership
and have an economic need,
reflect the Florida Education
Associations concern over the
cost of housing for college
students.
The UF has a two-story red
brick house at 1227 SW 4th Ave.
where 14 male UF students
work and live together. The
house belongs to the Florida
Student Housing and
Scholarship Foundation Inc., a
non-profit educational
corporation.
It was purchased last year by
the FEA for $35,000 from Dr.
Winston W. Little. FEA's Board
of Directors recently allocated
SI,OOO to purchase a washing
machine, dryer and couches.
The house has four
apartments and is located
one-half block from campus.
Although it is presently for
males only, applications have
been received from women.
Henry C. Lunsford, president of
the scholarship foundation, said
possibilities for expansion to
include a house for women is
good.
Florida State University has
two of these houses for women.
FEA has contributed over
$128,000 for financing houses
during the last 12 years and
annually budgets more than
SIO,OOO to the program.
Lunsford said an 85-cent
donation from each UF teacher
could pay for the house.
A drive to support the
scholarship houses is underway
both in Gainesville and
Tallahassee. Donations are
deductible from income taxes.
at
CRANE IMPORTS
[ggj iniumni
SALES-SER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Unlv. Ave._372-4373__

DROPOUTS
( No LABEL OH\
THE CAM/ ILL \ 7V,
f HAVE TO OPENI IT J f
" v a!

submitted Thursday to Arnold
Butt, chairman of the UF
Parking and Transportation
committee.
Jim Hollis, 5 EG, a council
member, said the proposed
parking fee discriminates against

Lunsford said revenues from this
drive could be used to remodel
the Gainesville house. The house
has a capacity to comfortably
accomodate 20 students.
Work around the house and
minor repairs are handled by the
residents. They also offer
tutoring services to other
residents. A house council acts
as a governing board, including
Ronald Hobbs, president; Larry
Shawaga, secretary-treasurer;
Richard Sawyer, house manager;
and Tom Hayes, public relations.
Residents range from
freshmen to graduate students
and are not required to major in
education. They come from all
over the state.
Selection for residency is
made by a committee of the
scholarship foundation headed
by B.K. Stevens.
Student expenses are food
and utilities. The foundation
helps them get scholarships and
jobs. Members must pay dues to
cover such things as television
repair.
The FEA house is open
full-time to university officials
who want to visit.

I J-Boy tA$ I
I mJS£u Sandwich |
I wSSSSSw?' French Fries, Cole Slaw I
J A Regular SI.OO Value \
K ~~ r I
t 13th & 13th St. %

students who earn less than
$4,500.
Employes of UF earning less
than $4,500 a year will be
charged $5 for parking on
campus, with a charge of $lO for
students.
The memorandum stated that
the charge is in reality a
discriminatory tax based on
annual income and individual
status.
Hollis said he thought it was
incredible that the
administration should spend
SIOO,OOO to bus people to the
center of campus without having
a study made of pedestrian
traffic patterns.
Consideration should be given
to the construction of a shelter
for persons caught in the rain
while waiting for buses, he
added.
The weather may play a big
role in determining die use of
the bus system, according to the
memorandum.
If analysis indicates that a
bus service is necessary, bids
should be let for a privately
owned, free enterprise (pay as
you go) transit system.
Hollis said dorm people will
be using the bus system but will
not share in paying for parking
because they do not own a car.
Seminole Lists
Due Friday
Fraternities and sororities
must turn in the lists of
members who want to purchase
1969 Seminoles to Pam
Pemberton in the Seminole
office, room 330 of the Reitz
Union by Friday.

YfcCKJ
C IV4* by United Feature Syndicate. Inc.

BY HOWARD POST
/ZaNYoHE FOR \ // 'S
(SMASHED OUVfeSfj

I ROBBIES I
S The Best In
Q mSandmchea
[COLOR TV a BILLIARDS"
11718 W. University Ave.
l^OnTheGoMCoast
/jgg\ What's NEW at the
BOOKSTORE?
NOT A POET?
THE CAMPUS BOOKSTORE CAN HELP YOU SAY
THAT SOMETHING SPECIAL ON ST.
VALENTINE'S DAY. COME IN AND CHOOSE
FROM OUR HUGE SELECTION OF GIFT BOOKS
OF ALL PRICES. WARM THE COLDEST HEART
WITH JUST THE RIGHT BOOK FROM YOUR
CAMPUS BOOKSTORE.
Some suggested titles:
365 WAYS TO SAY 'I LOVE YOU'
THE GREATEST OF THESE IS LOVE
FORGET ME NOTS OF LOVE
KAHLIL GIBRAN'S SELECTIONS
HALLMARK & PETER PAUPER BOOKS ON LOVE
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
# Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstore

Tuesday, February 4.1969. The Florida AUigator,

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 4,1969

Behind the sparkling walls of the new UF
Law Center lies an atmosphere of old-style
intellectual repression and academic
suffocation.
That the atmosphere is part real and part
imagined is unimportant. What is important
is that such an atmosphere exists and that it
is intellectually destructive.
For behind the modern architectural
design of the Law Center there is an
unhappy mood. It is a mood of dispair
which feeds upon itself, making real
problems worse and non-existant problems
real.
Last Friday a double-barreled gun fired at
the problem. Monday the skirmish
continued in the pages of this newspaper.
But what happened last Friday was
unique.
As law students reached into drop-boxes
for their Alligators, which contained part of
the story of the Law Centers problems, they
also reached for the Law Centers own
newspaper, The Verdict.
Until recently The Verdict, and its
predecessor The Shuffle, had been typical
examples of the dont rock the boat
attitude at the Law Center.
Friday things were different -as The
Verdict, in conjunction with the Alligator,
took a long hard painful look at the Law
Centers problems.
No doubt Law Dean Frank Maloney was
shocked by what he read. We can only hope
the honest constructive criticism was viewed
by him in its proper perspective.
One law professor, L.L. Lambom, struck
out particularly hard at the Law Center, and
hence at Maloney.
Said Lamborn: An almost systematic
repression of freedom of expression
regarding controversial ideas has resulted in
an oppressive atmosphere of suspicion, fear
and retaliation against dissenters.
While Lambom may have used words
unjustifiably strong, we dont think hes
entirely wrong.
Law students, we caution to say, like
lawyers, are a very conforming breed. As
professional mixers, and many as
professional or future politicians, they tend
to follow the rules and the company line
so they may keep their records clean.
Nevertheless, this propensity to
conformity need not result in stagnation.
More important, such conformity is more a
symptom than a cause of the Law Centers
problems.
What then is wrong with the Law Center?
Basically, it is an institution too

Most of us laugh when we read that some far-out
religious group has proclaimed that the end of the
world will soon be upon us, and that they are saving
themselves by going to some safe mountain retreat.
But I feel that their beliefs are not too far from
what may really happen. I think that it is evident
that if radical changes are not made world-wide in
governments and policies, and made soon, man will
not survive the 20th Century.
No, Im not a religious fanatic who thinks that
T*od will wipe man out for his sin's. Man may
destroy his own civilization. Our science and
technology, which has created unprecedented
affluence for many of us, also has produced The
Bomb, which could end mans reign on earth.
In a thermonuclear holocaust, those that survived
the first bombs would eventually die from the
fallout polluting our atmosphere, or from the
destruction of the interdependent systems we call
civilization.
Imagine fending for yourself in a smashed-world
devoid of stores, police, electricity, medicine,
running water. Most of us would not be able to find
and make our own food, devise rules to guide group
behavior, or rebuild the structures we couldnt build

Hassle Behind The Legal Facade

Another View.. Will Man Survive?

concerned with keeping up appearances. It is
a place where style, not substance, is the
most important quantity.
Dean Maloney had done much for the
Law Center. He has obtained funding for the
new building and additional structures. He
has convinced legislators that the UFs Law
Center must come first in the state system.
In so doing, unfortunately, he appears to
have lost sight of the reality that people, not
buildings, make schools great.
Dean Maloney has not done nearly
The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Pwt/koJu/i/ Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez James Cook
JAtiWllUlM. Executive Editor News Editor
h
Sunset In The Nations (Crime) Capital

to begin with.
Those who talk of fallout shelters, civil defense
programs, and protective techniques seem to have
forgotten how dependent man has become on his
ordered society. With most of the world in shambles
man would lose his societal restraints, and the
strongest would survive the longest.
But why is such a war almost inevitable? Because
of the way world politics presently have to be
conducted, the only way peace is maintained is
through a balance of terror, each side realizing that
world war would be suicide.
Over a long period of time this system is most
impractical. If we continue to escalate the arms
race, one side may have a momentary advantage,
and we will just have to hope that world leaders will
use reason, and not drop The Bomb when times
appear militarily right. There is also the chance of
accidental war.
Scientists have predicted that in the middle 7os
we will begin to see the start of world wide famines.
Because population increase is outpacing the ability
to produce food, and for certain religious reasons
world-wide birth control programs are not being
implemented, there seems no way to avert the

enough to make law students and law lawprofessors
professors lawprofessors feel at home in their college. He
has not done nearly enough to convince
more liberal and socially conscious members
of his faculty and student body that their
presence and ideas are needed and
considered.
Hence, many students and professors feel
un-needed and un-wanted.
Proof of this sad fact is that six members
of the not-so-large law school faculty
departed last spring. About four others are
expected to follow them this June with yet
another distinguished faculty member just
waiting for his ideal offer.
We think at least some of the sores of the
Law Center could be soothed if not healed.
Dean Maloney is the man to administer the
salve.
Associate Law Professor Robert Berry,
departing the UF Law Center soon for
Wayne State Law School in Detroit, Mich.,
has some suggestions.
Says Berry: Once recriminations cease,
once overcautiousness is replaced by hard
resolve, perhaps the following badly needed
occurences can add themselves to the basic
programs of this law school.
1) Within five years, this law school
should have at least four or five black
professors and 80 to 100 black students.
This would be a beginning.
2) Its faculty should be rich and diverse
and active, using whatever methods are best
for testing the law in particular areas and
helping it develop.
T) Its student body must become more
economically, culturally and ideologically
diverse.
4) The school should offer itself ever
more increasingly to the state of Florida,
helping fill even more fully such gaps as legal
representation for the indigent, systematized
updating and reforming of the statutory
laws, and the formulation of programs on
urban and social problems.
5) This school should reach beyond
narrow concepts of the law and bring into its
law center all the relevant knowledge and
ideas it can glean from such other
disciplines as sociology, psychology,
anthropology, economics and political
science.. .
This is a sound program, worthy of a
potentially great Law Center.
We challenge Dean Maloney to adopt this
course of action or a better one of his own
creation.
We shall watch the Law Center carefully
for signs of nroprpcs nr rlicnair

BY MIKE HITTLEMAN

starvation of millions.
And when there is over-population, hunger,
crowding, death and disease, there is discontent, the
kind that drives man to such irrational acts as war.
Man has been war-like since the beginning of
recorded history at least. One historian said that he
could find records of about five days of peace on
Is there hope for the future? I think there is, in
the world-wide youth-rebellion.
Young people are realizing the sad state of
affairs, the illogical acts of nationalism and
aggression, and speaking out against them. Since we
will be the ones to suffer for our elders mistakes, it
is up to us to criticize and dissent from unjust
actions, if we expect to have a world to inherit
when our time comes.
That is why the protestors and dissenters couid
e the force that savesscivilization from extinction.
Our new President showed his knowledge of this
revolution in his inaugural address, when he said
t tat the times are on the side of peace.
I only hope that youth will continue to question
and challenge, for we are the last hope of mankind.



OPfN FOKUM:

ViMtot
There is no hope for the complacent man.
Bury Yourself,
Uncle 'Redneck
MR. EDITOR:
On Thursday (1/23/69), your trusted Uncle Javerneck (a derivative
of George Redneck) wrote an article of the sadder days to be
produced by the inauguration of Richard M. Nixon as our nations
37th president. It seems as though Uncle Redneck is trying to produce
an image of our new president as that of . . the hot face, the
quivering jaw, and the belligerency that easily matched
JChrushchevs in debate.
Perhaps Uncle Redneck subscribes to the philosophy of better
Red than dead. As memory serves me, this was the period which the
Soviets used to say, We will bury you!
Perhaps if there had not been such a weak stand against
Communism in those days, and we had sent troops to Vietnam, the
United States would not have a commitment of over a half-million
men there today.
Perhaps if the UJS. had made their stand against Communism
known then, we would not be faced with the threat of Communist
take over in the Middle East today.
It appears that Uncle Redneck, as a staff member of the Alligator,
also feels that the press is immune to criticism, when much of then thenspace
space thenspace today is devoted to the criticism of any and all things known to
mankind. If the press had not played up the insurmountable lead of
RMN, we may have been blessed by the inauguration of Happy
Huby.
Uncle Redneck is also quick to point out the controversy which
surrounds some of Mr. Nixons appointees. I was not aware of the fact
that this was the first time a Presidents appointments were
controversial.
Perhaps I am merely one of the uninformed millions.
If Uncle Redneck possessed the greatness contained in but one hair
on Mr. Nixons head, he would be a truly remarkable man. Perhaps
Uncle Redneck should dig himself a hole, climb into it, and pull it in
behind him and relax for the next four (hopefully eight) years.
DENNIS C. BIDDLE
/Mrs. Thomas Fights
Along With Others

MR. EDITOR:
Os late, certain inane letters
have appeared in the Alligator
by indignant sophisticates.
One of these contributions
was written about Carol Thomas
and appeared in the January 30,
1969 issue of the Alligator. I
would like to attempt allayment
of some discrepancies found
therein.
Mrs. Carol Thomas was
alleged to be stealing so much
credit from the civil rights
Thanks, AWS
For Frauleins
MR. EDITOR:
As a fun-loving male on the
University campus, I hereby
propose a toast to the
Rathskeller Frauleins. For once
weve managed to assemble a
group of girls who really express
the Gator spirit.
Heres to the Frauleins
theyre the people who make the
Rathskeller the success that it is!
Thank you A.W.S. for a fine
selection of Florida coeds.
MIKE MILHAM, 4JM

workers who had fought and
died before her own involvement
in the movement. I believe,
however, that the esoteric
author of this complaint was not
aware that Mrs. Thomas never
considered herself
spread-eagled across the entire
travesty of human existence.
She has fought in towns
where civil rights work was a
warrant for personal degradation
and authoritarian punishment.
She has never requested verbally
or actively our writers
cognomen of noble St. Joano
suppose a reference to Joan of
Arc). Mrs. Thomas may not have
acted properly in all her
battles, but she worked with
integrity for the rights of racial
slaves to our society. Our irate
logician, gentle reader,
overlooks this fact, or has
become blinded by enmity for
persons he considers too often in
the limelight.
From disquieting college
campuses to racial-torn cities,
Mrs. Thomas has fought a war
beside others for the equality of
her second people: a realization
our self-styled sophisticate
chooses to disregard.
LAVON GENTRY
SELF-STYLED
POSTER PASTER

Make Up Your Mind
Or Shut Your Mouth

MR. EDITOR:
9
This writer finds the editorial of January 28,
1969 (regarding DeGarmos dismissal) in keeping
with the general quality of most Alligator
editorial expression, i.e., ambiguous, uninformed
ramblings of reluctant crusaders.
Your halting attempts at championing the
cause of the Report editor were lacking in several
respects. Initially, one would expect such an
inquisitive, ferreting organization as your staff to
have answers to the charges you aUedge which
are basic to any presumption of your having a
case, namely, how many students have been fired
by the library for misuse of keys?
How many of those offenses were committed
in a genuine effort to aid a student writing a
term paper?
One would certainly expect the fountain of
information readily exploited by your staffers to
provide answers to such questions of simple fact
when they have demonstrated themselves able to
procure with pinpoint accuracy such obscure and
secretive tidbits as the figures for birth control
pill usage and marijuana consumption among
various segments of the campus population.
With the feathers of such tricky
accomplishments riding high in your journalistic
caps, one can only wonder where the difficulty
could lie in finding out library dismissal policy,
with examples. Your lack of information is

Sm/fe, Mr. DeGarmo

MR. EDITOR:
Re: Did Nude Cause
Firing and Siding with the
Censors.
Evidently I am below
those book-burner
mentalities in Tigert Hall
and have been completely
hoaxed'by them. But, even
so, I fail to see how the firing
of Scott DeGarmo could
possibly give aid to the
bigots and the censors.
Those who purport this
should look again at the facts.
First, for what purpose
were these photographs used?
Were they art for arts sake,
(or for anything elses sake
for that matter)? Hardly.
Their sole purpose was to do
what they in part, Finally
accomplished
sensationalism, to create
some sort of controversy
concerning The University
Report.

Non-Violence Forgotten?

MR. EDITOR:
Ive been thinking about the
Carol Thomas article for awhile.
Sometimes my imagination
works over-time and I thought
Id share it with the paper and
readers.
Mrs. Thomas says that
violence is the only answer to
the racial problem. Right? OK,
picture in your mind a house
that has just been deluged with
fire bombs, etc. The house is in
flames. Its White occupants are
running out of the house,
clutching what belongings they
could grab. When they get
outside they see some Blacks
running away. The Whites yell,

Secondly, did DeGarmo
know, at that time, that he
was violating the librarys
regulations? Os course. Also,
did he know that the library
authorities would discover
Was Writer
The Nudie?
MR. EDITOR:
Ann Bardsleys
narrow-minded views and false
accusations of the book-burner
mentalities of Tigert Hall, and
the librarys firing of Scott
DeGarmo, makes me wonder if
it was she who posed as the
undraped worshiper of Florida
Wildlife, as photographed in
the University Report.
CLARA NETT, 3AS

Stop! Stop! Come back! We
want to thank you! So the
puzzled Blacks stop and come
running back.
The Whites embrace their
Black brothers and say, Gee,
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers' names ipay
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Tuday, Fabniavy 4,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

dwarfed by your poor logic.
In asking how many students have been fired
for allowing pressed cohorts into restricted areas
to finish term papers, you are implying that this
offense is analogous to the unauthorized use of a
restricted area as an unusual and erotic
background for nude photographs. Even you,
editors, are usually above this type of reasoning.
In short, this writer attempts no moral
condemnation of Mr. DeGarmo or his unknown
accomplice, who have certainly accomplished
their propounded goals. Rather he would
criticize your halting jump onto his bandwagon
of support.
If you would condone his actions, (which you
never do despite your time) come right and say it
with reason and evidence, and stop pointing an
ambiguous finger of accusal at those you have
not the courage to formally charge.
Any serious reader of newspaper editorials
could certainly not take seriously one which
seems to state I think youre wrong but I dont
know why so you better tell me why not. It is
thus no wonder that your indignance (constantly
expressed) at not being seriously accepted by the
adult community and the university
administration is met only with contempt for
those considered to be kids playing newspaper.
DANA BRADFORD, 3AS

this violation? Almost
certainly. DeGarmo thought,
in all probability, that,
although the librarians would
know, they would take no
action outside of a possible
reprimand. He miscalculated
and he lost. Thats the breaks.
Many points of what if
have been brought up, but
what ifs were not what
was.
The facts show that
DeGarmo willfully violated
the librarys trust in order to
create some sort of
sensationalism for his paper.
He did this probably
thinking that he would get
off with just a reprimand. As
it turned out he thought
wrong he gambled and lost.
Still he did create controversy
and draw attention to his
paper. So why arent you
smiling, Mr. DeGarmo?
GORDON GEORGE

thanks so much for burning our
house. One of our children also
died in the fire. We wanted to
thank you, because now, after
this, we know the real meaning
of brotherhood. We love you
now.
Boy, thats so neat. I can see
the scene re-enacted all over the
country Whites embracing
Blacks saying, Thanks so much
for destroying and killing. We
love you all now. And all
because of the wonderful
doctrine that violence is the only
answer to the racial problem.
Doesnt anybody remember
Martin Luther King?
I
-BARBARA SHIREK, 4JM

Page 7



i, Tha Florida AHktotor. Tiwdiy, Fobruary 4,1969

Page 8

NEW FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM ON UF CAMPUS
... to open doors September, 1970
University Budget
Gets 'Shot In Arm
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writar
UFs budget got a shot in the arm last week with the
announcement of an additional $350,000 allocation from funds of the
state university system.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell made the announcement at a
meeting of the Council of Deans.
The money, which will go for operating capital outlay and
expenses, really came as no surprise, since UF administrators had been
working since April to secure the extra funds.
OConnell called the $350,000 a small reimbursement for the
1967-68 fiscal year when all state agencies received 3 per cent less
money than was originally appropriated.
At that time, the UF received $900,000 less than the year before.
The budget has been a perpetual headache at the UF. Earlier this
week, OConnell said the percapita expenditure for students is
decreasing and he laid the blame on the burgeoning number of state
universities in Florida.
There is no doubt that the newer institutions of this state are
being founded at the expense of the older institutions, he said.
He hinted that someday the UFs enrollment might have to be
limited, because of skimpy financing.
Then too, difficulties in selecting a new vice-president of the
University can be attributed to the budget.
A list of 50 possible candidates for the post has been exhausted;
the $27,500 salary isn't a competitive one, on a national level,
according to O'Connell.
However, he has hopes the administrative vacancy will be filled
soon.
The former vice-president, Dr. Frederick W. Conner, was moved to
head the Office of Academic Affairs when Robert B. Mautz was
named chancellor of the state university system.
Grad School Dean Approved

Dr. Jarold Palmer Hanson,
chairman of the Department of
Physics at the University of
Texas, will become dean of the
UF Graduate School July 1.
Hanson, 48, a former UF
physics professor, will replace
Dr. L. E. Grinter, who retires
June 30 after 17 years as dean.
In his present position since
1962, Hanson has been director
of the Center for Structural
Studies for the past two years.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, in announcing the
appointment, said, Dr. Hanson
will be a capable successor to
Grinter. He brings with him a
Miller-Brown I
I
I
UNEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL Mfl
376-4552
I
DEADER I

record of achievement in
administration, research. and
teaching.
A native of Virginia, Minn.,
Hanson received his bachelors
degree from Superior State
College, Wis., and his masters
and Ph.D. degrees from the
University of Wisconsin.
He has been on the UT
faculty since leaving the UF in
1954.

SPECIAL REBATE
Conventions Short Courses Seminars
Upon using our motel rooms. .
We offer a cash rebate to your organization
Other free services will be included.
CALL US
km lUotel
U.S. ROUTE 441 SOUTH
'/f W GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
' I \ PHONE FRanklin 2-6333

Ground Broken For Museum

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Ground was broken last week
on the new Florida State
Museum to be located at the
corner of Newell and Radio
Roads.
The headquarters of the
museum will move from the
Seagle Building in central
Gainesville where it has been
housed for several years.
The museum will cover three
floors and will cost $2,219,000.
Contractor for the job is
Auchter Construction Co. of
Jacksonville.
The Gainesville structure is
the product of a decade of fund
raising. A National Science
Foundation grant will provide
sl.l million of the funds to
build the museum. Bond
appropriations will amount to
$140,000 with the remainder
made up of subscriptions from
around the state.
The original Florida State
Museum dates from 1917 when
it was established by an act of
the Florida Legislature. In 1951
a full-time staff was provided to
care for the museums exhibits.
The location of the museum
in Gainesville is due chiefly to
the fact that UF is also here. A
site on campus was originally set
FBK Dialogue
Needs Staff
Dialogue, a Blue Key
sponsored organization
investigating the needs of the
university, is looking for staff
members, Chairman Mike Hill
said Monday.
The need for a coliseum and
recognition of SSOC as a campus
organization are two of the
topics Dialogue will concern
itself with this quarter.
Staff members will do
research on many areas of
campus life and speak to
administrative leaders and
students.
Applications may be picked
up at the Florida Blue Key
office, room 312 of the J.
Wayne Reitz Union.
I flfcl I
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
Can, Trucks, 4-whoel I
1 drive.
2 No. lin Japan I
1 Codding fir Clark 1
H Motors S
I 1012 SOUTH Main St. §
I Open S A.M. 8 P.M. I

aside as early as 1950, but only
now have funds been available.
Other site museums are
located throughout the stated
where artifacts uncovered in the
area are displayed but the
Gainesville museum is the'only
state-owned collecting point for
the research carried on
throughout the state.
The Florida State Museum is
recognized as the best in the
South and as one of the best ten
in the nation. Among the
museums exhibits is the Pearsall
Collection valued at over
$600,000. The collection
consists of 400,000 North
American Indian artifacts.
The Pearsall Collection, along
with the rest of the museums
displays, have been housed in
the Seagle Building since 1937.
Originally build as a hotel, the
building for many years served
only as a warehouse for the
exhibits.
Despite the handicaps of the
Seagle Building over 40,000
people visit the museum
annually.

Tuesday, February 11,
explore an
engineering career
on earths
last frontier.
Talk with Newport News On-Campus Career Con Consultant
sultant Consultant about engineering openings at world's
largest shipbuilding companywhere your future
is as big as todays brand new ocean.
Our backlog of orders running for years ahead means
competitive starting salaries, career security, with your
way up wide open. It also means scope for all your
abilities. Were involved with nuclear ship propulsion
and refueling, nuclear aircraft carrier and submarine
building, even automation. We're a major builder of
giant water power and heavy industrial equipment.
Were starting to apply our nautical nuclear know-how
to the fast expanding field of nuclear electrical power
generation on land.
Interested in an advanced degree or research? Were
next door to Virginia Associated Research Center with
one of the world's largest synchrocyclotrons, offering
advanced study in high energy physics. Were close to
Old Dominion College and University of Virginia Exten Extension
sion Extension Division, where you can get credits for a masters
degree, or take courses in Microwave Theory, Solid
State Electronics, Nuclear Engineering and other ad advanced
vanced advanced subjects. Ask about scholarships, tuition grants,
and special leaves to implement these study and re research
search research opportunities.
Ask, too, about the pleasant living and lower living costs,
here in the heart of Virginias historic seaside vacation
land, with superb beaches, golf, fishing, boating, hunting.
5
IMMEDIATE ENGINEERING CAREER OPENINGS
Mechanical Engineers Naval Architects
Electrical Engineers Nuclear Engineers
Marine Engineers Civil Engineers
Industrial Engineers Metallurgical Engineers
Systems Analysts
See our representative
G. O. Vaughn
* Tuesday, February 11
He II be at the Placement Office to answer questions,
discuss qualifications, take applications for fast action.
Newport News /JjJX
SHIPBUILDING AND DRY DOCK COMPANY, l I
NEWPORT NEWS. VIRGINIA
An Equal Opportunity Employer. U.S. Citizenship Required.

Within the new structure, the
ground floor will be used for
public display. Plans now call for
visitors to travel through the
Earth Sciences, Life Sciences,
and Prehistoric Man sections
before coming into the area
housing permanent Florida
history. A separate part of the
ground floor will house a
revolving series of temporary
exhibits.
Upper floors will house
research facilities as well as
storage space for museum pieces
not on exhibit.
Completion of the new
museum will be in August, 1970.
delicious
X /f || STEAKS
\prjy I FINE FOOD
at-
student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. w. 13th ST.
378-0955



Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

PRE-MEDICAL and
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS
Registration with the
Pre-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 105 Anderson
Hall has been extended through
February 7. Absolutely NO
registrations will be permitted
after this date. You must bring
the full names of your
instructors and the section
numbers with you in order to
register.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
CANDIDATES February 7, is
the deadline for removing of I"
grades (except 699 and 799) for
candidates for graduate degrees
for March 25, 1969, graduation.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
DEADLINE: Feb. 7 is the
deadline for applying for
Graduate School for the 1969
Spring Quarter.
VISTA: Representatives will
be on the campus Feb. 3-7 to
interview persons interested in
their programs. Representatives
will be available in booths
located at the Reitz Union,
Information Booth across from
the Hub and at the Law Center
between 9 a.m. and sp.m.
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHERS EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of College
classification, are required to satisfy
the speech screening requirement
before being admitted into the
Advanced Professional Sequence or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and
elementary block. English and speech
majors do not take the test, as SCH
201 is required in all of their
programs. Appointments now are
being made in Room 124 Norman
Hall.
HILLEL HOUSE SEMINAR:
Rabbi Rudolf Adler will return
Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2:30-4:30 P.M., to
conduct a seminar on Jewish
Institutions, Rabbi Adler will be
availabel by appointment for private
counseling at Hillel House
(372-2900) from 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.

GAINESVILLE FLORID CREDIT UNION A
rt.r ima. ,... H.^.oo aJ i. slop-.*"*,, a-.* w. w W

CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb 4,7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with:
(A) report to Floyd 104 or 106;
(B) to Little 101 or 109; (C) to
Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121 or 125; (F) to Little 201,
203, 205 or 207; (G) to Little
213,215,217,219; (H) to Little
221,223, 225, 227, 233, 235 or
239; (l-L) to Matherly 2, 3,4, 5,
6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or
16; (M) to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 111, 113, 115, 116, 117,
118 or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110, 112 or 115; (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to Flint
101, 102, 110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
(W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 113 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 4,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Peabody 1,
2,4, 7, 10, 11; (M-Z) report to
Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208, or
209.
MS 102 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 5,7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
MS 204 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 5,7 p.m. in
LIT 101, 109, 113, 121 and
125.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 6,7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
MS 301 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 6,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to LIT 101,
109, 113, 121 or 125; (M-Z)
report LIT 201, 203, 205, 207,
213, 215.217 or 219.
MS 302 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb 6,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-M) report to MAT 2,3,
4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
14 or 16; (N-Z) report to MAT
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119.
CBS 262 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B) to
Little 101 or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121 or 125; (F)
to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; (G)
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219; (H)
to Little 221, 223. 225, 227, 233,
235 or 239; (l-L) to Matherly 2, 3,4,
5,6, 7,8, 9,10,11,12, 13,14 or 16;
(M) to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110, 112 or
115; (P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109; (R)
to Flint 101, 102,110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20; (W-Z)
to Walker Auditorium.

BLUB BULLETIN

CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) to Peabody 201,202, 205,
208 or 209.
CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CLC 142 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb 12, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B)
report to Little 101 or 109; (C) to
Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113, 121
or 125; (F) to Little 201, 203, 205 or
207; (G) to Little 213, 215, 217 or
219; (H) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235 or 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4, 5,6, 7, 8. 9,10,11,
12, 13, 14 or 16; (M) to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113. 115, 116,
117, 118 or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110,112 or 115; (P-Q) to Floyd
106 or 109; (R) to Flint 101, 102,
110, 112; (S) to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or
20; (W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 143 PROGRESS TEST :
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. in
Peabody 101,102,112.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106; (B) to
Little 101 or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121 or 125; (F)
to Little 201, 203. 205 or 207; (G)
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219; (H)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
235 or 239; (l-L) to Matherly 2,3,4,
5, 6.7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14 or 16;
(M) to Matherly 102, 106. 108,111,
113. 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110, 112 or
115; (P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109; (R)
to Flint 101. 102,110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20; (W-Z)
to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 253 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or
11; (M-Z) report to Peabody, 201,
202, 205, 208 or 209.
PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement 8t Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
FEB. 4: RADIO CORPORATION
OF AMERICA (RCA) EE, ME, IE,
Bus. Ad, Fin, Acctg, Math, Stat, Lib.
Arts. ERNST AND ERNST Acctg.
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF
HIGHWAYS-EC. PRESTON H.
HASKELL CO. Bldg. Constr, CE.
INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE 8*
TELEGRAPH CO. EE, ME,
Physics, ChE, IE. ANHEUSER ANHEUSERBUSCH,
BUSCH, ANHEUSERBUSCH, INC.-EE, ME, ChE.
HEWLETT-PACKARD CO. EE.
GENERAL FOODS CORP. Chem,
Food Tech, ChE, EE, IE, ME, Acctg,
Bus. Ad, Lib. Arts. DAVIS, PROBE
8i RICHARDS usually interviews
for staff accountants.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

FEB. 4-5: PROCTER &
GAMBLE Bus. Ad, Mrkt, Lib.
Arts. NATIONAL SECURITY
AGENCY EE, Math.
FEB. 5: CHARLESTON NAVAL
SHIPYARD ChE, CE, EE, IE, ME,
MetE, NE. DEPARTMENT OF THE
NAVY-AIR SYSTEMS
COMMAND-CE, IE, ME, EE,
Sanit. Engr, AE, ChE, MetE, Chem,
Physics, Math. LEVITT 8t SONS,
INC. CE, Arch. BENDIX
CORP. -AVIONICS
DIVISION-EE. PAN AMERICAN
PETROLEUM CORP. usually
recruits for technical majors.
LIBERTY MUTUAL usually
interviews for non-technical majors.
NORTH CAROLINA NATIONAL
BANK usually interview only
non-technical majors.
FEB 5-6: GENERAL DYNAMICS
CORP.-CONVAIR
DIVISION ME, AE, CE, EE, ChE,
Physics. GENERAL
TELEPHONE usually interviews
for technical majors.
FEB.S, 6,7,: CORNING GLASS
WORKS All engr. and science.
MONSANTO CHEMICAL usually
interviews for technical positions.
FEB. 6: DOW CHEMICAL
CORP. usually interviews for
technical and non-technical positions.
AMERICAN CYANMID
CO. usually interviews for
technical positions. B.F. GOODRICH
CO. usually interviews both
technical and non-technical majors.
FEB. 6-7: PPG INDUSTRIES,
INC. For RBiD, Engr, Prod. Mgt,
Trng. Program, Quality Control,
Production Planning, Indus. Sales,
Controller's Training Program,
Employe Relations, Mgt. Info,
Systems. NORTH AMERICAN
ROCKWELL-AUTONETICS &
LAUNCH OPERATION EE,
Physics, Eng. Sci, ME, Stat, Math.
UNION BOX OFFICE
ACCENT Tickets, $3.00 General
Public; Faculty, Staff &
Students Free; Man of La
Mancha, Faculty, Staff, &
General Public: $3.00, $2.25 8i
$1.50; Univ. of Fla. Students:
$2.50, $1.75 & $1.00;
University Film Series, (10
films), $5.00 General Public,
Faculty & Staff; $2.50 Univ. of
Fla. Student; 5 films Univ. of
Fla. Student, $1.50; Audobon
Film Series: $1.25 General
Public, Faculty & Staff; $.75
Univ. of Fla. Student; $.50
children.
Tuesday, February 4
VISTA, Recruiting & Testing,
Games Area Lobby, & 206
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Hillel Exhibition, Hillel Lounge,
10:00 a.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union. 3:30 p.m.

Tuesday, February 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

ACCENT Reception, 122
Union, 6:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
ACCENT Film, 'To Kill a
Mockingbird", Graham Area,
7:30 p.m.
Young Democrats Meeting, 346
Union, 7:30 p.m.
*V.
Wednesday, February 5
VISTA, Recruiting & Testing,
Games Area Lobby, & 206
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Hillel Exhibition, Hillel Lounge,
10:00 a.m.
ACCENT, Reception 122 Union,
10:00 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 245 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
ACCENT Lecture, Anson
Mount, 7:30; Louis Harris,
8:30, University Aud.
Circle K Meeting, 362 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Music Dept., Florida Woodwind
Quintet, Union Aud., 8:15
p.m.
Thursday, February 6
VISTA, Recruiting & Testing,
Games Area Lobby, & 206
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Hillel Exhibition, Hillel Lounge,
10:00 a.m.
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Athletic Dept. Awards Banquet,
Union Ballroom, 6:00 p.m.
Christian Science Meeting, 150 B
7:00 p.m.
ACCENT Lecture, Prof. Jean
Houston, 7:30 p.m.; John
Finlator, 8:30 p.m..
University Aud.
Audobon Wildlife Film,
Lecturer: Robert W. Davison,
Union Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 347
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Biological Sciences Colloquium,
Speaker: Dr. William Jensen,
McCarty Aud., 7:30 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 362 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Charm Classes, 118 Union, 8:00
p.m.
ACCENT, Reception, 122
Union, 10:00 p.m.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.;.**-*** >WAv;v/Ar> A vA'V' Wi l .yiv.ViV.v l r
FOR SALE |
Honda 450 Custom, must see to
appreciate. Call 378-5761.
(A-10t-70-p)
1§69 Honda 90, 3 months old, under
1000 miles, under warranty, just
tuned-up, incl. 2 helmets. $325 or
best offer. Ph. 378-4919 after 5 pm.
(A-st-71-p)
TOPCON AUTO 100 SLR 35mm
camera. Excellent condition, 53mm
F:2.0 lens light meter in the camera.
Call Bob, 378-7479. (A-3t-73-p)
1968 Scrambler, excellent condition
load and trail sprockets, only 1500
miles, must sell S2OO or best offer.
Call 378-2878. (A-3t-73-p)
1
Cushman scooter in good condition,
SIOO or best offer. Call 378-0705
after 6:00. (A-3t-74-p)
Beautiful Scott LT-1108 stereo FM
tuner plus 4-element finco antenna.
Perfect condition. $65. Call
378-3166. (A-3t-74-p)
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines,
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-75-p)
1968 48x12 Lamplighter central air,
1 bdrm. washer. Just like new. Call
376-9005. (A-st-72-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pm 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
GJ IO n
Inn >
Zj *;si f* * £
SI8I! i 3 3
H * 5
Zj Z
I Ul W M
S t tiisS
< < *< << << 3 ***
5
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| ,l1 1 3 O W
Nfl M M C O
Ht i f
a S a a 79
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FOR SALE
THE proven carpet cleaner Blue
Lustre is easy on the budget.
Restores forgotten colors. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-75-c)
Four month old stereo originally
slls. Want SBS. Need to sell to meet
school expense. Call Charlie, room
438 between slo pm. 372-9421.
(A-4t-75-p)
Used golf clubs and bag >/2 set $25.
New golf bag never used S2O.
Heathkit mono FM tuner S2O. Call
378-3224 after 5 p.m. (A-2t-75-p)
Smith Corona electric typewriter
$l2O new, now SSO firm. Serviced
Within 6 months of date. Call
378-3413. (A-3t-75-p)
Vespa 125 cc 66 runs very well. S9O
or best offer; Raleigh five speed bikes
26 in., boys and girls 5 mo. old. Call
378-8610 after 5. (A-st-75-p)
66 Allstate Sears Motorscooter.
White, 2600 miles. I no longer use it
enough. With helmet $125. Call
376-6558 after 6 p.m. George rm 5.
(A-st-75-p)
| FOR RENT 1
Desperate! 1 female roommate.
Landmark no. 169, 378-7782.
(B-7t-72-p)

Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 4,1969

| FOR RENT
Female roommate to sublet
Landmark apartment spring quarter.
Contact Judy after 7 oclock.
378-9489. (B-st-74-p)
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
apt. on Archer Road opposite Stengel
Field Airport. Married student couple
only. SSO per month for long-term
tenant. Water furnished. Phone
372-9903. (B-st-74-p)
Sublet Till June: spacious one
bedroom apt, pool and laundry
facilities, deposit paid, call 376-7647
after 5 p.m. (B-4t-72-p)
Modern furnished mobile home near
campus for student couple or single
student. $75. Phone 376-8063 after 1
p.m. (B-4t-72-p)
SUBLET: One bedroom furnished
apartment at Tanglewood Manor.
Available February or March 1. You
may use our security deposit. Call
376-1412 after 6 p.m. (B-st-72-p)
Must sublet: immediately spacious
one bedroom furn. apt. very near
campus 95/mo.? Come see and talk.
1605 NW 4th Ave. Apt. C.
(B-3t-73-p)
Quiet offices for the work-minded.
Plenty of parking. Walk to campus.
Computer Management Corporation.
Ph.: 378-1615. (B-st-73-c)
Spring Quarter roommate.
Gatortown apts. Pool, central air.
$42.50 monthly. Call Vic, Colin or
| Willis, 376-3915. (C-2t-74-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apartment near campus.
Available now or for next quarter.
SIBO/quarter. 372-1036. (C-3t-74-p)
|r V 'Ju:: aD 'wANTED
Rmmte for 2 bdrm upstrs apt, 14
blks frm cmpus on SE 4th Ave.
Kinda run down but groovy for
parties. Call Harry Tea 378-4954,
378-8686. (C-st-75-p)
Male roommate to share 2 bedroom
Gatortown apt. 42.50 per month plus
V utilities. Call 376-2234 after 4:00
p.m. Feb. rent paid. (C-3t-75-p)
Female roommate for 2 bedroom 2
bath apt. with fireplace 50.00 for
own bedroom 25.00 to share if
desired. Call 378-2184 12:00 1:00
or evenings. (C-3t-75-p)
rnrr;pij -L i[ U
HELP WANTED jj
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between 8 5. (E-10t-71-c)
. AUTOS I
X.v:v:-x-X\-x*x-:.vx-x-x<-x-x-Sx;s-s:*x*x->:-
1965 Comet low mileage, V-8,
R&H, very clean, $895, call Larry at
378-5769, hurry! Uncle Sam calls.
(G-3t-75-p)
4-4-2 1966 metallic gray black top
r&h good tires clean interior
excellent condition, SIBOO. Call
372-5463. (G-st-73-p)
1960 Buick LeSabre, automatic, V-8,
power steering and brakes. Must Sell
S2OO. Call Flipper, 372-0491 see at
1125 SW 2nd Avenue. (G-3t-73-p)
19 67 SS 350 Camaro $1950,
378-2105. (G-7t-72-p)
PERSONAL
:-x->x-x*x-x-TX*x*x-x*x*x-x*x-xx.N%%?rt*:*X";r:-
Share in Flying Hawks 1966 Cessna
172 Skyhawk. Full panel, 2 narco
mkl2s Student Pilots eligible. Call
378-8046 for info and demo ride.
(J-st-71-p) _____

DAY! ALSO
CTligilggllJ ROBERT WALKER in "THE YOUNG,
"KILLERS THREE" THE EVIL.
IPUMSMUiIMi AND THE SAVAGE"
STARTS WEDNESDAY! ELTH E R SPELL EXCITING
ENTERTAINMENT NOW TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME!
20THCENTURY-FOX presents D
CHARLTON HESTON S : f^\hlley
A the of
F>:Vi=f.; \sfe\ Dolls
sfciwrriTT-* r >7
1 P J Jte COLOR by DELUXE
E panavision

I PERSONAL
Boogalew and Cliff: the lion is
happy. Congratulations! Love
Sexy, Lips-Volup, & the Beast.
(J-lt-75-p)
Im just back from Bogota, Colombia
with ruanas, capes, silver and emerald
jewelry, Indian decor pieces in
brilliant colors. Ruana colors are
magnificent! Eunice Renshaw, The
Spanish Main, 105 W. University Ave.
372-0667. (J-st-75-p)
Need work on your car? Call Bill,
4EG, 12 yrs. experience. Very
reasonable rates. 372-4921 after 6
p.m. (J-3t-75-p)
WANTED: back issues of PLAYBOY.
Will buy or trade. Call Vince,
376-9473. (J-2t-74-p)
.y.v.SV.Y.V.y.v.v.y.v.v.v.v.wX'W'yiViV
I LOST & FOUND
:^>x*x<*xx*:*:*x*x*x*x*xx*x*x*xx.xwk*:
FOUND: Girls' prescription glasses
and case. Pick up in room 126
McCarty. (L-3t-75-nc)
LOST: one suede fringed Indian
jacket. Squaw unhappy! If found call
Deanna 392-9659. Reward: ten fish.
(L-3t-74-p)
I-.vx-x-x-x-x-x.v.s-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-
SERVICES
I*
>x*xx.s ; ;*:*: >x :x*xx.v ; ; : ::>>xxx%s i* :
Your problems are all solved. OM is
finally on campus. OM will answer
any problems &/or troubleshoot. Call
372-5457 or 372-1360 or 376-1587.
(M-st-73-p) j

1
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
gator
ads
sell
MOVIE AUDIENCEI
*******Q (J | Q £*****
A SERVICE OF FILM-MAKERS
AND THEATERS,
These ratings apply to films
released after Nov. 1,1968
THIS "SEAL
in ads indicates the film was
submitted and approvsd under
the Motion Picture Cods
of Seif-Regulation.
[s] Suggested for GENERAL
audiences.
@ Suggested for MATURE
audiences (parental discre discretion
tion discretion advised).
S RESTRICTED Persona
under 16 not admitted, un unless
less unless accompanied by parent
or adult guardian.
(§) Persons under 16 not ad admitted.
mitted. admitted. This age restriction
may be higher in certain
areas. Check theater or
advertising.
Printed as a public service
by this newspaper.
I .JAN JOHNSON r. by Deluxe I
'> ALSO IN COLOR 9:18 \
'jTjmjVIUyRIGADr

w m WWW w w w w w w W WV W W W W WWW
1 r n rin^ r |^",g|s
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want your child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyn's Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center, 5240 NW Bth Ave., ph.
372-6667 ir 376-6495. (M-st-66-p)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
Wanted laundry by the bundle.
Wash and iron. Will pick up and
deliver S.W. 16th Ave. area. Call
378-9533 after 4:00 p.m. (M-3t-65-p)
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-st-72-p)
?
$ VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
V. Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 12 24 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p) w
f fcr if***** ror nit* in-fed puppy.-*
s| l J -WXM BAAIO
yl V/fIH r**SO*S
? V1 II r 7/f, UOC* tg
P ** a a '<4ll CJU "or m
Aomrrto
SWITCH
I

EjH|r| HURRY!...
"LAST 4 DAYS
STEVE
I^fCOJEEI\
AS
BULLITT
TECHNICOLOR* FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS W
GO&P |5jJ SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
H5:40 7:45 9:50
2 BIG HITS .
"THE GOOD THE BAD
AND THE UGLY-
and
"HANG EM HIGH
MIBCCk
Nitro was their %
t weapon against
five blazing
oil infernos! \
JOHN WAYNE J
KATHARINE ROSS /
W 4" that "utAOUATi"ait m
vuMMieiriTEZlk
TcT
the \
m fixer :
Based on the Pulitzer £
* Prize winning novel
*jp by Bernard Malamud:
~**M*+*'
e How moth 4^l
love con o MEI
t young man stood? IKi
pm sol
7 |pv' rWE WMiBJx :
BBW/! GWSWwiJoNES .*
§IATHC



Two Frosh Join 'Bunch Os Brothers

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
In their first match for the
UF, Andy North finished 4th
and David Barnes 6th behind
All-American Steve Melnyks Ist
to give the Gators the team title
in the Senior Bowl Tournament.
Coach Buster Bishop
remarked When your first three
mem finish 14-6, its hard to
lose. And this years team is like
a bunch of brothers to make
things even better.
Since the recent NCAA ruling
that abolished classification of
athletes of golf, tennis and
swimming according to year in
school, freshmen North and
Barnes can compete as first year
players.
Five years ago blue-eyed
Andy North, 18, was told by
doctors that because of a rare
knee disease he wouldnt be able
to participate in any
sport except golf.
I had to play some sport,
North said as he explained that
he had always been quite good
in football, baseball and
>a.^
DAVID BARNES
.. .strokes one toward hole
SEC Statistics
SEC STANDINGS
Cons. All
WL W L
Kentucky 8 0 14 2
Tennessee 6 2 11 3
Vanderbilt 5 3 10 6
Florida 5 4 10 6
Georgia 5 5 9 7
Miss. St. 4 4 6 9
Auburn 4 5 8 7
LSU 2 6 8 7
Miss. 2 6 5 9
Alabama 17 4 10
SCORING LEADERS
Name G Pts. Ave.
Maravich, LSU 15 645 43.0
Issel, Ky. 16 392 24.5
Hagan, Vandy 16 385 24.1
Lienhard, Ga. 16 385 24.1
Walk, UF 16 384 24.0
Elliott, Ala. 14 280 20.0
Casey, Ky. 16 308 19.3
Justus, Tenn. 14 250 17.9
Mengelt, Auburn 15 264 17.6
Epling, Ga. 16 281 17.6

BARNES, NORTH FIND NEW EXPERIENCE

The
Florida
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Sports Editor
basketball while growing up in
Madison, Wisconsin.
North, in just four short
years, with the help of his father
and PGA Chicago club pro Lee
Milligan, gained considerable
high school recognition.
North won the 1966 and
1967 Wisconsin State High
School Championship.. .Runner
up in the 1966 and 1967 Orange
Bowl Tournament and also
runner up in both the U.S.G.A.
Junior in 1967 and Western
Junior in 1966 and 1967.
In comparison David Bames,
18, started playing golf at the
age of five.
I grew up right across the
street from the golf course,
Barnes said. It was natural for
me to play cause all five of my
brothers played.
Bames, with the help of his
father, who played in the
Masters and on the U.S. Walker
Cup team, became the best prep
golfer in Georgia while he was in
high school.
Barnes won the 1966
International Jaycee, 1965
Georgia State Jaycee, 1964
Georgia State prep.. .placed 3rd
in 1967 Future Masters and 2nd
in 1968 Atlanta Amateur.
It feels so good when you
can help the other guys by
playing good, North said.
Its really a new experience
trying to help the team, Barnes
said. Theres a lot more
pressure playing as a team.
Mainly, the big difference in
playing for the team, is that if
you blow it, you let the other
guys down, North said. But
what is really great is that the
other guys are always trying to

I SPECIALS
MONDAY
I Milk Shakes or Malts 15c
I with purchase of a sandwich
TUESDAY
I Banana Split 39c
Reg. 55c
I Ho m e o f friendly Dining
I ftedHogKIKGS FOOD HOST U.S.A.
I 1802 W. Univ. 372-6820
1 1430 SjjT : J3th_St : _37B :i l6S6_

help each other, so it makes us a
closer and better team.
North mentioned that it was
this bunch of brothers feeling
that made the team try to make
Richard Spears unwind after he
shot an 82, the worst score he
had ever shot for the UF in a
tournament. The story goes that
the team put a mullit in Spears
bedcalled a meeting in his
room and had a good laugh.
A mullit is about the lowest
fish in the sea.
Spears has really been
shooting a lot lower to live up to
his new nickname of Mullit.
But most of all, the
experience proved what North
and Barnes were talking
about helping each other so
that it helps the team overall.
This idea seems to work as
the Gators were the 1968 NCAA
Champs!
I feel privileged to be
playing on this team, North
and Barnes both said.
But the most fortunate
person of all is Coach Bishop in
that he had the privilege of
signing North and Bames to a
UF scholarship.
ANDY NORTH
.. .looks over approach shot

added touch that will see the
Gators bunch of brothers
repeat as NCAA Champs.
Andy North and David
Barnes hope so, thats their goal
for this year!
LOST BLACK
S leather
i
FINDER COMTACr
DBS ROBBIE, MATHS.

i
j ? 312 W. Univ. Ave. j
(across from L & W U stater ia)
B
Wholesale Salon Supplies £
: ** FEATURING 5 :
k CLAIROL HELENE CURTIS j
** - ee ea ea a.e J
: : : : : : .:>
\ 'ww ;
f!- ' :: :vocooowoww!v ;,wfv.;
. "x ;; \v:;XvX;Xv.vv'-v^H
Playtex-invents the first-day tampon
(We took the inside but
to show you how different it is.)
Outside: its softer and silky (not cardboardy).
Inside: its so extra absorbent.. .it even protects on
your first day. Your worst day!
In every lab test against the old cardboardy kind...
the Playtex tampon was always more absorbent.
Actually 45 % more absorbent on the average
than the leading regular tampon.
Because its different. Actually adjusts to you.
It flowers out. Fluffs out. Designed to protect every
inside inch of you. So the chance of a mishap
is almost zero! n rww l
Try it fast : Bi nllt fpV
Why live in the past? ** Ml-
XxCSjSjI Tz* 111 fllFlfl^v^v: 1

Tuesday, February 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

oS sssssss
CUSSIFI^ 05 sssssss
GffT sssssss
RESH^
MIAMI HERALD
Will have editorial and
advertising representatives on
the campus February 11 and
12, seeking summer interns
among juniors and permanent
employees among seniors. Dr.
Glenn Butler is arranging
appointments at School of
Communications.

Page 11



Page 12

I Thg Florida Alliwtor. Tuatdav. Fatoruary 4,1969

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
TUTORING SESSIONS
' H '
For Greeks pHBBBB
Institutions.. 7p.m.
Humanities.. 8
and
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
k M'ILQbMMMM.
%WMMWWM&It