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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 6 L No. 74

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HOUSTON Os HARRIS
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OSBORNE SIMON
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ACCENI SPECIAL EDITION

The
-_
Florida Alligator

University of Florida, Gainesville

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Monday, February 3, 1969



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3, 1969

ANSON MOUNT: Public Affairs
Manager of Playboy Magazine, Anson
frequently appears as speaker on the
subject of The Playboy Philosophy,
The New Morality, and the Sexual
Revolution. He is also a noted expert
on college football and is the author
of Playboys well know Pigskin
Preview. Mount served in World War
II and the Korean conflict. He
studied at The University of The
South and is currently writing for
Harper and Row on subjects
concerning religion and sexual
morality.
LOUIS HARRIS: A leading analyst ot
public opinion, Harris is president of
Louis Harris and Associates, Inc. His
firm conducts research for leading
corporations, such as American
Airlines, Standard Oil Company of
New Jersey, American Telephone
and Telegraph Company, The New
York Stock Exchange and the
National Football League. He
previously engaged in survey work
for private political clients including
the 1960 campaign of President John
Kennedy. In 1965, the University of
North Carolina founded the Louis
Harris Political Data Center in
recognition of his work in the
political field.
WILLIAM M. KUNSTLER: Civil rights
attorney, Kunstler has counseled
such stricking personalities and
groups as Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr., Rap Brown, Jack Ruby, Adam
Clayton Powell, Jr., the Freedom
Riders, and the Black Panthers.
Kunstler is a noted author and
contributor to the nations leading
periodicals. He received his B.A. at
Yale University in 1941 and his
L.L.B. Degree at Columbia
University in 1949. Since 1949,
Kunstler has been associate professor
of law at New York Law School.
STROM THURMOND: Thurmond, a
Republican Senator from South
Carolina and past presidential
candidate, was elected to the U.S.
Senate in 1954 in a write-in
campaign. He was the first person
ever elected to a major office in the
U.S. by this method. The Senator is
noted for his hi story-making
predictions and achievements, his
independence, adherence to
constitutional principles, economy in
government, and his strong support
of military preparedness. A veteran
of World War 11, and a Major General
in the UJS. Army Reserve, Senator
Thurmond has been awarded
seventeen decorations, medals and
awards, including the Legion of
Merit, Bronze Star with V, Purple
Heart, and Frence Croix de Gueve.

Accent 69 Presents...

WAYNE MORSE: Senator from Oregon
for 28 years, Morse has often acted
as arbitrator in labor-management
disputes. He has served as chairman
of the Presidents special boards for
the 1966 airlines dispute and the
1967 railroads dispute and chairman
of the Presidents Special Board on
Atlantic and Gulf Coast Maritime
Industry Dispute. He received a
Ph.D. M.A. from the University of
Wisconsin and a L.L.B. Degree at
Wilier force University. He has
received honorary degrees from
several schools including Cornell,
Drake, Salem College and Parsons.
He is the author of A Survey of the
Grand Jury System and The
Attorney Generals Survey of Release
Procedures. He is also a contributor
to law reviews and periodicals.
JOHN FINLATOR: Finlator is an
associate director of the Federal
Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous
Drugs who strongly enforces federal
laws concerning drug control and
regulation. He is past Director of the
Food and Drug Administrations
Bureau of Drug Abuse and Control.
LARRY KING: Noted journalist, is a
commentator for WIOD-Radio and
WTVJ-TV in Miami. He also writes a
regular column for the Miami Herald.
MADALYN MURRAY: An attorney,
psychiatric social worker and
engineer, she is an advocate of
separation of Church and State and is
responsible for the campaign that led
to removal of bible and prayer from
the public schools. Miss Murray is
currently embarked on a similar
campaign to Tax the Church. She
speaks on Separation of Church and
State, The Need To Tax the
Church: Their Financial
Involvements, The Bible-Prayer
Case, Atheism/Freethought.
Author of Why I Am An Atheist.
TOBIAS SIMON: Past general counsel
for the Florida Civil Liberties Union,
Simon won the landmark case before
the Supreme Court, Gideon vs.
Wainwright. He was past secretary
and member of the Florida Advisory
Committee to the United States
Commission on Civil Rights and is
currently a member of the United
States Supremem Court Bar and the
Florida Bar. Simon received his
L.L.B. Degree from Harvard Law
School in 1952.

MELVIN BELLI: Defense attorney, is a
senior partner of Belli, Ashe and
Gerry law firm. Belli was chief legal
counsel for Jack Ruby. He has been
conductor of Belli Seminars in Law
since 1951 and President of Belli
Foundation Lecturers since 1960.
Beli received his B.A. From the
. University of California at Berkeley
and his L.L.B. from Boalt Hall. Some
of his most notable books include
Modern Trials and Modern
Damages, and Life and Law in
Russia.

WILLIAM 0. DOUGLAS: Supreme
Court Justice and noted author,
Douglas is a member of the liberal
bloc of the bench. His books include
Being an American, Strange Land
and Friendly People, Journey
and Democracys Manifesto. He
received his B.A. from Witman
College in Washington, and his L.L.B.
Degree from Columbia. He holds
honorary degrees from Yale, William
& Mary, Rollins, Bucknell and
others. Mr. Justice Douglas was a
member of the faculty of the
Columbia Law School and the Yale
Law School. He also conducted
various studies in bankruptcy for
William J. Donavan, U.S. Department
of Commerce.
FREDERICK W. FLOTT: A career
Foreign Service Officer, Flott is
presently on duty with the
Department of States Bureau of East
Asian and pacific Affairs after three
and one-half years service in Saigon.
He entered the Foreign Service in
1947 and served with the American
Embassy in Paris until 1952. He has
also served with the American
Embassies in Iran and Germany, as
special assistant to Ambassador
Henry Cabot Lodge and as First
Secretary in the American Embassy
in Saigon. Flott is fluent in French,
Russian, German, Spanish,
Portuguese, and Italian.
MICHAEL HARRINGTON: Social
analyst and critic, Harrington is
famed author of The Accidental
Century Toward a Democratic Left
and The Other America. In the
latter his points on American poverty
and the destitute black were so
forcefully presented that both
Kennedy and Johnson used the text
in their war on poverty. Harrington
received his B.A. at Holy Cross
College, attended Yale Law School
and received a M.A. at the University
of Chicago. He was an organizer and
secretary of the Workers Defense
League in 1953 and also a member of
the national executive committee of
the International Union of Socialist
Youth.

JULIAN BOND: Leader of the
insurgent Georgia delegation to the
Democratic National Convention
Bond received national attention in
1965 when the Georgia House of
Representatives refused to seat him
because of his opposing views of the
Viet Nam War. The United States
Supreme Court ruled that the
Georgia House had erred and Bond
took the oath of office in January
1967. He was a founder of the
Committee for Appeal for Human
Rights and a co-chairman of the
National Conference of New Politics.
Bond attended Morehouse College
until 1961, when he left to join the
staff of the Student Non-violent
Co-ordinating Committee as
Communications Director. His work
took him to civil rights drives and
voter registration campaigns in
Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and
Arkansas.
JEAN HOUSTON Director of the
Foundation for Mind Research, Mrs.
Houston is co-author with hei
husband, Robert E. L. Masters, of
The Varieties of Psychedelic
Experience, the first comprehensive
study of the effects of LSD on
human personality. She is also
co-author with her husband of a
book, Psychedelic Art. In addition
to her extensive work with LSD. she
has trained psychiatrists and clinical
psychologists in the techniques and
management of psychedelic drug
sessions. Professor Houston takes a
realistic, but optimistic positive stand
on psychedelic drugs, based on her
own work. Her lectures aim at
providing the listener with a very full
understanding of just what
psychedelic drugs do, in what ways
they are of value, and how it is that
they ,provide the best access yet to
the processes and contents of the
human mind. Professor Houston is
currently teaching at Marymount
College, Tarryton, New York.
RAY C. OSBORNE: Floridas first
lieutenant governor in 80 years,
Osborne took his law degree from
the University of North Carolina,
after which he set up law practice in
St. Petersburg. In 1964 he was
elected to the state House of
Representatives and was reelected in
1966 and 1967. He served as
Minority Leader pro-tempore in the
1967 session and was elected an
outstanding member of the legislator
by his colleagues. Osborne, who gave
up his seat in 1968 to run for the
Public Service Commission, was the
leading vote-getter among
Republican candidates for state-wide
office with 48.4 per cent of the votes
cast. Osborne was named in early
January to fill the lieutenant
governorship created by the new
state constitution.



Panel Discussions Today Start Activities

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Two open-air panel
discussions with student, faculty
and administrative participation
and an Oscar-winning movie
commence activities for the
week-long Accent 69
Symposium.
Today at 12:30 pjn. at the
Plaza of the Americas, panelists
will discuss the role of youth in
national political parties and
politics.
A panel beginning at 12:30
p.m. Tuesday will delve into the
topic of power distribution
among the various segments of
the university students, faculty
and administration. Tuesdays
panel will also be held at the
Plaza of the Americas.
Todays participants will be
Dr. Kenneth Megill, assistant
professor of philosophy; Dr.
Manning J. Dauer, chairman of
the Department of Political
Science; and Dr. Robert
Sherman, assistant professor of

Accent: Alternative
To Student Violence

By LARRY BERRIN
Accent Chairman
It is obvious to everyone that
students in American and all
over the world are rebelling,
either vocally or physically,
about the direction and
philosophy of their
governments actions.
The student generation is
questioning the motives and
actions of all those who lead, or
pretend to lead, our society. We
question and want to know why
we fight for freedom around
the world, when at home the
Black man is still trying to
obtain his. We wonder why the
political system does not give us
a share in the processes of
running and building a modern
society.
Today, as never before the
students want to be a part of the
institution that determines the
direction of their lives. They
want and deserve equal
representation as a force in
American society. And, of
course, the college campus is
usually the first place they
begin.
They ask, why cant they be
part of the university
establishment and share in
determining and directing the
functions and goals of the
university.
Often they have met much
frustration and their efforts have
led to countless dead ends:
status quo fighting the change;
students not being given credit
for the potential they possess,
despite the fact that we are the
most informed and educated
generation in the history of the

j THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published fhre times weekly except during June,
July and August when it Is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florids AHI gat or, Reitz Union
Building University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601. < -
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $ 3.50 per quarter.
The Florid* Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable. A
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
if-*. Notices.for correction must be givyn before next insertion.

I T|
As an institution of higher learning, a university has
iSVL&K a special obligation to offer a forum for all points of
DIMENSIONS view > no matter how unpopular, .the more
controversial a belief, the greater the obligation of the
y/t ifr university to critically examine it. Accent presents a
/n r T wide spectrum of views and ideas from the people that
i |l are intimately involved in the affairs and nature of the
Mf' ijj} theme The Dimensions of Freedom. I
FREEDOM

education
Also taking part are Dr.
Michael V. Gannon, assistant
professor of religion; J.D.
Lindstrom, instructor of
journalism; Bill Sadowski, 4LW,
a member of the Student Senate
and a legislative aid in the state


-
IgHP*
LARRY BERRIN
... Accent chairman
world. So WHY cant we be a
part of the structure that
represents and determines our
destiny?
Unfortunately, when one
looks at the United States today,
and sees how students on college
campuses get front page news,
usually it is not because they
have developed new educational
methods or constructively
worked within the community.
It is because students have taken
over the administration building
or have had another
demonstration.
UFs Accent Symposium,
hopefully, is the counter-effect
of thoughtless student
radicalism. It is aciton in the
opposite direction; i.e.,
constructively building upon the
concept of an alternative to
violence. It is the opportunity to
open channels so divergent views
may be exchanged. Ideas can be
heard from all concerned and
serve as a basis for further
discussion.
It is the transition of ideas
and views, within the framework
of the theme, The Dimensions of
Freedom, and it will enable the

House of Representatives;
Donald Aiesi, a graduate student
in political science; and Jimmy
Bailey, leader of the UF Students
for Wallace.
Participants in Tuesdays
discussion on power in the
university will be Dr. Harry

UF student to present his point
of view, no matter what it might
be.
Accent is *an effort by UF
students to encourage
knowledge and understanding of
the pertinent contemporary
issues that presently confront
this country. By giving the
student body an opportunity to
meet and communicate first
hand with the thought-purveyors
and news-makers of the country,
we can develop a dialogue that
we intelligently focus on these
issues.
Accent offers a forum for
discussion and development of
ideas and the time to be heard.
It represents the working of
students among students to
create and formulate new
meanings for discussion.
Although, no actual policies or
principles are established for
application, it is the process of
thought and discussion that
brings about an atmosphere of
understanding and learning.
Accent gives the UF an
opportunity to take its place
amont the great institutions of
higher learning. It is the chance
for the university to establish
itself and justify its reason for
being.
The experience gained outside
the ordinary classroom is just as
important as the traditional
educational process. If the
university operates as a forum
for all points of view, no matter
how different, it will fulfill its
primary obligation to the
student. For what other reason
does a university exist, if not to
provide the location and
facilities, both human and
artificial, for the always
continuing process of creating
thought?
The UF needs this experience
if it is to garnish a reputation as
an institution of importance in
higher education, rather than
just a diploma factory. It must
show that it can accept, indeed
encourage, opposing views, and
out of such discussion develop a
true learning process, through
personal and individual
involvement.

Sisler, dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences; Dr. Sidney
Jourard, professor of
psychology;, Dr. Rene
Lemarchand, assistant professor
of political science; Dr. Corbin
Camell, associate professor of
comprehensive English; Robert

* -----
I Schedule Os Events |
I 1
S WEDNESDAY 8
i
f. 7:00-7:30 P.M. University Auditorium
Mixed media presentation
§
M
| 7:30-8:30 P.M. University Auditorium gj
>: Anson Mount
$ $
| 8:30-9 :30 P.M. University Auditorium |
;iji Louis Harris (Keynote) >
g
| 9:30-10:00 P.M. |
s:* Questions $
****
Reception at Reitz Union Rooms 122 and 123 :£
£ 10:00-11:00 P.M. |§
S?
,v
| THURSDAY §
7:00-8:00 P.M. University Auditorium S
$ Jean Houston j§
:j: a
8:00-9:30 P.M. University Auditorium |
John Finlator 3*:
g: ;g
| 9:30-10:00 P.M. |
:£ Questions §
| 10:00-11:00 P.M. Reitz Union, Rooms 122, 123 |
Reception i?
g |
& FRIDAY 1
g: |
jij: 2:00-4:00 P.M. Plaza of the Americas
A Madalyn Murray
:$ Julian Bond Si
I I
g: 7:30-8:30 P.M. Florida Gym |
Frederick Flott
: : : :§
:g 8:30-9:30 P.M. Florida Gym S:
g: Michael Harrington gi
| 9:30-10:00 P.M. |
P Questions |
g 10:00-11:00 P.M. Reitz Union, Rooms 122, 123 |
5 Reception ?j
I %
% SATURDAY A
I %
jg Michael Harrington LBJs Great Society g
8 9:00-10:00 A M Rdt? Union! 22. 123
I 1
6 Frederick Flott War in Viet Nam
| 9:00-10:00 A.M. Reitz Union, 349 g
11:30-1:30 P.M. University Inn
A Delegate Luncheon |

Monday, Fabmary 3,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Young, 4LW, SG ombudsman;
and Steve Hull, former editor of
the Alligator.
The moderator for both
discussions will be Skip
Livingston, 7AS, president of Pi
Sighia Alpha, political science
honorary.
Comments and questions are
invited from the audience.
To kill a Mockingbird,
based on the novel that won a
Pulitzer Prize for authoress
Harper Lee and three Academy
Awards for the producers, will
be shown free of charge both
Monday and Tuesdav night.
Several talent acts will also be
Appearing at the Plaza of the
Americas Monday, Tuesday and
Friday.
Todays showing will be at
7:30 in Broward Area, and
Tuesdays will be 7:30 at
GrahanuArea.

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3, 1969

Accent 69 The Best Error! In history

'Academic Tradition 1
Aim Os Program
By RONNIE BLOOM
Accent Public Relations Chairman
Accent 67 began, Accent 6B happened and ACCENT
69 is here.
Our mission is To Create An Academic Tradition.

The stage for Accent 69 is set
and the actors are ready to
perform. Nine months of
preparation, $13,000, and a lot
of work have gone into the
production of the week-long
symposium.
Accent proposes to analyze
and investigate the many aspects
of our theme, The Dimensions
of Freedom, . Vietnam,
drugs, civil disobedience, sex,
religion, due process, the cities,
and legislation and the political
process.
Several years ago Charles
Shepherd, then student body
president, visualized the
possibility of bringing prominent
speakers to the UF to discuss the
issues of the day. His idea
materialized, resulting in a three
day program featuring now
President Richard Nixon; past
director of CORE, James
Farmer; National Review
Publisher, William Rusher;
Florida Senator George
Smathers; columnist Sidney
Harris; and Drs. Russell Kirk and
Max Lemer. The theme was
The Responsibility of Dissent.
The symposium, sponsored by
student government was widely
acclaimed by the UF
administration, faculty,
students, and state newspapers.
Since 1968 was an election
year, the theme for Accent 6B
was Politics: Impact on Youth
and 10 speakers discussed this
topic. The most noted speakers
included independent lobbyist
Ralph Nader, political
consultant F. Clifton White,
republican historian Phillip
Crane, columnist James
Kilpatrick, and noted author
Harry Golden.
The success of Accent 6B was
questionable. That year few
students realized that there is a
difference between Accent
season salt and Accent
symposium. But, nevertheless,
the show went on.
Larry Berrin, senior in public
relations from Miami, was
tapped as general chairman of
Accent 69. Berrin was personnel
chairman of Accent 6B and past
chairman of the interfraternity
council speakers bureau.
During the last weeks of the
spring quarter of 1968, the
m
3,
jM iTi r^rr-
RONNIE BLOOM
... PR chairman

executive committee was
chosen. The first orders of
business were to set the date for
the Symposium, to decide on
the theme, and to make the
initial contacts with desired
speakers.
The summer quarter arrived
and most of the committee left
Gainesville. Jeff Weil, a senior in
public relations from
Jacksonville was chosen speakers
chairman for Accent 69. Weil
wrote letters to personalities
across the country inviting them
to speak at the UF. It was a long
summer for Weil, but he laid a
strong foundation for a
promising program. During the
fall quarter of 1968, the
remaining parts of the executive
committee were pieced together.
Frazier Solsberry, a junior in
journalism from Ft. Lauderdale,
was the choice for
vice-chairman. Solsberrys basic
duties consisted of
communicating with state and
local officials as well as the UF
administrators, faculty and staff.
Nancy Register, a junior in
arts and sciences from
Jacksonville, was chosen
executive secretary for the
second consecutive year. Miss
Register was better known to
the Accent staff as the
mass-mailer, or the
ditto-doer, or temper
typist.
This writer, a senior in public
relations from Jacksonville, got
the nod for the public relations
position. The PR mans basic
responsibility is securing
favorable press and publicity for
the program as well as bringing
the program to national
attention. He also invited
interested high school students
around the state and colleges
throughout the south. Three
hundred delegates are attending
this years Symposium.
Tom Blackmon, program
chairman, is a senior in arts and
sciences from Miami. Blackmon
is the man in charge of any and
all activities associated with the
actual program period. He
coordinated the Plaza of The
Americas activities, an art
exhibit in conjunction with
Accent, and scheduled movies
pertinent to our theme.
Tom DeMarco, technical
chairman, is a junior in business
administration.
Joe Hair, finance chairman, is
hoping to keep Accent on the
winning side. It was he who had
to say no because of financial
shortages when Hubert
Humphrey, Edmund Muskie,
Walter Cronkite, Edward
Brooke, and several others
decided to accept their speaking
invitation to Accent 69.
Jeff Fenster, publicity
chairman, is responsible for any
and all printing and publicity on
and
conducting an essay contest

PR CHAIRMAN SAYS

jgsMBBBa...
s ' s v > * s'

'''
jmmmm
19
- ***** fc*. Wfc,
ACCENT STAFFERS (L TO R) JEFF WEIL, FRAZIER SOLSBERRY AND LARRY BERRIN
... discuss plans for this weeks activities after a year of work

relating to the topic of the
Symposium. Fenster is a senior
in arts and sciences.
Barry Malter, in charge of the
personnel division of Accent 69,
is responsible for the
transportation of the guest
speakers and obtaining the
manpower, when necessary, for
any Accent activity. Malter, a
senior in arts and sciences from
Miami Beach, was the Accent
6B finance chairman.
Tom Warner, transportation
chairman, has procurred
courtesy cars from Chevrolet,

SEVERAL ACCENT FACTS .
Accent 67 brought nine speakers,
Accent 6B brought ten speakers,
Accent 69 is bringing 16 speakers.
Accent 67 hosted 194 high school and college students,
Accent 6B hosted 160 high school and college students,
Accent '69 is hosting 250 high school and college students.

Ford Plymouth, and Cadillac
Motor Divisions. Warner is a
junior in business administration
from Coral Gables.
Steve Hull will prepare the
Accent magazine containing a
synopsis of the week-long
program in addition to articles
written by noted speakers who
were unable to attend the
Symposium. Hull, a senior in
business administration from St.
Petersburg, was the former
editor of the Alligator.
Nancy Isenberg was the
Student Senate representative to

the Accent staff.
The Symposium, the largest
of its kind in the south and
perhaps the country, relies on
participation and concern. Do
not hesitate to take full
advantage of the opportunities
before you. Speak out! Question
those who are the most qualified
to answer the problems that this
nation faces today. These
opportunities will be available
throughout the program at
formal speeches, informal
receptions, seminars, and panel
discussions.



Law College Dissent Termed Typical

Conclusion of a two-part series.
By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
While several law professors
and students claim that a
turmoil of dissent slowly creeps
around the carpeted hallways
and plush offices of the new
Law Center, others argue that
discontent is no more prevalent
here than at other schools.
Associate Professor Michael
W. Gordon who came to the
UF last year as a visiting
instructor and has since chosen
to remain here is one.

.....
Pacemaker
All-American

IN RECOGNITION BID
SSOC Wins
First Round
By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
Although it is not public record yet, sources close to the
Committee on Student Organizations say the committee
plans to recommend the approval of UF charter applications
for SSOC and New Party.
The committee met in executive session Friday, more than a week
after a public hearing was held. At that hearing, members of SSOC
and New Party were questioned by the committee of four students
and five faculty members.
Chairman Rush Choate said Friday night the committee had
reached its decision, but its final recommendation had not yet been
written.
The committee knows the general context of its
recommendation, Choate said.
In addition to Choate, faculty members Bill Cross, Jack
Funkhouser, Edwin Kirkland and Vincent OConnell are on the
committee. Student members are Bob Buck, Jim Devaney, Susan
Johnson and Tom Blackmon.
The source said the vote was 54 in favor of chartering.
Three decisions will be written. Blackmon and Funkhouser will
each write a minority judgment, while Cross will write the majority
decision in favor of chartering, the source said.
The decisions will be made public upon completion, and will be
submitted to Vice President for Student Affairs Lester L. Hale who
will forward them to UF President Stephen C. OConnell, who will
fTl'flTl Him PETE KNOCKE
BUT WHO CARES ?
Inscribed for all time in UF architecture building concrete is this
stirring defense of apathy. The message is accurate enough but really,
Wnu UIIC4? ~ as -

I dont think theres any
more animosity here than at any
other law school, the
33-year-old former naval officer
and dean at the University of
Connecticuts law school says.
Several law professors have
charged that an atmosphere of
discontent prevalent at the
College of Law has prompted
several instuctors to accept
employment elsewhere.
Assistant Professor L. L.
Lamborn said that some of the
remaining professors, seeing the
handwriting on the wall, also
contemplate leaving.
And, as the most outspoken

The
Florida Alligator

and liberal members of the law
faculty leave, Lamborn and
others charge, they are replaced
by others who adapt more
easily.
While Gordon says he could
be classified as politically
conservative, he does not agree
that ideology was the criteria
used in his selection.
I think the law school has
been out looking for the best
people they can find, he says,
adding that instructor turnover
among younger faculty members
is not uncommon anywhere.
I dont feel there is any great
dissension on the part of the

Monday, February 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

'
Think of the failure...
j
... is kept in jail...

Warren Dedication Speech
Tells of Crisis in Courtroom

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Case backlogs and court
congestions have reached the
crisis stage in many parts of the
country, U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Earl Warren warned at
the dedication of the new $3
million Spessard L. Holland Law
Center here Saturday.
The operation of the U.S.
courts is a matter of personal
concern to me, Warren told
over 900 dignitaries, faculty and
students gathered at the Centers
modernistic auditorium.
And I must confess that

The political atmosphere at the UF College of Law has
been likened to a pendulum The arm, by general consensus,
is presently swinging to the right. At the same time, it has
been denied that politics play any part in faculty selection.
What is undeniable, however, is that young professors of
liberal persuasion continue to leave UF.

faculty, Gordon says.
I would think that if you
made it your primary goal to
maintain a liberal-conservative
balance you wouldnt be
fulfilling your role as an
educational instituion, he adds.
I would be concerned if
individuals were using the

Page 5

FI i iiP j W- m
jsstk %
PBPfPSfe'JIll- mmmmm j
of justice...
... a year or more...

despite magnificent efforts on
the part of many of the judges,
we are not meeting the challenge
of our times, Warren said.
He said it is often three, four
or more years before a civil case
can be tried.
Whenever such conditions
exist, he said, justice is being
denied to at least one party to
every litigation and often to
both sides.
A person of modest means
with a just cause cannot afford
to wait years and often has
forced upon him the necessity of
settling on an inequitable basis
or being forced into

classrooms to teach their own
political views whether
conservative or liberal, Gordon
says.
Assistant Professor Robert J.
Guttman agrees that he has
complete freedom to say what
I want in my classroom.
(SEE 'LAW' PAGE 8)

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Mr
m
JHr w' \
V,'' v\.
'I'M drQ**?* <
... when an innocent person...
WfT
a v : m, : -f"

... after his indictment...

bankruptcy, Warren said.
But he said the most
dramatic problem of the law
concerns criminal cases rather
than civil litigations.
Think of the failure of justice
when an innocent person is kept
in jail for a year or more after
his indictment before he can
have his case tried by a jury in
accordance with the
Constitution, he said.
And what is equally
shocking is the case of the
criminal who is released on bail
or on his own recognizance for
more than a year after having
{SEE 'WARREN' PAGE 6)



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3, 1969

Overenforcement Not 'Gentry Objective

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
UF President Stephen C. OConnell
said Thursday neither he or anyone else
in authority on the UF campus have or
will discriminate in any way against
any person because of political views
that are lawfully asserted and
exercised.
The presidents statement released to
the University Senate was an attempt to
clear up some of the unfortunate
attitudes and misunderstandings
resulting from the arrest and trial of
Lavon Gentry.
Gentry was arrested by the University
Police on Aug. 9, 1968 for placing
Bust the Draft Rally posters on the

Warren Speaks
Os Court Crisis

FROM PAGE FIVE

committed a serious crime,
Warren said, and thus enabled
to commit other serious crimes
before being tried on the first
charge.
He termed the conflict the
greatest problem of our
profession today.
The silver-haired justice
advocated the establishment of
law centers which tackle legal
problems of importance to the
community, the state and the
nation.
A center where lawyers,
scholars and interested citizens
can discuss the problems of the
day in a manner which will lead
to their solution he said.
This is an auspicious time
for the dedication of new
temples of justice, Warren said.
The towers of the old ones are
trembling from the injustices
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doors to Walker Auditorium after being
warned to stop by police. He was freed
on a technicality when his case came
before Gainesville Municipal Court last
month.
OConnell called the presumption of
ill-motives on the part of university
officials a dangerous point of beginning
for our dealing with each other on this
campus and in our society.
He said Gentry was warned and
refused to stop posting the signs. It was
not deliberate selective enforcement
because of political views he said.
There can be little doubt that
anyone who wishes to do so can post
about this campus with little fear of
apprehension, warning or arrest, the

that stalk them in almost every
part of the world.
Warrens address was the
highlight of the dedication
ceremonies which brought to the
campus what UF President
Stephen C. O'Connell termed as
the most impressive gathering
of distinguished individuals at
any university function.
Dignitaries attending included
Sen. Holland; Gov. Claude Kirk;
Board of Regents Chairman D.
Burke Kibler; former U.S.
Senator George Smathers;
Richard Ervin, Chief Justice of
the Florida Supreme Court; and
former UF President J. Wayne
Reitz.

an
Impossible
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No! .v i fF
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Not in the 9
Sunday, Feb. 9th
8:15 pm § /
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University of Florida J|V j
Gymnasium
A Student Government Production D .. u
Patricia Marand as Aldonza

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president said. However, there is no
record of any incident in which, after
warning not to do so, a person, student
or other, has been found continuing to
post wrongfully in the the face of
warning, he said.
OConnell said if political motives
had been the motive for the arrest
Gentry would have been arrested
without the warning.
The effort of the university is to
protect the students interests yet
maintain order, he said.
The alternative to the somewhat
loose, but nevertheless realistic,
procedure used on this campus, though
it may be selective and inconsistent at

times, is to adopt an always consistent
but purely legalistic hard line, arresting
every student for each breach of law
committed on this campus without
warning, OConnell said.
The policy which we follow on this
campus is that the use of the force of
law. .ought to be a last, not first,
resort, he said.
The president pointed out that no
person can be arrested for violating a
strictly campus regulation.
Only if the action also violates a
city, state or federal law can the act be
stopped by arrest, OConnell said.
If he (Gentry) was seeking to show
that lawful authority could be ignored
with impunity, he has failed as he
should have failed, OConnell said.



Annual IK
Blood Drive
Begins Today
The annual Interfraternity
Council blood drive begins today
and for the first time anyone
may donate, said Chairman Jim
Wilkerson.
The drive, beginning today,
will run through Feb. 28.
Parental permission is
necessary for those under 21
who wish to donate. Permission
forms are available at any
fraternity house, the blood
bank, or the IFC office in Tigert
Hall, room 129.
Non-greeks who want to
contribute are asked to give their
real names and the house under
which they wish to donate.
Two trophies will be awarded
at the conclusion of the drive,
one to the house with the largest
percentage of members
contributing and one to the
house donating the greatest
number of pints.
The blood bank is open
weekdays from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 12
noon.

CHUTE HITS POWER LINES
Sky Diver Escapes Injury

A UF student escaped injury
Sunday morning when his
parachute tangled in power lines
near SW 34th Street and Archer
Road, according to the Alachua
County Sheriffs Office.
Peter Weymouth, 2UC, lost
control of his parachute in
strong winds over Stengel Field
Airport and was blown away

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from the target area. He came
down on a power pole,
according to Bill Booth, 4AR, a
member of the Gator Sky Divers
Club.
Booth said Weymouth was
hanging eight feet off the
ground when he cut himself
loose and then called the
sherriffs office.

According to Booth, this was
Weymouths first jump.
Weymouth had about nine hours
of ground school instruction.
Booth said this was the first
time in five years that a Gator
Sky Divers Club member had
been involved in a parachuting
accident.

y f ITV-yf UFS REPRESENTATIVES I
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Monday, February 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3,1969

Law ColleaeDissent Termed Typical

j^^^PAGE^Fr^j
I have not run into any
personal troubles whatsoever,
he says.
But he adds that some
decisions around here seem to be
made on political grounds.
There have been certain
decisions made by the
administration that I would
disagree with, Guttman says. I
personally feel that Professor
Lambom should have been
granted tenure.
Lamborn, who has been a
member of the law faculty for
nearly four years, will see his job
terminated after next year unless
he is granted tenure or
permanent contract.
Frank Maloney, dean of the
College of Law, says Lamboms
tenure was in effect denied by
the professors own colleagues.
He said a preliminary poll of
tenured professors taken by him
revealed strong opposition to
Lamborns tenure.
Guttman says Lamboms
tenure may have been turned
down because of political
reasons.
I think those would be
impermissible grounds for such a
decision, he says. Lambom is
a valuable teacher and person.
Professor Robert J. Farley
says political ideologies have no
bearing on such decisions.
I dont know of anybody
who has expressed any
controversial ideas who has had
pressure put on him in any
way, Farley says.
I think dissent here is based
largely not on not being allowed
freedom of expression, he adds,
but in that certain people could
not force their views on other
members of the facultv.
If repression exists at the
College of Law, Farley says, it is
exerted by some professor
rather than the administration.
A few of them have been
trying to repress views of the
rest of the faculty, he charges.
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Henry A. Fenn, who was
Dean of the UF Law School
between 1948 and 1958, says he
has never seen a faculty yet
without widely diverging
opinions.
I would think it unfortunate
if we didnt have diversity of
opinion, he says.
While Fenn agrees that the
liberal-conservative balance
may be leaning toward the
conservative side, he says he
does not find the trend alarming.
Fiver years ago the balance
was the other way, Fenn says.
For the next two to three years
the pendulum swung to liberal
and now its going the other
way.
It just swings back and
forth, he says. I dont see how
you could help but do that.
He says departing professors
are merely seeking a better
environment for whatever they
want to do.
Ive never seen a school
where certain members of the
faculty were not unhappy
because they didnt have
control, he says, or because

Its not
every day you
can line up
an engineering
jobat
General Electric.
o
Its Wednesday, Feb. 12
\
Thats the day the GE interviewer will be on cam- ODDortunitiAc
pus. Hes coming to talk to engineers. All kinds of spends mnqt of hir Smn eS t i, here an engineer
engineers. hi 1 IS 7 16 Wl GE customers, using
Hell be talking about the opportunities at Gen- ety of problems W & * help them solve a vari
eral Electric. All kinds of opportunities. So no matter what t- a
Opportunities in research and development, youll probably finH r* f e ?S, neer you
Where an engineer can work on everything from actly the kind of £h th G ne ral Electr ic has ex exjet
jet exjet engines to x-ray equipment to ways to prevent Why not lino in yOU r . kmg for forair
air forair pollution. miaht lino 11T > ; a n intervi ew now? And you
Opportunities in manufacturing. Where an en- February 12 ? J b y U W£mt n Wednesda y
gineer can be responsible for designing a factory or
developing a new production system or getting the GENE RA I (SUM Cl EPTD I P
most out of other people. n ft L C LC ll I KIU
An equal opportunity employer

they didnt represent the
majoritys views.
Fenn, a member of the
colleges personnel committee,
denies political ideologies are
considered in the selection of
new faculty members.
The policy we have adopted
is to get some experienced
teachers, he says. Our hiring
policies in the past two years
have been to fill gaps in specific
teaching areas.
Dean Maloney says he does
not see faculty turnover as an
increasing problem.
He points to the 10-year
period during which Fenn was
the colleges dean, noting that a
I Miller-Brown I
I I
I I
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL NH
J/O-AOO AUTHORIZED I
I DEADER I

total of 13 instructors left the
school then.
1 During his 11-year tenure,
Maloney says, 14 positions have
changed hands even though the
faculty has increased from 20
members in 1948 to 36.
But dissidents point out that
just during the past year three
instructors have left the school
while three more who asked for
temporary leaves of absence may

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not return.
Associate Professor Robert C.
Berry-who will be taking a
post at Wayne State University
in Detroit after next June say s
the situation has become
crucial in the past two years.
A law school ought to keep
balance of various legal and
social concerns, he says. I am
quite afraid that we arent.



SSOC Speakers Popular

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Are UF radicals really going capitalistic? What
started as a joke has turned into a money-making
enterprise for the Southern Students Organizing
Committee. In Tuesdays Alligator a letter to the
editor from John Sugg, SSOC secretary, stated the
organization would have to start charging fees due
to the large demand for radical speakers.
A speaker will be furnished to any class,
organization or meeting upon three days notice,
the letter read. The charge will be $5 to any
non-radical group. A radical speaker will be
furnished on less than three days notice for an
additional $2.50 service charge.
Black radicals, at a premium because of political
suppression cost $lO. To speak to a group of over
100 people, there is an additional charge of 25 cents
per person.
SSOC, which usually gets about 20 requests a
week for speakers, expected a decline in calls,
according to Chairman Steve Fahrer. Instead, by
Wednesday evening around 35 people had called

FINISH BUDGET BEFORE ELECTIONS
Fund Requests For 1969-70
Have Feb. 15 Deadline

The Student Senate Budget
and Finance committee is
pushing for completion of next
years budget before the present
administration leaves.
All organizations chartered
by the student government must
submit fund requests for the
next year before Feb.ls.
The early completion of next
years budget is an effort to
eliminate the difficulties of the
previous one, John Englehardt,
secretary of finance, said
Wednesday.
This years budget was drawn
up separately for each quarter
since last summer. Organizations
were annoyed because they had
to wait to have their budgets
approved each time, he said.
He doesnt think drawing up
the 69-70 budget now is an
infringement of the next
administrations rights. It is
always their prerogative to
change it, Englehardt said.
Applicants must list their past
and intended expenditures, their
source of funds and an
explanation of each item
according to Mandatory
Financial Statement Law passed
by the Senate Tuesday night.
It is our feeling that some
clubs party on their own funds,
but ask student government to
fund any other expenses like
trips, Englehardt aid.
jj^CHJCWELR^EPAIF
NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM--9:00 PM Mon-Fri

In addition, any new source
of funds during the year must be
reported by a club within 15
days after the source becomes
available.
No specific penalty for
unreported fund sources was
mentioned in the bill.
But if they are discovered, it
will weigh heavily in their next
request for funds; theyll
probably be cut severely,
Englehardt said.

I
I FEBRUARY 3RD-BTH I
I
COMPLETE WEEK
I xiAtb ihe I
I the Folk-Rock sound I
I California and THE FUCK in Miami I
I Come ANY or EVERY night I
I I INTERCOURSE I I
I Wed., February sth at the Rathskeller I
I University of Florida President Stephen OConnell I

requesting speakers. Some stated that the
organization wasnt charging enough.
Fahrer credited the increase in business to the
values of a capitalistic society. Put a high price on
something and people think its worth more.
The SSOC members really arent such
heard-hearted entrepreneurs as it seems, however.
Fahrer stated that they would speak free to any
group that couldnt afford to hire a radical, or that
just didnt want to pay the fee.
SSOC presently has 10 speakers available to visit
classrooms and meetings and 10 to 15 more
preparing for the job. Most groups ask to hear about
SSOCs feelings on the war, the draft and the
university. The programs usually consist of a
prepared speech followed by a question and answer
session.
The speakers receive no cut from the fee. All
money goes directly into the SSOC treasury.
Currently there are no special plans for its use.
Radical speakers are available by calling
376-5044 or writing to Box 13636 University
Station.

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Monday, February 3,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3, 1969

Page 10

The Florida Alligator
'TlwpriMaf fiwdom
h ** * <* rwpoMiWUty."
Harold Aldrich
V Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Pydfrtfrfb Managing Editor
M Raul Ramirez James Cook
yiiMfAifQH Executive Editor News Editor
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| I Uudk JbjftU' ifo |
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Ik

Stop Madalyn Murray From Speaking, She Say

MR. EDITOR:
Today we live in a world surrounded by protests
and demonstrations on every hand. I personally am
opposed to Miss Madalyn Murray, professed athiest,
coming to our city and speaking in the Plaza of the
Americas on February 7, at 2:00 p.m. 1 regret that
this woman who is known to bring confused

Cartoonist Don Wright Shows Some A:

The dimensions of freedom -a
subject often tested on the UF
campus and throughoutour nation,
as well may gain new and
enlightening perspectives here in
the coming days as ACCENT 69
kicks off its third annual
symposium.
Culminating nearly a year of
dedicated work, the ACCENT
committee has lined up a
distinquished array of speakers
representing nearly the entire
spectrum of American political
life and thought.
Through discussion and honest
exchange of ideas, students can
gain much from the famous

MR. EDITOR:
Wednesdays editorial, The
Telltale Marks of Hypocrisy,
may have gone just a bit too far
in screaming censorship! in
regard to the activities of Vice
President Lester Hale.
You claimed he was closely
involved in what you call two
contradictory actions. He helped
draft the resolution on
maximum freedom for student
publications introduced at the

thinking to our young people, and the one the
world credits for removing prayer from our
public schools, has been invited by ACCENT to
speak at the UF campus.
I have contacted a university official, as well as
trying to contact ACCENT leaders, expressing my
desire that she not come but to no avail, and now
I ask you the public to join me in prayer for the

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B J BBH^^^Bjj^B

EDITORIAL
Dimensions Os Frei

RFCAUSE OF 'ETHICS* PROBE
f Get Off Dean Hales

people they will have an
opportunity to hear this week.
In turn, the speakers, all of
them intellectual leaders in then thenown
own thenown rights, may attain greater
knowledge and understanding of
the dimensions of freedom by
talking with and listening to
students.
But the opportunities for
meaningful communication can be
no more than the partici participants
pants participants both speakers and
listeners make them.
The chance to exchange ideas
on the issues and controversies
which are shaping American life
with some of the idea-forgers

Action Conference. And he
demanded an investigation into
facts surrounding three stories,
two of an expose nature,
published last term to determine
if the canons of responsible
journalism are being consistently
upheld.
For this, you delicately
suggest he bears the tell-tale
marks of hypocrisy.
As an impartial observer, I
cannot swallow your charges. I

next 10 days, that the God we serve will intervene
and that she not be permitted to speak. I am sure
that the world looks on eagerly when a request like
mine is made to see if the God the Christians
serve is still answering prayer. I challenge you to
join me. Thank you.
MRS. LYONS

am no supporter of mucl
administration policy and m 3
journalistic activities woul<
suggest I am a strong advocate 0
freedom of the press; yet, it
seems to me, in this instance
Dean Hale is not questioning
your ends of trying to print the
truth, but your means oi
achieving this end.
You wrote that Dean Hale
requested disciplinary action be
taken against those responsible

I USSBWt |
i 1
v



;dom
jmselves is what ACCENT is all
For when people exchange
ws understanding results even
en agreement cannot be
ic hed. Understanding how
jther man thinks and why
eds enlightenment and
3 wledge.
ACCENT offers a rare
lortunity for a meaningful,
uan-to-human cultivation of
jwledge.
Ve urge the university
imunity not to allow such an
ortunity to pass without an
>race.
because freedom without
wledge has no dimensions.
b
Back
for the stories under
investigation. Didnt he add IF
indeed these rules had, after
investigation, found to be
broken?
If an Alligator staffer had
deliberately lied to obtain birth
control pills at the student
infirmary, then she is culpable.
She certainly would not have
been a very ethical journalist.
It is reassuring, however, that
the paper and its writers were
acquitted by the Board of
Student Publications after its
investigations. This implies that
the means of the Alligator have
the same integrity as its end of a
free press.
But get off Hales back! Is an
investigation of your methods be
a subtle but damnable attempt
to influence editorial policies? I
think not.
LINDA MIKLOWITZ, 2UC

I Wen mil
spects Os The Dimensions Os Freedom

I 1 I MMS&; f A-* '
'l BHBHBHHI
Hf **
v'lt'. : -vf -f
1
DOW PROTESTOR REMOVED FROM REITZ UNION*"*
... demonstrations last year over napalm-makers

(HumiKi
UF STUDENTS PROTEST TREATMENT OF CIVIL RIGHTS WORKERS
** ... small core of students participate in local civil rights activities

DISSENT
AT UF

1
ik n
STUDENT ALLEGEDLY BURNS DRAFT CARD
... at election night rally at Tigert Hall

Monday, February 3,1969, Tha Florida AUtator.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3, 1969

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE I
v .;.
Honda 450 Custom, must see to
appreciate. Call 378-5761.
(A-10t-70-p)
Hollywood bed twin size, mattress
& box springs, SSO; tv console RCA,
$35; Heath FM tuner S2O; Phone
376-7175 after 6 p.m. (A-st-70-p)
1969 Honda 90, 3 months old, under
1000 miles, under warranty, just
tuned-up, incl. 2 helmets. $325 or
best offer. Ph. 378-4919 after 5 pm.
(A-st-71-p)
Vespa 125. S9O. Good shape, with
helmet. Call 392-8061 or 378-4449
after 5 p.m. (A-3t-72-p)
First $lB5 takes Hondo 90 1967.
2500 miles, excellent condition.
Need money for school. Call
378-8127. (A-3t-72-p)
1967 Honda CBI6O Helmet included.
Very good condition $350.00.
Inquire at Streit's Cycle Shop.
(A-3t-72-p)
1968 48x12 Lamplighter central air,
1 bdrm. washer. Just like new. Call
376-9005. (A-st-72-p)
1964 ZUNDAPP 250 cc. needs work,
S2O cheap, also 40,000 BTU GAS
HEATER very good cond. CALL
372-1603 after 5:00. (A-3t-72-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies,
Custom, reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY. 466-3340. (A-ts-69-p)
TOPCON AUTO 100 SLR 35mm
camera. Excellent condition, 53mm
F:2.0 lens light meter in the camera.
Call Bob, 378-7479. (A-3t-73-p)
1968 Scrambler, excellent condition
load and trail sprockets, only 1500
miles, must sell S2OO or best offer.
Call 378-2878. (A-3t-73-p)
1964 Honda Hawk, new clutch
spindle, front tire, metallic tan, tool
kit, helmet, parts, included S3OO
cash. I want to sell you a bike."
372-6997. (A-2t-73-p)
FOR SALE: 17 ft. Cobia fully
equipped w/75 Evinrude, electric
starter, used 150 hours. Murray
trailer. SISOO. Call 372-5505 after 5.
(A-st-70-p)
THE proven carpet cleaner Blue
Lustre is easy on the budget.
Restores forgotten colors. Rent
electric shampooer. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-74-c)
Cushman scooter in good condition,
SIOO or best offer. Call 378-0705
after 6:00. (A-3t-74-p)
Beautiful Scott LT-1108 stereo FM
tuner plus 4-element finco antenna.
Perfect condition. $65. Call
378-3166. (A-3t-74-p)
I FOR RENT i
,j X
Female roommate to sublet
Landmark apartment spring quarter.
Contact Judy after 7 oclock.
378-9489. (B-st-74-p)
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
apt. on Archer Road opposite Stengel
Field Airport. Married student couple
only. SSO per hnpnth for long-term
tenant. Water Phone
372-9903. (B-st-74-p)
Sublet Till June: spacious one
bedroom apt, pool and laundry
facilities, deposit paid, call 376-7647
after 5 p.m. (B-4t-72-p)
Modern furnished mobile home near
campus for st art couple or single
student. $75. v~non. 376-8063 after 1
p.m. (B-4t-72-p)
Must sublet 2 bedroom poolside
French Quarter apt. Call 378-8564.
(B-st-69-p)
SUBLET: One bedroom furnished
apartment at Tanglewood Manor.
Available February or March 1. You
may use our security deposit. Call
376-1412 after 6 p.m. (B-st-72-p)
Attr. 1 bdrm. furnished apt. avail,
immed. AC, all-electric, $96 mo.
Close campus, 1716 NW 3rd fifi/e. no.
21. Call 378-4632 evenings dr come
by. (B-3t-72-p)
Desperate! 1 female roommate.
Landmark no. 169, 378-7782.
(B-7t-72-p)
Must sublet: immediately spacious
one bedroom furn. apt. very near
campus 95/mo.? Come see and talk.
1605 NW 4th Ave. Apt. C.
(B-3t-73-p)
Quiet offices for the work-minded.
Plenty of parking. Walk to campus.
Computer Management Corporation.
Ph.: 378-1615. (B-st-73-c)

WANTED
o 8 8 8 BHWIB.e M*:*Xra*9i{B!o
One coed to share 2 bdrm. apt. with
3 other girls FQ apt. 72. Call anytime
after 2 pm, 378-9934. (C-st-70-p)
One female roommate wanted
immediate occupancy. Landmark.
Call 372-6853. (C-3t-71-p)
2 Females to accompany 2 gentlemen
on 3 day cruise to Nassau Fri. Feb. 7.
Entire fare paid by us. Interviewing
now. Call 378-0729. (C-4t-71-p)
Spring Quarter roommate.
Gatortown apts. Pool, central air.
$42.50 monthly. Call Vic, Colin or
Willis, 376-3915. (C-2t-74-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apartment near campus.
Available now or for next quarter.
SIBO/quarter. 372-1036. (C-3t-74-p)
HELP WANTED j
WANTED: Males, over 21 interested
in participating in antibiotic study
earn $50.00. Come to Room M-438
Medical Science Building Jan. 31,
Feb. 3 & Feb. 4. 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
for further details. (E-3t-72-p)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between 8 5. (E-10t-71-c)
*x-x-X-x-x-x*x*x-x-x-x-x*;^x-xx AUTOS
Triumph Spitfire MK2 1967. Must
be seen to be appreciated. Less than
14,000 miles, R&H, WSW, $1,500.
Call 376-0911 after 5 pm
(G-st-70-p) M
4-4-2 1966 metallic gray bla'"'
r&h good tires clean interior
excellent condition, SIBOO. Call
372-5463. (G-st-73-p)
1960 Buick LeSabre, automatic, v-8,
power steering and brakes. Must Sell
S2OO. Call Flipper, 372-0491 see at
1125 SW 2nd Avenue. (G-3t-73-p)
1967 SS 350 Camaro $1950
378-2105. (G-7t-72-p)
Lotus Elan S-2 1600 1966 model.
Truly an exotic sports car at a
reasonable price. Inquires welcome.
Phone Bob, 376-4313. (G-st-70-p)
PERSONAL
:
Attention American Indians! We
need your help. Contact Judy
376-0266 or Ronna 376-9962.
(J-2t-73-p)
WANTED: back issues of PLAYBOY.
Will buy or trade. Call Vince,
376-9473. (J-2t-74-p)
Bobbie: thanks for a wonderful yr.
Have a very happy anniversary and
may we have many more to come.
Your loving Pete. (J-lt-74-p)
Adventurous male with car or VW
bus desired to escort observer & HS
age Girl Scouts on field trip &
hootenanny Sat., Feb. 8, 378-1167,
(J-3t-72-p)
Share in Flying Hawks 1966 Cessna
172 Skyhawk. Full panel, 2 narco
mkl2s Student Pilots eligible. Call
378-8046 for info and demo ride.
(J-st-71-p)
9 I iTIW H I I
|i rrrw wii
ALSO AT 8:50

Page 12, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17,1969

WNN%%NV/NV*V*Vvvv*v*v.v>X*>wVi%*rt^'
1 LOST & FOUND |
LOST: one suede fringed Indian
jacket. Squaw unhappy! If found call
Deanna 392-9659. Reward: ten fish.
(L-3t-74-p)
Female German Shepard puppy 12
weeks old, lost around the VA
Hospital. If found, please call
378-9343. (L-2t-73-p)
Valuable reward for cheap watch,
lost on golf course, was Xmas present
Call Rick and check out his offer,
376-9440. (L-3t-72-p)
Found: womens glasses, brown
frames, pick up in Union.
(L-3t-72-nc)
WWWSSWWWWKWXOV.-.v.v.v.'WW*:;.;
SERVICES
ft.!WWs x :*>>x*vx*x*x*:*:*x*xNw*>x*x<*;
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-74-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (Across from Ramada
Inn) & 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-10t-74-p)
Wanted laundry by the bundle.
Wash and iron. Will pick up and
deliver S.W. 16th Ave. area. Call
378-9533 after 4:00 p.m. (M-3t-65-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-st-72-p)
"niE FOX like a milk-fed puppy.
IW* i lr J -vui badio
f 4 B MWm / n*so*s
f //rSMiOMri
Os // CAM Uto V BE
Aomrn o

I DOUBLE YOUR PLEASURE I
I Swing Along with Recording Artist I
I BOBBY GRIFFIN RANDY HALL I
The Australian Troubadour
<
I DOUBLES for the Price of One ... DURINGTHE4 7 m I
O COCKTAIL HOUR
Hot & Cold Hors d' oeuvres from our salad bar
I Join all yourfriends later in the Crystal Steak Room I
MBM

SERVICES
x ... S
j*>xx*v ; vx ; x*: >!*w x:*sv; x*xx i x*x!*v*. ;
Your problems are all solved. OM is
finally on campus. OM will answer
any problems &/or troubleshoot. Call
372-5457 or 372-1360 or 376-1587.
(M-st-73-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
. (M-ts-54-c)
ISnjohnson -s- by OeLuxe B
I ALSO IN COLOR 9:18 I
mi 3rd b,g
WEEK
STEVE
MCOUEEIM
AS
BULLITT
UITC
378-2434 j I II I $1
/"THE GOOD BAD,
AND THE UGLY" 7.9
AND HANG 'EM HIGH

SERVICES I
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want V>pur child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyns Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center, 5240 NW Bth Ave., ph.
372-6667 ir 376-6495. (M-st-66-p)
r*eWj*Cgr^Al^jjrj
HH&y%
Nitro was their
MjSm weapon against
five blazing
PpWpil: oil infernos! \
IP JOHN WAYNE!
KATHARINE ROSS /
THAT GBADUATfUiI
|oj
Sliffij
ititM. w. i m st. vfcyl **
the \
W& f* xer t
Based on the Pulitzer
4r Prize winning novel
by Bernard Malamud.
*JssU+*"
How much
love can a
l young man stand?
| CwsaoptettoNES .*
: |M||V
*IM **



WANT
Z-l-P-P-Y
RESULTS?
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
W K 3 n
| l| 1| | rn aoaooDcm £
; : ; : ; ; £
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SoS** 2 3T
3 | >
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(/)
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r 11
:::: i
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nrIHH

SAYS UF MEDICAL PROFESSOR
r The Pill A Possible Anemia Cause

By JUDY SPIRO
Alligator Staff Writer
A study by a UF medical
researcher suggested that in
some women the oral
contraceptive agents may disturb
the absorption of natural folic
acid a B vitamin.
Dr. Richard Streiff, assistant
professor of medicine in the UF
College of Medicine, studied
seven female patients from 22 to
29 years who had severe anemia
and found they demonstrated
varying degrees of folic acid
deficiency. All the women were
on oral contraceptives.
Reporting to the annual
meeting of the American
Federation for Clinical Research,
Dr. Streiff cautioned that these
studies are not to be construed
as indicating that all women on

oral contraceptives will develop
folic acid deficiencies or become
anemic.
It suggests, though, that the
pill may adversely affect some
patients so they will have a
decreased ability to absorb
natural folic acid through the
gastro-intestinal tract.
Summer Jobs
Can Be Found
Through SG
Finding summer jobs available
to UF students, including
government jobs in Washington,
D. C., is one of Bob Glens
biggest projects as Secretary of
Labor under Student Body
President Clyde Taylor.
His office is gathering
information and applications for
work in resort areas, camps,
department stores and industry.
Most students have asked for
camp and resort jobs.
In general, the work is
unskilled, said Glen. His staff
does not place students in jobs,
but simply refers them to
openings.
Civil service jobs in
Washington, D. C. are offered to
a quota number of students in
each state. Students wishing to
apply for these jobs must take
the Civil Service Examination
either Feb. 8 or Mar. 8.
An Exchange Visitor Program,
sponsored by the International
Student Affairs Club sends
students overseas to Great
Britain, Australia or New
Zealand for $55 if the student
has a sponsor in that country.
For $lO more, the club will find
the student a job in the country.
Jobs in the Gainesville area
will also be looked into, said
Glen.
In addition to summer
employment, the office sponsors
a running babysitting service.
Applicants who wish to babysit
give hours they are available,
where they can be reached, past
experience and whether or not
they have transportation.
Persons needing a babysitter
are referred to one, and the price
is settled between the parties
involved, said Glen.
Those interested in applying
for jobs can call Bob Glen or
Bruce Lavine, in the Student
Government office at 392-1665.

IN THE MALL
From Our Italian Kitchen
FEATURING: v fgCt
f r , Spaghetti with meat balls 1.50
Italian Foods QjKStSIJ Spaghetti with meat sauce 1.50
Specialty Sandwiches AA' (only above two in child's portion) 1.00
Delicious Salads P \ 2!*
Domestis jf Spaghetti oven baked in casaerole
Domestic and Jg with cheese 1.75
/ mpo rw f (Earmittplla a g Sirsssrr*... 3
Wine and Beer ft ao
Ka /* J tf\ y J All Spaghetti orders served with
CONCENIAL U CONTINENTAL V' I HOME BAKED LASAGNE 1.501
ATMOSPHERE A , dg withm..tbails 2.00
Hf, U (p HOME STYLE CHEESE RAVIOLI
Serving Continuously with meat ba **
11 am to 8:30 pm Above >'*/
CLOSED SUNDAYS Roll and Butter

However, he said, these
same patients quickly regained
acceptable blood values when
placed on doses of synthetic
folic acid, even while remaining
on the oral contraceptive. Those
who stopped taking the
contraceptive quickly regained
their red cell levels through
normal dietary intake of natural
folate.
The study, which is still
underway, was conducted in the
Veterans Administration
Hospital, where Dr. Streiff is the
clinical investigator, and at the
UF Clinical Research Center.
The seven female patients
taking oral contraceptives were
not pregnant, had no measurable
intestinal disease, were not
alcoholics and had well-balanced
diets.
The first patient was suffering
increasing fatigue and pallor
when she was admitted to the
Clinical Research Center with
severe anemia of six months
duration. Before she was
admitted, she was treated
unsuccessfully with iron,
Vitamin 812 and whole blood
transfusions. The only
medication she had received
were oral contraceptives, which
she had been taking for the

HAIR STYLING M
" SHAMPOO,NG RAZOR CUTTING
APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
WO§L SIMS BARBER SHOP
817 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
THIRSTY
% GATOR &
Women Are Like Elephants
To Me: I Like To Look
At Them, But I Wouldn't
Want To Own One.
W.CFMIs Is Alive At The
THIRSTY GATOR
"The Fatal Glass of Beer"
each Monday Night 10 till 2 6 days a week

Monday, February 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

preceding two and one-half
years.
Dr. Streiff placed the patient
on a well-balanced normal diet
and found no changes in blood
values. She was then given small
doses of synthetic folic acid and
felt better on the second day of
treatment and had improved
blood values by the fourth day.
The other six patients studied
had similar symptoms and a
similar response to the same
treatment.
Dr. Streiff did a separate
control study of 18 health
volunteers, nine on oral
contraceptives and nine not. He
found that those on the pills did
not absorb natural folate as well.
Emphasizing that the results
of this study are limited and
inconclusive, Dr. Streiff said that
the evidence does show a need
for further investigation.
Haw *Sk
;/ Your Generator %
I OVERHAULED Soecial 1
15*50 |
INCLABOR/
"
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
S 0 NW lA AVf. GAINESVILLE
MON.-Fit. t AM-7PM SAT. TIL S PM
371-4011

Page 13



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3,1969

POLLUTION AT UF:
Does Any Real Problem Exist?

By GAYLE MCELROY
Alligator Staff Writar
Billows of burning oil pour
from smoke stacks behind the
engineering building leave
tell-tale ashes on nearby autos.
Swirls of oil and surface water
are all that remain in a
rain-soaked, deserted parking
lot. Reports of mud-like
sediment filtering through a
dorms faucets are filed in
November.
. And eye brows are raised, but
not very high. For the university
looks to the city, and the city
turns to the county, the county
turns to the state and the state
to the federal government.
Pollution becomes everyones
problem, yet no ones.
Dr. Roy McCaldin, an air
pollution expert in
environmental engineering,
thinks UF is relatively a
pollution free area, but
admittedly has not run tests on
campus or in the vicinity.
Our research is done
elsewhere. We work at a power
plant on the Gulf Coast and have
gone as far as West Virginia and
even Arizona to do pollution
studies, he said.
While McCaldin was busy
doing his research elsewhere,
Courland Collier, assistant
professor of civil engineering and
a Gainesville city commissioner,
was delving into local aspects.
The university and city of
Gainesville are the biggest
contributors of pollution in
Alachua County, he said, listing
the causes of contamination.
Automobiles and oil fumes
from stacks behind the
engineering building head the
campus list. Sulfur dioxide, a
major source of bad air, is
emitted from the three smoke
stacks, he said.
e Sludge in the Gainesville
sewage treatment plant, burning
at the garbage dump, and an oil
backup used to generate
electricity during cold weather,
have brought complaints of
foul odors from residents.
The complaints have finally
pushed the city commission into
action. Something the county
did a year ago. Something the
state and federal governments
did years ago.
In March, 1968, city
ordinances prohibiting existing
and future sources of water and
air pollution were presented to
the commission by Dr. Edward
Byrne, former public health
director, and B.C. Pafford, his
assistant.
Both ordinances would
authorize the commission to
grant exceptions only under
stated conditions and require
periodic sampling and testing by
the city health officer. Neither
ordinance has been approved.
Photos By
Tom Kennedy

DEPTH REPORT
iVeeOPOBOOOOOOOOOOOOeBOePOOQQQQOeeQOOOOOOOPOOOOOOQftOOOOQOOOOOOOOWOW

The water pollution ordinance
would require approval of plans
and a certificate to operate
sewage disposal systems or waste
treatment facilities.
If the air pollution ordinance
were in effect, new industries
that could cause bad air
would have to be approved by
the commission.
Both ordinances were referred
to a special investigative
committee. Collier, two
representatives of local
engineering firms and Director
of Public Utilities John Kelly sit
on the committee.
Approval of the ordinances
are awaiting a solution to the
present system of generating
electricity in Gainesville. The
city is now on an interruptable
supply of gas which converts to
oil during heavy gas usage in
winter months.
Kelly must present a solution
to the oil burning, which is a
major source of area air
pollution.
There are several alternatives,
such as buying a higher grade oil,
paying a higher rate for gas or
burning a cleaner fuel during
stable air conditions.
"People concerned about
pollution are optimistic.
Kelly said hed have
something in the near future,
Collier said.
I have hopes the city and
county ordinances can be sent
together to the Florida Air and
Water Pollution Control
Commission, Pafford said.
Pafford, who is now director
of the Alachua County
Environmental Health Division,
was hoping they both could be
sent to Tallahassee this week.

-, - |
WlMKMCiggMife*.:{,;&£ W-^V?&&>*C. JgWWMEfflmlmm*: "?^M
wp^ayiy,: c i^fc 1 *. <^<,*f < '^y < ~ .na'i'w "r* :T- *sig*Klig* POOL OF SLUDGE AND DEBRIS BEHIND ENGINEERING BUILDING NEAR UNION
... experts say there is no real pollution problem in Gainesville.

The county ordinances,
passed a year ago, may lie in his
office waiting state approval a
little longer if he waits for
approval of the city ordinances.
No, they wont come up
within a week, Kelly said.
Hopefully, they will be brought
up within 30 days.
Kelly defends the
contaminated areas and his
reasons for delay on the new
ordinances.
We bum gas ninety-five per
cent of the time. And the five
per cent of the time we burn oil,
the pollution may or may not
exceed the standards set in the
new ordinance, he said.
There are other oil burning
places in the city which would
be more of a danger, he said,
but Id rather not pin-poinl
them.
He blamed the delay of actioi
on waiting to review new stati
standards approved last week.
Our failure to act at this
point was because a majority of
our committee and the
commission felt it would be
futile to get local acceptance,
but then get turned down at the
state level.
But Pafford looks at the state
laws in a different light.
They are often weaker than
local laws, he said. Thats the
reason we have local laws, so
they can be more specific.
Yet he sympathizes with
Kellys delay.
The problem of burning oil

**
M; v
SMOKESTACKS FROM ENGINEERING BUILDING
... do they cause air pollution on campus?

is an economic one. The city is
justified in trying to balance this
out. Itll just be a matter of time
and they (the ordinances) will be
br o ught before the
commission, he said.
Pafford stressed that the
ordinances were mostly to keep
pollutant-forming industries out
of Gainesville and the county.
They are preventive
ordinances and public health is a
preventive business. We owe it to
the public, he said.

Pafford compared Gainesville
to other places.
We have better air than most
places and ther are no polluted
lakes in the county, he said.
We have a good water
surveilance program and sample
every public water supply in the
county every 30 days. Several
times a year we check all surface
areas in the county, Pafford
said.
But he admitted, Some
private water supplies are
polluted.
Some area pollants # are on
their way to being eliminated,
though.
Complaints of burning refuse
at the city dump may soon
decrease with the increase of
burying refuse in sanitary land
fill, said new City Manager
Harold Farmer.
The city has purchased
eighty acres of land fill
southwest of Gainesville which
we might move to, he said.
This is the cheapest way to
dispose of garbage.
He explained that the
commission recently approved
over $1 million for the
expansion of the sewage
treatment plant.
IVe had some calls about
odors from the sewage treatment
plant. I suppose this constitutes
come type of pollution,?* Farmer
said.



Real Fire At Practice Drill Turns Into Social

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Word had leaked out. Every girl in East
and Weaver halls knew a fire drill was
scheduled for Thursday morning at 12:45
a.m. So they waited patiently, dress and
ready.
When an alarm sounded at 12:20 to
warn of a real fire, reaction was divided
between panic and somebodys calling
wolf.

Senior Art Exhibit In Reitz Union
Reflects Creative Experiments

Chairs, flags, womens faces
and legs are reflected in the
works of senior art students in
their current exhibition in the
Reitz Union second floor
gallery.
The drawings are experiments
in techniques, materials and
subject matter.
There are several drawings by
each student showing some
differences in background, color
or mood of the same subject.
Mike Hitchcock develops his
ideas in etchings of a chair
entitled, Did you look behind
the chair?, This chair is saved
for Nancy and The padded
chair.
Beckie Hollingsworth used as
subjects an American flag and a
chair in a room, while Ron
Chessers works were of
womens legs.
Another senior student,
Marcia Reifman, combined
photography with drawing.
Marilyn Minter exhibits studies
of a womans face.
The students have been
encouraged to emphasize the
more creative and experimental
aspects during their senior year,
since they have had considerable
academic drawing in preceding
courses, said Art Department
Chairman Eugene E. Grissom.
The show will run through
Tuesday, Feb. 4 and then be
exhibited at other schools.
New Journal
Is Published
Scientists from around the
world will be contributing to the
UF chemistry departments new
publication, Journal of
Magnetic Resonance.
The first issue, which
appeared this month, includes
contributions from Japanese,

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Amid cries of That cant be the fire
alarm, it s too early! nearly 370 residents
evacuated the building.
Smoke smelling like burnt rubber curled
through the chute openings in East hall.
Some rushed around calling instructions
for the drill. Others laughed, Its only
fake smoke.
A real fire had started in the garbage
chute and a real alarm was set off by a real
automatic device. Two resident assistants
went down to the basement and found that

Swiss, British and Canadian
universities.
The publication is edited by
Wallace S. Brey, with Mrs. Eileen
Hennessey as secretary. Dr.
Thomas A. Scott of the UF
Department of Physics is a
member of the editorial board.
Published bi-monthly by
Academic Press,Tnc., New York;
the journal will contain original
papers in nuclear magnetic
resonance, electronic spin
resonance and related fields of
chemistry and physics.
34 UF Graduates
Work For NASA
Thirty-four UF graduates are
presently among the scientific
and professional employes of the
NASA-Marshall Space Flight
Center in Huntsville, Ala.
The UF graduates are involved
in development of the powerful
Saturn-Apollo rocket under the
direction of Dr. Werner von
Braun.
Marshall officials report UF
graduates contributed to the
historical flight around the
moon by the Apollo 8.
The booster rocket, Saturn V,
stands 363 feet tall.
Teaching Awards
To Total S3OOOO
The standard Oil Foundation
of Indiana is sponsoring Good
Teaching Awards in which
students will nominate teachers
from each college for the prizes.
The dean of each college will
choose one student to nominate
a teacher from his college. The
names of these teachers will be
submitted to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Then, the list will be

narrowed down to three, each of
whom will win a SI,OOO Good
Teaching Award.
According to the Office of
Academic Affairs, this is the first
time students have had a hand in
choosing teachers for awards of
this kind.
Prof To Present
Science Paper
Dr. N. E. Bingham, UF
professor and chairman of
Science Education, will present a
paper at the National
Association for Research in
Science Teaching in Pasadena,
Calif., Feb. 9.
Binghams paper, A
Demonstration of an Improved
Science Curriculum for
Underachieving Students, will
be used to prepare teachers in
this program.
UF was recently awarded a
grant from the Cooperative
College-School Science
Improvement Division of the
National Science Foundation.
Dont 'Light Up
In UF Buildings
The Office of Academic
Affairs is reminding students and
faculty that smoking is
prohibited in classrooms,
teaching laboratories and
libraries, except in certain
designated areas.
The regulation was
formulated in a memorandum
from former UF President J.
Wayne Reitz in 1966.
Deans and directors are
empowered to deny the use of
classrooms and laboratories
under their supervision to any
faculty member who refuses to
obey and enforce this policy,
states the memo.

the automatic watering system in the
basement had not extinguished the fire.
They called the fire station and proceeded
to water down the flames with the hose.
I havent the slightest idea why the
system failed to put the fire out, but were
sure going to look into it, said Larry
Hughes, one of the resident assistants for
Tolbert Area.
Meanwhile it took the girls about ten
minutes to evacuate, instead of the desired
three.

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Monday, February 3,1969, The Florida Alligator,

In 15 minutes, the drill had turned into
a midnight social.
Even the firemen cooperated, who
arrived four minutes after they were called.
Laughing, boys huddled against the fire
truck to have their pictures taken. Girls
cuddled next to Paul Smith, driver of the
fire truck, to have theirs taken.
Most of the drills are like this,
said.
And the resident assistants still dont
know how the fire started.

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Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3, 1969

Gators Survive Nipping Dogs, 73-69

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UF edged out the Georgia
Bulldogs in the closing minutes
Saturday afternoon 73-69 in a
regionally televised basketball
game in Athens.
The Gators trailed most of the
first half before taking a 3534
halftime lead. Mike
Leatherwood put the Gators out
in front with two free throws
with one minute left in the half.
In the second half the
Bulldogs spent most of the time
playing catch-up ball. Georgia
took the lead one time in the
second half on a Bob Lienhard
shot that made the score 63-62.
Five other times Georgia closed
the gap on the Gators, just as it
seemed UF was about to pull
away.
After UF had built a 68-63
lead late in the game Georgias
Cauthen Westbrook hit to tie it
up 6969 with 2:44 remaining.
Neal Walk then took a pass from
Andy Owens and scored as he
mmK. / fill
I
Hr j /Hr JH
Jm
BT | % g
... scores double figures again.
Soccer Tourney
The UF Soccer Club will host
an Invitational Soccer
Tournament Saturday at 12:30
p.m. on Fleming Field and the
east corner of the Drill Field.

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The Florida Alligator

MARC DUNN
Sports Editor

was fouled by Heb White.
Walk missed the foul shot.
The Gators then attempted a
slow-down that resulted in a
jump ball between Georgias
Tom Brennan and Mike
McGinnis. Georgia got the ball,
Hgg^****
ft] mk jl FT/
WF mro
Jr j.-
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. . hits for 12 points.

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Steaks and Seafoods our specialty i f \
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Reservations accepted
| Harry M. Lanton, Manager
Closed Sundays t Jj-

WALK SETS NEW MARK

but Boyd Welsch was fouled and
made both good on a
one-and-one situation. The score
was 7369 with 20 seconds left.
Welsch started a new string of
free throws after having his old
one stopped at 20 straight earlier
in the game.
The battle between Lienhard
and Walk never really developed
because of Georgias diamond
plus one defense. The Bulldogs
threw up a four man zone and
man-to-man on Walk. This
meant that Walk was always
double-teamed. In statistics it
ended up about even, Walk
scored 22 to set a new 3-year UF
scoring record, to Lienhards 28.
But Walk came up with 22
rebounds to Lienhards 15.
Owens, who had one of his
finest performances to date, also
had 22 points for the afternoon.
He hit on 10 of 18 field goals;
this was the sixth game in a row
that Owens has hit the double
figure mark.

BILL DUNN
Assistant Sports Editor

Leatherwood also had a fine
performance working the ball
around and through the bottled
up middle Georgia had created.
He also opened up the Bulldogs
by hitting on five of eight shots
and scoring 12 points.
UF is 54 in the Southeastern
Conference and depending on
the Auburn and Vanderbilt
games coming up on the road,
the Gators may end up with an
NIT bid.
UF meets Auburn Feb. 8 and
Vandy Feb. 10.

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Nothin Finer Than Whuooina N.C.

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Nothing could have been finer
Sunday for Wolfpack and Tar
Heel swim teams than to return
to North Carolina after
downright rude treatment over
the weekend at the hands of
Coach Bill Harlans Gator
tankmen.
The UF swimmers maintained
their undefeated streak with a

V'pp .=.< ...
NICK ARROYO
BETTER THAN CHAMPAGNE
... Harlan all wet too?

... Unless Its A Hos, Grimy Lola Chevrolet |

" DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.
(UPI) A grimy Lola-Chevrolet
driven by Mark Donohue and
Chuck Parsons limped past the
broken hulks of Germanys
proud Porsches Sunday to win
the accident-marked 24 hours of
Daytona endurance race.
Second and far behind
the winner was the other
Lola-Chevrolet, entered by actor
James Gamer and driven by Ed


Orthopedic Gator Eighth,
Puts Porsche Through Paces

BySUZI WHALEY
Alligator Sports Writer
DAYTONA ls you see a bright red Porsche
911 parked outside your doctors office, its
probably Dr. Harold Williamson, UF graduate,
making an emergency room pit stop.
Dr. Williamson and his Porsche took eighth place
in the 24 Hours of Daytona Sunday.
Williamson, an orthopedic surgeon in Tampa,
says his favorite hobby is racing.
He treats his hobby with the same precision and
thoroughness he does his profession. In the races
youll find him working right alongside his
mechanics, preparing his machine.
He drives his racing car to work every day, and
all around town. The only difference is that he has
to reinstall the muffler after the race.
He first became interested in racing during World
War II when he was a fighter pilot.
Racing is very similar to flying, he said, it
takes coordination of hands and feet, accurate

tight 58-55 dual meet win over
previously undefeated North
Carolina State Friday and a free
and easy 7239 trouncing of
North Carolina Saturday at the
UF Pool.
Fridays win was certainly the
sweetest as the Wolfpack was the
only team to mar the UFs dual
meet record last season.
The team of Hank Hough,
Bruce Williams, Mark McKee and
Andy McPherson, the same

Leslie and Lother
Mottschenbacher. All the Lola
drivers were Californians.
The Lolas were given little
chance at the outset to be
around at the finish. But all five
of the normally indestructible
Porsche 908 prototypes broke
down while leading the race, and
two British-entered Ford GT4Os
also fell out before the end, one
in a fiery crash.

SWIMMERS MEET FSU SATURDAY

judgment of speed and distance and certair
mechanical knowledge and ability.
Williamson described his racing as a tremendous
release of tension.
He finds it very relaxing to race after a week of
setting broken bones and operating on people.
He has a very unique technique in racing: Just
go as fast as you can.
His method is obviously very successful after his
performance Saturday and Sunday. The last time he
entered 24 Hours of Daytona, in 1967, he took
tenth place overall and first in the touring class.
If its still in one piece, he said, I will run at
Sebring in early April.
The most important thing about racing,
according to Williamson, is the preparation of the
car. Before each race the car is taken apart and
carefully reassembled, then given a number of tests
to catch any defect before the race.
With two months to prepare for Sebring, the
good doctor will be boning up on his engine
manual in hopes of capturing the big spring event.

foursome that pulled out a
previous last minute win over
Florida State, left the Gators
victorious.
Harlans pack hits the road
this coming Saturday to meet
Florida State a second time. The
FSU meet will be the stiffest
swim test before the UF takes
on powerful Tennessee here
March 1.
Saturdays meet came easy
after the closely-matched
competition Friday.
It was States first loss in a
half-dozen meets this year, first
loss in their past 20 dual meets
and only their fourth defeat in
the past four years, the second
by the UF.
Baby Bulldog Bruce
Williams broke his third record
in two days Saturday by taking
the 200-freestyle in 1:45.9
topping the old meet marie of
1:48.2.
Friday, Williams established
meet and pool marks in the
1,000 (10:18.4) and the 500
(4:57.4).
The twin wins left the UF
with a flawless so record on
the season.
Results:
North Carolina State
400-medley relay N.C. State
(Evans, Falzone, Long, Birnbrauer),
3:38.4 (meet and pool record)
1,000 freestyle -1, Williams (F);
2, McGrain (NCS); 3, Page (F),
10:18.4 (meet, pool, varsity record)
200-freestyle l, Hough (F); 2,
Russo (F); 3, Coyle (NCS), 1:50.3
50-freestyle l, Voves (F); 2,
Schall (NCS); 3, Peek (F), 22.6
200-IM McKee (F); 2, Ristaino
_ (

Third in the $86,000 race was
a tough little Pontiac Firebird
driven by Jerry Titus and Jon
Ward.
In fourth was a Porsche 91 IT
driven by Bruce Jennings and
Herb Watson, and fifth was a
Porsche 911 driven by Bert
Everett and Alan Johnson.
The Donohue-Parsons car,
suffering fuel cell and exhaust

(NCS); 3, Bridges (F), 2:01.9
1-meter diving l, Rosar (NCS);
2, Link (F); 3, Munz (NCS), 257.50
points
200-butterfly l, Long (NCS); 2,
Russo (F); 3, Ristaino (NCS), 1:57.8
(meet, pool record)
100-freestyle l, Birnbauer
(NCS); 2, Schwall (NCS); 3,
McPherson (F), :48.9
200-backstroke l, Evans (NCS);
2, Strate (F); 3, Bridges (F), 2:02.2
500-freestyle l, Williams (F); 2,
Coyle (NCS); 3, Page (F), 4:47.4
(meet record)
200-breaststroke l, McKee (F);
2, Falzone (NCS); 3, Watiszeck
(NCS), 2:16.9 (meet record)
3-meter diving l, Rosar, (NCS);
2, Link (F); 3, Simmons (NCS),
285.25
400-freestyle relay Florida
(Williams, Hough, McKee,
McPherson) 3:14.0
North Carolina
400-medley relay Florida
(Strate, McKee, Murphy, Voves),
3:41.3 (meet record, old record
3:42.2 in 1967)
1,000 freestyle l, Page (F); 2,
McElroy (NC); 10:45.9
200 freestyle l, Williams (F); 2,
Hough (F); 3, Briston (NC), 1:45.9
(meet record, old record 1:48.2 in
1968)
50-freestyle l, McPherson (F);
2, Hariston (NC); 3, Wigo (NC), :22.1
2 00-IM l, Perkins (F); 2,
French (F); 3, Hood (NC), 2:06.4
1-meter diving l, Smith (F); 2,
Montgomery (F); 3, Humphrey (NC),
221.15 points
200-butterfly l, Russo (F); 2,
Bedell (NC); 3, Sheehe (F), 1:59.3
100-freestyle l, Wigo (NC); 2,
Peek (F); 3, Bell (NC), :49.8
2 00-backstroke l, Dannerman
(NC); 2, Munigal (NC); 3, Murphy
(F), 2:06.4
500-freestyle -1, Page (F); 2,
McElroy (NC), 5:04.6
2 00-breaststroke l, Williams
(NC); 2, McCullough (NC); 3, Ahrens
(F), 2:23.7
3-meter diving l, Link (F); 2,
Humphrey (NC); 3, Scafuti (F),
268.35
400-freestyle relay Florida

manifold problems of its own,
averaged less than 100 miles per
hour.
It made more than 30 pit
stops in the race which ended at
3:08 p.m. EST.
Less than half of the field of
63 starters finished. The five-car
Porsche factory team had been
considered an almost sure bet to

|HK. niiinaSi i 4
* BHHV ft wmmm*. BiBBHHBIHBHHBHHft
CURTIS MAULDIN
SWIFT SWISS IN THE PIT
... Bonnier-Norinder Lola/Chevy
Mgim VflGlkS
* v
-...- CURTIS MAULDIN
DOCTOR'S HOUSE CALL?
.. ex-Gator probes ahead.

Monday, February 3, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

jf m Isl S
j&,.. £
Min j|| Wk
NICK ARROYO
EXTRA UMPH!
... Gator bench strength

y
repeat its 1-2-3 victory here last :
year. £
The Porsches jumped off to a£
commanding lead before sunset:*:
Saturday but exhaust manifold
troubles several hours into the %
race flooded their cockpits with £
choking fumes. Three of them 3
left the race Sunday morning
with broken intermediate shafts,
the engine froze on a fourth and*
the other broke a camshaft.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3, 1969

Jourdan Consistent Fosbury Flops!

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
UFs Ron Jourdan proved himself to be the
worldd best high jumper!
Jourdan cleared the magic 7-foot barrier again
in Fridays prestigious Millrose Games and
Saturdays Boston AAU meet, winning both meets
with jumps of 7-1 against the worlds best.
UFs two mile relay team of John Parker, Bill
BaDinger, Eammon OKeeffe and Bob Lang
accompanied Jourdan to both meets and ran second
in the Millrose Games, third in the Boston AAU
meet, ranking them among the nations top five,

Cats Magic Number Four
ToTakeSEC,NCAA Berth

ATLANTA (UPI) The
official magic number for
Kentuckys Adolph Rupp as he
closes in on victory No. 800 is
down to four.
The way his Wildcats are
going, it lookd
The way his Wildcats are
going, it looks like theyll wrap
up Rupps 24th Southeastern
Congerence cage title and 18th
NCAA playoff berth at just
about the same time.
The Vandy Commodores are
three full games behind
Kentucky, which now has an 8-0
league record, 14-2 over-all, and
with a visit Monday night at
defensive minded Tennessee,
they may soon be out of sight
entirely.
Oood Sarvica Starts
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Tennessee, which beat
Auburn 64-59, still has an
outside shot at the Wildcats
with its 6-2 SEC record, 11-3
over-all.
Pistol Pete fell behind last
yearss NCAA record scoring
pace this weekend as he got
only 40 points in LSUs
120-79 victory over Pittsburgh
Friday night and was outscored
by Mississippis Ken Turner
36-31 in Saturdays 84-81
overtime loss to the Rebels.

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UF TWO-MILE RELAY TEAM 2nd, 3rd

according to UF track coach Jimmy Carnes.
Jourdan's jump of 7-1 in the Millrose Games
proved him to be the worlds best as Dick Fosbury,
1968 Olympic champion, failed to clear 6-10.
Jourdan sewed up the Boston AAU meet with his
7-i.
He tried 7-3 Vi at the Boston AAU meet but
just nipped the bar on his way over. Its his goal
this year to set a new world record in the high jump,
says Carnes.
Ron is doing a fantastic job, winning
consistently as he does, Carnes said. He deserves
all the credit he can get after the way he is
jumping.

That duel between 6-foot-l 1
Bob Lienhard of Georgia and
6-foot-l 0 Neal Walk of UF
probably should be considered a
standoff even though UF won
the game.
Lienhard had 28points and 15
rebounds.
The Vanderbilt at Tennessee
game Monday night is crucial
since this years SEC runnerup
probably will get a berth in the
National Invitational
Tounament.

the design shop 3448 w. university
lanterns I and an infinite
india spreads bUI number of items
Engineers:
Good ideas
get off the ground
at Boeing.
So do careers.
Let's talk about it on
Monday through Wednesday
February 10 through 12.
At The Boeing Company, you can be a member
of a team that's famous for making good ideas fly.
Such as the 707, America's first jetliner. And
the 727 trijet, the 737 twinjet, Boeing-Vertol
helicopters, the Boeing-built first stage for the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration's
Apollo/Saturn, V moon rocket. And the NASA
Lunar Orbiter, the USAF Minuteman, and the USN
hydrofoil gunboat Tucumcari.
Boeing has exciting new projects on the way up,
too. The 747 superjet, world's largest and fastest
commercial jetliner, scheduled to make its first
flight by the end of 1968. America's supersonic
transport, now being developed at the company's
Commercial Airplane Division. Plus other ad advanced
vanced advanced programs in early development and on
Boeing drawing boards.
They can help get your career off to a dynamic
start in applied research, design, test, manufactur manufacturing,
ing, manufacturing, service or facilities engineering or computer
technology.
Visit your college placement office and schedule
an interview with the Boeing representative.
Boeing is an equal opportunity employer.
Divisions: Commercial Airplane. Space, Missrle & Information Systems,
Vertol, and Wichita. Also, Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories.

The Christian Science Monitor, a top
international newspaper, will be doing a feature on
him and his success, according to Carnes.
Jourdan was also asked to speak this week before
the prestigious New York State Track Chib, the
same club distance ace Jim Ryan spoke to when he
was doing so well last season.
Due to studies and prior arrangements, however,
Jourdan will not be able to make it at this time.
Jourdan will compete Saturday in the Baltimore
All-Eastern indoor meet.
The next team meet will be a dual meet against
Tennessee and Georgia Tech at Knoxville, Feb. 14.



A

Those of you lacking the
initiative to investigate the
sports activities of Gainesville
have missed a mind-blowing,
intriguing experience associated
with the relatively new event of
the rallye. The events call for
two participants, a driver and a
navigatojr, a car, a great deal of
patience, and an extreme
awareness of the road.
Upon entering the latest rallye
entitled MISSION
IMPOSSIBLE last Saturday
afternoon, I was given the
impression that beginners rarely
reach the final destination, and
that the adventure would last
well on into the evening, ending
in nothing short of a
nerve-wracked excursion.
Comparitively, it appeared to
be a complete search for the
missing G wrapped up into a
few hours time. The object is to
follow specific instructions
(given at the starting point) to a
checkpoint, where an official
gives the driver and navigator
another set of instructions,
leading them on to the next
LOOK
LEVIS
in CORDUROY
U
ym
Sizes: Waist 26-36
Length 29-34
Wheat Charlie
Brown Co Green
Cool Blue
5.98
*
Gainesville Shopping Center

SKIRTING THE ISSUES

Rallye Round Gainesville Boys

point.
Navigator, Valerie Dodd, and
myself, were completely new to
this type of adventure, and were
slow to comprehend the
general iristructions, or
abbreviations (which was the
first reason we got lost); The
specific instructions left us
blank.
Our first flaw found us in the
VA hospital parking lot, trying,
within the limits of the mles, to
find a legal way out.
After working our way out of
that mistake, we proceeded to
travel ten miles of the rallye,
unfortunately, all in the wrong
direction. Those of you whom
we visited on the so-called road
of SW 35th Avenue, please
apologize to the chickens, cows,
horses, etc., or anybody else we

M V*te cuit& (fowt
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ALL OPTIONS I
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OFFICER FOR AN APPOINTMENT A I
AND AN INFORMATIVE BROCHURE /K\ I
ON PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES f I
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THE CHARLESTON NAVAL SHIPYARD r
LOCATED AT CHARLESTON. SOUTH CAROLINA MMI I
A SUPPORT FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR POWERED I
SUBMARINES AND OTHER MODERN NAVAL VESSELS | I
An Equal Opportunity

might have disturbed that night.
Speaking of night, we had
assumed we would finish this
drive before evening, and as the
sun sank in the west, we found
that we could no longer read the
instructions, much less follow
them. It was not until two days
later that we were told that the
usual equipment for a rallye
consists of pencil, paper, a
dictionary, raincoat, flashlight
(or flood light), telephone
directory, compass, and
sometimes an encyclopedia.
Although we never finished
the rallye, we did find out that
the general trend was to travel
the main streets of Gainesville m
the beginning, and work our way
to the back roads of the
community, ending up on the
outskirting trails of Alachua

BY BETH GRAVES

County.
Throughout the rallye various
questions were asked pertaining
to signs, posts, or markers on the
side of the road. They could be
found inside laundromats along
the way, on telephone cable
markers, billboards (in small
print), and on fence gates.
Again, we never got around to
finding these answers, in fact, we
never found the first checkpoint.
Our last major faux pas was
the consideration of Dead End
streets. Many time we traveled
to the end of them turned
around, and proceeded to 8. R
@ SS (turn right at the stop
sign, one of the few general
instructions we understood).
This in turn led us in the wrunp
direction, streets, and anything
else that could afford to go

Monday, February 3,1969, Tha Florida Alligator.

wrong that night.
We did find out that
MISSION IMPOSSIBLE was
exactly fifty miles in length; we
covered over a hundred miles of
Gainesville. Our true highlight
was our misinterpretation of a
mileage timing in which we
cruised at fifteen mph on 441,
with cars whizzing past at
seventy mph.
Needless to say at this point,
this driver and her navigator got
completely baffled, and
managed to be one of the eleven
cars never to finish. After going
over the complete route with
Jim Fielding, creator of the
Mission, we found that logic and
craftiness should be applied at all
times; these guys are clever. Lost
or not; spaced out or not; it was
an entertaining experience ?

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 3,1969

Campus Crier
\ SPONSORED BY STUDCNTGOVERNMENT

* ACCENT WEEK FEB 3-9
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Dont Miss Any Os These Events

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3,1969
12:00 2:00 p.m. Panel and Dialogue Plaza of the Americas
7:30 9:30 p.m. Film: "To Kill a Mockingbird" Broward Area
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4,1969
12:00 2:00 p.m. Panel and Dialogue Plaza of the Americas
7:30 9:30 p.m. Films 'To Kill a Mockingbird" Broward Are
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5,1969 UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
7:00 p.m. Mixed Media Presentation
7:30 p.m. Anson Mount
8:30 p.m. Louis Harris
9:30 -10:00 p.m. Question and Answer Period
10:00 -11:00 p.m. Reception at Reitz Union, Rooms 122 & 123
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6,1969 UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
7:00 p.m. Jean Houston
8;30 p.m. John Finlator
9:30 -10:00 p.m. Question and Answer Period
10:00 -11:00 p.m. Reception at Reitz Union, Rooms 122,123

SUPPORT GATOR LOAN FUND

JXatijSfeeller L
OPEN ALL DAY
TO rs
EVERYONE
(FACULTY STAFF STUDENTS)
For Breakfast Lunch and Dinner
NO MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED
FOR FOOD ...
But If You Are Thirsty. .
Come With A Member

NOTICES
Need a Baby Sitter? We have a large supply and are eager to help out. Call the
Student Government Labor Department 35 P.M., Monday Friday at
392-1665.
Students:
-Have YOU thought about work in Europe?
-Have YOU considered counseling at summer camps?
Have YOU wanted to work for the Government in Washington D.C.?
Discover Summer Employment Opportunity sponsored by Student Government.
Contact the Department of Labor, 392-1665.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7,1969
2:00 4:00 p.m. JULIAN BOND- Plaza of the Americas
MADALYN.MURRY
7:30 8:30 p.m. FREDERICK FLOTT Florida Gym
8:30 9:30 p.m. MICHAEL HARRINGTON Florida Gym
9:30 -10:00 p.m. Question and Answer Period Florida Gym
10:00 -11:00 p.m. Reception at Reitz Union, Rooms 122 8t 123
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8,1969
9:00 -10:00 p.m. JULIAN BOND Reitz Union, Rooms 122,123
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
1:30-4:00 p.m. Panel on Civil Disobedience Melvin Belli Union Ballroom
Tobias Simon
William Kuntsler
Larry King, moderator
7:00 8:00 p.m. STROM THURMOND Florida Gym
8:00 9:00 p.m. WAYNE MORSE Florida Gym
9:00 9:15 p.m. Film: "The Dimensions of Freedom" Florida Gym
9:15 -10:15 p.m. WILLIAM O. DOUGLAS Florida Gym
10:15 11:00 p.m. Reception at Reitz Union, Rooms 122,123
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9,1969 FLORIDA GYMNASIUM
8:15 -11:00 p.m. "Man of La Mancha"

have a question or a problem ?
call
j:
392-1650 student gvt.
be sure to leave name, address & phone no.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCES
INAUGUARATION OF
THE FLORIDA FAIR HOUSING AUTHORITY, A UNIVERSITY
COMMUNITY SERVICE.
THE AUTHORITY SHALL ENDEAVOR TO MEDIATE AND ARBITRATE DISPUTES
BETWEEN TENANTS AND LANDLOARDS, BETWEEN FELLOW TENANTS AND WILL
IMPLEMENT OMBUDSMAN IN THE SOLUTION OF HOUSING DIFFICULTIES.
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE AUTHORITY INCLUDE
MAINTENANCE OF UNRESOLVED COMPLAINT. RECORDS CONCERNING BOTH
LANDLORDS AND STUDENTS. AN INSPECTION SERVICE IS ALSO MAINTAINED
FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL AGGRIEVED PARTIES.
WE INVITE THE STUDENT BODY AND LOCAL PROPERTIED INTERESTS TO
SOLICIT THE AID OF THE AUTHORITY IN SETTLEMENT OF COMMON PROBLEMS.
PHONE OMBUDSMAN 392-1650 24 HOURS A DAY. YOUR CALL WILL BE
RELAYED. FROM 36 MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, PHONE STUDENT
GOVERNMENT 392-1665. OFFICES. THIRD FLOOR, REITZ UNION.

TO ALL S.G. BUDGETED ORGANIZATIONS:
ALL BUDGET BEQUESTS FOR YEAR 69-70 ARE DUE
IN THE OFFICE OF THE TREASURE OF THE STUDENT
BODY BY FEBRUARY 15,1969. FAILURE TO COMPLY
WITH THIS REQUEST WILL RESULT IN A DELAY OF
THE RELEASE OF FUNDS.
ALSO REQUIRED IS A BREAKDOWN OF ALL
SOURCES OF INCOME AND AN ACCOUNTING FOR
FUNDS SPENT FROM SEPT. '6B
JOHN ENGLEHART
SEC. of FINANCE