Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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BRIAN GOODHEIM
THE SPARKLE OF WINTER
Mary Amann caught a diamond of sunlight over her shoulder while
mddeling for Seminole advertising. Mary, 21, is a junior in the College
of Arts and Science and a Chi Omega from Hollywood, Fla.

Earl Warren Key Speaker
At Law Center Dedication

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
The $3 million Spessard L.
Holland Law Center, delayed
more than three months with
labor problems, will be
dedicated Saturday by Supreme
Court Chief Justice Earl Warren.
The center, which will
eventually include a housing area
for students, will be named in
honor of Holland, a 1916 UF
graduate, who has served in the
U.S. Senate since 1945.
Along with Holland, Gov.
Claude Kirk Jr., ex-Sen. George
Smathers and numerous
legislators and jurists are
expected to attend the various

Dissent Lies Beyond Law Center Facade

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Beyond the shiny glass
windows, carpeted hallways and
newly-painted walls of the
Spessard Holland Law Center lie
the quiet shadows of dissent.
A discontent described as
sporadic professional
disagreements by some while
harshly condemned as the fruit
of systematic repression by
others but denied by none.
Some, like Asst. Prof. L. L.
Lambom say that the discontent
of some of his colleagues stems
from their refusal to adapt to a
reactionary system.
An almost systematic
repression of freedom of
expression regarding
controversial ideas has resulted
in. an oppressive atmosphere of

functions of the two day
dedication beginning today.
Dedication activities will
begin this afternoon with
registration and tours through
the center and a reception for
Warren at 5 p.m. at the Ramada
Inn.
A banquet at 6:30 p.m. will
follow.
UF law Prof. Robert J.
Farley, former dean of the
University of Mississippi Law
School, will speak at the
banquet.
Saturday morning at 9:30 a
seminar on The New Biology
and The Law, will be held at
the Center. The seminar will be

An almost systematic repression by some
members of the faculty, the administration of the
College of Law, Tigert Hall, and the Board of Regents
has resulted in the stifling of freedom of expression.
Liberal and politically active law professors leave UF
to be replaced by those who can more easily adapt.

suspicion, fear and retaliation
against dissenters, Lambom
charges.
He points to a spiraling chain
including some members of the
faculty, the administration of
the College of Law, Tigert Hall
and the Board of Regents as
the forces triggering repressive
measures.
One by one, Lamborn says,
stimulating colleagues leave or
are forced to leave, or personal
repressions become
overwhelming.

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol. 61, No. 73

STUDENTS ASKED TO LEAVE
University Senate
Closed To Press

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Though students and
student press members were
expelled from a university
senate meeting Thursday
afternoon, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell said
earlier in the day he had
no objections to students
attending as members or
observers.
He was responding to an
Action Conference resolution
which requested the senate open
its doors to students. The
resolution, passed Wednesday,
called for five student senators,
Alligator and University Report
staffers and other members of
the press to be permitted to attend
university senate meetings.
Students and press were asked
to leave Thursdays meeting
before discussion began on

moderated by UF Prof. Earnest
M. Jones. Dr. Rene Duois,
bacteriologist at Rockefeller
University in New York, will be
featured speaker.
Other members of the seminar
will be the Hon. Warren Burger,
judge of the U.S. Court of
Appeals of the District of
Columbia; Dr. Samuel Martin,
UF provost of the Medical
Center; Dr. Emil Mantink,
former chief of surgery at the
local Veterans Hospital and
Marcus Plant, University of
Michigan law professor.
A dedication luncheon,
presided over by Robert Mautz,
(SEE 'NEW' PAGE 5)

Some of the remaining
professors, Lamborn adds,
seeing the handwriting on the
wall, also contemplate leaving.
And so the more liberal and
politically active members of the
Law faculty drift away, they are
replaced by others who adapt
more easily, Lambom says.
There was a time, he sa
when members of the Law
faculty could have been divided
into- ideological factions of
equal strength.
(SEE 'FACTORS' PAGE 4)

University of Florida, Gainesville

University Senate Cited For:
9 Refusing to provide students with copies of
pending Faculty Senate Legislation
$ Ignoring student requests to be consulted on
matters of student concern
9 Alienating, if not refusing entrance to, students
desiring to attend Faculty Senate proceedings.

agenda items, including the
report of the ad hoc committee
on violence.
Members of the student
senate delegation denied
entrance included Gary
Goodrich, student body vice
president; Charles Harris,
majority leader; Scott Holloway,
minority leader; and Bruce
Boud rcau, academic affairs
chairman.
A motion was passed to
have the constitution committee
of the university senate draw up
proposals to allow the press and
students to observe meetings.
This must be done two weeks
prior to voting.
Harris stated that any matter
discussed at the meeting which
had not previously been
presented to or discussed by
the students should be
considered null and void. He
said that he will be meeting with
University College Dean
Franklin A. Doty today to
discuss the matter.
I personally have no
objections to students sitting as
members or observers,
OConnell said.
However, when the
university senate has
confidential matters to discuss,
it should meet in executive
session. The senate is perfectly
entitled to do this under the
law, he said.
OConnell also raised no

(UWHlltl M ? 11 I 1
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SPESSARD HOLLAND LAW CENTER
born in a shadow ** *

Friday January 31, 1969

objections to members of the
press sitting in on senate
meetings, except for executive
sessions.
The Action Conference
resolution was passed in support
of a recent student senate
resolution which asked that
student senate representatives be
allowed to attend university
senate meetings on matters
concerning students.
Commenting on the student
senates action, OConnell stated
a belief that the student senate
possibly could lose some
effectiveness by becoming
involved in university senate
matters:
I would hate to see student
government lose its own senate
and identity as the body which,
hopefully, represents the
interests of the students.
A by-law in the university
senates constitution is keeping
students out. The ruling
prohibits anyone who is not an
active member from attending.
However, members at the
December university senate
meeting voted to waive the
ruling for that meeting, and
students were permitted to sit
in.
OConnell refused to
speculate on whether the
university senate eventually
would vote to amend the by-law,
thus including students in all
future meetings.




Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 31,1969

Katz Resigns,
Gets New Post

Ric Katz, Student
Government secretary of the
interior, tendered his resignation
to Student Body President Clyde
Taylor Thursday and was named
special assistant for cabinet
projects.
Taylor named Katz
roommate, Bill Modlin, 3AS, to
replace him.
In accepting Katz resignation
and naming him to his new post,
Taylor said the ex-secretary of
the interior had done his job
well, perhaps too well.
Ric has become involved in a
number of projects around
campus, Taylor said, and I felt
it would be best to allow him to
take over responsibility of
them.
Im sort of giving him free
rein, he said.
Taylor said between 20 and
25 projects are in the making,
but are not yet complete.
He said he hopes Katz will be
able to guide most of these ideas

No Frolics Tickets
For UF Independents
Tickets to Interfraternity Council (IFC) Winter Frolics will not be
sold to independents.
Mikes Wilkin, IFC treasurer, said Thursday that a 5,500 person
limitation set on the Florida Gym has caused the IFC to limit sale of
Frolics tickets to fraternity men.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell set this limit after the gym was
declared a fire hazard by Robert G. Sherrard of the Physical Plant
Division.
Tickets will be distributed among the fraternities and sold to
fraternity members only. The tickets that are left over will be on sale
to the general public, according to Wilkin.
There are presently 2,700 fraternity men op campus. Since tickets
are for couples only, sale of tickets to these men will represent 5,400
of the 5,500 available tickets.
Steve Zack, IFC president, said that due to lack of time they
probably couldnt do anything, but that the IFC is looking into the
possibilities of another location. Zack refused further comment on the
subject.
The possibility of the UF getting an activity center will be discussed
today at a closed meeting of a committee formed to investigate the
situation.
The activity center would be a coliseum-type building, but its use
would not be limited to sports events, OConnell said Tuesday.
If there were such a center, it could remedy future Frolics
problems.
Valentines Day Scheduled
Date For Panhellehic Ball

Its time to take those formals
out of mothballs.
The first annual Panhellenic
Ball is scheduled for Valentines
Day, Feb. 14.
Proceeds from this
girl-ask-boy dance, one of two
formal events at UF, will go into
a scholarship fund for Greek
women.
The fund will be similar to
the IFC scholarship fund,
according to Fred Pounds,
ex-IFC social chairman, who is

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

to completion before the end of
the Taylor administration, in
three months.
Three things Katz will be
working on, Taylor said, will be
an amphitheatre, a permanent
speakers stand at the Plaza of
the Americas, and various
landscaping projects on campus.
One of Modlins duties will be
to plan and administer campus
elections, including a special
referendum to determine the
future Cf student government.
One of Taylors campaign
promises was to offer the
student a chance to abolish
student government.
Modlin said he would like to
see the election held soon.
My personal feeling, he
said, is that it should be this
quarter.
A new election procedure,
using computers, which would
cost only 10 percent as much as
prior elections, will be used in
the referendum vote, Modlin
said.

helping Panhellenic with
arrangements for the dance. He
said it will probably be offering
short-term loans.
The dance in the Reitz Union
Ballroom will feature live
entertainment. Dean of Women
Betty Cosby and UF President
Stephen C. OConnell have been
invited.
The ball will be limited to
Panhellenic members and their
dates.
Jane LaFrance is
Panhellenic chairman of the ball.

RIC KATZ
... named special assistant
Informal
Talks To
Be Held
Intercourse, a series of weekly
informal discussions held at the
Rathskeller, will host UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
on Feb. 5 at 12:30 p.m.
John Paul Jones, dean of the
College of Journalism, and Harry
H. Sisler, dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences, will speak on
Feb. 11 at 2:00 p.m.
Representative Ralph
Turlington and State Senator
Bob Saunders are scheduled to
participate in Intercourse.
Also included in the list of
speakers for Intercourse is R.H.
Whitehead, UF registrar.
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VD Rate On Rise
By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Correspondent
An apparent increase in the incidence of venereal disease among
students at the UF is attributed by Dr. Wilmer Coggins, director of
Student Health, to improved diagnostic techniques and not to an
increase in promiscuity among students.
During the Fall Quarter, 34 cases of gonorrhea and 3 cases of
syphilis were treated by the UF infirmary.
In the period from July, 1967 to June, 1968, 35 cases of gonorrhea
and 2 cases of syphilis were treated there. <
According to Coggins, a confidential investigation is made of each
case of venereal disease treated at the infirmary. The investigation is
to find out who infected the person being treated. An attempt is made
to contact this other person and get him to come in for treatment
cases of syphilis are reported to the Alachua County Health
Department. Only syphilis cases are treated or investigated by the
country health department, according to Charles Archer, investigator
for the health department.
Archer said the country is trying to eliminate syphilis and every
effort is made to treat all persons who might have contacted it from
an infected person.
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Membership
For 'Action'
Extended

The Greek Way

Lambda Chi Alpha
The Lambda Chis are
working with the March of
Dimes with a Make a Wish for
the March of Dimes Wishing
Well located at the hub.
Contributions to this effort will
benefit handicapped children all
over the world.
The Crescent welcomed 16
new brothers and a strong pledge
class of 23 men, and the Little
Sisters of the Crescent greeted
over 60 girls as Little Sister rush
began last Sunday.
This weekend UFs Epsilon
Mu chapter will host a bar-b-que
and a party with Ron and the
Starfires for brothers of the
Lambda Mu chapter at the
University of South Florida.
Phi Kappa Tau
Phi Taus winter pledge class,
34 strong, has elected the
following officers: Bill Moon,
president; Tom Hayes,
vice-president; Rich Bergenstal,
secretary; Dave Penoyer,
treasurer; Mike Rinkel, chaplin;
and Dan Hall, sgt.-at-arms. These
men will be leading the largest
pledge class on campus.
Buzz Greene, Phi Tau
National field secretary from
Oxford, Ohio, has been visiting
the chapter for the past week.
Three pledges, Rich
Bergenstal, Ed Kaylor and Mike
Mastandrea, are now members of
Phi Eta Sigma, the freshman
scholastic honorary.
Brother John Cosgrove was
elected parliamentarian of the
Student Senate at last Tuesdays
meeting.
Pledge Rich Bergenstal has
received state-wide fame as being
one of two UF athletes to make
4.0 grade point averages last
quarter.
Beta Theta Pi
Local Betas are sponsoring a
new colony at Florida State
University, with an installation
to be held Sunday on the UF
campus.
The FSU chapter will be the
Betas second in Florida. Several
national officers are expected to
attend the installation, including
Lee Hagan, district chief of
Tennessee, and K. Warren
Fawcett, national magazine
editor.
Alpha Gamma Rho
AGR brother Dr. Clifford M.
Hardin, chancellor of the
University of Nebraska, has been
named the new secretary of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture.
President Richard M. Nixon has
commented that Hardin brings a
new dimension to the office
with his unusually sound
knowledge of agriculture,
administration and academics.
Tau Kappa Epsilon
The Tekes recently hosted a
Block Buster party with four
other fraternities. The party was
held at the Tekes new house
with Chi Phi, AGR, Phi Psi, and
Phi Epsilon Pi participating.
Highlights of the quarter are
the new 14-man pledge class and
the initiation of eight new
brothers. The Tekes have also

The Student Action
Committee of undergraduate
education students has extended
its membership to interested
students.
The group, which has been

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writer

installed three new officers: Ken
Anderson, social chairman; Mike
Coury, historian; and Randy,
Colemen, pledge trainer.
Delta Sigma Phi
The close of initiation week
added 12 new men to the
brotherhood of Delta Sigma Phi.
Delta Siga listed two brothers,
Bazil Duncan and Rene
Vandervorde, on the Presidents
List for outstanding academic
achievement.
House manager Bruce
Wilkinson announced that
Guaranty Federal and Loan has
approved a loan for the new
house and construction is
planned to begin in March.

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active for a year, recently
presented a charter for
recognition as an official campus
organization.
The committee discusses

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shortcomings of education and
serves as a communication
between students and faculty.
It is more than just a gripe
group, said Dr. Emmett
Williams, associate professor of

Friday, January 31, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

education, it has an affective
voice in decision making.
Interested students should
contact Chairman Richard
Corrente,4 ED in the
undergraduate education office.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 31, 1969

Factors Os 'Repression
Influence Profs Leaving

FROM PA6E OWE
But those who are leaving in
conjunction with hiring practices
have changed the position, he
says. He says conservative forces
have acquired a commanding
voice in the faculty.
Things certainly are not
getting better, he says, theyre
getting worse.
Lamborn, who has been a
member of the Law faculty for
nearly four years, may see his
job terminated at the end of
next year. Personnel regulations
require that a professor be
granted tenure before five years
in a position or else be
dismissed.
There is a stronger
possibility of my being forced
out than leaving voluntarily, he
says. Obviously if 1 received an
offer from a substantially better
school Id take it.
Repression is disgusting and
hard to live with, Lamborn
says, yet there may be
something I can do about it as a
professor.
Frank Maloney, dean of the
College of Law, says Lamboms
tenure was in effect denied by
the professors own colleagues.
He said a professors tenure
must be approved by a majority
of the colleges 19 tenured
professors.
But a preliminary poll taken
by him revealed very strong
opposition to Lambom's tenure,
Maloney said.
Activities have nothing to do
with tenure, Maloney says.
Others who share as liberal
views have been promoted and
given tenure in recent years.
One of these is Assoc. Prof.
Robert C. Berry, who was
granted tenure last year after
four years in the faculty.
But he has since accepted an

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offer to join the faculty at
Wayne State University in
Detroit after next June.
I dont regreat having come
to the UF, Berry says. But he
says he agrees with Lamborns
statement that an exodus of
liberal professors may be slowly
developing.
I do not think that many
people have been given a raw
deal here, he says. But there
are some that 1 think have not
been treated to the extent they
deserve.
I dont like to sit around and
see friends of mine in this type
of situation, he adds.
Berry says that personal
reasons' combined with
ideological conflicts with the
administration of the UF have
prompted him to accept the
position at Wayne State.
Three people left last year,
he says. And I know of others
who are wondering about the
kind of future they may have
here.
Berry said that about 10 of
the colleges 36 faculty members
may be wondering about their
futures.
The college of law is going
through growing pains, he says.
That was evident when I came
here.
But it has become crucial in
the past two years, Berry says,
such that people more than
before have been assessing what
future they have here.
A Law School ought to keep
a balance of various legal and
social concerns, he says. Im

afraid that we are not doing so
here.
Maloney agrees that certain
programs have been
neglected specially in the
interdisciplinary areas dealing
with social and anthropological
aspects of the law.
But he (Berry) never
discussed with me
interdisciplinary programs and if
he had I would have indicated 1
personally hoped such programs
could be established in the near
future.
He shrugs off charges that
political ideas may influence the
colleges hiring practices.
People are not being hired on
those bases, he says. It is not
unusual for young faculty
members to move in the early
days of their career.
In my opinion, he says,
we began this academic year
with a stronger faculty than
weve had the year before.
Our promotion schedule is
one of the fastest in the
country, Maloney says, and
Ive tried to promote those who
merit. This includes anyone
regardless of political ideas.
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natol 1 The'MiTRF rT ma ", n: Mr L J Glinos Colle 9 e Relations Coordi-
corporation, 4000 Middlesex Turnpike. Bedford. Mass.



New Law Complex Dedication Saturday

Ready After
Three-Month
Postponement
chancellor of the state university
system, Will begin at noon in the
Reitz Union ballroom.
Luncheon speakers will
include William B. Lockhart,
president of the Association of
American Law Schools and dean
of the University of Minnesota
College of Law, and D. Burke
Kibler 111, chairman of the
Board of Regents.
The actual dedication will
take place at the center at 2:30
p.m.
Smathers will officially name
the center and Julius F. Parker,
member of the Board of Regents
will dedicate the complex.
The center was designed by
Miami architects Pancoast,
Ferendino and Granton, and
includes a modern library,
750-seat auditorium, lecture
halls and classrooms.
One of the most noticeable
aspects of the new center is the
physical appearance. Bare
structural concrete covers much
of the outside walls, stairwells
appear to be half finished and
the walls have the texture of the
underside of a bridge.
Although the center was
scheduled to open in September,
classes Could not be held until
January, because the building
was not completely finished.
The delay in completion was
caused by a number of labor
problems, including a strike,
which lasted only a few days,
but held up work for a longer
time.
Another problem was the

LAW CENTER IS LOCATED IN THE OLD BETA WOODS
... on Newberry Rd. behind fraternity row

RENE DUBOIS
... keynoter

mm If I fMb ll !| 'l l
FIRST FLOOR READING ROOM IN LAW COMPLEX LIBRARY
.. the library is one of the busiest sections of the College of Law

FRIDAY
5 p.m 6:30: Reception for Earl Warren at Ramada
Inn
6:30 p.m 8:30: Banquet at Ramada Inn
SATURDAY
9:30 a.m 11:30: Seminar The New Biology and
the Law, Law Center
Noon 2 p.m: Luncheon at Reitz Union
2:30 p. m: Dedication at Law Center Auditorium

change in supervisory personnel.
Seven different men were in
charge of the construction
during the time from
groundbreaking to completion.

Biology, Law Seminar Set

World famous scientist Dr. Rene Dubos
heads up a list of participants in a medico-legal
seminar Saturday as part of the dedication
program of the new law center.
Dubos keynotes the seminar entitled The
New Biology and the Law.
Warren Burger, judge of the U.S. Court of
Appeals, District of Columbia, will present some
of the legal questions raised by the prospect of
increased transplant operations in the future.
Dr. Samuel Martin, provost of the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center, and Dr. Emil Mantini,
former chief of surgery at the Gainesville
Veterans Hospital, will assist Dubos in

When the housing area is
complete, the center will be the
Universitys first live-leam
complex, a new concept in
colleges.

presenting medicines side of the New Biology.
Completing the five-man panel is Marcus Plant,
law professor at the University of Michigan,
whose books on law and medicine have served as
the instructional texts fori numerous medico-legal
courses at various colleges throughout the
country.
We comic 1 -ed many topics, but the medical
and legal involved in transplant
operations seemed the most appropriate for the
times, said associate law dean Leonard Powers.
The two-hour seminar, which is free and open
to the public, begins at 9 a.m. at the new law
center auditorium.

The idea is a part of a
decentralization of learning,
said Harold Riker, housing
director for UF.
When a university gets as big
as UF there is a tendency for the
individual to get lost, Riker
. said.
What were planning here is a
complete college within a
; college, Riker said. The main
law building has already been
completed. Now, were about to
add 128 two-man apartments
adjacent to the main building.
At the same time, he said,
a service facility, a snack bar
and meeting lounge, for
example, will be built.
The apartments will be
constructed in a pinwheel
fashion, and will consist of six
four-story buildings.
Each apartment will include a
bedroom, bath, living area,
kitchenette and study area, and
will be offered exclusively to law
students.
Occupancy for the apartments
is set for September, 1970.
The apartments will hold 256
students and student wives at
capacity.
When the apartments are
completed in 1970, the Law
Center will be the fifth or sixth
live-learn project in the country.
One of those already in
operation is the Johns Hopkins
University Law School.

Friday, January 31,1989, The Florida AMiMpu

flf %
FRANK MALONEY
... law school dean
K
SPESSARD HOLLAND
... to be honored

Page 5



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 31,1969

Page 6

Florida Players
Perform Tonight
The Florida Players will give
their first performance of the
winter quarter tonight in
Constans Theatre at 8. Lewis
John C arlinos Telemachus
Clay will be read.
A cast of 11 will present this
readers theatre production of a
young writer in Hollywood.
Admission is free.

TO ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY
Cartoonist Speaks Tonight

Milton Canis, creator of Steve
Canyon and Terry and the
Pirates, will address the Arnold
Air Society tonight following a
6:30 p.m. dinner in the Reitz
Union Ballroom.
The nationally syndicated
columnist will use easel and
charcoal in his presentation
before society members and
invited guests.
Alex Mavro, information
officer for the society, says that
Canis last year was named an
honorary member of the local
squadron.
Special guests include the
commandant of the
Southeastern Air Force ROTC,
local businessmen and deans of
several University of Florida
colleges.
The UF chapter of the Arnold
Sig Eps Help
Heart Fund
Sigma Phi Epsilon kicks off
campus participation in the
National Heart Fund Drive
tonight with a banquet hosting
all fraternity presidents and
housemothers.
Local state representatives
and Mrs. J. Hillis Miller, a board
member of the State Heart Fund
will also be there.
During February, National
Heart Month, the Sig Eps will
coordinate fund raising projects
among all fraternities. They are
offering trophies to the
fraternity in both Orange and
Blue Leagues which raises the
most money. The trophies will
be awarded at Interfratemity
Council Frolics, Feb. 21.
Sig Eps have participated in
the Heart Fund Drive since
1963, collecting between one
and two thousand dollars each
year.
WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIR
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DROPOUTS
/\

Air Society was chartered in
1950, making it one of the
oldest in the United States.
The 36 members of this
service club work at Sunland
Training Center and the
Gainesville Boys Club. They

Accent Meeting Monday
A meeting will be held in the Accent office at 4 p.m. Monday for
all persons serving as hostesses and as drivers for Accent speakers for
the week-long Accent 69 Symposium.
J All persons who have been already contacted to serve as drivers or
hostesses and all those still interested in serving are asked to be at the
meeting.
The Accent office is in room 313, Reitz Union.
m I
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Military Ball along with their
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Cadet Colonel Donald E.
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Enemy Troops In S. Viet Increasing.. Laird

WASHINGTON
(UPI) Defense Secretary
Melvin R. Laird said Thursday
the number of enemy troops in
South Vietnam has increased in
the last six to eight weeks, but
that the allies are in a good
position to meet any offensive.
Comparing the war situation
now with a year ago when the
Communists mounted a major
Tet lunar new year offensive,
Laird told a news conference:
I hope were in a better
position this year than we were
last year to deal with that type
of contingency. It is true that
theres been considerable
movement of forces from the
north to the south down

OConneff Criticizes
Investigation Editorial
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C. OConnell Thursday took issue with an
Alligator editorial which lambasted the administration for calling an
investigation into three controversial stories.
Nobody on this campus, myself included, is above being
checked, OConnell said.
The editorial in Wednesdays paper bawled out Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale for demanding an investigation into the
facts surrounding three stories published during the fall quarter.
The stories were the pill series, the story about two staffers who
were locked into the library and the story about censorship of
four-letter words in the Purdue University student newspaper.
The circumstances warranted an investigation, OConnell said.
There was a question of misrepresentation of facts to a University
official, he added.
The editorial contended the Board of Student Publications
investigation, which subsequently cleared those involved in the stories,
was a threat of external manipulation.
The obvious desired end is the elimination of embarassing stories
and the suffocation of free discussion of controversial issues, the
editorial claimed, calling Hales action an attempt to influence
editorial policies.
I think the conclusion of the Alligator that this was suppression is
unwarranted for it seems to say that no question can be raised about
anything, anytime, OConnell said.
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through Laos, and the force level
of the enemy has been increased
in the last six to eight weeks.
But Laird said that Gen.
Creighton B. Abrams, U.S.
commander in Vietnam, was
confident that his contingency
plans would prevent another Tet
offensive.
On the basis of official
Pentagon figures, there appears
to be 20,000 more North
Vietnamese troops in South
Vietnam now than last October.
Last October, former Defense
Secretary Claik M. Clifford
reported there were 80,000
North Vietnamese troops in
South Vietnam and 30,000 to
40,000 available in Laos,

ALLIES STILL IN 'GOOD POSITION

Cambodia and North Vietnam.
Now, the Pentagon lists 100,000
North Vietnamese troops in
South Vietnam and 30,000 to
40,000 outside its borders.
In his first news conference
since he was sworn in as defense
secretary, Laird said he plans to
go to Vietnam in the not too

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subsequent staff engineering (project) work. The future is plant management or plant (or
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An accounting training program involving on-the-job training and special accounting projects in
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Our starting salaries are more than competitive, with semi-annual salary reviews.
Our Benefits are all company paid including 100% tuition refund.
Most assignments are in Louisville, Kentucky; however, we have other plant operations in
Baltimore, Maryland; Lawrenceburg, Indiana (20 miles west of Cincinnati); and Headquarters in
New York City (Accountants).
These are our qualifications; now let's talk about yours during a personal interview.
A Seagram representative will be on your campus February 7,1969.
Let's get together".
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distant future.
He said the United States
must make sure its troops in
Vietnam are protected during
the Paris talks. Every effort is
being made to keep sufficient
pressure on the enemy so that
our service personnel in Vietnam
will not be overrun, he said.

Friday, January 31,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Laird assigned his deputy,
David Packard, to head a
Defense Department study of all
questions raised by North
Koreas seizure of the inteligence
ship Pueblo. It will include
questions such as protection of
intelligence ships and the role of
such vessels in the future.

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 31,1969

The Florida Alligator
*Th price of fra adorn
SflfaK Harold Aldrich
Editor-1 rvChief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor
sj[PP^

Clyde Ellis called Tuesday
nights Student Senate meeting,
unbecoming and degrading.
Gyde was too kind.
The meeting was redundant,
unnecessary, undignified, and
great for the manufacturers of
Excedrin and Bufferin
headache-pain-pill-dispensers.
For the last two quarters Ive
been the official student senate
reporter.
I like the job usually.
Tuesday night I didnt.
When representatives of the
student body spend FORTY
minutes debating two special
requests of relatively little
consequence to the senators
its a heck of away to spend an

Sounds heard around the Alligator office, Vol. II:
Do you realize you said good-by to that
person 14 times?
You got yourself into this, you get yourself out
fit
Keim, did you steal our picture of Larry
Smith?
No, what would I do with a picture of Larry
Smith?
Youre sure you dont have it?
Frisk me!
She said she had a date last weekend but this
weekend shes free.
Free or moderately inexpensive?
I dont know if I like that connotation.
tl
Do we have a reporter who wants a story?
Do we have a reporter who wants the story of a
lifetime?
Do we have a reporter who wants brownie
points?
Im too old to be a brownie.

Staff Writings

Disappointed In The Student Senate

Staff Writings

Still Babbling At The Alligator Office

evening.
I never saw such inefficient
conduct in the hallowed
chambers of the student senate.
It was not only degrading
to the student body but
embarassing to the visitors
present at the meeting.
Student Senators wasted
approximately TWENTY
minutes debating how much
money it takes to drive to Miami
and whether toll fares should be
included in the transportation
fee.
If FORTY minutes on special
requests wasnt enough, insult
was added to injury in the
person of Bob Fleischman,

EDITORIAL
Let Sunshine In

By expelling several student leaders
from their Thursday afternoon meeting
the university senate has closed its eyes to
any belief in the sunshine in
government concept of lawmaking. a
One of the foremost theories ot
government in Florida is the right of the
public to know what lawmaking groups
are doing. The university senate is denying
the university community this right by
barring members of the press from its
meetings.
We fail to see what this group of
faculty and administrators want to hide
from the press and student leaders. The
only subject we can see that the senate
might want to discuss in private would be
the awarding of honorary degrees.
Any discussion of regular policy
decision-making should be open to the
press, students, or anyone interested in
observing the proceedings.
If the members of the university senate
are so sensitive that they do not want
anyone outside of the senate to hear their
opinions on issues, there is something
wrong with their sense of responsibility
and leadership. Any person in the senate
with a grain of self-pride should be able to
make his opinion known and stand behind
it.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has
said that he has no objections to students

budget and finance committee
chairman.
Each time Bob rose to answer
questions or clarify a point in
the special requests, senators
representatives of the entire
student body started talking,
laughing and generally disturbing
his address.
Student Senators, I bequethe
to you a copy of Emily Post if
necessary.
Your action was indicitive of
high school student councilers
for what my violent damation
means to you.
And just what I and several
other senators needed was a
little no-no session at the end

Whats an adjective for a citizen of the United
States? United Statesian?
We have a shoot to kill story coming in from
our dead reporter.
Does anyone around here know the fellows on
the track team?
Careful, Kathie Larry might want his socks
back.
Well, tell him hell just have to come over and
get them himself.
Ive got to go to class. Save me some space on
the page.
Cant anyone identify the guys on the track
team?
Someone answer the d phone!
Ever notice theres never any profanity used
around this office? Gripes, yes, swearing, no.
Hey, has the Miami Herald been on campus to
interview yet?
If youre really desperate, you can take a picture
of my hairstyle.

of the unfruitful meeting.
Friends of friends were
advised to tell their friends of
friends unclarified messages.
Apologies (that shouldnt
have been necessary) were issued
to special requesters (that had
already left.)
Roll was taken, for the second
time, from a nonexistent
quorum. (Some smart senators
left).
Opinions were given on other
senators (indirectly of course)
and senators (who decided to be
direct) responded with
v e r y-nice-to-listen-to-but-dull-as y-nice-to-listen-to-but-dull-asheck-to-suffer-through
heck-to-suffer-through y-nice-to-listen-to-but-dull-asheck-to-suffer-through excuses
for former conduct.

or members of the press attending the
university senate meetings, except for
executive sessions. This is a reasonable
suggestion, and the university senate
could prevent a conflict between
themselves and the rest of the university
community.
The university senate cannot justify its
secrecy. It is not a secret organization, but
a body of faculty and administrators
making policy decisions that affect the
entire university. The outside must be
allowed to view the workings of these
lawmakers.
For too long a time the university
senate has been controlled by a small,
close-knit group of conservative faculty
and administrators who could be
compared to the Pork Choppers of early
twentieth century politics of Florida. This
group is slowly being broken down by the
influx of younger, more moderate
members of the senate.
Open meetings would expose this group
even more and bring about their demise
even quicker.
We urge the university senate to take
off their blindfolds and realize that what
they do at their meetings is important to
more people than they realize.
Lets open up the doors and let the
sunshine in.

By Ellen Dupuy

By Kathie Keim

I just said, if youre really desperate ...
Sanders, do you know the people on t e
cross-country team?
Is Harold in the office?
Whos calling?
I saw John . Theyve been practicing. They re
waiting for us to get a croquet team together.
Whats that, your fraternity salute?
I have quite a nasty column about my senators.
Oh, theyre your senators now.
Yes, I have quite an affinity for those guys.
Are there any messages for Raul?
It says, Dont touch UPI machine, so no o y
will touch it to put in new paper.
Still no paper in the wire. 9
Were you planning on using this typewriter.
I have to open the box of paper before I can p
it in the wire machine.
Where do I take a column?
The wire machine is acting up again. Do we
anyone who reads Chinese? Garbled Chinese.

Student Senators come on!!
You have committees to
organize your small-easy-to-un small-easy-to-untangle-in-committee
tangle-in-committee small-easy-to-untangle-in-committee requests.
You have paper and ink to
write out your reprimands-apol reprimands-apologies-announcements-gripesnews-type
ogies-announcements-gripes- reprimands-apologies-announcements-gripesnews-type
news-type letter.
Use them.
It was a bad meeting.
1 was disappointed in the
student senate.
I guess it doesnt matter.
Im only an Alligator reporter.
But remember there were
visitors present and your image
went down, student senators.
If nothing else beware, SG
elections are coming soon.



OPIN FORUM:
A Avia mil ViM<£
'There is no Mope for the complacent mas."
Facts Were Distorted
*

MR. EDITOR:
In view of some of the rather incredible things
that are being written, I would like to clear up a few
points about what might be called the Nudie Photo
Feature Firing Flap.
While the Associated Press, the St. Petersburg
Times, The Miami Herald and the Miami News
managed to convey fairly accurately what I told
them, I believe the Alligator and the Gainesville Sun
have been responsible unwittingly perhaps for
some important distortions, omissions and
downright fiction.
I never contended, as you say, that I was fired
because of the Universitys Reports
anti-administration policy. I merely noted in
response to questioning that the Report had been
highly critical of a number of things on campus.
And, I told what I knew to be true about the case.
This included the fact that Pres. Stephen C.
OConnells office called the Florida History Library
last Thursday and expressed a good deal of

DeGarmo Incident
An Invented Issue

MR. EDITOR:
I simply cannot believe your
editorial regarding the Scott
DeGarmo incident. To suggest
that DeGarmo was unjustly
dismissed from his job is to show
a childish naivity that I simply
cannot comprehend.
Gentlemen there is no issue
here! Simply and accurately
stated, DeGarmo committed a
serious breach of trust in
allowing the library to be
habited after hours.
It does not matter in the least
what the purpose of the use was,
whether to study or whether to
have some atrocious-looking
model pose for petty pictures.
Where Are You
Artur Freiner?
MR. EDITOR;
I write concerning the letters
you have printed written by
Artur Freiner. Mr. Freiner shows
remarkable insight into the
problems and issues facing the
world today and he finds
incredibly practical solutions to
these problems.
He appears to be a very
enlightened individual who is
terribly concerned with the
plight of the entire human race
in our highly complex and
rapidly changing environment. It
is imperative that Mr. Freiner
continue to make his genius
available to the students of this
university.
I would very much like to get
in touch with Mr. Freiner
concerning an opening on the
executive board of the PUKT
PARTY and I would appreciate
it if he Would respond as to his
whereabouts through the
Alligator.
MARK COHEN, 3AR

In fact, DeGarmo let
individuals in the library
after-hours and without
permission to do so. Come on
now, kiddies, mommy and
daddy are not around to spank
poor Scotty, and to admonish
him not to do it again.
Were growing up (at least,
thats the accepted hypothesis).
The library has and certainly
should have discretion in
incidents of this tvoe.
Hopefully, in the future you
will publish editorials written
with a little more thought, so
that our money will be used
more appropriately. I know
Lavon is free now and an issue is.
needed badly, but lets not try
to invent one!
MIKE SEGAL, 4LW
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Correspond With Serviceman
Through Operation Mail
MR. EDITOR:
If you would like to correspond with a serviceman in Vietnam,
please send an introductory letter, with picture enclosed if possible,
to:
Operation Mail Call
175th RR Co.
APOSF 96227
..
. --djEmb.
SP 4 DAVE McKEEVER
/ RA 18977515, BOX MP
175th RR CO.
APO SF 96227

perturbation over our photo feature. I was also told
at the library that a phone call was made to
OConnell, who was out of town.
Further, I was fired not by my supervisor, but by
another library administrator, John Veenstra. And,
when the AP called Veenstra, he would not admit
this but referred the call to Vice President Fred
Connor, who denied that I had been fired.
Finally, when a student member of the Conduct
Committee reportedly said that body was planning
to call up the editors of the Report, I said I did not
believe we could get a fair hearing before the
committee, as several of its faculty members had
been personally angry with me for investigating
their actions.
And, I noted the body was appointed by
OConnell, who had been one of the main targets of
the Reports criticism.
Throughout, I merely told the facts. I have not
yet attempted to put any interpretation on them.
SCOTT DeGARMO

;;;w;w;v^av.v. .v.w.v.v;v;v>k : xv>>>; >Xw: K"X'X %V'V**wwww-v//.v.v< i
I Chances Os Pain
All of the world is full of hate and mistrust,
$ Each person using any means to make gains for :
ft himself ft
To be the best whether worthy or not is a must, ft
S And violence and hatred is covered by lies. S
1 I
Pain and depression is endured by all, >:
:|i And each person blames another for all the wrong, g
i$ Apathy is condemned and blamed for our nations fall,
But no one feels he should be the one to right this §
v wrong. ift
S
* A
x To crawl in your own little shell is thought to protect, §
S And shutting out others will lessen the chances of pain, h
But in so doing the beauty of life they neglect, £
And are often blinded never to experience compassion §
| again. |
3 Life lived today is the biggest of all downs, %
x But everyone believes they are having fun, |
| And that the world will always go around, |
| They neglect to try and solve a problem with anything ij
S but a lack
ft Os compassion or the butt of a gun. 5
I I
/ say NO!, to this wretched existence, :j:
Down with self-pity and up with respect, !:
Let there be more to life than harsh words and ft
materialistic fools, %
| Why cant there be love where it once was before. ft
| DALE CARMICHAEL. 2UC I

Prevent Parking Fees

MR. EDITOR:
I feel compelled to add my
voice to those protesting the
proposed fees for faculty and

A Modern-Day
Inquisition

MR. EDITOR:
Those of us who attended
Lavon Gentrys Legal Lynching
two weeks ago were rather
shocked to see the noose taken
away from Lavons neck due to
a semantical technicality.
Now that the justice has been
proclaimed in Hogtown, we
though, there would never be an
act of torture similar to the
lynching perpetrated upon UF
serf-students. We were wrong,
alas; a modem-day Inquisition
took place the night of
Wednesday, January 22.
This was not a
Torquemada-type Inquisition,
complete with auto-da-fe. No,
my friends, this was an
Administration-sponsored
Inquisition, the purpose of
which was to question the
dastardly devils of Southern
Student Organizing Committee
and Student for New Partv.

staff parking. Free parking is one
of the few fringe benefits
accorded to employes at this
institution.
To attract or retain these
employes, the University will
now have to grant them
increases in salary commensurate
with the parking fees, and the
overhead costs of this additional
salary will result in a net loss of
revenue to the University. All
that will be gained is some ill
will over a bit more red tape.
I hope it is not too late to
prevent the implementation of
this unfortunate aspect of the
new parking plan.
DANIEL A. BELKIN
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
OF PHYSIOLOGY

Friday, January 31,1939, Ttw Florida Allipator,

The spokesmen for these
groups were to have confessed
all the sordid details of their
subversive plots, but, alas and/or
alack, they failed to break down
under the questioning.
At least, however, it was
apparent to all that the
hearing was being conducted
in the spirit of D. Burke Kibler,
John Champion and J. Wayne
Reitz.
The SSOC representatives
repeatedly disavowed SDS ties,
yet the men with the questions
were not convinced.
The explanation given was
we dont confuse the two,
mind you, but the general public
- the tax payers may.
How quaint! Were the SSOC
people being questioned by a UF
panel or by a group of Micanopy
fruit-fly salesmen? Do
taxpayers determine who is to
be chartered? No one answered
these questions.
When it was New Party time,
the name Dick Gregory was
mentioned as a national NP
leader, where upon Mr. Kirkland
asked anxiously, Do you agree
with everything Dick Gregory
stands for?
No one on the panel seemed
to know what Dick Gregory
stands for, but they were quite
willing to judge anyone who did
know. My God, the mans black!
How more radical can you get?
Can these New Party people
really accept Dick Gregory as
something other than a Commie
nut?
We all, I trust, eagerly await
the outcome if any -of the
hearing. The burning of
Dissenters is an ever-popular
Administration sport, and there
is still time to get em all.
I just hope that someone gives
me a place to hide when the
torches are lit.
DAVID MILLER
Frustrated
Professor
MR. EDITOR:
As a junior faculty member
who has also been frustrated by
the frequent lack of
communication between the
Faculty Senate and much of the
rest of our campus, both
students and faculty, I should
like to add my support to the
three demands on the Faculty
Senate which were presented in
Student Body Bill 69-1012.
I would further suggest that
one step toward better
communication might be for
each meeting of the Faculty
Senate and the Student Senate
to be announced in the Alligator
with a proposed agenda, as I
believe is already being done for
occasional meetings of the
Student Senate.
JAMES B. CONKLIN, JR.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
OF PHYSICS

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 31, 1969

F T* W-WWi
pM
UF RECEIVES HOUSE
John R. Harrison, right, president and publisher of the
Gainesville Sun and Lakeland Ledger, discusses the donation of
his 19-room Gainesville home to the UF Foundation with (left
to right) UF President Stephen C. O'Connell; Gainesville
attorney Sam T. Dell, vice president of the Foundation's Board
of Directors; University Relations Dean Fred Cantrell, who
serves as executive director of the Foundation board, and
William E. Elmore, vice president for business affairs at the
university.
The 37-year-old Harrison house is located on a three-lot site
at 727 SW 27th St.

UF Prof Publishes
On Nuclear Partides

Dr. Alex E. Green, UF
assistant research professor of
physics, culminated nine years
of work with the publication of
The Nuclear Independent
Particle: The Shell and the
Optical Models.
The book is a scholarly
treatise designed for by
other researchers in the study of
the interaction of nuclear
particles.
Green co-authored the book
Dialogue 1969
Interviewing
Mike Hill, chairman of the
1969 Dialogue project, will be
interviewing applicants
interested in working on
Dialogue in room 316 of the
Reitz Union Monday from 2 to
4 pjn. There are positions open
for five or six students.
Does the UF need a coliseum?
Should the SSOC be recognized?
These and other topics of
student interest will be included
in Dialogue.
Hill said Dialogue should be
underway within three weeks.
The programs will feature
interaction between students
and a panel of experts on each
topic.
Hill can be reached at
3784714 or 372-9284.
Got a Sick Car?
Our 5 skilled
Mechanics have
over 80 years
experience
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
Corvair Specialist
1031 So. Main 376-7771

with T. Sawarda of the
University of Southern
California and D.S. Saxon of the
University of California at Los
Angeles. Green said the three
met at an international
convention on nuclear optics in
Florida in 1959. They began
work then.
Green assumed his present
post six years ago after coming
to UF from General Dynamics.
He has written books on atomic
and space physics, nuclear
physics and the middle
ultraviolet.
Green has a doctorate in
physics from the University of
Cincinnati.

N WAYNE REITZ UNION J. WAYNE REITZ UNION J. WAYNE REITZ UNION J. WAYNE REITZ UNION J. WAYNE REITZ UNION J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
1 REITZ UNION THEATRE f 4o< S
i 1 1
1 WINNER OF 3 ACADEMY AWARDS! __ \
t "A GRAND UPROARIOUS BASH!" tj K UT £
£ 111 Time Q W W Z
lw I X
I K OB i
-i g j w |
1 ... m 4 Starring: Cliff Robertson =
§ S ?c\ V x s
t X J in James Gregory £
£ hi ANTHONY QUINN 9 Z
J] ALAN BATES IRENE PAPAS >
2 SSL MICHAEL CACOYANNIS PRODUCTION Cl ?
< M "ZORBATHE GREEK" -g KODert V-Uip
co-starring LILA KEDROVA Z
-i HP AN INTERNATIONAL CLASSICS RELEASE 2
Z Original Soundtrack Album available on 20tH Century Fo Records Z
9 a in =
§ 3% mg It's skipper was skinny, boyish, and a hero. h
n r?__ __ Later he became President.
ZORBATHE GREEK
z I
$ FRIDAY JAN. 31 6:00, 8:30, 11:00PM SATURDAY FEB. 1 6:00, 8:30, 11:00PM $
Jj ~5
-i WAYNE REITZ UNION J. W/>YNE REITZ UNION J.WAYNE REITZ UNION J. WAYNE REITZ UNION J. WAYNE REITZ UNION J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

TQ UF ART GALLERY
Kuniyoshi Works Coming

For the first time in nearly 20
years the works of the famous
Japanese-American painter
Yasuo Kuniyodii will go on
public display in a major
retrospective exhibition opening
Feb. 7 for two months at the UF
Gallery.
During the past two decades,
the works of Kuniyoshi have
remained in private and museum
collections. Now they are being
brought together for an
exhibition representative of all
the significant periods of his
P luction. ranging in dates
>\\? early 1920 s until his
h in 1953."
The more than 100 creations
by Kuniyoshi are executed in
exceptionally brilliant colors,
emphasizing several
transformations in the artists
style which assured him a
permanent niche in the history
Bette's Hairstylist
1620 W. Univ. Ave.
University Plaza
Ph. 378-2244

. .
EVERYONES INVITED TO
L $ E
OPEN HOUSE
TONIGHT
9pm til 12pm
featuring music by
The Most Exquisite Rush

of American painting.
The exhibition is composed of
54 paintings, augmented by
numerous gouaches, drawings,
and lithographs.
Kuniyoshi came to the United
States from Japan when he was
13, arriving in Seattle, working
and studying art in California,
ending up at the Art Students
League in New York in 1916.

#STIIK SHDKC l
Student Special
(With The Coupon)
I Our Regular 88t Steakburger I
* Luncheon And Any 15C Drink I
| $1.03 Value Only 85< plus tax |
| Steak n Shake |
* 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville I
p

After years of struggle, he came
to be the first living American
painter to have a one-man show
at the Whitney Museum of
American Art in New York.
Following its display at the
University through March 30,
the exhibition will have a second
presentation in May and June at
the National Picture Collection
of the Smithsonian Institution



Orange

address all campus calendar
notices to public functions
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

PRE-MEDICAL and
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS
Registration with the
Pre-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 105 Anderson
Hall has been extended through
February 7. Absolutely NO
registrations will be permitted
after this date. You must bring
the full names of your
instructors and the section
numbers with you in order to
register.
~ j
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS All teacher
education majors, regardless of
college classification, are
required to satisfy the speech
screening requirement before
being admitted into the
Advanced Professional Sequence
or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE
400 and the elementary block.
\ 1
ENGLISH AND SPEECH
MAJORS do not take the test, as
SCH 201 is required in all of
their programs. Appointments
are now being made in Room
124, Norman Hall.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
CANDIDATESFebruary 7, is
the deadline for removing of "I"
grades (except 699 and 799) for
candidates for graduate degrees
for March 25, 1969, graduation.
GRADUATING
STUDENTSStudents who
expect to graduate at the end of
the Winter Quarter must file an
application for the degree and
pay the graduation fee at the
Office of the Registrar no later
than Jan. 31, 1969. Students
must make application for tfie
degree in the quarter in which
they expect to graduate,
regardless of previous
applications.

YOUR NEXT CAR LOAN... Bfiili Blllj wraj^W
7> ~'4L?Q Try our km * rto flMncing **w <
VjSRx, y~ " ?"* rr f h ~ l _: JJiMyHK^rjKr*^-
ll cill 392-0393 so cw< ll^ w > -,
/Jmi fp) 3M anywhf * ro ** Rlto
1 I
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMTOS FEPOML OR]miTJJNION § #|
sth Avnu at th comer of 12th Streer ** l^mmm ^^

Administrative Notices

GENERAL NOTICES
DELTA PHI EPSILON invites
everyone to join them at their
open house tonight, from 9 to
12 p.m. Dress casually & enjoy
free refreshments while listening
to the sounds of "The Most
Equisite Rush."
On Sunday (Feb. 2) at 11
a.m. there will be a lunch and
bowling party, starting at the
Hillel House. The price is $.85
for members and $1.25 for
non-members. Awards will be
given for the highest and lowest
series.
- o
GRADUATE SCHOOL
DEADLINE: Feb. 7 is the
deadline for applying for
Graduate School for the 1969
Spring Quarter.
NOTICE
Student Government Production
Subscription holders who are
unable to attend the new
February 9th date for the
MAN OF LA MANCHA may
receive a refund.
VISTA: Representatives will
be on the campus Feb. 3-7 to
interview persons interested in
their programs. Representatives
will be available in booths
located at the Reitz Union,
Information Booth across from
the Hub and at the Law Center
between 9 a.m. and sp.m.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMS: Friday, Jan. 31, is the
deadline for receipt in the office
of Foreign Languages of the
application for all foreign
language functional exams to be
given Saturday, Feb. 8,1969.

BLUE BULLETIN

PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb 4,7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with:
(A) report to Floyd 104 or 106;
(B) to Little 101 or 109; (C) to
Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121 or 125; (F) to Little 201,
203, 205 or 207; (G) to Little
213,215,217,219; (H) to Little
221, 223, 225, 227, 233, 235 or
239; (l-L) to Matherly 2, 3,4, 5,
6,7, 8,9, 10,11,12, 13, 14 or
16; (M) to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 111, 113. 115, 116, 117,
118 or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110, 112 or 115; (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to Flint
101, 102, 110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
(W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 113 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 4,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Peabody 1,
2, 4. 7, 10, 11; (M-Z) report to
Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208, or
209.
MS 102 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 5,7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
MS 204 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 5,7 p.m. in
LIT 101, 109, 113, 121 and
125.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 6,7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
MS 301 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 6,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to LIT 101,
109, 113, 121 or 125; (M-Z)
report LIT 201, 203, 205, 213,
215.217 or 219.
MS 302 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb 6,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-M) report to MAT 2,3,
4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
14 or 16; (N-Z) report to MAT
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

JAN. 30-31: MCDONNELL
DOUGLAS CORP.AE, EE,
ME, Eng. Sci., Eng. Mech., DE,
MetE, B, M, D. AETNA LIFE
CASUALTY CO. All majors.
B, M.
JAN. 31: TORNWALL,
LANG AND LEEAccount
ing, B. M. OWENS-CORNING
FI BERG LAS CORP. ChE,
CE, Cer. E, EE, IE, any major
for sales. B, M. THE CECO
CORP. CE, Bldg. Constr.,
ME, IE, Bus. Adm. B.
TRIANGLE STATIONS BA
or better in any curriculum.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
SERVICES ADMINISTRA ADMINISTRATIONCE,
TIONCE, ADMINISTRATIONCE, ME, EE, Math,
Physics. B, M D.
DE ERING-MILLIKEN
CO. Tentatively will interview
for PhD's in Chemistry only.
MEAD CORP. Usually
interviews for technical majors.
RAYONIER, INC.Usually
interviews for technical majors.

Friday, January 31,1969, Thu Florida Alligator,

PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement 8t Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.

FEB. 3: BURDINES No
special degree, any major. B, M.
LYBRAND, ROSS BROTHERS
& MONTGOMERY Account-
ing, Accounting, B, MBA. FACTORY
MUTUAL ENGINEERING
CORP. ME, EE, Chemistry,
Math & Physics. B, M.
PENINSULAR INSURANCE
CO. Any degree, B, M.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK
O F ATLANTA-JACKSON ATLANTA-JACKSONVILLE
VILLE ATLANTA-JACKSONVILLE Bus. Adm., Acct.
Finance, IE, B. NASA GEORGE
C. MARSHALL SPACE
FLIGHT CENTEREE, AE.
ME, Eng. Sci., Eng. Mech., Phy.,
B, M, D. THE TRAVELERS
INSURANCE CO. Usually
interviews non-technical majors.
JOHN HANCOCK INSURANCE
CO. Usually interviews
non-technical majors. HASKINS
AND SELLS Usually
interviews for staff accountants.
NASA J.F.K. SPACE
CENTER Usually interviews
for technical majors.
FEB. 3*4: RADIO
CORPORTATION OF
AMERICAEE, ME, IE, Bus.
Adm., Fin., Acct., Math., Stat.,
Lib. Arts. B, M. ERNST AND
ERNSTAccounting, Law. B,
M.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

;£'XX£sX£-XC*XsV*X*:XYW^
| FOR SALE |
Honda 450 Custom, must see to
appreciate. Call 378-5761.
(A-10t-70-p)
SPECIAL THIS WEEK: Aluminum
secretarial chair like new. Cost new
$47.50, NOW SIO.OO. JR Office
Furniture Co. 620V2 S. Main St.
(A-st-69-p)
Hollywood bed twin size, mattress
& box springs, SSO; tv console RCA,
$35; Heath FM tuner S2O; Phone
376-7175 after 6 p.m. (A-st-70-p)
1969 Honda 90, 3 months old, under
1000 miles, under warranty, just
tuned-up, incl. 2 helmets. $325 or
best offer. Ph. 378-4919 after 5 pm.
(A-st-71-p)
For Sale: 1967 Triumph Bonneville
TI2OR Rebuilt top end. Best offer
over SBOO. Call 376-9450, ask for
John Albers after 6 pm. (A-3t-71-p)
Used Japanese sewing machine. Not
fancy but runs well. Portable with
case. Ideal gift for her! $25 or best
offer. 3 78-9450 after 6 pm.
(A-3t-71-p)
Vespa 125. S9O. Good shape, with
helmet. Call 392-8061 or 378-4449
after 5 p.m. (A-3t-72-p)
First $lB5 takes Hondo 90 1967.
2500 miles, excellent condition.
Need money for school. Call
378-8127. (A-3t-72-p)
1967 Honda CBI6O Helmet included.
Very good condition $350.00.
Inquire at Streits Cycle Shop.
(A-3t-72-p)
1968 48x12 Lamplighter central air,
1 bdrm. washer. Just like new. Call
376-9005. (A-st-72-p)
Smith Corona electric typewriter,
1965 model, SBO. Royal portable
typewriter, 1965 model, S3O. Phone
378-5033 after 5 p.m. (A-2t-72-p)
BEAUTIFUL BSA 1967 650, .060,
3/4 cam, 300 mi. on eng. Deep green
and chrome. Bike at A R Bid. Ask
$995. Dave Finlay, 378-4043.
(A-2t-72-p)
1964 ZUNDAPP 250 cc. needs work,
S2O cheap, also 40,000 BTU GAS
HEATER very good cond. CALL
372-1603 after 5:00. (A-3t-72-p)
PILE is soft and lofty . colors
retain brilliance in carpets cleaned
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-73-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies,
Custom, reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
Ml CANOPY. 466-3340. (A-ts-69-p)
TOPCON AUTO 100 SLR 35mm
camera. Excellent condition, 53mm
Fs2.o lens light meter in the camera.
Call Bob, 378-7479. (A-3t-73-p)
1968 Scrambler, excellent condition
load and trail sprockets, only 1500
miles, must sell S2OO or best offer.
Call 378-2878. (A-3t-73-p)
1964 Honda Hawk, new clutch
spindle, front tire, metallic tan, tool
kit, helmet, parts, included S3OO
cash. I want to sell you a bike."
372-6997. (A-2t-73-p)
FOR SALE: 17 ft. Cobia fully
equipped w/75 Evinrude, electric
starter, used 150 hours. Murray
trailer. SISOO. Call 372-5505 after 5.
(A-st-70-p)
I FOR RENT I
Must sublet 2 bedroom poolside
French Quarter apt. Call 378-8564.
(B-st-69-p)
SUBLET: One bedroom furnished
apartment at Tanglewood Manor.
Available February or March 1. You
may use our security deposit. Call
376-1412 after 6 p.m. (B-st-72-p)
Sublet Till June: spacious one
bedroom apt, pool and laundry
facilities, deposit paid, cad 376-7647
after 5 p.m. (B-4t-72-p)
Modern furnished mobile home near
campus for student couple or single
student. $75. Phone 376-8063 after 1
p.m. (B-4t-72-p)
RH
E>

| FOR RENT I
Attr. 1 bdrm. furnished apt. avail,
immed. AC, all-electric, $96 mo.
Close campus, 1716 NW 3rd no.
21. Call 378-4632 evenings dr come
by. (B-3t-72-p)
Desperate! 1 female roommate.
Landmark no. 169, 378-7782.
(B-7t-72-p)
Must sublet: immediately spacious
one bedroom furn. apt. very near
campus 95/mo.? Come see and talk.
16 05 NW 4th Ave. Apt. C.
(B-3t-73-p)
Quiet offices for the work-minded.
Plenty of parking. Walk to campus.
Computer Management Corporation.
Ph.: 378-1615. (B-st-73-c)
| WANTED
One coed to share 2 bdrm. apt. with
3 other girls FQ apt. 72. Call anytime
after 2 pm, 378-9934. (C-st-70-p)
Male roommate to share 3 bedroom
IV2 bath house with central air and
heat, separate bedrooms. Occupancy
Feb. $50.00/month plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 378-7041. (C-st-64-p)
One female roommate wanted
immediate occupancy. Landmark.
Call 372-6853. (C-3t-71-p)
Wanted: two female roommates to
share French Quarter apt. Call
376-9659. (C-3t-71-p)
Roommate wanted, immediate
occupancy College Terrace. $65 mo.
Prefer upper division or over 21. Call
376-2758. Utilities included.
(C-3t-71-p)
Male roommate, Landmark, 2 bdrm.
$45 per mo. plus utilities, see Jim or
Tom after 12:00 p.m. Apt. 143.
(C-3t-71-p)
2 Females to accompany 2 gentlemen
on 3 day cruise to Nassau Fri. Feb. 7.
Entire fare paid by us. Interviewing
now. Call 378-0729. (C-4t-71-p)
WANTED: one coed who likes
bowling or handball. Must be under 5
ft. 4 in. and 120 lbs. Call 376-9578
after 6 p.m. (C-lt-73-p)
Female student needs place to live.
Prefer 40 dollars or under a month
and close to campus. Call Mimi
372-6768. (C-lt-73-p)
v-wk-Xvxw-v.sww; ii?w iicn. t kfflwj;
HELP WANTED ||
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between Bs. (E-10t-71-c)
WANTED: Males, over 21 interested
in participating in antibiotic study
earn $50.00. Come to Room M-438
Medical Science Building Jan. 31,
Feb. 3 & Feb. 4. 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
for further details. (E-3t-72-p)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Phone 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
£*x4w.x*x*x*xx*x*x*x<*&>x*xx*x.!s
| AUTOS |
Triumph Spitfire MK2 1967. Must
be seen to be appreciated. Less than
14,000 miles, R&H, WSW, $1,500.
Call 376-0911 after 5 p.m.
(G-st-70-p)

BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
Ist RUN MAIN FEATURE
TfflliraiiHailiW SHOWING 7:00 & 10:25
One had GUTS...one had GUNS I /
THE GAL THEY HAD EtETWEENTHEM 1
ROBERT DIANE DICK
-rjxzfSfiS
SS* .S' andTMeSaVaCE
spiked qates l.veljOaafV
... Ml M ~ AMERICAN INTERNATIONALISM .^*UrV.-nuiH
L M | CHAEI MARK M
DAMON BROWN H

Page 12

5, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 31. 1969

r:X'X*x*X*x-x.x*swx*X"X*x-:.;
AUTOS
xXrX*x*:*X4*:*x*x*x*x*NXi!Xs*x-x*:S
4-4-2 1966 metallic gray black top
r&h good tires clean interior
excellent condition, SIBOO. Call
372-5463. (G-st-73-p)
65 Corvair automatic 140 hp conv.
Automatic, top SBOO. 372-7659 after
6 pm. (G-st-69-p)
63 MG Midget w/llOOcc engine new
top & trans, blue metal flake paint,
sharp, call Jan at 376-5295, or
372-0126. (G-st-69-p)
1964 Merc, 390 super maruder
engine, power steering and brakes,
automatic trans. Must sacrifice S7OO
cash. Call 376-8912 after 6 pm.
Hurry!! (G-st-69-p)
Lotus Elan S-2 1600 1966 model.
Truly an exotic sports car at a
reasonable price. Inquire; welcome.
Phone Bob, 376-4313. (G-st-70-p)
1965 Datsun 4 dr. sedan, very clean,
radio, heater, new tires, low mileage.
Top speed 90 m.p.h., 25 m.p. gallon.
$550 or best offer. Call 372-8246.
(G-st-68-p)
1967 SS 350 Camaro $1950,
378-2105. (G-7t-72-p)
1960 Buick LeSabre, automatic, v-u,
power steering and brakes. Must Sell
S2OO. Call Flipper, 372-0491 see at
1125 SW 2nd Avenue. (G-3t-73-p)
PERSONAL
*
.v.\vXX*XXV.V.vX*X*X:>X-X*X.V.VX*X*X*X*
Dear Pitico: Happy Ist. Thank-you
for the most wonderful year of my
life! I wuv you! TU Boobita.
(J-lt-73-p)
Pug, Happy birthday. Being absent
minded I tied a string around my
birthday, so I would not forget your
finger. Love, Tadpole. (J-lt-73-p)
Need attractive coeds to work for
Muskie in 72. Possible national
exposure. Apply at old Seybold
Bakery Bldg, or call 376-0430.
(J-lt-73-p)
Attention American Indians! We
need your help. Contact Judy
376-0266 or Ronna 376-9962.
(J-2t-73-p)
Kimble welcomes 28 new brothers
into the bond of Delta Chi.
(J-lt-73-p)
SWTE
Pngmar bergman's]
I 8181 ANDERSSON / LIV ULLMANN I
Imps SAT. );f J
jvjf RADLKY MrrXOSR
t£
sssr \\\ j [sss%
PERSSON \\\ CAM NOTH
(I, A Woman) \\7 / Aomrrto
sun n

WslHa v L*********************** ***
I 1071 X. W. 1M Si. \W] +
{FINAL 7 DAYS j
{ This isThe Fixer" {
t ... who didnt know Jjflf/X i
* he had courage jjfflfcv
... until courage was all
| he had left. jMT J
{The Fixer. Based on the Pulitzer Prize- {
{ winning novel by Bernard Malamud. {
* the fixer [mi i
W | 7T l m l MATURE oudiences J
* Starring Aldfl DdtCS (poren.ol discre.ion odv.sed J
{Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman, {
San Holm, David Warner, Carol White {
* ********************************
liii'in !.w ) t \ IJ\ **************************
ACTION!
! '/aim Wayne t
jfa/HAWiVzr 7to&y e/hi///r/yyOiV|
J technkdior 1 'HmLivamyms 9 J
5 LT 1
*
l_gwHwjLSei>t viH ]
JPaxton Quigleys crime J
{was passion... and his *otuuf+
!
:| I*
{ I '^ TIE WMiEUX J
*- t&\ Q IT. J
! O j

Use our handy
mail in order
form.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
|,j j
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
Want to be part of an exciting, bold,
creative student professional
organization ATTEND SUNDAY
2:00 pm, rm 173 NORMAN.
(J-3t-71-p)
Adventurous male with car or VW
bus desired to escort observer & HS
age Girl Scouts on field trip &
hootenanny Sat., Feb. 8, 378-1167,
(J-3t-72-p)
Send living love. Broward offers
delivered carnations for Valentines
Day 75 c. Order now in the
Broward Lobby 7-9 pm. Proceeds
donated to the Gator Loan Fund.
(J-4t-70-p)
Presentation of available TRAVEL
plans to Europe, Asia, Middle East,
N. Africa, Thurs. nite, Jan. 30, 7:30
pm in 2nd floor Reitz Union
Auditorium. (J-4t-70-p)
Share in Flying Hawks 1966 Cessna
172 Skyhawk. Full panel, 2 narco
mkl2s Student Pilots eligible. Call
378-8046 for info and demo ride.
(J-st-71-p)

IMiiSIBB
lii|til
%SKvx
111
\ 1 _ 1
|T' I***"
pA / HAW

H Please reserve copies of the 1969 Seminole jP|
js | have enclosed $ ($5.00 per copy)
|i C,tV Vou will be notified in the Alligator when the" Kj
|3 yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole, lp|

nwwwwwc xnwwwwm.
PERSONAL
WAw. my .s !ttffr
The Friday afternoon club has in 2
weeks attracted over 200 guys & girls
from all areas of work and study at
the U of F, to the Lamplighter for
singles mixers, in private rooms, each
Friday aft. from 5 7:30. Drinks
45c ladies 20c. If your friends
cant tell you about this opportunity
to meet fun people over 21 come
and bring them with you this and
every Friday afternoon. (J-3t-71-p)
W-NVWV.wy.v. .vAW!v?,v.wy.wiv
1 LOST & FOUND I
%
,***** *2*J # "*"e**2*"2** # **r** t t*t*t l t*.** *****%****#**# **i # i ^**
Female German Shepard puppy 12
weeks old, lost around the VA
Hospital. If found, please call
378-9343. (L-2t-73-p)
Desperate parents desire info on male
cream colored short haired puppy
lost on 21 Jan. near sth Ave. and
15th St. Call 378-1131. (L-st-69-p)
Valuable reward for cheap watch,
lost on golf course, was Xmas present
Call Rick and check out his offer,
376-9440. (L-3t-72-p)
Found: womens glasses, brown
frames, pick up in Union.
(L-3t-72-nc)

THE UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES
(a subscription program)
PRESENTS
SUNDAY
LAUREL 1 FEB 2nd
P OUVf. 1
9:oopm HARDY
REITZ UNION AUD.
admission by subscription ONLY
(subscriptions available at the door)
SSSSSZ2S^^^Hi^MHMHBRBSEES^SSSSSS9BE22SS£KF
Blues in Concert I
featuring I
THE SECOND COM MING I
and Light Show
and
THE LOAD I
Sat. Feb. Ist B:3opm I
in the I
CEDAR HILLS ARMORY I
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA |

I SERVICES
Your problems are all solved. OM is
finally on campus. OM will answer
any problems &/or troubleshoot. Call
372-5457 or 372-1360 or 376-1587.
(M-st-73-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want your child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyn's Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center, 5240 NW Bth Ave., ph.
372-6667 ir 376-6495. (M-st-66-p)
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-st-72-p)
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,'
prices from $250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655:
(M-13t-61-c)

H,weu-... comc by AjKouriD
q p.YV Friday 4- Saturday
,B^vo.u^m rSuy Aoe.
" ,.* ; ... >
EpSlil §teve I
U-Jmiccijeem
Cg&kj AS!
LiLih 'BULLITT!
UppMp|d| A SOLAR PRODUCTION
The word "BB|-
W
m
written
all over
something
more
ROBERT WJGHIM
JACQUELINE BISSET DON 60RDON- ROBERT DUVALL-SIMON OAKUND
MHDMAKI CCI I Music bylllo ScMnn*sCfgtnpl*¥lYMAl| K IHUSIMAN and MARRY KUINER B*se IMyKIVIAIX rtLL* teeue Producer HOBtm fc Produced bPMUIP o*Nlottl ftrecled by l*Htfr ttb <&£}/§
|jjfMtrn mmm vmiKU] TECHNICOLOR* PROM WARNER BROS.-BEVEN ARTS
m
M AIOOIHAU.HLM 8
I THE CHARGE OF I
I THB, LIGHT BRIGADE I
nni *
I i* B
I TREVOR HOWARD VANESSA REDGRAVE JOHN GIELGUD HARRY ANDREWS JILL BENNETT I
W DAVID HEMMINGS chahlis rood m..* joh\ adoison Praam neilhaitiu S
Director TOM RICHARDSON PANAVISION' COLOR by Delu w (JlUtBlI Al*tlStS S

Friday, January 31, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Use our handy
mail In order
form.

Page 13



Page 14

. The Florida Alligator. Friday, January 31,1969

UF Hosts
Negro
Priest
By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writer
Father Clarence J. Rivers, a
Negro priest and an
accomplished singer and actor,
will perform a Negro folk Mass
for the Catholic Student Center
this Sunday at 11 a.m. and 5:15
pjn., and will give a concert in
the Reitz Union Monday evening
at 8 all part of the University
Religious Associations
Religion In Life series.
Father Rivers is probably best
known nationally and
internationally as a composer of
contemporary Church music,
who launched a revolution in the
American Catholic Church with
the publication of his An
American Mass Program in
1963.
His latest composition, a mass
dedicated to The Brotherhood
of Man, received a standing
ovation when performed at the
Newport Jazz Festival.
Herbert Kupferberg, critic for
the New York Herald
Tribune, has called Father
Rivers music a highly effective
combination of Gregorian Chant
and Negro spiritual. . his
melodies have a natural easy
flow: they are simple but
moving and they are sung with
taste as well as fervor. .. More
sophisticated church music there
is, but none which
communicates more sincerity,
warmth, or dignity.
Father Rivers needs 50
_ iiiiiiTTrar/
| |(
KoSj
Jl***ooaM ill
Shakes
... the old-fashioned kind!
. . CREAMY GOOD
. . TRIPLE-THICK
... FROM THE FIRST SIP
.. TO THE LAST DRAW
.. MMMM GOOD!
McDonalds.
is sour kind of place.
OMcOonald Cofp tM
201 N.W. 13th St.|

FATHER CLARENCE J. RIVERS
... to sing two masses and concert.

student volunteers to assist in
the masses and the Moi lay
concert as a choir. An ,ic
interested should be at the
Catholic Student Center at 4
p.m. Saturday for rehearsal.
A graduate of Athenaeum of
Ohio, Father Rivers received an
MA in Philosophy and attended
graduate school in English
Literature at Xavier University
and Yale and in Drama at the
Catholic University of America.

0
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CHARLESTON NAVAL SHIPYARD
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ALL OPTIONS
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OFFICER FOR AN APPOINTMENT
AND AN INFORMATIVE BROCHURE ifi
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A SUPPORT FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR POWERED P|l
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An Equal Opportunity Employer
i. . .... V- * r

Good Service Starts
at
CRAI^^ORTS
SALESES Eh VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

Do Something Different This Summer
H you ore between the ages 1830
In good health
Locking for a challenge
ISRAEL NEEDS YOU!
Soo Dr. DON A. HALFERIN in
IRoom 121 C Arch. Bldg. 376-5942
ENGLAND
4 FRANCE
ffl AUSTRIA
GERMANY
Explore Europe for 21 days of exam-free travel
beginning July 10th.
Conducted by David Kenerson, Professor of Humanities.
S6OO covers all expenses transportation, room, board,
and fees.
FOR DETAILS CALL 392-1517



PRESERVATION HALL TO PEBFDBM
'Old Time Jazz Band
Featured Saturday

By CHRIS SCHAESEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Hot Pre-Dixieland jazz, still
sizzling from strip joints in
Storyville, and the funeral
parades in New Orleans at the
turn of the century, will come
wailing and stomping to the UF
Saturday at 8:15 p.m.
For one night, the
Preservation Hall Band will turn
the Reitz Union into a French
Quarter.
Improvisations of Sweet
Georgia Brown and Up the
Lazy River will stir blood after
an authentic New Orleans meal
in the cafeteria. A dance after
the concert in the Reitz Union
Ball Room with a professional
jazz group completes the New
Orleans Evening sponsored by
the Reitz Union Fine Arts
Committee.
The music, created as it is
played by five great Negro
musicians differs from the
conventional Dixieland music in
that it is pure, simple, and
spontaneous. Dixieland is slicker
and rehearsed.

9 BH
PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND
... to give New Orleans Cabaret performance Saturday.
The Worlds Best Compact
Car stops
with disc brakes
straight quick & sure!
| 9 k
j
DATSUN/2
MAKE THE SOUND MOVE TO
DATSUN AT YOUR NEARBY DEALER.
Godding & Clark
1012 South Main
Gainesville

The musicians, all in the age
range of 70, will take the feel of
this style of music to the grave
with them. Preservation Hall is
the nightly stomping ground of
many old time New Orleans
musicians who manage to pay
their union dues through
donations at the door.
Billie and DeDe Pierce rule
the piano and trumpet. Billy,
bom in 1907 in Florida, learned
the blues rhythm almost before
she could talk. She took
Clarence Williams place for a
week as accompanist for the
great blues singer, Bessie Smith.
DeDe Joseph LaCroix
Pierce was born in New Orleans,
1904. Both he and his wife are
considered the leading
exponents of old New Orleans
jazz.
- Trombonist Jim Robinson
played in World War I and was a
member of the famous Sam
Morgan jazz band.
William Humphrey was bom
with a licorice stick in his
mouth. The clarinetist played

with The Excelsior Brass Band in
1918.
The drummer, Joe Cie Frazier
is considered the citys finest
percussionist since the late Baby
Dodds.
Tickets are $1.50 for
students, faculty and staff, and
$2 for the general public. They
are on sale at the Reitz Union
Box Office.
The faculty club is sponsoring
a complete French dinner in the
Arredondo room.

AT DUBS... THE
HfHHHJHpjI YOUNGER
cocktail
HOUR
DAILY
J 11<
The Younger Men
will play 5-7 p.m
each day
Mini-skirt contest every Thursday
A N.W. 13th St.
DUB S LOUNGE
your pleasure I
I Swing Along with Recording Artist I
I BOBBY GRIFFIN RANDY HALL |
The Australian Troubadour
111 111
I DOUBLES tor the Price of One... "£££" I
X Hot & Cold Hors d' oeuvres from our salad bar I
If Join all your friends later in Steak Room I

SALES-SERVICERENTALS
"Authorized
BISISI Smith Corina
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Office Equipment
j2B _M- Main St. 376-5551
I SOPHIA!
LOREN
CHARTER FLIGHT
A/aw YORK 70 MILAITALY
IO WEEKS i- Cn oo CALL (39)2-I6&S
RM- 310 UNION
DEADLINE JAN. 31st

Friday, January 31, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 31, 196&

Page 16

Gators Swim Wolves Today

Coach Bill Harlans unbeaten
Florida swimming team gets its
roughest test of the season today
when national power N.C. State
visits here.
The Gators (3-0) face the
Wolfpack at 4 at Florida Pool,
and on Saturday, they meet
North Carolina at 2 p.m.
Thus far, Harlans team has
shown balance and depth while
sweeping to wins over South
Florida, Georgia and FSU. In
addition, times recorded by
several top members of the
Gator team rank among the best
in the nation.
Mark McKee, a standout
sophomore who set three
individual varsity records as a
freshman last year, has started
the 1969 swimming season
impressively with record-setting
efforts each time out.
Bruce Williams, sophomore
from Eustis, is also off to a good
start, his latest efforts being a
record in the 200 yard freestyle
(1:45.4) and the winning time in
the 500 yard freestyle against
FSU.
Other top Gator swimmers in
the three wins have been Bill
Strate, Jim Perkins, James
Murphy, Andy McPherson, Tom
Peek, Hank Hough, Bob Bridges,
Bob Appleget and Rich Ahrens.
McKee, a standout sophomore
who set three individual varsity
records as a freshman last year,
lias been ranked 10th in ihe
MEAT MARKETS
SHUN
STEffi
Wl
TH'S IS WESTERN CORN
FED BEEF FROM
IOWA
TENDER AND FLAVORFUL
WESTERN
SIRLOIN
TIP (£)](<
ROAST VJ&ih.
BONELESS
FOR- YOUR FREEZER
WHOLE
tans jm
SIRLOIN a u.
20 To 25 Pound Average
Sliced any Thickness
and Freezer Wrapped
Frostv Morn Budget
SLICED BACON
MANY OTHER GREAT
MEAT BUYS AT DELOACH'S
THIS WEEK
SHOP EARLY AND AVOID
THE RUSH.
- V-./'' :
DeLoach's North
401 N.E. 23rd Blvd.
DeLoach's West
3432 W. Univ. Ave. J
PRICES GOOD THURS., FRI. A Sat.

World in the 4UU-meter
individual medley. McKees time
of 4:48.2 is only nine seconds
off the listed world record.
Butterflyer Barry Russo is
listed as the 21st ranked
performer nationally in the
Dorm,GDI
Deadline
Independent bowling and
dormitory tennis will begin
shortly and teams desiring to
participate should register their
teams now.
A team in bowling will be
made up of 5 men and each will
bowl two games each day in a
single elimination tournament
with total pins determining the
winners.
A dormitory tennis team is
composed of 4 players. Two
play singles and the other two
play doubles.
The deadline for bowling
registration is February 4 and
tennis is February 6. This may
be done at the Intramural
Office, Room 229 Florida Gym.

What
the interviewer
wont tell you
about
General Kleetric.
He wont tell you about all the job opportunities business philosophy and our benefit programs.
we have for college graduates. And, in plain language, it tells you exactly how
Not that he wouldnt like to. and where a person with your qualifications can
Its just that there are too many jobs and too start a career with General Electric. It even gives
little time. you the first step in starting a career with us a
In a half-hour interview our man couldnt begin Personal Information Form for you to fill out.
to outline the scope and diversity of the opportuni- If you like what the brochure tells you about us,
ties we offer. Opportunities for engineering, sci- why not tell us about you? Our interviewer will be
ence, business and liberal arts majors. on campus soon.
Thats why we published a brochure called p[||[n I I EIFATniA
Career Opportunities at General Electric. U L If C K A L wRfISJI CLfcUl KIU
It tells you about our markets, our products, our .
An equal opportunity employer
..
, ... . l

200-meter butterfly.
Work-horse Bruce Williams, is
ranked 23rd nationally in the
100-meter butterfly.
At least one standout State
swimmer, Jim Coyle, might not
make the trip because of a
prolonged bout with the flu.
In addition to risking the
20-meet victory streak against
the Gators, the State swimmers
will also be trying to keep
another string going. Not since
1965 has State lost to a
Southern team. That was to
FSU. Over that span. State has
won 36 of 37 meets, losing only
to Yale.
BOWLING
SUNDAY
SPECIAL
35< per game
or 3 games SI.OO
ALL DAY
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

| Mel Ward Jim Bartlett I
Dan Sapp BU f I W ir 1
I CO>*B George Corl Harol -
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ, Aft.
# NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1206 I
I#D^^^RE^PREM^M£AYM^I7S^^J
J Climb aboard V
/The S.S. Winnjammer
I*. Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. WJ
j : Dinners to 12:00 P.M. //
f ((
, Bernie Sher at the Organ
on \ /\
Thursday, Friday & Saturday >l*
Oysters & Clams on the half shell f
M ichelob on draft
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. V
Reservations accepted
< -v- Harry M. Lanton, Manager M (
Closed Sundays



NIT BID WIDE OPEN
Kentucky Dominating SEC Race

ATLANTA (UPI)-Good
thing the Southeastern
Conference voted to allow its
runnerups to go to the National
Invitational Basketball
Tournament this year because
Kentucky has erased most of the
suspense from the race for the
leagues NCAA berth.
True, the SEC race still isnt
even half over. But unless
somebody can slow down those
sth-ranked Wildcats, the rest of
the teams are battling strictly for
second place.
Thus, Vanderbilts
Commodores carry with them
the hopes of the other SEC
members Saturday when they
try to keep runaway Kentucky
from pulling entirely out of
sight.
Vanderbilt, currently 114,
and Tennessee, 10-3, are
regarded the SECs two best bets
for an NIT berth although
Louisiana State, now 7-6 after
Pups Build
Character
NEW YORK (UPI) If
getting up at two in the morning
to feed a squalling infant never
broke your balance wheel, give
Santa permission to drop a
puppy off at your house.
A puppy helps the children
build character. This happens
when boy of girl cares for the
helpless furry creature.
But until children get the
hang of it, be prepared to do
some of the chores.

t THE I
! PUSEXYATIOI f
I HALL
| JAZZ BAND |
.''
$ ninTu TO see the last original jazz band direct ||
HEAR ALL THE MUSIC THA \ from NEW ORLEANS. A
& DIXIELAND AND ALL LATER JAZZ FORMS. TT
t #
t #
f #
£ FEB. 1. 8:00 p.m. Reitz Union Ballroom By Fine Arts Committee Reitz Union
* VOO Students Cl 1.50 Faculty & Staff 2.00 General Public
| DANCING AFTER THE CONCERT

losing five straight, could move
into the picture, if the Bengals
can wind up with a respectable
record, because of the attraction
of Pistol Pete Maravich.
But no one realistically
expects Vanderbilt or any other
SEC team to halt Kentucky in
its drive for its 24th league title
and 18th NCAA berth. The
Wildcats, looking like the
Adolph Rupp teams of old, are
13-2 over-all, 7-0 in SEC play
and play seven of their 11
remaining games at home.
Maravich, who still leads the
nations scorers with a brilliant

1232 UNIITAVE.

44.2 average despite being held
to 21 points Monday night by
defensive-minded Tennessee, is
back in action Friday night
when LSU hosts Pittsburgh.
Only other major college
game in the Deep South Friday
is Hawaii at Miami.
Maravich and the Bengals play
again Saturday as host to
Mississippi, a team Pistol Pete
averaged 43 points per game
against as a sophomore last year.
In other Saturday action,
Auburn, which pulled off an
upset at Vanderbilt last
Saturday, will be at Tennessee,

Alabama will be at Mississippi
State and OF will be at
Georgia -all SEC action.
Among the independents,

/gX Whats NEW at the
bookstore*?
THIRTEEN DAYS KENNEDY
BETWEEN PARENT & CHILD GINNOTT
AN ARTIST AND THE POPE PEPPER
HIGH PRIEST LEARY
LONESOME CITY McKUEN
STANYAN STREET
AND OTHER SORROWS McKUEN
THE WORLD OF ROD McKUEN McKUEN
THE FALL OF KHRUSHCHEV HYLAND
VOICES FROM THE EDGE
OR ETERNITY MYERS
SOUL ON ICE CLEAVER
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00RM.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
* Campus Shop & Bookstore

Friday, January 31.1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Florida State will host rising
Jacksonville University, Miami
will host Morehead State and
Tulane will host Pittsburgh.

Page 17



Page 18

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 31,1969

THE CUPBO ARD
Generation Gap In Athletics |
& By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor *

'Sitting on the outside of a roundtable discussion of this weeks
NCAA media conference was tortuous to this reporter.
Burning to ask several questions but not formally participating, I
decided to pose a question thats been bugging me through this
column.
Does the NCAA consider its athletes as children or adults?
There seemed to be a big communications hangup from the very
start of the conference. The associations executive director Walter
Byers opened the meeting Monday telling writers We must remember
that we are dealing with young boys when we speak of intercollegiate
sports.
Later, when the topic switched to eliminating some of the high
costs of intercollegiate athletics, UF Head Coach Ray Graves called
for the participation of freshman in football and basketball claiming
that frosh were old enough physically and mentally to go right into
varsity competition.
The obvious incongruity of these two philosphies illustrates why
rules governing athletic competition are subject to such heated debate.
Are they made for kids or mature students?
The same thinking was brought up again when Washington football
coach Jim Owens referred to recruiting practices. Owens said the
pressures of big time recruiting are injurious to the young,
impressionable prospect and must therefore be limited.
Then on the other side of the coin, the NCAA got into a huff about
the haircut issue. It was almost as if it was a Big Brother-type thing
with the NCAA playing the role of the old woman who lived in a shoe
and had so many kids she didnt know what to do.
The point is this: The NCAA has reached a pinnacle of power and
has still failed to define the commodity it is dealing with. For that
matter, so have college athletic departments.
But that may have been the purpose of the media conference, an
open exchange striving for the definition.
Perhaps a separate code must be found for the freshman-sophomore
athlete and another for the junior-senior.
I was always treated like a kid when I played football here, says
one Gator turned professional football player. The difference with
the pros is that they treat you like a mature person.
Ultimately the problem in essence is that there is a generation gap
alive in athletics, at least on a college level. It is a real problem in
communications. Athletics can be bettered when conscience efforts to
narrow it are made.

I A TGIF 2:00-500Xl
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Gators Face DOGfiaht

Coach Tommy Bartletts
Gators begin their roughest road
trip of the season Saturday,
when they face the Georgia
Bulldogs on area TV, at 2:10
p.m.
The Gators riding on a three
game winning streak will travel
to Auburn on Saturday,
February 8 and meet Vanderbilt
in Nashville on February 10
before returning to the confines
of Florida Gym.
Center Neal Walk could well
arrange Gator record books with
his performance against the
Bulldogs, providing he scores at
least 19 points.

Cindermen Go North,
Jourdan Vs. Fosbury

Gator high jumper Ron
Jourdan will get the chance to
prove himself as the top high
jumper in the country tonight at
New York Citys Millrose
Games.
His opposition: Dick Fosbury
and John Caruthers are the
nations best.
The 6-0, 150-pounder from
Pensacola has gained the fame
by jumping over the magic seven
foot barrier five times this
winter. The only sub-seven foot

808 LANG
... relay team
G'ville Strip
Hosts Thrills
The parachutes will be
popping this Sunday afternoon
as two double A fuel dragsters
attempt to set a news strip
record at Gainesville Dragway.
The Quartermaster Chassis
Special from Chicago, Illinois,
has posted times of 6.85 seconds
at 232 MPH and is certain to
prove successful with his
a ttempted assault of the
established mark of 7.10 seconds
at 211 MPH.
GAINESVILLE DRAGWAY
is located 3% Miles north of the
Municipal Airport on State Road
225. Gates open at 10:00 A.M.
w th Eliminations promptly at 2
P.M.
', Have "H
Your Generator s
OVERHAULED Special %
50 i
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ALACHUA COUNTY
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SO* NW AVf. GAINSSVIIIf
MON.-Ftl. a AM-7FM SAT. Til S PM
_ 3714011

In any case, he should come
home from the trip as the
all-time three-year scoring leader
in school history.
He needs 19 points to snap
Joe Hobbs 1,331 three-year
point output set in 1956-57-58.
The Gators latest streak has to
be credited to an aggressive surge
by Neal Walk, Boyd Welsch and
Andy Owens in the past five
games.
Walk has played superbly in
the last three outings. He
improved his season averages to
24.1 in scoring and 17.3 in
rebounding. Walk scored 30
against Ole Miss and grabbed a

was a 6-10% effort off a
gymnasium floor in Richmond,
Va.
Here is a list of his
accomplishments this winter:
Dec. 14, N.E. Louisiana Indoor
Inv., 7-0; Jan. 10, Washington
National Inv., 7-0; Jan. 11,
Chesterfield Inv., Richmond,
6-10%; Jan. 18, Samuels Benefit,
Gainesville, 7-2; Jan. 24,
Philadelphia Track Classic, 7-1;
Jan. 25, Ohio State, 744.
Ron is considered the most
consistent jumper in the United
States this winter, says track
coach Jimmy Carnes. Everyone
in the country wants him to
participate in the big meets.
Jourdan has his sights set on
the NCAA Indoor record held
jointly by Fosbury and Otis
Burrell at 7-0. The NCAA
Indoor meet is scheduled for
March 14-15 in Detroit,
Michigan.
John Thomas holds the
American Indoor record of 7-3.
In the recent dual meet with
Ohio State, Jourdan cleared 7-3
but the bar slipped to the
ground as he was getting out of
the pit.
Olympic performer Jack
Bacheler and Floridas two mile
relay team of Bob Lang,
Eammon OKeeffee, Bill
Ballinger and John Parker will
accompany Jourdan to the
meets.

ITHE WHOLE TOWNS TALKING
ABOUT
Alans Cuban a
Why?
I Delicious New Orleans Roast Beef
I Great Chicken Salad
I Big and Juicy Italian Super Subs
I The Famous Alans Cubana
I Hot Meat Balls
I Hot Dogs Anyway You Like Em
I Chocolate Eclairs
9
|yfl-mn I FREE DELIVERY! 378-1252

season high of 24 rebounds.
Boyd Welsch has been a real
comer for the Gator attack. The
6-i guard has not missed a free
throw since the Vanderbilt game
on January 6. He has scored 17
straight from the charity line
and has a nifty .833 percentage.
Owens, a 6-5 forward from
Tampa, is living up to his prep
All-America fame in the Cigar
City. He has hit in double figures
in the Gators last five games and
has improved his rebound mark
to 8.9 a game.
Our up-and-coming road trip
could mean a lot to the rest of
our season, says Coach Tommy
Bartlett. We are still in the SEC
race but cant afford many more
losses. Im pleased with the team
play in their last three outings.
The Gators are sporting a 96
overall mark, 4-4 in SEC play,
good for fifth in the conference.

1 Wheelstanding! Tire Smoking! Nitro Burning!
\
* Double "A" Fuel Dragsters- A Paid!
* Attempting to shatter track record of all mphH
* Plus Wheelstanding Champion "Chevy Rebellion
* See him run the entire 1320 on his rear wheels!
* Plus! "Run what you Brung E.T. Classes!
* Plus! Stock Elim! Street Elim! Lomp. Elim!
* Plus! 3 out of 5 Match Bash! Criscoe vs. Owen!
SUNDAY FEB. 2 nd
General Admission $2.00 Children under 12 Free with adult
Located 3 1 /2 Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225 4s sociat'
Timetrials 1 AM Eliminations 2 PM
i .... i mi 1

Rentz Charges In
I had hoped to be drafted by some team, Gator back Larry
Rentz said. And now that San Diego has picked me I will definitely
try to make it with them.
Rentz became the San Diego Chargers 17th pick in the football
draft Wednesday.
Im real happy to have the opportunity to tryout with the
Chargers, Rentz said.
Rentz, who has played defensive safety, quarterback and flanker
for the Gators in three seasons, was drafted as a defensive back by the
Chargers.
I felt that if I was going to be drafted at all, it would be as a
defensive back, Rentz said.
The Chargers called me just to establish contact with me, Rentz
said. Nothing financial was mentioned at all,
r MENS HANt STYLING B
SHAMPOOING RAZOR CUTTING H
LONG HAIR STYLING I
APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
SIM'S BARBER SHOP
L 817 W. UNIVHtSITY AVE.

Friday, January 31, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator. Friday. January 31. 1969

H*v't ~ I
of ijjf' ast Beef Sandwich 1968, rhys
f Theres one in every crowd who didnt
m get his yearbook. Theres one in every
B J B mF' 1 4 crowd who wants a yearbook. The
VP life BP VP \ Seminole has a limited number of 1968
jJ UJp Seminoles for sale in Room 330 in the
WwiML ||i I
1405 S.W. 13th Street v^J
led South el sh. und., P o Eamonn OKeeffee PMMjjMIMWMB
When Florida track coach Jimmy Carnes speaks about his m I
freshman runner Eamonn O'Keeffee, he often mentions thank M g
Vested, Lightweight, heavens for the "luck of the Irish". M vIIGCK LIST
Very Fit and Proper O'Keeffee, this week's Alligator Player of the Week, came to __ - .1
the UF from Dublin, Ireland, and in five short months has POf I OUr NGGCIB
become the pride of the Gator track team. The half-miler is a
member of the nationally ranked Florida two-mile relay team. TCVTD AAI/C
B| Wi£+ r "Eamonn has done an outstanding job for us," says Carnes. TEXTBOOKS
, "He is a dedicated runner and before he finishes at Florida he kirui A KID I ICCrI
should rank with the best in the nation." WCW MIIU UDCI^
The 5-9, 146-pounder holds four Ireland prep records along ID AI
BBr -ZEI with six Ireland Junior AAU marks. Last year as a senior in AKv*MI ICLIUK AL
high school O'Keeffee turned in a 1:50.4 clocking in the half EQUIPMENT AND SUPPL El
W nulle, which would have ranked him with the top three preps in JwrrlltJ
America. ART SUPPLIED
Last summer the little Irishman won the Junior wvrrUCw
International 400 meters against Spain. Since coming to
Florida he has turned in a 1:54.0 indoor half mile. STUDY LAAAPS
Carnes says it took a little Irish luck to get O'Keeffee to
M/ MHHEBi Florida. "I first heard about Eamonn from Fred Wilt, who is py kA OUTFITS
B the editor of Track and Field Technique. Thanks to Fred and WwlrllW
B Eamonn's high school coach Tony Farrell, we were able to ClifC ATCUIDTC
secure his talents." SWEATSHIRTS
O'Keeffee has been traveling all over the United States with
I the Gator two-mile relay team. He has participated in the N.E. I COLLEGE PETS
HT Louisiana Indoor the Washington National the
B~ Chesterfield Inv. in Richmond, Va., the famed Millrose Games COLLEGE SEAL
v in New York and the Boston Garden in Boston.
1 "Eamonn has been a great asset not only to our track team M CT A TIO K|FD Y
1 but to the whole university," says Carnes. "He has become one I I I nlCI\ I
* \ of the most popular athletes on campus."
I Carnes hopes his "Irish luck" will last forever. FILM AND DEVELOPING I
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