Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 12

AC Wants Students
At University Senate

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The Action Conference
Wednesday unanimously passed
a resolution requesting that
representatives of the Student
Senate be permitted to attend
University Senate meetings.
The resolution stated that the
university senate should give
material on matters concerning
students to the student senate
before being considered by the
university senate.
The student senate passed a
resolution Jan. 21 demanding
that representatives of the
student body have a right to
attend and address the university
senate on matters concerning
students.
The student senate declared
itself not bound by any
matters the university senate
passes unless their demands are
met.
The Action Conferences
resolution was passed in support
of the student senate.
University senate meetings
should be open to five official
representatives of the student
senate, including members of the
Alligator and University Report
and any other duly accredited
members of the press, the
conference resqlved.
The university senate meets
today at 3:30 p.m.
Also passed was a proposal
that the UF shall make no rules
restricting the publication, sale
or distribution of non-university
sponsored literature by students,
faculty or staff of the UF.
The proposal required that
these publications be required to
indicate in some way their sole
responsibility for their
contents.
A proposal presented by the
Task Force on Freedom of
Expression was passed which
stated that the right of registered
students to assemble as campus
organizations should be
determined through student
government channels.
ABSENT
SENATORS
These student senators were
not present at the end of
Tuesday nights meeting:
Lawrence Anderson, Robert
Ashley, Barbara Banter, Jeff
Bay man, Larry Bercu, Nicki
Ciprich, Tom Cone, Douglas
Crow, Ann Curran, Daniel
Eckert, Susan Erb, Howard
Foster, Mark Gage, Larry
Martin, Michele McCartan,
Kathy Monaghan, Tom Moss,
Nick Nicosia, Barbara Nunn,
Lois Ottinger, Betty Jo Pardron,
Robert Palmer, Charles Riggle,
Bill Sadowski, Alan Starling, Pat
Tidwell, Faith Tulino, Kathy
Waldman and Ken Weil.

The
Florida Alligator

Presently, organizations
wishing to be recognized must
be approved by the
Faculty-Senate Committee on
Student Organizations.
The Task Force also presented
a proposal that certain
unconstitutional clauses in the
State of Florida loyalty oath be
removed.
The oath, which must be
taken by all faculty and staff of
the UF, now states that I am
not a member of the Communist
party and will not lend aid,
support, or advice to the
Communist party. I do not
believe in the overthrow of the
government of the United States
or the state of Florida by force
or violence.

'Gator Go Gets
Plans Go-Ahead

By BILL MARDEN
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF Dairy Science
Department has entered into
discussions with an unnamed
comapany to begin production
of Gator Go. They have taken
precautions to avoid a Gator
Ade type controversy,
according to Dr. C. B. Browning,
UF Dairy Science Department.
Present plans call for one
company to make the basic
ingredients which could be sold
to dairy companies who would
then make the Gator Go.
The unnamed company has
already made up test samples of
the basic ingredients.
Under this plan,Browning said,
Gator Gos uniform high quality
oA.
DR. ROBERT CADE
... at work in his lab
and standards could be
maintained nationwide.
Browning said that it was
hoped that these precautions
would eliminate the possibility
of legal problems arising similiar
to those that have occurred in
the Gator Ade controversy.
Gator Go was developed

University of Florida, Gainesville

Manning J. Dauer, chairman
of the Political Science
Department, pointed out that a
Supreme Court ruling in 1967
had declared this
unconstitutional and the
proposal was unanimously
passed.
A proposal presented by the
Task Force on Curriculum that
all departments provide and
maintain open files listing
information as to how the
course is taught was also passed
unanimously.
Such information as required
textbooks, the number and type
of required papers and
examinations and, wherever
possible, copies of previous
exams will be included.

through research by the Dairy
Science Department with the
assistance of Dr. Robert Cade,
inventor of Gator Ade.
Browning said that the
problem of how the money
received by the University was
to be divided up among the
inventors and the University is
an unanswered question thus far.

Phi Dells May Be Punished
Over Fight At SAE House

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Phi Delta Theta fraternity was
temporarily suspended early
Wednesday morning by Dean of
Men Frank T. Adams following a
skirmish involving
approximately 150 Phi Delt and
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Brothers.
IFC President Steve Zack said
Wednesday night the suspension
will remain in effect through
Saturday pending an
investigation and any action
warranted by IFC officials.
Sgt. C.C. Goad of the
University Police, reported he
sighted a car driven by an
unauthorized driver on Stadium
road shortly after midnight
Tuesday.
He said he followed the car,
driven by John Reaves, lUC, to
the Sigma Alpha Epsilon house.
According to Goad, he
followed Reaves car which was
one of five cars and a
motorcycle caravan of Phi Delt
fraternity brothers enroute to
the SAE house.
Police reported that verbal
insults were exchanged and then
small group fights erupted.
Police said they were unable to
determine which group initiated

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SOMETIMES ITS GOOD TO BE ALONE
When the sun is out and classes are through for the day it's the
perfect time to get some fresh air and just sit around and think about
things. Alligator photographer Nick Arroyo catches Candy Dodson,
2UC, taking advantage of the unusually mild January weather.

physical contact.
The SAEs were armed with
makeshift weapons and golf
clubs, crutches, a steel pipe and
wooden sticks, police said.

ACLU Condemns
Firing Os DeGarmo
The student chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union
Wednesday condemned the firing of Scott DeGarmo, University
Report editor, from his library job as a violation of freedom of speech
and press.
They have asked UF President Stephen C. OConnell to take
remedial action immediately as a token of good faith on his part
that freedom of speech and press shall be inviolate at the UF in the
future.
The University Report is an off campus newspaper published by UF
Students.
Scott DeGarmo was fired subsequent to the Reports issue featuring
shots of a nude girl in the graduate library. He was charged with
letting unauthorized personnel enter the P. K. Yonge Florida History
section of the library after hours.
In this instance the ultimate responsibility for suppression of
freedom of the press lies with OConnell according to Steve Johnson,
a board member of the ACLU.
DeGarmo was not fired because of any technical breach of duty as
a member of the library staff, but because he photographed a nude.
Johnson said.
It is fairly common knowledge that some graduate students do
have keys and do use that section of the library during unauthorized
hours.
* While the main point of the resolution was to bring attention to
DeGarmos loss of his assistantship, we do think it is a case of
selective law enforcement. Johnson said.

Amarica's
Number I
Collage
Daily

Thursday, January 30, 1969

Police officers were unable to
control the group of
approximately ISO boys because
(SEE 'PHI DELT', PAGE 2)



Page 2

!. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 30,1969

LITTLE NEW BUSINESS DISCUSSED
Student Senate Cuts SG Cabinet

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Student senators spent forty
minutes debating two special
requests at the meeting Tuesday
night with actual business at a
minimum.
Three new bills presented in
floor debate were read, voted on
and passed.
I The Student Body Presidents
Cabinet was reduced from 20 to

Phys Ed Dissenters
Get Protest Voice
By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writer
Students dissatisfied with a Student Senate recommendation that
compulsory Physical Education be continued will be able to voice
their opinions February 6.
An open meeting has been scheduled by the Physical Education
Committee of Student Government, with the time and place to be
announced next week.
The date has been changed from Monday in order to give sufficient
notice for all students interested in attending.
The committee was appointed to make suggestions on changing the
PE program at UF. At a meeting last week they presented a seven
point proposal to Physical Education and Health Dean Dennis K.
Stanley.
Among the proposals was one to keep PE mandantory. Their
proposal was a modification of a proposal by Secretary of Student
Activities Bruce Harlan suggesting mandantory PE by dropped.
After reporting to the senate, it was suggested members of the
committee meet with students to get their opinion.
We will consider the suggestions, chairman Joyce Miller, 3AS,
said. But I doubt we will change our suggestion. Miss Miller said her
committee would meet with the senate before talking to Stanley next
week.
Miss Miller said a student government committee chaired by Harlan
is also looking into voluntary PE.
It is the senate that will pass a resolution because they are the
legislative branch. It will not be the student government (executive
branch) that makes the decision, she said.

B- 9:30 p.M. I
MS
&

ten members with
undersecretaries to take over the
old cabinet positions.
A bill limiting funds for
campus organizations personal
publications was thrown back to
committee because of
controversy in the wording.
Six persons were officially
delegated to attend the facultys
University Senate meetings.
These persons were designated

as the president or vice-president
of the student body, the editor
of the Alligator and the
University Report, president of
the senate, and the majority and
minority floor leaders.
The heavily debated special
requests came from the John
Marshall Bar Association
(JMBA) and the American
Institutes of Industrial
Engineers.
| Paid Your I
I Phono Bill Yet? |
?
| What happens to the UF
>; student who neglects to pay >i
his Centrex phone bill? jj:
.* No one seems to know. :j:
j* Tom Wells, UF business
? manager, said Tuesday that
ij bill paying is an obligation :ji
: the individual student has to
: the phone company. :|i
:f When asked what action :
:j: the Bell Telephone Company
: would take against students :
* with delinquent bills, district :
: manager Robert Coleman %
said, We havent really |
: reached that point. So far \
: weve had very good results. 3
:jj He said any action would ji
> not be taken through the jj
J: university, but that the phone Si
: company deals directly with
j: students. x
j: So what happens to the UF
j student who does not pay his
ijj telephone bill? We havent :j:
$ had to think about it, said §
$ Coleman.
X

JMBA requested jnu to
finance the establishment of a
student faculty placement
committee and to supplement
funds budgeted for freshman
orientation.
JMBA was granted S2OO.
The engineering society
requested $2Ol to attend a
special conference in Miami.
Their request was cut to
$29.60 which involved carefully
calculated reports from
Miamians on the cost of one car
to travel to Miami and whether
toll fare should be included.
Because of the behavior of the
senators during the special
request proceedings, majority
floor leader, Charles Harris,
apologized to the JMBA
representative and the
engineering senator.
Both men had already left the
meeting.
At adjournment a special roll
call was taken. A quorum was
present -by one person. Many
senators left during and after the
special request debate.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official ppinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
correction musLbe given before next insertion.

Frat Fight]
Erupts
PA6E put j
of insufficient manpower and
lack of adequate enforcement
devices, Goad reported.
Reaves is a freshman and is
not permitted to drive a vehicle
in Alachua County according to
university regulations restricting
freshmen from operating
vehicles here.
His car was impounded by
campus police but Reaves
received the car Wednesday
afternoon after promising to
take the vehicle out of Alachua
County.
Adams was called to the area
at 1:30 a.m.
This group dispersed when
Investigator J.K. Morrison began
taking photographs of the
incident, police reported.



SHOP MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10 A.M. TIL 9:30 P.M.
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Thursday, January 30,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



I Th Florida Alligator, Thurntay, January 30.1969

Page 4

Economic Group Works
With Gville Merchants

What started out as just a one shot plan to
lower movie prices has blossomed into a permanent
committee to deal directly with Gainesville
merchants.
The Gainesville Student Economic Council
(GSEC) was formed last quarter by Gary Goodrich,
vice president of the student body, and the
presidents of the student bodies of Santa Fe Junior
College, PJC.Yonge High School and Gainesville
High School.
Its goals were to obtain lower movie prices,
formal wear rental reductions, and check into
laundry rates.
The GSECs research disclosed that Gainesville
was the only city in the state without student rates
for movies.
Goodrich approached Director of Wometco
Enterprises, Jack Williams, in Miami, earlier this
month and asked for appropriate action.

Ij*' Jll i
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' fS 'BB
Three shapely Graham Area Playboy bunnies present quite a
view as they take a view out of a Graham window. The comely
coeds will grace the Graham Area Saturday from 7 p.m. to 1
a.m.Additional attractions include floor shows, dinner and
dancing.
Savant Taps 22
By Torchlight

Twenty-two women students
were tapped into Savant-UF,
leadership and service honorary,
Tuesday night.
The new members were given
orange and blue ribbons in a
torchlight ceremony at Century
Tower.
After a torchlight procession
to the Reitz Union, a reception
was held in the East Gallery.
The new members are: Becky
Hucks, Sara Aptecker, Carol Lee
Butler, Nancy Pierson, Patty La
Brot, Renee Millard, Sharon
Hackney, Susie Wright, Linda
! SG CABiNET MEETS j

j There will be an important :
meeting of the Student :
: Government Cabinet today at :
: 5:30 in the SG Office. :

Satlof and Sarah Jane La France.
Kathy Maxfield, Janis
Moorbacher, Barbara Kesterson,
Karen Kay, Susan Johnson, Judy
Hirsch, Celeste Hardy, Jan
Halker, Kathy Corrigan, Joan
Bradbury and Dana
Baumgardner.
@ DELICIOUS I
STEAKS I
FINE FOOD I
student prices
Breakfast served 1
daily. 1
1614 N. W. 13th ST. I
378-0955 I

Wometcos Plaza Theaters have since lowered
their prices 25 cents.
Now the council plans to work directly with
Gainesville merchants to obtain student discounts.
Goodrich does not think that prices are
excessive in Gainesville. This is the age o
standardized prices in department stores.
I do think many places have sloppy and
disrespectful service, Goodrich said.
Goodrich said he would rather pursue an
economic program with the merchants than have a
student cooperative store, as proposed in a letter
to the Alligator, Jan. 27, because it is much more
immediate and possible.
He would not rule out the possibility of students
developing a cooperative, but preferred to put his
confidence in the GSEC.
Im positive well have it set up before the end
of the quarter and will have it effective starting next
quarto:, he said.

Complaints Received
By Ombudsman Line

By SUZI WHALEY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Ombudsman Action Line,
official complaint center of
Student Government, is now in
operation and is receiving calls
from students about problems
ranging from the sale of Playboy
on campus to grades, said Bob
Young, UF Ombudsman
director, Wednesday.
Students can call the
Ombudsman office, Room 232
of the Reitz Union, at any hour
and their complaint will be
recorded. The next day the

Ford Motor Company
wants to talk with
graduating engineers
February 13-141969
Become a part of the better idea company in the following fields:
Design Engineering Manufacturing Engineering
Design implementation packaging cost manu- Process engineeringplant layouttool design
facturing feasibility vendor consulting. material handlingindustrial engineering.
Development Engineering p c
Vehicle systems and component development .. riant engineering
engineering evaluation. Maintenance control and schedulingequipment
installationstructural changesutility services.
Test Engineering
Program, facilities, and methods development ~ Quality Control
vehicle systems and component testing. In-process inspection and material testing sup-
_ sup_ plier quality controlmachine capability product
Technical Computer testing
Systems Engineering
Hardware/software development systems appli- Production Control
cations and programminginternal consulting. Production and procurement schedulingparts and
D raw material procurement and control operating
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Applied engineeringhuman factors vehicle sys systems,
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Positions for the following disciplines:
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Register with your placement office for a personal interview.
opportunity employer.

132 PENDING SINCE MAY
UF Probes Job-Jam
i i

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Approximately 132 job
reclassification appeals have
been pending before the state
personnel board since last May.
This backlog was the focal
point of discussions Wednesday
between UF officials and staff
members of the board.
There is a greater need for
autonomy in reclassifying jobs,
said UFs personnel director,
Robert A. Button.
Because state employee job
categories are covered by
blanket salary and position
requirements, jobs peculiar to
the university system are
classified the same as
non-university connected jobs,
he said.
This condition has led to
conflict within the university
system in hiring, promotions,

Ombudsman replays the tape
and contacts the students who
called. He then goes to work
solving the problem.
In most cases, the
Ombudsman has been very
successful, according to Young,
but in some cases they do fail as
a result of the lack of
cooperation they receive from
other parties on campus.
The Ombudsman Action Line
number is 392-1650. Students
can call or come into the
Student Government office from
2 to 5 p.m. to file their
complaints.

salary increases for meritorious
work and reclassifying jobs with
changing requirements.
At least one legislative
committee has reported thk
problem to UF.
A joint, ad hoc committee
report Sept. 14 on conditions at
UFs Shands Teaching Hospital
pointed out that failure on the
part of the state personnel
classification system to
recognize the peculiar problems
of a teaching hospital has
seriously hampered its operation
and has added unnecessary costs
and administrative burdens.
Shands Hospital Director
Stuart A. Wesbury, said he was
encouraged and pleased with
the board meetings.
We are on the way to good
relations, he said.
The personnel board is in i
process of auditing each of the
jobs under appeal. They are
beginning to render decisions,
Button said, but no deadline is
set.
Nearly 500 hospital job
classification appeals were
forwarded to the board in 1966.
There are still 80 pending, and
are included in the 132 UF
appeals.
The legislative committee
report noted the slow response
of the board in acting on
requests.
Button said he hopes the
board will delegate to UF some
of the responsibility for
recategorizing positions.
Wesbury said the significant
resolution to campus problems
was a tentative arrangement for
periodic trips to UF by the
board staff.



Winter Enrollment
Tops '6B Total

A winter quarter record
18,849 students currently are
enrolled on the UF campus.
Figures released Wednesday
by Registrar Richard H.
Whitehead show only 999 fewer
students than the 19,848
attending the traditionally-larger
fall quarter that ended in
December. The figure is 1,184
above the 17,665 enrolled last
winter.
Individual college totals rank
University College (containing
all freshman and sophomores)
first with 6,114. The
male-female ratio continues to
close with 3,483 men and 2,631
women currently designated as
University CoDege students.
Chile Site
Os Seminar
On Education
By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Santiago, Chile, is the location
of a seminar Saturday on
research on teaching
effectiveness involving UF
faculty members and
representatives from South
American schools.
Drs. Emmett Williams and
Robert Soar will attend the
two-week conference along with
50 staff members of American
community schools in Santiago;
Asuncion, Paraguay, Buenos
Aires, Argentina and Montevideo
and Mercedes, Uruguay.
: The seminar, third in a series,
is being conducted in
conjunction with the
University-to-School Project,
under the auspices of the Office
of Overseas Schools of the State
Department.
The American community
schools in SoYith America are
independent, not
government-operated, Williams
said. The State Department
provides a minimum of
assistance for the schools.
Providing American
curriculum combined with a rich
cultural experience for children
of United States citizens in
South America is the major aim
of the schools but at least 50 per
cent of the student bodies of
most schools is composed of
people from countries other
than the United States. In the
Santiago school, 23 countries are
represented.
The majority of the staff and
teaching body of the community
schools are South Americans.
In addition to seminars, the
University-to-School Project
provides a number of other
services to the American
community schools. United
States members of the program
visit the schools frequently and
materials such as video tapes are
sent.
Teachers for the schools can
train in the United States. Two
teachers from the school in
Paraguay are on campus now for
a one-year special training
program.
Williams noted that UF has
sent three people to intern in the
South American schools and
others are being sought who are
looking for a foreign experience
while interning.

Upper division colleges (which
include graduate students) are
led by the many-faceted arts and
sciences with 3,281 and
education with 2,318. In this
category, more women (1,648)
are enrolled in education with
more men (2,117) taking arts
and sciences majors. The latter is
second in womens choices with
1,164 listed, while second place
among men (1,573) is the
College of Engineering.
The professional colleges of
law and medicine have 585 (law)
and 304 (medicine) with 59 of
the medical students taking
graduate work.
Regular undergraduate
programs enrolled 15,299, not
including 2,661 taking graduate
courses. Engineers enrolled in
GENESYS (Graduate
Engineering Education System!
courses throughout the state
total 238, yielding 19,087
students for the winter quarter.
In the upper division colleges,
the most undergraduates (2,324)
are in arts and sciences, followed
by education (1,632),
engineering (1,191) and business
administration (1,137) 5 A
breakdown shows more
undergraduate men (1,413) in
arts and sciences while education
(1,331) led the women
undergraduates choices.
The School of Forestry
remains the only all-male
domain on the campus with 98
students 11 taking gtaduate
courses. The professional fields
of law and medicine have almost
equal numbers of undergraduate
women l4 in law and 16 in
medicine. Nine women are
enrolled in engineering programs
with five of them on the
graduate level.

UF Leads The South
In Supplying Peace Corps

UF is currently number one in
the South in supplying Peace
Corps volunteers. With 51
applications received in Winter
Quarter recruiting, UF has
forged ahead of Oklahoma State
and the University of Texas,
nearest competitors, Peace Corps
recruiters said Tuesday.
The college of Arts and
Sciences supplied the highest
number of this quarters
volunteers at UF with 25,
followed by the College of
Business with six and the College
of Journalism with five.
Thirty-one of the new recruits
are seniors and five are graduate
students. For teaching positions
in the Corps at least a bachelors
degree is required.
Latin America was the
preferred area of work for 22 of
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Unlv. Ave. 372-4373

§§H 9 HraS
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\VlaHa llyfta\VlaHa
IITMIM. 1 jig!
IB BN B 1 EB W
J j; J: t J jj.. *' i sj
NEW STYLE?
Monogrammed jackets,
handkerchiefs, shirts, ties,
belts O.K. But on the seat
of your pants?
Pick Up Proofs
The following students
who have not received proofs
of pictures from the Seminole
may pick them up at their
office on the third floor of
the Reitz Union: Eisenhart,
Diane P.; Hartsaw, Kenneth;
Leclercq, Michael; Schalleen,
Michael R.; Stoddard, Gerald
J.; Tumipsee, Jody; Waters,
George.

the volunteers, with Africa
getting 12 requests and Asia
nine.
The Peace Coprs recruiting
team will return to UF next Fall.
Including last quarters
applications, the total number of
UF volunteers this year is 98.
Oklahoma has 53 and Texas 50.
However, second recruiting trips
are planned for both those
universities this year.

ENJOY EATING
TRY THIS BREAKFAST SPECIAL
CAN TO MAM MON TNRO FRI
A
2 EXTRA LARGE EGGS
OR
2 HOT CAKES
SSfrV JLjQ{
TOAST MM m 1125 W. UNIVERSITY AVI. I

I Air France Offers 1
|European Travel Plan|
ft* Air France has announced that students can travel and study :j:|
| in Europe this summer for as little as $995. $
| Three programs are available for interested students. The first ijjj
is a program for students who want to travel through Europe. *:
The second is a combined travel and study program. The third
will house students in private homes in or near Paris. :j:j
§: The travel tours will cost from $995 to $2,207 depending on
ft length, travel and study tours from $995 to $1585, and the ;ft
$: housing tours from $320 to $495. : ft
$ The student has a choice of travel tours from 32 to 63 days in : ft
j:j; length, departing from New York beginning June 12 through
ft August 18. Students may travel by high speed trains, local
|:j ferries, and high speed hydrofoils to a number of destinations in >:
Europe. ft;
ft The study and travel program will offer courses in accredited
j:|: foreign universities. These tours include extensive travel,
ft excursions, and cultural events, as well as study, and last from
:j|: 44 to 60 days.
j:|; Information on any of these programs can be obtained by |:j:
ji|: local travel agents or Air France Offices.
xXiWSSSSSSSSSSiWtXtXiXiftXSSiXS&XSSiXtX'XX^Si'SX'fX'X'SSX'SSSX'SSSSSft'ftwi
I ;
|ss*
THAT franklin GIRL
Its Play Time!
Play Time means Pant Time!
Pant Time means Franklins!
A sample is this three-piece
outfit that really says CO.
Other models available to
intrigue you. Come see.
2401 SW SW 13th Street OPEN Mon Sat>
Village Square 9:30 to 6:oopm

Thursday, January 30,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



, Th* florid* Alitor, Thursday. January 30,1900

Page 6

Navy Recruiting
Here This Week
The Naval Officer Recruiting
Team will be on campus through
Friday from 8:30 a.m. until
4:30 pjn. on the ground floor of
the Reitz Union.
The Go Navy team will
interview, counsel and test
eligible men and women UF
students, interested in earning a
Naval commission.
XX*X*X*X # X< # X O XvX*X*X*X*X # X%vX # Xv

TO FINANCE SERIES
New Film Group Formed

A University Film Committee
has been formed to finance and
establish a film series.
The new committee was
formed because the Florida
Cinema Society has become
indefinitely inactive due to
financial problems.
The committee has a
meeting Tuesday, and formed
Group South for the purpose of
making experimental Aims, said
Mrs. Eleanor Roberts, public
functions manager of the Reitz
Union and a committee member.
For the first experimental
film Dwight Godwin has
donated 1200 feet of color film
and use of Teaching Resources
film lab for a short five minute
movie, Roberts said.
Group South meets next
week and they are interested in
more student members, she
added.
After the first film, Group
South will make films for any
organization on campus at

UF Science Seminar
To Host 40 Students

The National Science
Foundation has assured 40
outstanding high school science
students of an exciting summer
in UF laboratories.
A $14,850 NSF grant to UF,
announced Friday, supports
Floridas 11th consecutive
summer research participation
program for secondary students.
Along with the grant, largest
yet for the project, support
comes from the Volusia County
Heart Association and several
regional units of the Florida
Heart Association.
The 1969 program runs from
June 16 through Aug. 9.
Dr. Luther Arnold, associate
professor of education and
director of the program, stressed
the great value of the project is
that it brings high school
students into personal contact
with science and scientists.
Promising students gain
increased understanding of
scientific content and methods
through instruction and research
participation given by persons of
recognized stature, Dr. Arnold
says.
Through lectures, laboratory
research and field trips, the
youths -two boys to every girl
- become so stimulated that,
almost without exception, they
go on to college and into
science-related careers, Arnold
says.
Their locations on campus
span the horizons of research
medicine, engineering, physical,

DROPOUTS
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~

minimal cost because they have
no labor cost, Roberts said.
The other feature of the
committee will be to present ten
movies in the Reitz Union
Auditorium on Sunday nights
during the Winter and Spring
Quarters.
The In t e rnational
Underground Films shown
Sunday were well received,
Roberts said.
We will be showing old
movies from the twenties,
because of their inexpensive
price, she said. We are
interested in what movies people
would like to see that are being
produced now.
An appeal for support in a
memorandum to the university
community was distributed
Tuesday from the Reitz Union
Information Desk. The
University Film Committee is
asking all members of UF to buy
a subscription to the film series.
Subscriptions for UF students
are $2.50 for ten movies.

social and communication
sciences, to name some broad
areas. Research ranges from
atoms to animals.
Many past participants have
been awarded large college
scholarships because of
experience obtained during the
university program, Arnold
says.
Only juniors or accelerated
sophomores are invited to
attend. Approximately 25 per
cent come from outside Florida,
and slightly under half usually
enroll at UF after high school
graduation.
Principals and science teachers
nominate students, who are
selected by a committee of nine
professors.
Grant money is used for
operating expenses, scholarships
to students needing support and
for the three high school
teachers and one graduate
assistant who serve as
counselors.
I Miller-Brown
I
I
ONE MILE
NORTH OF 40%
THE MALL AM
376-4552 AUTHORIZED
I DEADER

Subscriptions to the film series
for faculty, staff and general
public are $5. Students can also
buy a half subscription for
$1.50.
A list of the proposed films
to be shown include Laurel and
Hardy, W.C. Fields, Paul
Newman, Anthony Quinn,
Birth of a Nation, Zorba the
Greek, plus films by Alfred
Hitchcock, John Ford and John
Huston.

"WHAT WE HAVE HERE IS
A FAILURE TO COMMUNICATE
Sound familiar? This communication lag happens everyday. You've experienced it and
been frustrated by it. The Union Program Council, with your help, will do something about
it.
This ad is an attempt at communicating a simple message: The Union Program Council
wants new ideas, suggestions, and criticism. From you and for you. The Program Council
needs your response or the communication attempt will be a failure.
The form below is worthless unless you complete it and return it (to room 310 in the
Union).
Let's have some communication here.
' T
I YOUR OPINION OF EXISTING PROGRAMS: I
I YOUR SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE PROGRAMS 0 |
I ~
] IZIZ ~7 p 1
.OTHER REMARKS- zl
I ac
J | |
__ PHONE: I

(potfT FORSHT, AGATHA-^
\ VfefeEENGAGED#/
w r
/ st>~

I ALIBI LOUNGE
uHUR., FRI.,SAT., 9-2
ENTERTAINMENT
I FOR YOUR LISTENING
I PLEASURE
I 3334 W. Univ.

BY HOWARD POST
7COrtSRATutATIOMs' \
VI 7
-f# M
jr



fFrenchSpy
fTalks Here
|
:: How did Soviet espionage
penetrate French President
Charles De Gaulles official
ijij family?
Phillippe Thyraud de
Vosjoli, chief of French
intelligence in the United
ig States from 1951-1963, will
reveal this exciting story at
the UF Auditorium at 8 p.m.
jj: tonight.
g Vosjoli was also the
jj: operating head of a French
spy ring in Cuba and his
jj: governments top
jjj representative on the Atlantic
| Pact Intelligence Board.
His appearance is
sponsored by the Universitys
ijij Forums Committee,
ijjj Admission is 75 cents for
ijij students and $1.25 for the
jjj general public.

UF Students Here From
68 Foreign Countries

UF is becoming a truly
international university.
This quarter 683 students are
attending UF from 68 foreign
countries, making the
proportion of foreign students
the largest ever.
Cuba, India, and China bring
the most students, the majority
of whom are in graduate school.
The College of Agricultures
tropical agriculture program,

| IJIJIBBSJffIIJS I
| J mwuumwumo jj
By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Columnist
He it doesnt matter what his name was, it really
doesntexcelled in most all things. In THINGS, you know, and in
most of them he excelled.
In high school he excelled in all of his classes, scoring points in class
whenever he raised his hand to answer questions in a
more-than-intellegent-manner. He was one of a few whose father
could afford to buy a car for and because of it combined with other
becauses he excelled in girls. They liked him because and they did
things for him.
In sports he was untouchable and they called him the golden boy,
the king, the god, the main one, the best in the state. The coaches
loved him and because of it the girls loved him more.
He was a nice guy type of guy and the other guys were never
jealous or enviousit was an honor for the golden boy to snake their
girls from them or beat them on the field or in the streets with
burning tires on hot concrete or asphalt, as the case was.
In college it was a repeat story but never got redundant or verbose
or absurd or. He would be a first-rate top-notch number-one engineer.
Everyone knew it his profs, his friends, his parents, his enemies, his
girls. Even strangers.
He excelled in all things in college. The fiats wanted him. The
sorority girls wanted him. His friends wives wanted him. He was in
great demand, this excellent golden boy.
He graduated with top honors (iMyboy, your mother and I are
proud of you, we always knew you could do it, my boy. .).
Companies wanted to give him thousands of dollars (My boy, you
cant go wrong with us. Think of the advantages...). The pro football
league begged for his talents (My boy, think of the fame, the glory,
the money ...dont let your talents go unused, my b0y...). He was
everybodys golden boy, a boy in demand who excelled in things.
He made promises and things then went into the ARMED
SERVICES (lets hear it for the ARMED SERVICES) for two years.
He excelled.
He got purple hearts, dozens of ribbons, medals and he even got to
meet the president, who wanted him to keep excelling.
He got out and he was still golden. Women fell at his feet,
corporations wanted him and were willing to pay plentyhe was a
success in every measure. .
But he wasnt sure who he was so he took a .357 magnum pistol
and put the barrel in his mouth and aimed it at the back of his head
and pulled the trigger and blew his brains all over a wall.
His funeral excelled but his marble gravestone wasnt so hot.

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which attracts many South
American students, helps make
agriculture one of the most
popular fields of study for
foreign students. The Colleges of
Engineering and Arts and
Sciences also have a large
number of foreign students
enrolled.
The problems confronting the
foreign student are similar to
those of any UF student.

Housing, financial, academic,
and personal problems top the
list. Few students have a serious
language problem because of the
English language test required
for admission.
To help foreign students with
any special problems, UF has the
International Student Center.
The ISC provides counseling
services and helps obtain visas,
besides promoting UF in foreign
countries through' alumni and
the U.S. Information service.
In addition to the ISC, there
are several foreign student clubs
on campus so that students can
get together with other students
from their own country.
These clubs, including the
Indian, Chinese, Latin American,
Portuguese-Brazilian, Persian,
Arab, European and Thai clubs,
are coordinated through the
Council of International
Organizations. The CIO also
sponsors exhibits and programs
such as International Week,
which will be Feb. 17-22.
Qs sales & services
(tttjrciw)
wig salon JJ
1013 w. university ave. )/
vX. 2 blocks from campus jC)

6jgi% : H
HlflF "LET'S ALL GO TO BURGER CHEF" \ l
' 715 NW 13th St. I
1412 N. Main 'St. \ V\j§|k /f I

Gainesville Merchants
Aid International Week

Twenty-seven stores in the
Gainesville Mall are donating
materials and space to assist the
Council of International
Organizations in their annual
recognition of International
Week.
The off-campus celebration is
Feb. 3 through Feb. 7. Each
store will display articles from
countries throughout the world.
Native items will be furnished
by the UF International Council.
The purpose of our
extending International Week to
the Gainesville community is
two-fold. We want area residents
to feel more a part of the UF
campus and we hope to continue
the display project as an annual
event, said Ted Plocharski,
president of the International
Students Organization.
Campus festivities for
International Week begins on

Twig campus Twig mall
1131 W. Univ. Ave. 2552 N.W. 13th St.
diMaJ
PRE-INVENTORY CLEARANCE
we start the big countdown next week . and we sure dread
counting all this merchandise ... so we've talked the boss into
really letting us loose, and we've cut prices to the core ...
LEATHER SHIFTS .. Reg. S4O s4s 14.99 and 16.99
LEATHER VESTS .. Reg. sl9-S3O 6.99 and 11.99
LEATHER VESTS .. Reg. $24 S2B 9.99 and 11.99
DRESSES... Reg. sl2 s24 6.99
DRESSES... Reg. S2O s3o
GANT SHIRTS... Reg. $7-$7.50
PLUS
OTHER DRESSES, BLOUSES, SLIMS,
SKIRTS, COATS, HANDBAGS /2 PR,CE

Thursday January 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Feb. 17 with an International
Buffet Banquet. Each club will
bring dishes from their native
land. Member clubs are: Arab,
Brazilian, Chinese, Indian, Latin
American and Persian.
During that week the
Interfratemity Council and
Panhellenci Council will invite
foreign students to dinner. Other
activities for the week include a
beauty contest, movie, talent
show and an international dance.
Correction
Tau Beta Phi, professional
engineering society, will hold
its annual banquet at the
Holiday Inn, Sunday, at 6:30
p.m., rather than at the
University Inn, as was
reported yesterday in the
Alligator.

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 30,1969

Page 8

The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
h At axareiM of re^omibiUty/'
Pwfesfir* Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
A Raul Ramirez James Cook
wAmltoCdH Executive Editor News Editor
SDS Deserves
No Recognition

MR. EDITOR:
I have been reading with
concerned interest about the
current demands of SDS, or
SSOC, to be recognized as a
student organization. Mr. Miller
has voiced himself eloquently on
numerous occasions, presenting
the case of those students
left-of-center, and often pointing
a somewhat intimidating finger
at the administration, seemingly
to blame them for the lack of
recognition suffered by these
students.-
Something continues to
puzzle me however; something
thus far not answered by
anyone.

Nauseating Chimes
MR. EDITOR:
We also find the tower chimes irritating if not downright
nauseating. We have enjoyed a period of blessed quiet we plead with
the establishment not to destroy it.
We do not know of anyone who actively enjoys the chimes but we
do know of numerous people who actively dislike them.
Also they make hearing in those classrooms nearest the century
tower almost impossible so much so in fact that we know of cases
where professors have simply given up even trying to speak over them.
Hence we ask for their permanent end.
WILLIAM L. HASSEL, 4AG
DONNA DANESE, 4AS
PENNY POCKRASS, 4AS

Carol Thomas Gets Too Much Credit

MR. EDITOR:
A hundred times I have been
tempted to respond to some of
the inane things that appear in
the Alligator. I always refrained,
reasoning that most students are
not too time-wise or
experienced, and since the
campus newspaper is mainly a
teething ring for undergraduates;
sophomoric utterings are
excusable because so many of
them are in fact sophomores.
Sophisticates shouldnt joust
with neophytes; its akin to
shooting fish in a barrel.
But Mrs. Carol Thomas, the
self-styled civil rights activist
that was profiled in the Jan. 23
issue, is over 35, has attended
several colleges, and has even
spent six months in jail. Yours
truly has achieved those very
same accomplishments so she
seems fair game for me.
To begin with, the first seeds
of civil rights were not planted
in the middle of the 20th
century. They were sown before
the American Bill of Rights,
before the French Rights of
Man, and even before the British
Magna Carta. Mrs. Thomas was
not present at any of these
events and it is doubtful that she
will ever measure up to the
droppings of those who were in
attendance.
Secondly, there was some
animosity aimed at
German-Americans in World War

Why should an organization
that historically has done
nothing but submit demands,
disrupt and criticize, offering no
constructive remedies, show
nothing but disrespect for other
students activities, and
seemingly strive for total
disintegration why should
such an organization think they
deserve to be recognized?
They take. They demand. But
they give nothing. They claim to
love their fellow man, and say
their goal is peace among men
a goal we can all ascribe to but
isnt the first premise of love to
give?
JOHN BRETT, 4JM

I. But that was in 1918, before
Mrs. Thomas was even a zygote.
It did not occur during World
War 11. (This writer is also of
German ancestry.) Mrs. Thomas
sees herself spread-eagled across
the entire travesty of human
existence, savoring every wound.
It seems to be her personal
wish-fantasy. How like the noble
St. Joan to endure, chin-up, all
the agony. Perhaps society
should apologize to Mrs. Thomas
by having a special medal struck
for her.
Let us focus, gentle reader,
on the drive for Negro rights in
the United States. If one is
seeking the earliest seed then
it goes without saying that it all
began when the first slaves were
brought to Virginia in 1619.
Many whites were opposed to
slavery from the start and
immediately worked actively
against it. To save space, well
collapse all the time till 1900
when the NAACP was formed in
Niagara Falls. Caucasians were
among the charier members,
hence joining it 50 years later is
not much of an attainment.
The Congress of Racial
Equality was formed when a
racially mixed group sat-in at
a formerly segregated Chicago
restaurant in 1942. Our little
Janie-come-lately was not yet
ten.
A Negro named Mrs. Parks,
not a white named Mrs. Thomas,

EDITORIAL
Greater Suppression?

. o c
* The men who govern the nations
colleges and universities are predominatly
white, wealthy Protestants whose politics
lean to conservative Republicanism.
So spoke The New York Times in a
copyright dispatch by Fred M. Hechinger
about 10 days ago. The fact that the story
was based on research by the prestigious
Educational Testing Service (ETS) of
Princeton, N.J., made the report particularly
noteworthy.
Although it comes as no startling
revelation to many, the ETS found a basic
split between the thinking of the Trustees
(such as the Florida Board of Regents) and
the on-campus coalition.
Significantly, ETS noted: To the extent
that ideological difference among these
groups remain (or increase), we might expect
greater conflict and disruption of academic
programs, a deeper intrenchment of the ideas
of competing factions, and worst of all, an
aimless, confusing collegiate experience
where the students program is a result of
arbitration rather than mutual determination
of goals and purposes.
At the UF, where many a clash between
conflicting ideologies has been blamed on
the on-campus administration, the ETS
report seems particularly pertinent.
Perhaps the blame is on the wrong
doorstep.
Witness this ETS finding: In matters
relating to academic freedom, more than
half of the trustees felt that the
administration should control content of
student newspapers; well over one-third
believed that it is reasonable to require
loyalty oaths from faculty members and that
students punished by local authorities for
off-campus behavior should also be
disciplined by the college.
But perhaps more significant, one fourth
of the trustees held that campus speakers
should be screened and 27 per cent disagreed
with the statement that faculty members

initiated the modem civil rights
movement. The year was 1955.
The first sit-in in the South
was staged in Oklahoma City in
1958. It was an all-Negro
demonstration. Neither Mrs. nor
Mr. Thomas were there.
The biggest blast of all is that
no whites, absolutely none,
participated in the
demonstrations until February
Ist, 1960 in Greensboro, North
Carolina. (That is not the late
fifties.) The first Caucasian
participant was the Rev. Dr.
Merrill Proudfoot. I suggest that
if the Thomases can prove it was
they and not he they should
present their evidence to Lewis
Killian, James Vander Zander,
Kenneth Clark, Louis Lomax,
Eric Lincoln, Edward Frazier,
and a dozen other black and
white social chroniclers so they
might rewrite their bodes.
These and other historians,
sociologists, and political
scientists may be consulted as
well to learn that the modern
integration movement ended in
1966. It did not end a few days
ago with Carol Thomas
egocentric declaration that it
was all over.
There are at least a half-dozen
people right now on the UF
campus who can conclusively
prove they did participate in the
sit-ins to end segregation before
1966. They are dispersed among
the faculty, staff* and student

body. I would like to list their
names but not having consulted
them I cannot presume they
wish their relative anonymity
disturbed.
I can, however, describe the
white persons who were involved
in the early 60s. They were not
glory hunting publicity hounds
elbowing their way to center
stage. They were well-disciplined
workers who kept their
individual personalities out of
the limelight. They knew the
spotlight had to be kept on the
movement and not fixed on any
individual, most especially not
any Caucasian individual.
Eight of the white activists
were brutally murdered in
Mississippi and Alabama during
the crucial period; states which
the Thomas couple missed in
their travels. It galls me to see
them attempting to pluck the
laurels off those tombs.
If Carols life-long struggle
and uphill battle has left her
very tired maybe she ought to
take a rest from stealing so much
credit.
The martyr poses in those
Photographs are something else.
Too bad the hands and feet were
not shown as I fully expected to
see nail holes, albiet if there they
would more than probably have
been self-inflicted.
As regards soul no one can
bestow that .quality on
themselves just by saying they

have the right to free expression of
opinions.
That the ETS also found that trustees (or
regents) in the South prove more
conservative on academic freedom issues
than those in other areas may also not i>e
surprising. But it certainly goes a long way
toward explaining the climate of academic
suffocation which previals here.
Compounding the last unhappy
conclusion is the ETS finding that trustees
of public institutions (such as the UF) tend
to be the least freedom -oriented.
The dreary Times report also noted that
trustees by a margin of more than 50 per
cent feel that faculty and students should
not have major authority in many of the areas
of decision-making.
Even on the appointment of academic
deans, which many faculty members
consider crucial to their interests, the
newspaper reported, almost two-thirds of
the trustees believed that this was a matter
for them and the administration.
It almost follows logically that ETS also
found more than half of the trustees and
regents thought the decisions concerning
policies on student protests is a matter for
administration and trustees alone.
When one considers all these findings, and
the additional facts that trustees tend to be
political conservatives and business minded,
it becomes easier to understand how the
American campus has become a
battleground between the generations.
Tragically, at least on the level of state
universities, the major blame can probably
be placed squarely in the laps of the
governors who appoint the regents.
Realistically, the outlook for a new
attitude on the part of regents is dim.
Instead of increased freedoms we may well
see increased suppression as the ageing
politically appointed educational leaders
react to the demands of the mid-20th
Century.

have it. It is a determination that
must be made by others.
Moreover, black nationalists (the
idols of her heart) claim that by
definition no Caucasian has soul.
(Sorry Carol, you just havent
suffered enough.)
Furthermore, Carol Thomas
and Jack Dawkins calling some
of the whites klansmen on the
Alachua County Grand Jury and
the Negroes on it Uncle Toms
sounds just lice the fascists who
yell Commie and Pinko at
everyone who doesnt fit their
narrow stereotypes. Lets face it,
scare words only impress mental
dwarfs.
An additional note can be
made on the transient Jack
Dawkins. While it is true that the
police do not know where he is,
it is also true that Mrs. Thomas
doesnt know either. If she were
attuned to the local Negro rather
than entertaining out-of-town
black militants, she would be
aware of the scuttlebutt that
exists in all five of the citys
. black ghettos.
From the gilded Lincoln
Estates all the way down to The
Fifths, the rumor is that
Dawkins is dead. He was killed
by Gainesville Negroes who were
incensed by his paying of a
teen-aged gang to
indiscriminately fire-bomb the
favorite laundromat of the local
blacks. pAUL SNYDER, 7AS



Give The Blacks Their Power Now

MR. EDITOR:
Two years ago, through a tutorial program, I met
a black family a father, and his three children. As
time passed, many more faces became familiar to
me in the neighborhood. I tutored, and I talked to
the young people most of whom were boys close
to my own age.
Eventually, there was no more studying only
discussion. I have listened and watched, and I have
learned learned much more than those kids
ever learned from me. Thats as it should be.
Dora, Junior, Joe, the others, the streets, houses
are realities not people and things that I hear
about. They are truths ugly truths. I know the
education those children are getting. Dora is using
books I read twelve years ago and shes not even
allowed to bring some of her textbooks home.
Junior is an intelligent boy with a potential for
college, but the academic preparation hes getting
will most certainly handicap his attempts at higher
education. Theft schools policy of passing so
many failing students from grade to grade just to get
them through contradicts the essential goal of
educating youth.
The enormous number of drop-outs and
passed students points to a major failure on the
part of the teachers and administrators to reach the

"A II Problems
Impossible Task

MR. EDITOR:
It seems to me that one basic
flaw is very evident in your
proposal of a catch-all
communication program.
Your phrase free discussion
of all problems, real and
imagined, causes me to wonder
if anything of value could be
realized from such a
confrontation. Half the battle is
deciding just what to talk about,
and you want to talk about all
problems?
Perhaps if each participating
organization submitted two
problems and some possible

No Excretion Yet
MR. EDITOR:
RE: A Big Hurrah For Saviors! (The Alligator, Jan. 22, 1969).
Richard Davidson, slef-proclaimed president, secretary, and
grounds-keeper of SANE (Students Advocating No Excretion), would
appear to be suffering from a rather lengthy adherence to the
principle advocated by this group.
DAVID W. HINNANT, 4AS
f-'i f! H
They Liked Me! They Really Liked Me!

solutions, and then have a
committee to select ten of the
more urgent. In this day when
more and more interests refuse
to compromise, it necessitates
some manner of selective
consideration, to help reduce
time consuming arguments over
things like what problems are
more important, whether they
really exist, etc.
In other words, narrowing the
scope of the task will facilitate
the completion and final
achievement of the goals.
BEN AYRES, 4JM

young people Os the ghetto to offer students an
education which they can relate to.
Besides poor schooling, I have seen the broken
homes not one or two but many, too many.
.The boys I know young men who will soon
have families and must make it on their own seem
lost, floundering, with hopes and dreams for their
futures but without the knowledge of what to do to
fulfill their aspirations. How can they know? What
models or guidance do they have to show them how
to get out of the poverty theyve lived in all their
lives?
I no longer think welfare is great -for I have
noted how it controls lives and destroys self-respect.
The biggest lesson I have learned these past two
years is the importance of the expression Black
and Beautiful.
Talking with the young people, I have noticed
how afraid they are that I will think they are
so-called ignorant. They have distorted
self-concepts and lack a feeling of personal worth
and of belief in themselves.
I have found confirmation of all my observations
in books like the Autobiography of Malcolm X
and Silbermans Crisis in Black and-White.
Because of what my eyes and ears and the printed
word have told me, I am frustrated and angry not
as angry as I should be perhaps, or as angry as I may
yet become.

OPEN FOtUM:
Aitlitiwl VifiAMt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."
Competition For Radicals:
HIB Will Furnish Speakers

MR. EDITOR:
Due to the heavy pressures put out by various
radicals at the UF, it has become necessary for HIB
to initiate a new program to furnish a speaker to
various radical classes, meetings, and other
gatherings.
A speaker will be furnished to any radical class,
organization, or meeting upon three days notice
delivered by mail (P.O. Box 13427 University
Station) or by phone Univ. ext. 392-1429. The
charge will be $50.00 to any radical group ($5.00 to
non-radical groups). A moderate, conservative
speaker will be furnished on less than three days
notice for an additional $25.00 service charge.

Dont Help The Parasites

MR. EDITOR:
I seem to have been
greatly misinterpreted in my
last article. I realize that
patriotism is something that
is scoffed at today, but this is
irrelevant, because it makes
no difference to me whether I
am cut down or not becuase
my beliefs will only become
stronger.
The more I think about
my last statement the more I
tend to disagree with it. .
.with truly justice and liberty
for all. In fact, the
conservative faction in
America is just not getting
liberty or justice at all!
How would the SSOC feel
if a right wing radical group
appeared on the campus?
(Not a bad idea, I might add).
This is an immature way of
whitting a desire. I realize
that * liberals are an
open-minded lot With
non-bigoted thoughts except,
of course, against anybody
that doesnt agree with their
idealistic philosophy.
An article in last weeks

Alligator dealt with the bad
conditions in America. I agree
that America is in bad shape
in a few places, but these
problems wont be solved by
guaranteeing an income. I
agree to help them, but with
guaranteed jobs if they cant
work anywhere else.
Let them help themsleves.
Americans black, white,

Letter From tired American
Plagiarized Another Article

MR. EDITOR:
Ronnie Clarks letter I
am a tired American which
appeared in the Jan. 22
Alligator was touching.
However, I am tired of people
plagarizing articles and
editorials which discuss
honesty, integrity, and
morality. If we must
plagarize, lets copy articles
on dishonesty and
immorality.
There appeared on page
120 of the Feb. 14, 1966

Thursday, January 30,1969, Thu Florida Alligator,

I am angry because I see a damn vicious cycle
dedicated to keeping the oppressed oppressed, and
it will continue as long as the black people lack
control over their own lives.
Once I was an integration-yelling liberal.
No more!
Now, I am for the separatism advocated by black
power leaders, because the major part of the black
problem lies in what these 350 years have done to
the black mans personality: the self-hatred, the
sense of impotence and inferiority that destroys
aspiration and keeps the black man locked in a
prison weve all made.
It seems that only by the black people rising up
as one and gaining power over their own destiny will
this problem be solved.
And as Malcolm X said, If it takes violence to
get the black man his human rights in this country,
In for violence ...
Its taken a long time for me to come to my
present stand, and I have not yet stopped
questioning, reading, learning. But for me, the
evidence is too great to ignore.
I, with a growing number of others, now believe
that radical social reform must be effected by any
means necessary before its too late to do
anything.
SANDRA WOOD, 3AS

Black radical groups, at a premium becuase of
unpredictable reactions, will be spoken to for a cost
of SIOO.OO. To speak to a group of over 100 people,
there is an additional charge of $2.50 per person.
All proceeds go to a non-profit (although not
chartered as such), educational organization,
namely, HIB.
JAMES LEE HOLLIS, SEG
PRESIDENT, HIB
P.S. If you leftists keep coming up with ideas like
this, youll be right.
P.S.S. For those who dont know what the HIB is, it
stands for Hollis Is Broke.

poor, rich are only human.
Dont take away their souls,
they will be no more than
parasites living off of a rich
society!
RONNIE CLARK, lUC
P.S. I got the major ideas for
my last article from Alan C.
Macintosh.

U.S. News and World Report
an editorial titled I am a
Tired American by Alan
Mclntosh, Publisher, The
Rock County Herald,
Luveme, Minn.
On the top of the same
page appears No part of this
or any other page may be
reproduced without written
permission.
ALLEN DURLING
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
.-

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 30, 1969

STUQMNIS NEEDED FOR CHQIR
Negro Catholic Priest
To Say Folk Masses

The University Religious
Association will bring Father
Clarence J. Rivers, a Negro
Catholic Priest, to the Reitz
Union Ballroom Monday evening
as a part of its Religion in Life
Series.
Father Rivers cond£?t will
consist of his music that is a
Lutheran
Concert
Tonight
The Cortland College Singers
of State University of New
York, at Cortland, will appear in
concert at the First Lutheran
Church tonight at 8:15 p.m. The
concert is part of a 3,000 mile
tour in Florida.
The choir is under the
direction of Guy B. Webb,
former director -of UFs Mens
and Womens Glee Clubs.
Fresh from their successful
debut at New Yorks Town Hall
last spring, the 60-voice choir
has been hailed as one of the
nations top collegiate choirs.
Their tour program will
include works by Ives, Schultz,
Oliveros and Mendelssohn. A
group of early American folk
songs and spirituals will close the
concert.
Cortland is a coeducational
institution of more than 3,400
students located in the
geographic center of the state
midway between Syracuse and
Binghamton.
' j| wL ipt
GUY B. WEBB
... Choir Director
Sunland
Visit
Planned
The Catholic Student Center
Service Committee is planning a
Sunland Training Center visit
Sunday.
The students will be leaving
the student center lounge at 2
p.m. and plan to talk with the
children and coordinate games.
This is the first of a series of
bi-weekly visits planned by the
service committee.
Students interested in
participating in this program
should contact Bridget Breen,
chairman, ait 392-9609.

revolution in the American
Catholic church.
Combining elements of
secular and white church
traditions, Father Rivers music
produces something original and
uniquely American.
A priest of the Archdiocese
of Cincinnati, Father Rivers is an
accomplished singer and actor.
His latest composition, a mass
dedicated to The Brotherhood
of Man, received a standing
ovation when performed at the
Newport Jazz Festival.
Father Michael Gannon of
the Catholic Student Center

umm
Does it really work?
Ifyouve ever resorted toNoDozat4a.m. NoDoz when you can get caffeine in a
the nightbeforean exam, youve probably cup of coffee?
been disappointed. Very simple. You take NoDoz all at
NoDoz, after all, is no substitute for once instead ofsipping coffee for lOmin lOminsleep.
sleep. lOminsleep. Neither is anything else we can utes. And if you take two NoDoz tablets,
think of. the recommended dosage, you get twice
What NoDoz is is a very strong stim- the caffeine in a cup of coffee,
ulant. In fact, NoDoz has the strongest Two tabletsisnt that likely to be
stimulantyoucanbuywithouta prescrip- habit forming? Definitely not. NoDoz is
on completely non-habit forming.
?> ne x , Which means its safe to take
v What s so strong about that. whether youre cramming at night. Or
If we may cite The Pharmacological about to walk into an 8 oclock class. Or
Basis of Therapeutics: Caffeine is a driving somewhere (even though youre
powerful central nervous stimulant. Caf- rested) and the monotony of the road
feme excites all portions of the central makes you drowsy
nervous system. Caffeine stimulates all One last thing you should know
portions of the cortex but its mam action about NoDoz. It now comes in two forms,
is on the psychic and sensory functions. Those familiar white pills you take witf>
It produces a more rapid and clearer flow water. And a chewable tablet called
of thought and allays drowsiness and NoDoz Action Aids It tastes like a choc
fatigue. After taking caffeine one is ca- olate mint, butTdoeeveSng reguSr
pable of more sustained intellectual es- NoDozdoes. y 8
fort and a more perfect association of And ifyouve managed 4
ideas. There is also a keener apprecia- to stay awake this Jt
tion of sensory stimuli. long, you know i J
Very interesting. But why take thats quite a lot.

announced that Father Rivers
will be saying two Negro folk
masses at the Student Center
Chapel Sunday.
Father Rivers will need 50
students to assist him in the
masses and Monday concert
serving as his choir. Anyone
interested should be at the
Catholic Student Center at 4
p.m. Saturday afternoon for
rehearsal.
All students are invited to4he
masses Sunday at 11 a.m. and
5:15 p.m. in the Catholic
Student Center Chapel and the
performance Monday at 8 p.m.
in the Union Ballroom.

jijig -/^
iMMlil^-,' /t&m S
ip 2J I jt^nsv*
| .' lp*F|"? |l ll|| [ \
ftf 11 KIJH ?JB 1 f r J Iw£\ v
Pr# -. *oi %i% IK Pi iJP -> 4jk
HOME FROM THE WAR
Norma Dew and John Adam have a mother-to-son kitchen
conversation after he returns from the war. This is one of the many
dramatic scenes in "The Subject Was Roses," playing at the
Gainesville Little Theatre tonight, Friday and Saturday.



>*j|
b .. V ; J;
K|
w^ x , '''" )te - "\
Hfev, J^Sfc^l.,.
/ -har.-A
x J l£pp&& j /
u
FLORIDA-BORN BILLIE PIERCE
... featured piano piayer in Preservation Hall Jazz band
Preservation Hall
To Swing Saturday

It is perhaps fitting that the
pearly gates of New Orleans jazz
should be located at 726 St.
Peter Street in New Orleans,
where two faded musical
instrument cases hang in front of
a shambled building proclaiming
that THIS is Preservation Hall.
Built in 1750, a one-time
private mansion, tavern,
apartment building, art gallery
and music hall, Preservation Hall
is now the home of Sandra and
Allen Jaffee, as well as the
nightly stomping ground for
many old-time New Orleans
musicians who began their
playing of original jazz at the
turn of the century.
Negro Senior Citizens of Jazz
like Pappa John Joseph, DeDe
and Phillie Pierce, Jim Robinson,
Ernie Cagnolatti, Slow Dray
Pavageau (who is the official
Mayor Bergundy Street in the
French Quarter), Percy
Humphreys and Paul Barnes still
gather in the evenings to play
that warm, happy, early jazz
music that was once standard
with the strip joints of the
Storyville section and the
funeral parades.
A select group of these
septagenarians on tour will
appear at the Reitz Union
Ballroom Feb. 1 sponsored by
the Union Fine Arts Committee.
Featured at the piano is Billie
Goodson Pierce who was born in
Florida in 1907. She came from
a family of pianist-vocalists and
learned the blues rhythms
almost before she could talk.
When Billie was fifteen, she took
Clarence Williams place for a
week as accompanist for the
great blues singer, Bessie Smith.
As a substitute piano player
for the silent films, organ player
for touring minstrel shows, and
pianist for numerous traveling
bands of the era, Billie found
herself in New Orleans at
Popeyes, Charlie Palookas and
the Kingfish where she played
with George Lewis and DeDe
Pierce, marrying the latter in
1935.
The Union Fine Arts
Committee is presenting a
complete New Orleans
Evening Saturday night.

Starting with a French
Quarter meal, the night should
come close to transporting
participants to Bourbon Street
with all its rhythm and intrigu^.
The Union Cafeteria is
featuring New Orleans dishes
and the faculty club is
sponsoring a complete French
dinner in the Arrendondo Room
before the concert.
After the Preservation Hall
Performance in the New Orleans
Cabaret decorated ballroom, a
dance will follow. The Soft
Winds Quintet, a professional
jazz group from this area will
provide the music.
. Tickets at $1 for students,
$1.50 for faculty and staff and
$2 for the general public are
now on sale at the Union Box
Office.
Poetry Reading
Professor Ed Ochester will
conduct a poetry reading and
discussion on Three
Contemporary Poets today in
the Reitz Union, rooms 122 and
123. All interested students are
invited to the ninth period (4:40
- 5:30 p.m.) meeting.

Chicken, served with MMffjHtfV'
' potatoes and tangy
m coleslaw
J CV)^^St.^

FOR WINTER QUARTER
Three Plays Planned

The Florida Players have
announced an ambitious bill of
plays to be presented this
quarter. On tap are three full
length plays, each an innovation
in its own right.
The first to be presented is
Lewis John Carlinos
Telemachus Clay. The play
tells the story of Tel Clay, a
young writer who seeks his
fortune in Hollywood. Written
expressedly for presentation
which emphasizes the spoken
word through dialogue, the play
is a collage of scenes and sounds
with a cast of eleven persons.
This Readers Theatre
Production of Tejemachus
Clay will be presented at 8 p.m.
Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 in the
Constans Theatre.
The Players second offering
this quarter is their major
production of John Bowens
After the Rain. A British
import which opened to first
night cheers last season on
Broadway, After the Rain is a
constantly absorbing example of
theatrical virtuosity and
imagination.
Set some two hundred years
after the great flood of 1970,
After the Rain is the
re-enactment of the voyage of

"" WONDEJET n
MOUSE
RESTAURANT
SPECIAL SPECIAL
K.C. STRIP STEAK Iw/BAKED POTATO Jh |
LONDON BROIL &1 If\
w/BAKED POTATO \|) I I U
VEAL PARMIGIANA i r
w/ITALIAN SPAGHETTI q> I. IO
OPEN FACE
BLACK ANGUS sn/v
w/FRENCH FRIES V UV/
14 S.W. Ist AVE.

survival by five men and three
women aboard a raft built by an
enterprising manufacturer of
breakfast cereals to prove that
man can survive by GLUB alone.
In the course of their sojourn
on the raft the survivors manage
to lay the foundations for a New
Society. In telling their story the
author offers alternately
scathing and hilarious comments
on the building up of social
patterns and the making of
myths.
Conceiving of After the
Rain as a comic fantasy, the
director James Lauricella (who
directed last years highly
successful version of The
Imaginary Invalid) has
assembled a cast of actors who
can deliver both the delightful
farce and delicate irony which
Bowen has woven into his script.
After the Rain will be
presented for seven
performances beginning
February 24 at 8 p.m. in the
Constans Theatre.
For their final presentation
this quarter the Florida Players,
in conjunction with The Modern

Thursday, January 30, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Dance Group, will offer a
dramatic dance version of T.S.
Eliots high acclaimed verse play
Murder in the Cathedral.
Murder in the Cathedral
marks the first time that the two
campus organizations, The
Modern Dance Group and the
Florida Players, have joined
forces in entertaining campus
audiences and may be seen
March 7, 8 and 9 at 8 pm in the
Constans Theatre.
MEAT MARKETS
SIRLOIN
SMS
mt
TH*S IS WESTERN CORN
FED BEEF FROM
IOWA
TENDER AND FLAVORFUL
WESTERN
SIRLOIN
ROAST
BONELESS
FOR-YOUR-FREEZER
WHOLE A
SffIUMM U lb
20 To 25 Pound Average
Sliced any Thickness
and Freezer Wrapped
Frostv Morn Budget
SLICED BACON
MANY OTHER GREAT
MEAT BUYS AT DELOACH'S
THIS WEEK
SHOP EARLY AND AVOID
THE RUSH.
DeLoach's North
401 N.E. 23rd Blvd.
DeLoach's West
3432 W. Univ. Ave.

Page 11



Page 12

* Ttw Florida AHigator. Thuraday, January 30,1900

HKiE
3-lb. Con PUKE VEGETABIE...Iimit 1 W/J5.00 Os more purchase excluding Cigarettes .. 12- OX. .ALL FLAVORS
ASTOR SHORTENING 49* fsffi CHEK
ARROW DETERGENT 39* Wig DRINKS
BUTTER COOKIES 4/sl. fSfe If \fl
FAMILY LOAF BREAD 19* SJ V% S |
200-0. ARROW FACIAL SPRAY DEODORANT W
Tissue 5/$ 1 Arrid Dry 49*
2-Roll BATHROOM 11-oz. AQUA VELVA SHAVING Toothpaste... 58* Fig Bars 39*
P I JL B _ 12-oz. PALMOLIVE 20-0. Doublemint, Juicy Fruit or Wrigley's Spearmint
Tissue 23' Lather 39' Shampoo 49* Gum 69*
mmaugtk
Rilners v AHj
lUIM* 1 COFFEE 39 If 1
Limit 1 Offte of your choice with $5 or more purchase excluding cigarettes OOf
uuanuiy Reserved Prices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon, Jan. 30 5 I H J^L
When You Buy More than One-You Really Save mmm
Kl* Peaches 3/$l flfciln c /si
Papple Juice... 4/$l M CATSUP 5/ $ 1.
I Pork 4 Beans...B/$l % ilffir
Beanss/$l Pears4/$l TOMATO Jl ICE 35
Corn 5/$l Ham 3/$l tomato paste 2/37*
No. 303 Con REAL SOUTHERN WHITE ACRE No % Con VAN CAMP VIENNA M m mm
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s o ufe 5 |HS*JB 0000 thru feb. s Regulor Size 3/37c . Bath Size mtsuv smui.
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TOP VALUE STAMPS : | 111 I TOP VALUE STAMPS Personal S.ze 81710 9
.~c aoac-Av. o. 12-oz. 38c . 25*oz 77c 38 oz
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8 lv y OQ P 2/25* Gain Detergent. . $ 1.47
*;\io # >



on These Specials ||||
,i. g sHimo I USDA CHOICE BEEF SPECIALS
15X1? ROUND STEAK 99*
=;CQ< STRIP STEAK T
i#s- 1 CHUCK STEAK 69*
V. POT ROAST. .. 69'
SWIFT SHLD. ROAST 89*
h N lAQ DELMONICOS..T
IIHM\ 4 f/JJ Ribs 59* Stew 3 99*
CAN li Stew T Beef 3 5 1 47
TARNOW SLICED All MEAT FRESH PORK TENDERLOIN FINE c OR ROAST OR 16 o* BORDENS WRAPPED SLICED AMERICAN 7'h lb W D BRAND FRESH FROZEN BEEF
BOLOGNA 59* STEAKS 99* CHEESE FOOD 79* STEAKETTES.... $1.79
Mb. Bog COPELAND FRESH PORK FRESH BOSTON BUTT 6 Count CRACKIN GOOD FLAKY 13 4 Pk<, SUNNYIANO SPtCIAI SMOKED LINK
SAUSAGE 59* PORK ROAST... 49* BISCUITS 3/29* SAUSAGE 99*
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FRANKS 45* SPARE R 185..... 59* BISCUITS 4/41* SLICED BACON.. 59*
10E OFF ANY FRESH FROZEN GROUPER OLD FASHION l ib SWIFT PREMIUM
TARNOW PIZZA FISH FILLETS... 69* DAISY CHEESE.. 79* FRANKS 69*
FREEZER QUEEN BREADED 2 Lbs USDA GRADE A' QUICK FROZEN BONELESS JENNIE O 10 oz KRAFTS Crocket Barrel Mellow 65C Sharp Z9c E. SI. jrp 1o; SWIf T PREMIUM BROWN 4 SERVE I
VEAL STEAK 79* TURKEY ROAST $1.99 STICK CHEESE......B3* SAUSAGE 65*
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GOLDEN RIPE
hllllllir IHI Meat Pies 5/sl. Stick Bar... 2/sl.
HA IIA HI It J 18 HAA r Dinners 39* Fruit Pies 3/sl.
YOUNG A TENDER POLE LARGE FIRM HEADS 0 Juice 5/sl. Turnips 3/sl.
KPflllS Mrn AV L6TTUC6* X 07 FLAVORS cookin bag BIRDSErE s min broccoli spears o* baby
Mb. BASKET SALAD SIZE TOMATOES or VINE RIPE Hi Meat Items4/sl. Limas 3/sl.
romatoes..M 29 idddojCmA ot E ,vk
u.gs W ads snow |Hm us~= guow Co r n Sticks... 39 Fis li F l ll et 2/$ 1
Cauliflower 49 unions....o m rll'r.L. n/tt - a/t%
swE f T.j U ,cY,..,0(0.-.wm sl bhi '" aa a nAj Cup Cokes it/y I Margarine 4/$ l
r ( Pound Cake...69* Margarine 45*
Celery 2/39* Apples 29 |rrf i^yssri;
Giont Size CHEER .. Large I T .OP.yALU| STAMPS j lima TO p VALUE STAMPS ; TOP VALUE STAMPS ;
Cheer Detergent 87* Detergent . 39*j18 %suor IKM jKlf I
Dreft Detergent . 39* Bathroom Cleaner 79
IVORY SNOW.Lorg. Sue 39c .. Gioni sii. SRIC.SRANRwM.SU.JJ.. G.S. qq ? 1 TO. VALUE STAMPS ; TO. VAU*. STAMPS | TO. VALUE ** |
H7f L eaner * .... coc..*. **. .me,_< ...... ..^1....
rrst. . c- *) "JO Saner 15-OZ 39c 28-OZ 69c 40-OZ. *IS JB good thru feb S Ite* ! CONDENSED SUDS Giont Size 77c . Jumbo Sue >2 39 Super J r\r\* TKxKXW #33. ~ #34 *>>

Thursday, January 30, 1960, Thu Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for sale I
Honda 450 Custom, must see to
appreciate. Call 378-5761.
(A-10t-70-p)
SPECIAL THIS WEEK: Aluminum
secretarial chair like new. Cost new
$47.50, NOW SIO.OO. JR Office
Furniture Co. 620 V? S. Main St.
(A-st-69-p)
61 10 x 50 2 bedroom ft. kitch.
mobile home. Very nice, must sell.
$2300. After 5:30 372-5742.
Arredonda Estates. (A-3t-70-p)
Smith-Corona portable manual
typewriter, pica type, good
condition, best offer. Call 378-7571
after 1 pm. (A-3t-70-p)
FOR SALE: 17 ft. Cobia fully
equipped w/75 Evinrude, electric
starter, used 150 hours. Murray
trailer. SISOO. Call 372-5505 after 5.
(A-st-70-p)
Arrendonda Estates 69 Archer 2
bedroom 12 ft. x 60 ft. SSOO cash,
$86.33 month, local bank financing,
Lot $25 mo. 372-5604, 5 to 7 pm.
(A-st-68-p)
Hollywood bed twin size, mattress
& box springs, SSO; tv console RCA,
$35; Heath FM tuner S2O; Phone
376-7175 after 6 p.m. (A-st-70-p)
1969 Honda 90, 3 months old, under
1000 miles, under warranty, just
tuned-up, incl. 2 helmets. $325 or
best offer. Ph. 378-4919 after 5 pm.
(A-st-7 1-p)
For Sale: 1967 Triumph Bonneville
TI2OR Rebuilt top end. Best offer
over SBOO. Call 376-9450, ask for
John Albers after 6 pm. (A-3t-71-p)
Electric bass. Excellent shape, must
sell. Starvation setting in. Call
372-0970 after 3:00. Luther.
(A-2t-71-p)
Used Japanese sewing machine. Not
fancy but runs well. Portable with
case. Ideal gtft &jr her! $25 or best
offer. 378-9450 after 6 pm.
(A-3t-71-p)
Vespa 125. S9O. Good shape, with
helmet. Call 392-8061 or 378-4449
after 5 p.m. (A-3t-72-p)
First $lB5 takes Hondo 90 1967.
2500 miles, excellent condition.
Need money for school. Call
378-8127. (A-3t-72-p)
1967 Honda CBI6O Helmet included.
Very good condition $350.00.
Inquire at Streits Cycle Shop.
(A-3t-72-p)
1968 48x12 Lamplighter central air,
1 bdrm. washer. Just like new. Call
376-9005. (A-st-72-p)
Like Brute Power? 450 Honda, Dual
overhead cams, dual carbs, everything
(and pipes!!!) S6OO. Call Rick,
376-9440. (A-lt-72-p)
Smith Corona electric typewriter,
1965 model, SBO. Royal portable
typewriter, 1965 model, S3O. Phone
378-5033 after 5 p.m. (A-2t-72-p)
BEAUTIFUL BSA 1967 650, .060,
3/4 cam, 300 mi. on eng. Deep green
and chrome. Bike at A R Bid. Ask
$995. Dave Finlay, 378-4043.
(A-2t-72-p)
1964 ZUNDAPP 250 cc. needs work,
S2O cheap, also 40,000 BTU GAS
HEATER very good cond. CALL
372-1603 after 5:00. (A-3t-72-p)
FOR RENT
Must sublet 2 bedroom poolside
French Quarter apt. Call 378-8564.
(B-st-69-p)

|ip bw
3BHL
Jp \lj S S fl'- P^|k
FAMILY PORTRAIT: A riotous career of lawlessness comes to a
temporary halt as (I. to r.) youngster Tony York, Robert Walker,
Diane Varsi and Dick Clark pause for a family picture in
( "Killers inree, raucous comedy drama rereased by American
| International now playing at the SUBURBIA DRIVE IN THEATRE.

Page 14

| for rent
SUBLET: One bedroom furnished
apartment at Tanglewood Manor.
Available February or March 1. You
may use our security deposit. Call
376-1412 after 6 p.m. (B-st-72-p)
Sublet Till June: spacious one
bedroom apt, pool and laundry
facilities, deposit paid, call 376-7647
after 5 p.m. (B-4t-72-p)
Modern furnished mobile home near
campus for student couple or single
student. $75. Phone 376-8063 after 1
p.m. (B-4t-72-p)
Attr. 1 bdrm. furnished apt. avail,
immed. AC, all-electric, $96 mo.
Close campus, 1716 NW 3rd Ave. no.
21. Call 378-4632 evenings dr come
by. (B-3t-72-p)
Desperate! 1 female roommate.
Landmark no. 169, 378-7782.
(B-7t-72-p)
Furn. 2 bedroom apt. SW 16 Ave.
$l2O mo. for 2. Feb. 1, occ.
37{)-3552, 378-2957.(8-3t-69-p)
Immediate sublet furnished eff. apt.
AC, gas, heat, $75. Convenient to
shops, school. Lease till June,
376-9936. (B-st-68-p)
Furn. 2 bedrm. apt. SW 16 Ave. $l2O
mo. for 2. Feb. 1, occ. 378-2957,
376-3552. (B-3t-69-p)
ec a w
| WANTED
Wi.ii 8 QMWWM 9 One coed to share 2 bdrm. apt. with
3 other girls FQ apt. 72. Call anytime
after 2 pm, 378-9934. (C-st-70-p)
Roommate male 2 blocks from
campus, AC, TV, stereo, 41.00 per
month as soon as possible. Call
378-9721 after 7 p.m. or come to
1105 NW 4th Ave. (C-st-68-p)
Male roommate to share 3 bedroom
IV2 bath house with central air and
heat, separate bedrooms. Occupancy
Feb. $50.00/month plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 378-7041. (C-st-64-p)
One female roommate wanted
immediate occupancy. Landmark.
Call 372-6853. (C-3t-71-p)
Wanted: two female roommates to
share French Quarter apt. Call
376-9659. (C-3t-71-p)
Roommate wanted, immediate
occupancy College Terrace. $65 mo.
Prefer upper division or over 21. Call
376-2758. Utilities included.
(C-3t-71-p)
Male roommate. Landmark, 2 bdrm.
$45 per mo. plus utilities, see Jim or
Tom after 12:00 p.m. Apt. 143.
(C-3t-71-p)
2 Females to accompany 2 gentlemen
on 3 day cruise to Nassau Fri. Feb. 7.
Entire fare paid by us. Interviewing
now. Call 378-0729. (C-4t-71-p)
.. -<*;.:*tt;!8!8!6 l MM | 0g M.Uv M WWWjI
HELP WANTED i
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Pleas** call Charlotte
Hardaway, University ext. 2-2046
between 8 5. (E-10t-71-c)
WANTED: Males, over 21 interested
in participating in antibiotic study
earn $50.00. Come to Room M-438
Medical Science Building Jan. 27
29 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. for further
details. (E-3t-72-p)

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 30,1969

1 HELP WANTED f
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida-32601.
Phone 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
AUTOS 1
65 Corvair automatic 140 hp conv.
Automatic, top SBOO. 372-7659 after
6 pm. (G-st-69-p)
Dodge 57 Great engine, fair body,
poor chasis. Needs repair. Will sell to
Ist person wholl pay $125. Call
Howard at 378-8895 after 7:00.
(G-3t-70-p) f
1957 wheel drive long bed jeep, runs
good but needs some minor work,
$450. Will trade for big bike. After
5:30, 372-5742. (G-3t-70-p)
Triumph Spitfire MK2 1967. Must
be seen to be appreciated. Less than
14,000 miles, R&H, WSW, $1,500.
Call 376-0911 after 5 p.m.
(G-st-70-p)
63 MG Midget w/llOOcc engine new
top & trans, blue metal flake paint,
sharp, call Jan at 376-5295, or
372-0126. (G-st-69-p)
1964 Merc, 390 super maruder
engine, power steering and brakes,
automatic trans. Must sacrifice S7OO
cash. Call 376-8912 after 6 pm.
Hurry!! (G-st-69-p)
MkMEI
lust some
PUNKS from the
PECKERWOODS
out for a picnic!
... Before it was
over, 37 men
M were dead. JSf
raj&k p-<- v -x
1;.
WALKER VARSI CLARK
CO-FEATURE AT 8:55

Bb^wl^BlMHI : tHBHhF

r^^jww
rBM W~W. S~ "The Fixer*', .who wftl
$ didnt know he had courage... until .yfc
5 courage was all he had left. iSJ J
Â¥ Alan Bates Elizabeth Hartman s m
¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ yyyyyyyy pjtV YYYY
STARTS tomorrow
1 ]¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥^
yka r/cv/A r wta* I
J wK KnzitAiMS Rostft
_ THAT "GRADUATE" GIRL .*
?
J nrr TwntrrriiTriiaaMMMiMMMMMiMMf TECHNICOLOR J
* os,drring __ *ui J
JAY C FUPPEN BRUCE CABOT-MEREA JMUXtKSI
¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥
STARTS TOMORROW
181 ffl SlflfiM ¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥
| 2 W. Utfrrztfy Ave. [ J
| Paxton Quigleys crime was passion $
and his punishment fits exactly!
{ Hes the exhausted captive of J
{three young ladies, with a i , f
* unique idea of revenge. IBl^iWT.frS^yl
ATtIC -' i
* c
* ¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ ¥¥¥¥¥tMMT¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥

Effli LfHM^s
I !.% w I wo 4- 1 i
I !,>>.> r * m I |
I 3:40 5:40
I 7:45 9:50
r-LSTEVt-L
livicQUErfxf
IfeIJLUTTM
**^^^L^UTACTlON^r"
'l."UJj.|lW l
y-''-. NOW! I
2:00 4:25 /
6:45 9:00 /
iisi
.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS |
Lotus Elan S-2 1600 1966 model.
Truly an exotic sports car at a
reasonable price. Inquires welcome.
Phone Bob, 376-4313. (G-st-70-p)
1965 Datsun 4 dr. sedan, very clean,
radio, heater, new tires, low mileage.
Top speed 90 m.p.h., 25 m.p. gallon.
$550 or best offer. Call 372-8246.
(G-st-68-p)
1967 SS 350 Camaro $1950,
378-2105. (G-7t-72-p)
\;xx-x-vtX&'YK*>tt>>X"X*NNssra-wxv:<\
| PERSONAL
fossvwx ICWIM WililiWiaiSWWKWK^
End January the fun way at the D
Phi E open house. Dance Friday
night from 9 l2 to The Most
Exquisite Rush". (J-lt-72-p)
Presentation of available TRAVEL
plans to Europe, Asia, Middle East,
N. Africa, Thurs. nite, Jan. 30, 7:30
pm in 2nd floor Reitz Union
Auditorium. (J-4t-70-p)
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
Want to be part of an exciting, bold,
creative student professional
organization ATTEND SUNDAY
2:00 pm, rm 173 NORMAN.
(J-3t-71-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville. Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pm. 2 days prior lo starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
W N) n
l| l| l| £
M

a
a H
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11
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tmmmmmm v
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t% - 't- # M' : # f >. * J *

jN!irwxxw*x<-x%x PERSONAL |
Rick and Kitty O. want to thank the
whole mangy group for helping us to
celebrate our Ist its been such a
- year we ma V 9 et married now.
(J-2t-71-p)
Share in Flying Hawks 1966 Cessna
172 Skyhawk. Full panel, 2 narco
mkl2s Student Pilots eligible. Call
378-8046 for info and demo ride.
(J-st-7 1-p)
The Friday afternoon club has in 2
weeks attracted over 200 guys & girls
from all areas of work and study at
the U of F, to the Lamplighter for
singles mixers, in private rooms, each
Friday aft. from 5 7:30. Drinks
45c ladies 20c. If your friends
can t tell you about this opportunity
to meet fun people over 21 come
and bring them with you this and
every Friday afternoon. (J-3t-71-p)
Send living love. Broward offers
delivered carnations for Valentines
Day 75 c. Order now in the
Broward Lobby 7-9 pm. Proceeds
donated to the Gator Loan Fund.
(J-4t-70-p)
Adventurous male with car or VW
bus desired to escort observer & HS
age Girl Scouts on field trip &
hootenanny Sat., Feb. 8, 378-1167,
(J-3t-72-p)

Thursday, January 30, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

| PERSONAL |
janet watch out for roller skates,
dogs, and mean little boys. Big
Brother and the Holding Company.
(J-lt-72-p)
LOST & FOUND |
Desperate parents desire info on male
cream colored short haired puppy
lost on 21 Jan. near sth Ave. and
15th St. Call 378-1131. (L-st-69-p)
Valuable reward for cheap watch,
lost on golf course, was Xmas present
Call Rick and check out his offer,
376-9440. (L-3t-72-p)
Found: womens glasses, brown
frames, pick up in Union.
(L-3t-72-nc)
SERVICES
#*
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Its Not
That
Gator Ads
Sell More.
Just Good
Sense

I Thurs. Fri. Sat. Night I
I * J&atfygfeeUer I
I From the "Flick I
I in Miami I
I Gamble Rogers I
I I
I Serendipity Singers Fame i I
I PLUS Fri-TGIF Reduced FYices 2-5 I
I Sat. afternoon Jam Session Qjffifl I
U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc.
I i\atfjsfceUer 'i \ I
<- . v %
e I 1 -- : .. :*

Page 15

.vx*x*xv .v.v;wx x*x*xx*v- .v.v;*; : .'*x : v
SERVICES
: : 8
v; xx*x.w. .v;*w*x*x4*'x.%vxxx*>w*y*
OM! Guaranteed to bring relief from
all your suffering. OM! The answer to
the question. Any question! OM
loves you, can help you. OM.
(M-st-68-p)
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want your child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyns Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center, 5240 NW Bth Ave., ph
372-6667 ir 376-6495.
ALIBI LOUNGE J
THUR., FRI., SAT., 92 [
ENTERTAINMENT
FOR YOUR I
LISTENING PLEASURE J
334 W. Univ. Ave. I
[ TONIGHT
HEAR CONTROVERSIAL
FRENCH SPY
PHILIPPE
THYRAUND
DE YOSJOLI
CHIEF OF FRENCH
INTELLIGENCE IN U.S.
Forums
Reitz Union Programs Council
UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
f
JAN. 30 8 PM
STUDENTS: 75< PUBLIC: $1.25
TICKETS AT UNION BOX OFFICE
AND AT THE DOOR

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

SERVICES
WMiiwaww iwwwwcwww!
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-st-72-p)
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,
prices from $250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-13t-61-c)



Page 16

. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 30,1969

The Ideal
Wesson Oil ... 39 c
PGQChGS 4 . 1
TM It or 5 " I
EgJLJNH \KSB |gr^ i? .Lima Beans 4r*l
p|) /(??*** Stokely's Shellie Beans or Cut
m, reen Beans 5 v. *1
V ******* Stokely's
Green Beans 4tr $ l
Lady Betty Healthful Stokely's Small Whole
Prune juice 2 - $1 Green Beans 4 # .r $ l
Libby's
Tomato Juice 4 4 iHTM
Dole #303 Green Beans 5s 5 1
Fruit Cocktail 5 .... *1
RaTsinlT.r.: x 29 c Sauerkraut sss $ 1
Premium MnOZCAT
Beef Hash 39* K H 99free
Premium Snackin' Good
Betty Crocker Dessert Special
Pound Cake Mix e... 3 pk 9 s. *1
Pillsbury's with Walnuts (7c off) /t^BlfeV
Brownie Mix *7'46* gll||lPr ; MfifytED JSSs
Carnation Skimmed
Evaporated Milk e... * 10 c
UlmAu4 witn this coupon and op KisiM
12 For Cold, or Flu! flK' :
_ .. Minuto Maid Froxon Florida Orange Cone. SW^
.., Ham. i Orange juice .... 2 97=
i Corn sticks
aaaambmmmaaaaaaatamaaaaaaammaaaay | | 1 1
|Ma A or Turkey I I Bj
[TjTi]-JWGreenStamps GWiUkfl MBSBm
I Pepsodent A,< Macaroni & Cheese .s££ $ 1 Jfy
Tooth Paste troxoo 4Af/
5-ox. Tube & MeClt ... $ J^KLLI/jjiW/
OQUC6 -.^B
[T|]|E TXT Coconut Custard
; * jbj Froxon
Puffs Perch Fillets s*s
#3 (inpirox sot., iess) Shrimp Cre01e....... ska. 39 vHlliiiHiii^^
nftfin nnQ T £!rnr EXTRA f-'-IFrTI~ EXTRA F EXTRA EXTRA B l "V|_f V f X TRA BPS^n
(Rapid Shove it Realomon || Sanka || McCormicks |s " Valley Vrost J
(Rog., Menthol, Lime) Cocktail Mix Instant Coffee Black Popper W hoU Strawberries
11-ox. can 24-ox. hot. 8-ox. jor 4-ox. can ; lVi-lb. pkg.
#4 (Sxpiro, Sot., Fob. i, 1969) l # 5 (Ixplr.. Sot,, Fob. 1, I 960) .! #6 (Ixeiro. Sot., Fob. I, 1969) # y (Ixyirox Sot., Fob. |, ltS) j|j #B (Ixpiroi Set., Folk. I, 1969)
x/ukfHkM*M*MM(k*Af(k****M(k(ktk AHA***** XftiHkft{isi&JkAit*itSk*fnnir*ftf>nftnnir>"" in unlbmuHMuuuuuuuuuuuk]



Thursday, January 30,1969. Tha Florida Alligator,

H
down produce lane
Crisp, Firm, Sno-white
Cauliflower 39* prices effective m
n ni[[l|iiii Tomatoes JAN 3 - 31 FEB * 1939 /
Large
JO go go m Serve Turkey, Ocean
Pascal Celery 2 .! 23 Cranberry Sauce .... tr 27 C
D'Anjou Pears 8 59* !rL c, ~ 2 J-1J !S 9JI IP A
Grapelade %*** 39 e
Crisp, Mouth-Watering
Mclntosh Apples Grape Jelly %*- 39'
Grape Preserves "T 39' O rjl
Chocolate
Mom, lets make ?£?£ ~ 49
Caramel Cones che.ze.it, *
- jfEkk HlhnSiMnwH
Marshmallows'".rr 23' ABcsf 1
health & beauty aids y lf[l|^WGreenStam ps
I !A^ u 10-oi.OQc Jim. I I
LISTGiIiIG hot. o / 1 I
Mice Rrofl# 1301 40 c V o TI #l 1
m A m m EXTRA IP^I
liill^GreenStampspj
Smucker's Asst. |
I* rUHIIA !| HOiiliHMi Wl Trrn fTVI Flavors Syrups I
t markets a fc q m reg. bottle |
£E*jjftfc"H^>^T^||e*e-A---Uftitte,Qlwfput^UtrPfsMte £E*jjftfc"H^>^T^||e*e-A---Uftitte,Qlwfput^UtrPfsMtereserved
reserved £E*jjftfc"H^>^T^||e*e-A---Uftitte,Qlwfput^UtrPfsMtereserved
1 Swift's Premium Flovortite $ lAIA Kl kA AIM CT Hi wleM#l |l
IUI4 N. MAIN ,1.

Page 17



I. The Florida Alligator, Thursday. January 30.198

Page 18

9 c
JH^KLColeSfaw.. c 39*
Ww IjJJ Bologna r 79 c
alwoy* Tasty
- New England cookery reflects Puritan "plain living and high think think.
. think. .-w ing." But some of the menus from the Old South prove that the
r-llSlllliP HdMHMMdRfeIAV' jjV 4 pleasure of hearty eating is also an American tradition. In today's
> t** diet-conscious world, hearty eating means plenty of the high highquality
quality highquality protein of meat, poultry, and fish. But there's no reason
a W why it can't be enhanced with traditional Southern seasonings
A Swifts Pram him Government-Inspected and flavor combinations. For example: Baked Chops with Sour
Shippsd IISDA Grads A Quick-Frozsn Eviscerated Cherries: Salt and pepper 4 thick loin pork chops and brown both
_ sides a little bacon grease. Place a cup of uncooked rice in the
tltfm Dtcvcn I _ bottom of a casserole. Pour contents of a No. 2 can of sour red
*P BASTID I 11|H^lArdHS I JHA cherries (including juice) over rice. Sprinkle with 1 tablesp. sugar,
II | the grated peel of half a lemon, a dash of cinnamon. Arrange'
A P4I chops on top, cover and bake lVs hours at 350. Serves 4.
I Ml IwwlbSA Shrimp-Stuffed Potatoes: Bake 2 large Idaho potatoes. Cut in
half lengthwise, scoop out insides, reverse shells. Mash and beat
with 1 tablesp. butter, half teasp. salt, dash of cayenne pepper,
m and half a cup of milk. Add 1 teasp. minced onion, 1 tablesp.
fk minced parsley, and a half pound of peeled, cooked shrimp. Fill
shells with mixture, top with grated cheese, brown in hot oven.
Serves in Sherry Sauce: this one comes from the Gas Gasi
i Gasi pari Ila Cookbook published by the Tampa Junior League. (A
I great one to own!) To serve 4, salt, pepper and brush with butter
4 fryer halves and brown under broiler. Saute' in 2 tablesp. bacon
grease 1 large chopped onion, Va chopped green pepper. When
brown, add 2 cans of beef consomme' and 2 teasp. curry pow powder.
der. powder. Simmer 10 minutes and pour over chicken in roasting pan.
seafood treats chicken 1 to 2 cups sherry. Serve on brown or wild rice.
. *
Seafood Treat, Quick-Frozen
Red Grouper Fillets TdITIOW Wieners .... "C 39 c
Cottage Cheese
dairy specials 59 c
TOE Cracker
Margarine 29' §| pJg£#>Z. 7j|.|p. l\/\W
t 3 J, SAi/tMei pWUAJ
Wisceniin Ckt.it tar *\
HQjfe Muenster Cheese .... IT 89 c vs



Rathskeller Is 'A Little Bit Os Heaven

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
Good food, good drink and
good entertainment abound at
the little bit of heaven haven
- the Rathskeller.
The Rathskeller itself
represents the realization of one
of the most ambitious projects
attempted at this university and
- regardless of all obstacles it
seems to be succeeding.
Under the administrative
guidance of Joe Mullen and an
effervescent (if sometimes
overworked) staff the Rat
taking care of business namely
providing a congenial
atmosphere for student and
faculty discourse and displaying
some of the local talent around
the university as well as first-rate
professional performers.
So far, Your Fathers
Moustache, the Lee Shaw Trio, a
jazz group, and the comedy
team of Jerry Grayson and
Danny Costello have provided
amusement and entertainment.
Other coffee-house circuit
performers to grace the Rats
stage in the very near future
include the Ewing Street Times
-a folk rock group direct from
the Flick Coffeehouse in Miami
and Erika, Eros and Young a
group comparable to Peter, Paul
and Mary from New York.
According to Allan Vengel, in
charge of out-of-town bookings,
he has been negotiating with
Chesters Children, a fok rock
group who has just completed a
European tour, Bob Altman, a

: [ m
ERIKA, EROS & YOUNG
... comparable to Peter, Paul & Mary
I ROBBIES j
WRi The Best In
Meals. QmSandwichet
[COLOR TV & BILLIARDS]
11718 W. University Ave.l
1 'On The Gold Coast I

satirist from the Flick, the
Saxons and Co. and Josh White,
Jr.
If none of those are your bag,
some of the local talent
includes: the UF Jazz Octet
featuring John Sauls and Greg
Stevens; Fran Belous, a
delightful song stylist; a Blues
and Latin band; Jeff Biel, a
comedian; Dan Flynn and Mike
Foley, songsters of the
Righteous Brothers genre;
Jimmy Hausen, singer; Dean
Burton Crat, satirist; Bob Dussia,
Stephanie Spencer and the
Seventh Chord -a folk and
blues group featuring Rick
Oliver, Jamie Sterret and
yours-truly, Kitty Oliver.
Aside from music and
comedy, Intercourse programs
will be presented every Thursday
at 2 p.m. with the exception of a
special appearance by President
Stephen C. OConnell
Wednesday, Feb. 5 at 12:30
p.m. Dean Sisler is scheduled for
Feb. 11 at 2 p.m.
In order for the Rathskeller
to bring high-calibre
entertainment both
professionally and locally there
must be money. Consequently
there is a small fee of 50 cents
per person for members and 75
cents for non-members after 8
p.m; each night when the I.D.
checking system goes into effect.
Membership for students and
staff is $1 per year to defray the
operational cost. According to
Bob Allison, the treasurer, Any
business needs initial operational

ENTERTAINMENT FEATURED NIGHTLY

funds as they help reduce the
admission price. However, the
Rat is a non-profit
organization wishing only to
serve the students.
After 8 p.m., a member may
bring as many as five people into
the club on his or her
membership card if they pay the

COLOR TV SALE
LOWEST PRICES EVER ON
ALL NEW^
COLOR TV
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required fee. Larger groups must
receive special permission.
All the personnel of the
Rathskeller are students
including the management.
Closing time is midnight on
weekdays and 2 a.m. on
weekends. The Rathskeller

Thursday, January 30, 1960, Tha Florida Alligator,

opens for business every day at 7
a.m. Breakfast, lunch, and
dinner is served.
Performing nightly on the
piano is Joe Whalen. This
weekend, Gamble Rogers,
former lead singer of the
Serendipity Singers, will be
featured.

Page 19



. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 30,1969

Page 20

Bengals Reverse Dennis Doubts

By Alligator Services
UFs Guy Dennis was a Fifth
round draft choice of the
Cincinnatti Bengals Tuesday in
the AFL-NFL Professional
football draft.
Dennis graded out higher than
any pther offensive lineman in
Gator history, he was also the
only Gator wire service
All-American this season.
Tuesday before his draft
Dennis had reservations about
being picked by any of the pro
teams.
Im not sure Ill be picked by
anyone, Dennis said.
Dennis now joins Gators
Larry Smith, LAs first-round
choice and Jim Yarbrough,
SPORTS
SHORTS
Man of the Year O. J.
Simpson, U.S.C.
Top Performer in Baseball
Denny McLain, Detroit Tigers
Top Performer in Pro Football
Earl Morrall, Baltimore Colts
Top Performer in College
Football O. J. Simpson,
U.S.C.
Top Performer in Pro Basketball
Bill Russell, Boston Celtics
Top Performer in College
Basketball Lew Alcindor,
U.C.L.A.
Top Performer in Hockey
Stan Mikita, Chicago Black
Hawks
Top Performer in Boxing Joe
Frazier
Top Performer in Track and
Field Bill Toomey
Top Performer in Swimming
Debbie Meyer
Top Performer in Tennis
Arthur Ashe
Top Performer in Golf Billy
Casper
Top Performer in Motor Sports
Cale Yarborough
All-Sports Rookie of the Year
Earl Monroe, Baltimore Bullets
FSU Topples
Mad Gamecocks
TALLAHASSEE
(UPI) Florida States
Seminoles upset the South
Carolina Gamecocks, 87-66,
Tuesday night in a game called
with 1:57 to play when
Gamecock Coach Frank
McGuire refused to leave the
playing floor.
Referee Reggie Copland f
Birmingham, Ala., stopped the
play when two consecutive
technical fouls failed to stop
McGure from arguing about a
call under the Gamecock basket.

Detroits second-round pick, as
pro draftees.
m
Speculation on salary bonuses
for the ex-Gator grid stars varied
from $200,000 for Smith to
$70,000 for Yarbrough.
Few name players were left
for Wednesdays selections,
All-America linebacker Bill
Hobbs of Texas A&M was the
second player chosen, going to
Philadelphia after Buffalo
opened the second days action
and eighth round by picking
James Harvey, a defensive tackle
from Virginia Tech.
Bob Gladieux, Notre Dames
Fine running back also went in
the eighth round, going to
Boston as its sixth choice.
Donnie Shanklin, the small
but speedy halfback from
Kansas, was taken by
Philadelphia on the 10th round.
But, for the most part, the
teams dipped into the small
college ranks for possible future
stars.

.Hcnv.to
interview
170 companies
in half an hour.
v <
*
Just talk to the man from General Electric. As you do, youll find that you dont necessarily
He represents 170 separate GE companies that have to spend a lifetime working on the same job
deal in everything from space research to electric in the same place. We have operations all over the
toothbrushes. And each of these product depart- world. Chances are youll get to try your hand at
ments is autonomous. Each has its own manage- more than one of them.
ment and business objectives. Our interviewer will be on campus soon. If
So a job at General Electric offers the kind of youre wondering whether its possible to find chal chalimmediate
immediate chalimmediate responsibility you might expect to find lenging work in big business, please arrange to see
only in a small business. him. He speaks for 170 companies.
Right from the start you get a chance to demon- 'ftrt.
strate your initiative and capabilities. And the (i FNF RA I FI C PTD If 1
more you show us, the faster youll move ahead. wtHE II M L CLEwI If I U
An equal opportunity employer
> ;- 1 : -4 .T- t ' . 1 . : 2
: : : n: * :: ' . .....
/-- .
- -- r

Gator AH-American Fifth Round Choice

The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistwit
Sports Editor
Four players from Grambling
College were taken in the eighth
and ninth rounds and another in
the 12th.
James Harris, a highly
regarded but injury-prone
quarterback, was taken in round
eight by Buffalo. Henry Jones, a
fullback, went to Denver, Ed
Watson, a linebacker, was taken
by Houston and Hilton
Crawford, a defensive back, was
grabbed by San Francisco, all on
the ninth round.

Richard Lee, a massive tackle,
went to Boston on the 12th
round.
Joe Owens, a linebacker from
Alcorn AM&N, went to New
Orleans on the ninth round
while teammates Willie Peake, a
defensive tackle, and Willie
Norwood, a tight end, were
chosen by San Francisco and
San Diego, respectively, on the
11th round.
Pittsburgh took a pair of
Arkansas AM&N defensive
linemen, Clarence Washington
and L.C. Greenwood.
The pros continued to tap the
Ivy League more heavily than in
the past two decades.
Miami took Bruce Weinstein,
Yales tight end, on the eighth
round while Kansas City took
defensive tackle John
Sponheiner of Cornell in the
10th go-round.
Brian Dowling, Yales star
quarterback, went to Minnesota
on the 11th round.

v<. .'' iHF \' ;'! ':
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GUY, THE BENGAL
... didn't expect it



==THt GUN-LAP-
Thinclads Making Supreme Effort
lk==========s=== s====== = BY CALDWELL TUMEC =**

UFs track team is really
swinging.
Hot from a smashing win over
the highly touted Ohio State
Buckeyes, the thinclads have
been working and rocking in the
sundiine to the beat of the
Supremes, Ventures, and James
Brown over their outdoor stereo
setup and everywhere you turn
the word is Tennessee. They
meet the Vols and Georgia Tech
in three weeks.

Wolfpack Tankers Scared

North Carolina State
Universitys swimming team, the
pride of the Atlantic Coast
Conference, risks its 20-dual
meet victory streak Friday at
Gainesville, Fla., against the
UFs powerful Gators, winners
of the last 14 Southeastern
Conference championships.
The next day, coach Willis
Casey sends the wolfpack (5-0)
against Florida State at
Tallahassee. Florida is unbeaten
(4-0) this season, and Florida
State (3-1) lost only to Florida,
with the final event of their
meet deciding the outcome.
Against the UF, the Wolfpack
will be going against a team bent
on revenge. State edged the
Gators here last year, handing
them their last dual meet defeat
in two seasons, but the score was
close. However, the Wolfpacks
only returning event winner
from that victory is Bob
Birnbrauer.
The Gators have
All-Americans in Barry Russo,
Andy McPherson, Jimmy
Perkins and Bruce Williams, and
an outstanding freshman in
freestylfer Steve Hairston,
national prep sprint champion
for the past two years, ready to
go against State, winner of clear
title to the last three ACC
crowns.
Birnbauer will probably be
matched against Gator star
freestyler, Williams. Casey plans
to send freshman standout
Tommy Evans against Mark
McKee in the 200 individual
medley,
Eric Schwall of State will test
SEC 100-yard freestyle champion
McPherson, and Casey has hopes
for a victory in this event, as
well as in the diving, despite the
fact that UF has another
outstanding diving team, led by
Bob Link.
At least one standout State
swimmer, Jim Coyle, might not
make the trip because of a
prolonged bout with the flu.
Casey also noted that Evans has
been out of competition for six
weeks because of surgery due to
a broken nose.
In addition to risking the
20-meet victory streak against
the Gators, the State swimmers
will also be trying to keep
another string going. Not since
1965 has State lost to a
Southern team. That was to
FSU. Over that span, State has
won 36 of 37 meets, losing only
to Yale.
State last lost the UF, which
this year feels it has its strongest
team ever, in 1964.

The Gators held a team
meeting Monday and the
consensus was that UF would
never again play second fiddle to
the hillbillies on the cinders.
The team planned a number of
spirit raising maneuvers to
prepare for the Volunteers and if
sheer enthusiasm ever won a
track meet, Tennessee is in
serious trouble.
Ron Jourdan could be the
biggest track name ever to

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PLENTY OF FREE PARKING IN REAR

emerge from UF. According to
Track and Field News, only one
other person had recorded a
7-foot high jump at this stage of
the season. Ed Caruthers of
Pacific Coast leaped over the
magic seven at the Los Angeles
Invitational. But he has done it
only once.
Jourdan has gone over at
seven or higher at least ten times
this season, in practice and
meets. In fact, on only one

Thursday, January 30,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

occasion has he failed to clear
the height, that was on a
slippery basketball floor at the
Chesterfield Relays. But then
again, 6-1044 aint all that bad.
Jack Bacheler of UFs Track
Club apparently has recorded
three of the fastest three mile
times of the early season with
13:30.5, 13:37.1, and 13:45.0.
Two of those times were
recorded in trials with no real
competition. Kerry Pearce of El
Paso has run a 13:40.0 outdoors.

Lindsey
z* M&?
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MHI Imm
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Cnjoy the long, lean Levis look In a rugged
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Sreat selection of groovy solid colors. Re Renember,
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Men's Sixes27-38 *B I
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GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER I

but there is no one else close
right now.
UF*s two mile relay team may maybe
be maybe getting an injection of speed.
At a trial held recently, quarter
miler Bill Ballinger ran the 880
in 1:55.8, first time ever over
that distance.
Coach Carnes may use the
speedster some on the indoor
circuit where pure speed is of
prime consideration. Sprinter
er me"trial *wJtfi no*previous half
mile experience.

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 3Q, 1969

flpf|
Mb
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8j
ROY BENJAMIN
.. .cross country

I Sport Trivia I
I I noticed that Monday I
I night Tennessee held Pistol
Pete to 21 points, at LSU, I
with Billy guarding him. In I
three games against the Vols, I
Maravich has yet to score jj
more than 21 points! I
8 Incidentally, does anyone B
still doubt Tommy Bartlett as I
to the fact that Tully Gym in
Tallahassee is a snake pit? ||
ls so, ask South Carolinas 8
Frank McGuiree. 8
Answers to todays quiz 8
appear at the end, upside B
I 1) Who is thel
commissioner of thel
Southeastern Conference? 8
2) What are the names of I
the star husband and wife I
tennis combination who I
attended the UF in the early I
3) Who was the star of the I
University of North Carolina I
basketball team that went I
undefeated in 1957, beating I
8 Kansas and Wilt Chamberlain I
I in the NCAA finals? Where is I
8 4) Where does former I
Kentucky All-American
8 Louie Dampier now play I
ball? (Incidentally, do you I
remember his cousin, John I
The Shot Dampier?) 8
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8 qSiH 53 19 8 9 puo3 je qoeoo 8
8 pq jaqseq paaq aq* mou si 8
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I ttU3|o3 tt o|UoX, t (I |
Blues Tap
The UF Intramurals
Department has announced its
selections to the All-Campus
Blue League Fraternity Football
Team:
OFFENSE: Steve
Kaufman XP, Bruce Weeks XP,
Frank Oberhausen XP, Chuck
Gresser DU, Bill Crampton DX,
George Lattuel PGD, Glen
Ripple TX.
DEFENSE: Ted
Billhorn AGR, Ken
Christianson PKPSI, Bob
Wattle XP, John Haverty TKE,
Ray Brewer PGD, Jerry
Schecter DX, Mike Tracy DU.

NCAA Dis-tressed Over Athletes Haircuts
At this winters NCAA meeting in athletes were wearing their tresses. Can This collection of a few of the more
Los Angeles, officials were perturbed an athlete perform just as well with long successful Florida athletes seems to
with the radical hair styles in which hair? indicate that he can.

mmmm
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JIM YARBROUGH
.. .giant tight end

-p£p??f/vr n?m
I IJ "( SPY SCANDAL
The former chief of French Intelligence in the U.S. reveals the fantastic story
of Soviet espionage that penetrated De Gaulle's official family
'Martel/ the key Russian agent PHIHPPE THYRACJD
Repercussions that caught Kim Philby Tiff VOSJQLI)
JJFJC/s secret letter to De Gaulle . _
chief of French intelligence
in the U. S., 1961-1963
mhJ
rAMVA^a^^ffi^ac.
VNXVBRSZT7 AUDITORIUM
Tickets at Reitz Union Box Office & at the door
$1.25 Public 75 c Students
FORUMS COMMITTEE REITZ UNION PROGRAMS COUNCIL

sip
HARMON WAGES
.. .Atlanta Falcons

W Aim
Wr
7 tililFlii r tii ii pi ii i*
& jBB
B I I\ ? uRL
8^
BRUCE WILLIAMS
.. .swim ace

p
* : '&~ '3B2''
JIM McNERNY
FSU swimmer



Speed Weeks Get Green Light Friday

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Daring, danger and skill of
gruelling competition over the
worlds fastest speedway by the
worlds fastest automobiles will
epitomize Daytonas Speed
Weeks beginning Friday with a
250-mile world championship of
Formula V racers followed by
the 24 Hours of Daytona on
Saturday.
Variety is the spice of Speed
Weeks and racing enthusiasts will
flock in excess of 200,000 to the
entire slate of races climaxed by
the eleventh annual Daytona
500 for late model stock cars on
Sunday, Feb. 23.
It all begins Saturday when
the starter flags the smaller but
powerful European machines off
in the 24 Hours of Daytona, a
supreme test of endurance

Maverick Rides Again!

DAYTONA BEACH (UPI) James Gamer has
rounded up a four-wheel posse that could well head
off the favorites in the car-killing 24 hours of
Daytona.
Gamer, who climbed to success with a television
cowboy role and then worked his way into a
Formula One racing seat in the movie Grand Prix,
will pace the pits nervously Saturday and Sunday. It
wont be an act.
The tall, handsome actor, who has lately sported
a bushy beard, heads up the racing division of
American International Racing Inc., AIR a Sunset
Boulevard-based firm typical of the monied new
breed of racing enterpreneurs.
AIR, with two big, five-litre new Lola-Chevy

Bowl Full Os Frills
Stirs Official Tiff

By Alligator Services
Gator and Los Angeles
Ram-to-be Larry Smith and
teammate Jim Yarbrough both
received expense-paid trips to
Bermuda for their play in
Tampas American All-Star game
and, because of it, bowl officials
and National Collegiate Athletic
Association officials are in a
huff.
NCAA executive director
Walter Byers claimed in
Gainesville this week the game
played recently was not
conducted according to NCAA
standards. But he said the NCAA
hoped to rehabilitate the
sponsors.
All participants in the game,
including the UFs Smith and
Yarbrough have technically lost
their amateur status and are no
longer eligible for amateur
athletic scholarships.
Head Coach Ray Graves said
he would find jobs for both
players who were drafted
Tuesday by professional football
teams.
Attorney H. Vincent
Thornton, representing the
sponsors, claimed Tuesday the
NCAA failed to communicate
with them and that the sponsors
resented the implication they
misled the players.
Byers said in Gainesville

topped only by the 24 Hours of
LeMans in France.
It is the eighth year for this
day-night affair that will again
be a battle royal between the
Porshes, Fords and Ferraris over
the high banks, long straights
and curving infield of Daytonas
3.81 mile road course.
Dan Gurney captured the
first Daytona road race in 1962
after it was extended to 24
hours from 3 three hours that
year. He was driving a Lotus 19
at an average speed of 103.664
miles per hour. In 1963, It was
Pedro Rodriquez of Mexico City
in a Ferrari.
Rodriquez teamed up with
Phil Hill in a Ferrari for the
finish line the following year.
Then Fords started to dominate
with Ken Miles and Lloyd Ruby
setting the pace for two
consecutive years, the latter of

Monday the expenses and
awards given all the players were
excessive and that upon
accepting them, each player
became a professional and would
not be allowed the remainder of
his scholarship.
Each player received
matching his and hers wrist
watches, a room, two meals, and
S2O per diem, plus a trip to
Bermuda for himself and a
companion.
Thornton, saying he was
shocked by the NCAA position,
noted it would have been
impossible for a player to stay in
Tampa for $25 at this time of
year.
He said it took months to
find out what the NCAA
considered acceptable for
boys playing in All-Star games
and by the time we found out
they considered our plan
excessive, 90 per cent of the
boys we wound up with in our
game had been invited and it
appeared they were coming.
Only three turned down the
offer after it was explained they
would be branded professionals
by accepting the gratuities, he
said.
The remainder of them
accepted and most went on to
play in the Senior Bowl, where
they received cash for their
efforts, he said.

T7os, could well have the two fastest cars in the
race over the high-banked Daytona International
Speedway where gleaming white Porshes finished
one-two-three last year.
There will also be two other Lola-Chevys among
the pack of more than 50 cars which roar under the
green flag at 3 p.m. EST Saturday. The race ends at
3 p.m. EST Sunday.
I loved it, says Gamer of his movie stint as a
driver. Its in my blood now. Although Gamer
will not drive here, he has lined up a team cf four
top American drivers to compete in an amibtious
28-race schedule during 1969.
With Garner directing from the pits, California
drivers Scooter Patrick, Ed Leslie, Dave Jordan and
Lothar Motschenbacher will handle the track work.

.... r
f
n

which set a race record of
108.02 mph covering 2537
miles.
Ferrari broke up the Ford
playhouse in 1967 when the late
Lorenzo Bandini and Chris
Amon pushed their car into
victory lane. Porshes challenged
last year and swept the top three
places. The big issue again is who

~ :vn-- 1
4
What did you say
your name was?
#\\
There must be a safer way to meet \]
girls. Luckily for you, we put instruc instructions
tions instructions on self-defense in every package
of Hai Karate After Shave and
Cologne. But even so, please be a little
careful how you use it. A good social
life is fine, but the way youre going
youll be too battered to enjoy it. [3!&|
Hai Karate-be careful how you use it.

will dominate racings three
party system.
Infield admission is $10;
grandstands $7; paddock sls.
Best bet for watching the race is
afiywhere in the spacious infield
where spectators can camp
overnight while the race in on.
Best place for pictures and
mingling is the paddock but a

Panhellen ic Council
wants YOU to sign up
for INFORMAL RUSH
Details in Room 315 JWRU
thru Monday Feb. 3

Thursday, January 30,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

limited number of tags (3,000)
at sls a piece are available.
First recognized as a Florida
program that began on the beach
along the Atlantic Ocean,
Daytona Beach Speed Weeks
have grown not only into
national prominence, but have
attracted international
recognition because of the
entrance into the picture of
foreign cars and machines to
compete with Americas best.
The roar of the larger
American motors and the whine
of the smaller, but powerful
European machines at Daytona
International Speedway signal
the start.
Three weeks of grinding,
gruelling competition over the
world famous speedways tow
major courses will bring to an
end the 1969 thrill packed
program.

Page 23



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 30, 1969

Page 24

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