Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker

All-American

Vol. 61, No. 70

DRAFT jgggL
At 10:01 a.m today in New York, 26
professional football teams will begin
selecting from more than 400 top college
football prospects. Speculation is that UFs
All-American fullback Larry Smith will go in
the first round. See story on page 10.
Nude Girl Gets
National 'Eye

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
University Report Editor
Scott DeGarmo says the au
naturel photographs of an
unnamed girl in the Research
Library are being given
nationwide circulation.
The New York Daily News
requested copies of the seven
pictures which appeared in the
University Report last week,
DeGarmo said. The Daily News
is a tabloid with the nations
largest circulation.
One of the pictures was
circulated on the Associated
Press regional wire along with a
story about the publication. The
Miami office of the AP later sent
instructions to its member
papers instructing them not to
use the picture.
A spokesman for AP said the
picture had been sent from

- ifv bmmhHP WmrWm jPPIIII jh
JH I II 1 '.

The
Florida Alligator

Gainesville but that officials
issued the retraction later after
deciding it was objectional and
had no news value.
The story about the
publication was given
nationwide coverage however,
and DeGarmo said he has
received calls from as far away as
San Francisco concerning the
pictures.
The spoof idea didnt come
across as strongly as we had
intended in the Report,
DeGarmo said, but outside
stories featured the spoof idea as
we intended it.
DeGarmo said the story
received front page coverage in
some papers with such headlines
as Theres A Nude Girl in the
Library.
Fired from his job in the
Research Library for allowing
(SEE 'NUDE' PAGE 2)

University of Florida, Gainesville

INVOLVING PILL SERIES
BSP Clears 'Gator
In Ethics Questions

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
The Board of Student
Publications voted
unanimously Monday to
take no action against an
ex-Alligator staff writer for
her series on the policy of
dispensing birth control
pills at the UF infirmary.
The Board concurred with
the findings of a subcommittee
which investigated the
professional ethics involved in
a series written by Sydney
Frasca, and which appeared in
last terms Alligator.
Miss Frasca has since
withdrawn from school.
Miss Frascas stories told how
she had attained birth control
pills at the infirmary. To get the
information, Miss Frasca went to
a doctor and simply asked for
the pills.
After attaining a perscription,
she consulted Dr. Wilmer
Coggins, director of the
Department of Student Health.
The investigation was called
for by Lester Hale, Vice
President for Student Affairs,
who said there was a possibility
that journalistic standards were
not adhered to.
A three man subcommittee,
consisting of board members Bill
Zewadski, a student; Dexter
Deloney, professor of law; and
Norm Going, editorial advisor of
the Alligator and ex-officio
member of the board, was
named and began work in
December.
In their report to the Board
the subcommittee members said
it was their opinion that there
was no attempt to falsely report
the conditions at the infirmary,
and would therefore recommend
no action be taken.
Therefore, we recommend
that no action be taken by the
board against such persons with
reference to the instances, the
report said.
Hale, in calling for the
(SEE 'ALLIGATOR' PAGE 2)

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FREDERICK FLOTT RAY OSBORNE
. . Vietnam specialist . first in SO years
Lt. Gov., Diplomat
End Accent List
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Floridas new lieutenant governor and a senior career
diplomat have been named as the two Final speakers for the
week-long Accent 69 Symposium beginning Feb. 3.
Ray C. Osborne, the ninth lieutenant governor in "state
history and the First in 80 years, will speak at a Feb. 8 dinner
for Accents invited guests at 4:30 p.m. in the University Inn.
Frederick W. Flott, a specialist in Vietnamese affairs who has
just returned from six months temporary duty in Saigon and
Western Europe, will speak at 2 p.m. Feb. 7, at the Plaza of the
Americas.
Sharing the program will be Madalyn Murray, the woman
responsible for the removal of prayer from the public school
system.
Osborne was named by Gov. Claude R. Kirk in early January
to fill the lieutenant governorship provided for in the new state
constitution adopted in November.
The previous constitution, adopted in 1885, had abolished
the post.
Osborne served in the state House of Representatives from
1964-67, leaving his seat to enter the state-wide race for the
Public Service Commission. He polled 48.4 per cent of the 1.6
million votes cast in a losing cause.
Flott, who entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1947, has
served with the U.S. embassies in France, Iran, and Germany
before becoming a special assistant to Vietnam Ambassador
Henry Cabot Lodge in 1963.
He also served as a First secretary in the U.S. embassy in
Saigon from 1965-68.
He is currently on duty with the state Departments Bureau
of East Asian and PaciFic Affairs.

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Tuesday, January 28, 1969

WELL PRESERVED
Jazz is the musical baby of
America, and New Orleans was
its cradle.
The Union Fine Arts
Committee will present the
Preservation Hall Jazz Band
Saturday night ip a "New
Orleans Cabaret" performance.
Featuring a jazz concert with
a dance following in a New
Orleans night club atmosphere.
Preservation Hall will appear in
the Reitz Union Ballroom.
Tickets are available at the
Union Box Office.



5, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 28.1969

Page 2

OConnell: New Universities Robbing UF

By Alligator Sarvicat
UF President Stephen C. OConnell,
in his first press conference of the
winter quarter Monday, said the UF is
sinking into mediocrity as the per
capita expenditure for students goes
down.
The price of everything has gone
up, OConnell said. We have
requested a fifty per cent increase in our
budget, but the money just isnt
increasing fast enough.*
He viewed as a tragedy the day
when the student population of the
university would be limited because of
improper financing.
To prevent us from going deeper
into this hole, there may soon be a time

: -v-rtfr i
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- __ NICK ARROYO
GATOR GIRL

Today's Gator Girl is young freckle-faced Miss
Carol Wright, lUC. Carol belongs to AOPi and is
planning to major in political science. Carol basks in

Nude Captures Attention

the pictures, DeGarmo
previously said he would be
forced to drop out of school
because of lack of funds.
However, DeGarmo said that
since his dismissal from the $250
a month library job he had
received offers of places to live
and other offers of help. He now
says he is going to make every
effort to stay in school and get

SG Senate to Meet
Select 4 Observers
Student Senate will meet tonight at 7:30 to discuss the
authorization of four students to attend the University Senate
meetings.
The representatives selected are vice-president of the student body,
Alligator editor, Student Senate president, the majority or minority
floor leader or their designated representatives.
Another bill to be submitted tonight asks that the Student Body
presidents cabinet be reduced from the allocated 20 cabinet members
to 10 or 12.
A third bill on the agenda asks that student activity fees be
excluded from individual organization publications. These
publications are defined as not being representative of the entire
student body.
Senators will meet in room 349 of the Reitz Union.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

when a limit win be placed on the size
of the student body, OConneU said.
, This Would be a tragedy for the
state, the university and most of aU for
; the students, he said.
OConnell said the UF has suffered at
i the expense of the newer state
institutions.
There is no doubt that the newer
institutions of this state are being
founded at the expense of the older
institutions, the president said.
OConneU denounced the idea that
aU of the state universities, the seven
institutions already in existence and the
two new ones still on the drawing
boards, can be made great overnight.
To get two great universities you
first have to have one. There is no better

his M. A. in history which he
expects to receive in December.
Concerning the finances of
the Report, DeGarmo said,
printing costs and advertising
revenue have just about balanced
out as of this last issue.
However, there have been some
additional costs so we have a
small deficit.
With the request for copies of

the January sun which must seem very different
from the sun that shines back home in Montreal.

the photos from several sources
and the 250 extra copies of last
weeks edition being so much in
demand, DeGarmo said, Were
starting to make some money
from our little photo feature.
We did not originally
conceive of the Report as a
money-making project, but
rather to increase the political
and social consciousness of the
campus.

AFTER THE LIBRARY OR
JUST A STUDY BREAK...
TRY THE RATHSKELLER
LOCAL ENTERTAINMENT
ALL WEEK 1
U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc. I)
&atf)gfceUer r(f

place to start than at UF, he said.
OConneU said UF would be the
cheapest to complete.
The president also announced that he
had recommended a new Dean of
Graduate Studies to replace retiring
Dean L. E. Grinter to the Board of
Regents.
OConnell declined to name his
choice pending the board s approval.
He also renewed his caU for the
elimination of duplication of services
among Floridas universities.
Particularly, OConneU said, we
need to research our graduate programs.
These are the most costly and they
should be offered at one university
where they can receive greater
attention.

Alligator Cleared
On Story Ethics

HOW Hit OWE
unauthorized persons in to take
investigation, said the board may
had wanted to refer the situation
to the Committee on Student
Conduct if there was proof Miss
Frasca had lied to a doctor.
The only thing were
concerned with is whether board
policy has been broken, Board
Chairman Butler said.
Hale said Monday night no
further action would be taken
unless other facts are made
public.
Unless something unforseen
happens, I intend to abide by
this decision, he
said.
Although the investigation
centered around the pill series,
Hale asked the board to look
into the publishing of a story
which was written by two staff
writers who allowed themselves
to be locked in the University
College Library overnight, and a
story coneming the firing of a

String Performance Cancels

A music department departmentsponsored
sponsored departmentsponsored performance by the
faculty string quartet originally

OXlonneU also hinted that planning
for the long-awaited Coliseum might be
underway soon.
It was also announced earlier
Monday that a $200,000 gift to the
university by Mrs. Cordelia May, of
Ligonier, Pa., would be used to establish
a chair of reproductive biology at UF.
Dr. Harry Prystowsky, chairman of
the department of obstetrics and
gynecology, said one of the most
distinguished environmental biologists
in the country had accepted an offer
from UF. He wfll arrive in Gainesville
July 1. He wiU bring with him an entire
team of researchers.
Prystowsky would only say that the
biologist was from the Northeast

student editor at Purdue
University for using a four-letter
word.
The Alligator story used the
word which led to die Purdue
editors firing.
In all three cases the
subcommittee found the
methods to be ethical, as far as
board policy stated it.
Because Deloney said he had
difficulty finding a written set of
journalistic ethics, board
member John Champion asked
that the board try to write one
for use by the Alligator staff.
If we cant find out what
the practical methods are, how
can we expect the staff to know
them?" Deloney adked.
The motion was put off until
a full complement of four
students could be attained.
Two student members of the
board are not enrolled in school
and their replacements have not
yet been named.

scheduled for tonight has been
cancelled.



Promise Could Prevent Parkina Fee

By DON YOKEL
Assistant Assignments Editor
Promising the administration you
will not drive a vehicle on campus, could
save you the cost of a parking fee.
Parking and Transportation
Committee Chairman Arnold F. Butt
Monday tabled the promise not to drive
on campus motion until Fridays
meeting*
If the motion is passed by committee
and UF President Stephen C. OConnell,

Transportation Committee
Asks Car-Ban Be Lifted

The UF Transportation and
Parking Committee on Monday
passed a resolution to drop the
Alachua County driving
restriction.
The rule which appears in the
Rules and Regulations
Governing Traffic, Parking, and
Registration at UF, restricts
students with ratings of 1 and
2UC from owning or operating
an automobile in Alachua
County.

'Biggest Drug Raid 1
Ends In Sentencing

A former UF student was
sentenced on charges of illegal
drug possession, and two others
pleaded not guilty to similar
charges, in circuit court
Thursday.
Robert M. Fine, 22, arrested
in a raid last June which netted
over $25,000 worth of marijuana,
was given a sentence of six
months to two years in prison.
He was arrested June 7 in an
Alachua County Sheriffs raid on
a Gainesville rooming house. The
80-pound marijuana find was the
largest drug confiscation in
Gainesvilles history.
Fine will be eligible for parole
in six months, according to
AFT Praises
SG Censure
Os Faculty
The UF chapter of the
American Federation of
Teachers (AFT) has applauded
the Student Senate for its action
at the Jan. 21 Senate meeting,
when it condemned the bad
faith shown toward students by
the Faculty Senate.
According to Robert
Sherman, president of the AFT,
there is no such body as the
Faculty Senate. There is a
University Senate representing
neither the interests of the
students nor those of the
faculty, Sherman said.
At the general membership
meeting Feb. 5, the AFT will
discuss ways to create a faculty
senate that is not dominated by
administrators and non-teaching
professors.
Miller-Brown 1
I I
j I
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL
376-4552 AUTHORIZED I
I DEALER I

it could mean an individual savings
ranging from $5 to $27 for staff,
students and faculty.
This proposal is designed to take into
consideration those who ride to work
with fellow students or employees,
according to Gary Goodrich, Student
Body vice president.
>0
Estimated loss of revenue for a
promise not to drive on campus plan
was set at approximately $5,000 by
Tom Wells, UF business manager.

A motion to discontinue the
policy was made by Joseph
Little, assistant UF law professor
and committee member.
Notification of the City of
Gainesville of change in UF
policy, with final approval
needed by UF President Stephen
C. OConnell, was included in
the motion.
If President OConnell acts on
this committee recommendation

Circuit Court Judge George
Patten, who handed down the
sentence.
The other case involved a UF
student and his companion who
were arrested in December on
charges of possessing marijuana.

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CHILD'S PLATE
10 Years and under m* mm
Includes Beef Patties, W
Choice of Potatoes or Rice, B
and Choice of One Vegetable. fll
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H University Ave. 9B
Downtown
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it will be legal for students to
own and operate vehicles outside
the boundary of the campus.
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich introduced the
rule change for committee
discussion.
Goodrich said that he would
tell incoming students that the
regulation prohibiting driving by
1 and 2UC students in Alachua
County is not enforced and
cannot be enforced.
I itMffim I
Sedans, Wagons, Sports |
Cars, Trucks, 4-whtol
I drive. U
| No. lin Japan |j
Godding fir Clark
| Motors f f
f 1012 SOUTH Main St.
Opan 8 AM. 8 PM.

It doesnt matter if we dont decal
those who promise never to come on
campus, said A.I. Shuler, chief of
campus police.
Butt said that registering cars not
coming on campus would give the
outside community knowledge of the
number of UF related vehicles.
Wells said there is $3,000 worth of
decals that are waiting to be printed
plus a contract for busses that is
pending.
The committee moved to hold a

Do Something Different This Summer
If you are between the ages 1830
In good health
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Looking for a challenge
ISRAEL NEEDS YOU!
See Dr. DON A. HALPERIN in
Room 121 C Arch. Bldg. 376-5942
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Be Sure To Be On Hand
At Our Friday Night g
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Treats and Goodies!!
* EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT 6 p.m till 9 p.m. 7

Tuaaday, January 28, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

meeting Friday at 3:30 pm to speed up
the decision making needed before the
new parking program goes into effect.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell
formed the committee last year to help
in processing suggestions from
interested individuals and groups on
campus and help form rules concerning
the proposed parking plan.
Bussing student to the center of
campus from outlying parking lots is
one of the features of the parking
proposal.

Page 3



I* Hm Florida Alligator,Tuasday, January 28,1969

Page 4

Deadline Drawing Near
For Fall Term Freshmen

Mrcfa 1 is the application
deadline for students wishing to
enter UF as beginning freshmen
in Sept., 1969.
The freshman class is limited
by Board of Regents policy to
2,800. Richard H. Whitehead,
director of admissions and
registrar, says the March 1
deadline allows the university to
admit a balanced class from
all areas of the state.
He emphasizes the
importance of meeting the
admission deadline for all
students who wish to attend the
university as beginning
freshmen.
Our experience has shown
that anyone who meets the
admission requirements and has
his application in on time has
been assured a place in the class,
Draft Info Now
Offered By SG
A Draft Information Library,
with books and pamphlets on
every phase of the selective
service system, has been opened
in the newspaper room on the
first floor of the College Library.
Completion of the Draft
Information Library fulfills the
first part of a project of the
Selective Service Bureau.
Other phases of the program
now being set up include the
formation of legal counsel of law
students who have researched
the field of draft appeals or who
have had experience in the field
of draft appeals.
Also, a pamphlet on how to
get a 2-S or student deferment
and keep it will be published in
the near future. The pamphlet
will also include appeal
suggestions.
The final part of the program
will be a continuing series of
speakers on the pros and cons
the draft.
The formation of the
Selective Service Information
Bureau was a promise of Student
Body President Clyde Taylor in
his campaign for the top spot in
student government last winter.
The committee functions
through the auspices of Student
Government.

PHILIPPE THYRAUD Di YOSJOLI
CHIEF OF FRENCH INTELLIGENCE IN US.
FROM 1951 TO 1963
THE
FRENCH
SPY SCANDAL
THURSDAY, JAN. 30 8 pm
UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
i' ;
TICKETS AT REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE OR AT THE DOOR
STUDENTS: 75< PUBLIC: $1.25

even under the selective
admissions policy,* he said.
Whitehead notes that
applications to date are
approximately the same in
number as those received by this
time last year. We must give
priority to those eligible
applicants meeting the
deadline.
High school students may
obtain application forms from
their guidance office or by
Magic to Spike
Credit Meeting
Door prizes, souvenirs and
magic will spike the annual
meeting of the Campus Federal
Credit Union at 8 pm
Wednesday.
Trearurer Mrs. Louise Hinton
will make her annual report in
the Medical Sciences Building
Auditorium at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center.
Entertainment manipula manipulative
tive manipulative magic will be by Dr.
Augusto F Ortiz, University
research associate in
mathematics.
UNC Magazine
Hosting Contest
Coraddi, the literary
magazine at the University of
North Carolina at Greensboro, is
offering $25 awards for the best
poem, prose and art submitted
by students.
UF students are invited to
participate.
The Coraddi staff will
select the works for publication.
Gibbons Ruark, poet and
professor at the University of
Delaware, and Jonathan
Baumbach, novelist and
professor at Brooklyn College
choose the final literary winners
from the published manuscripts.
A representative from the
University of North Carolina art
department will pick the art
winner.
Manuscripts and art work
should be sent to Coraddi, 205
Elliott Hall, The University of
North Carolina, Greensboro,
North Carolina 27412. Entries
should be received no later than
Feb.s.

writing the admission office* at
the university.
In its role as the land-grant
institution of the state, it is
important that the University of
Florida admit a well-balanced
class from aU geographic areas of
Florida, Whitehead said.
The balance is based or.
s jch factors as the ratio of men
to women, geographic
distribution, varied interests and
abilities, he said.

TooTTSrvictTtorSs
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CRANE IMPORTS
iAblvf M
Sq in
BALES-SERVICE BALES-SERVICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS BALES-SERVICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
_go6E.Pnlv.Ava. 372-4872

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Group Budget
Requests Due
Budget requests of student
organizations for the 1969-70
fiscal year are due no later than
Feb. 15.
All requests should be
submitted to the office of the
Student Body Treasurer in the
Student Government offices on
the third floor of the Reitz
Union.

Infant Samson To Flex
800 Strong Arms Soon

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Still in its infancy, Project
Samson is hoping to undertake
some ambitious projects that
will require the strength of the
Samson of Biblical times.
Approximately 400 UF
students have volunteered to
work this quarter to supply that
manpower.
Samson, short for
Socio-Economic Opportunities
Network, was begun last April
by Student Government. During
the summit volunteer workers
conducted a day camp at Camp
Wauberg. With the coming of the
fall quartet, Project Samson
embarked on a full-scale tutoring
program.
Currently under
consideration are a variety of
new projects. A friendship
program between UF males and
area teen-age boys will be
coordinated with the Alachua
County Sheriffs Department. It
will be operated in much the
same way as Big Brothers, Inc.
John O'Shea, Samson
executive chairman, said the
purpose of the program is to
develop close interpersonal
relationships between interested
university students and
community young people.
Also being discussed is a
student variety show an

Lindsey
PEWTER MUGS
with a Free Interlocking Monogram!
see-through glass bottofti... r\
a beautiful gift! tj)h/ '0
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rfMMto *** --
. TL<
Vv :; :. B v- jHfti
jlSI
a Mb fj|^JS^wM^Rn?
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Gainesville Shopping Center 1302 N. Main

DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST

C I EACH MOVEMENT IN I ( T-T-IYPO6RAPHICAL \
i \ -J THE HULA CAM BE V Kl S&i j V_, ERROR? r~ J
L/AVf reap as a MfoRP

organization of talented UF
students who would perform for
school children at community
centers and elementary schools.
A special film series is being
planned which would bring
youngsters films by request be
it Florida A and M football
highlights or wildlife specials.
Health instruction will also be
considered for the community
centers. Homework centers may
be set up for after-school hours
to provide children with a quiet,
supervised place to study.
These new projects are still in
the planning stage, O'Shea said.
Research is being done to see if
they are feasible and if there is a
need for the program in the
community.
One of the basic philosophies
of Samson, according to Bert
Simon, program director, is that
no program should be initiated
unless it is both heeded and
requested by the community.
Vista (Volunteers In Service
To America) workers are
assisting Samson in recognizing
community needs. Wednesday
night 275 new volunteers met
with Vista agents to discuss
problems encountered in
working with underprivileged
children.
There are two Vista workers
stationed on campus, working
regularly with Samson. Their

work includes introducing
prospective tutors to their
students and families.
Tutoring volunteers give
about one hour once or twice
weekly to tutor in a childs
home.
Besides tutors, administrative
personnel are also needed to do
the groundwork for the
proposed programs. Applications
are available in the Samson
office on the third floor of the
Reitz Union.

tables from the KINGS tables...
. * *. # .
. ft**
. *...* .. \>
*. '** I 3
.*. ;*.*.* -/ J /;..
W*. *\vv-l 9 //
y .
The c oy'and the Gilberts*
A boy once reached into a pitcherfui of filberts and
clutched a fistful. But then he found he could not
remove his fist from the slender neck of the vessel.
Whereupon a wise fellow standing nearby gave him
this reasonable advice: Grasp only half the quantity,
my boy, and you will easily succeed."
KING'S Moral: Too much is more than enough. We
discourage the practice of tipping at KINGS Food
Host, because we do not want our employees to have
to depend on the irregular tip as a wage, nor do we
want them to compete with each other for the tip to
the extent that they appear greedy. Neither do we
want our customers to be subjected to the higher bill
and biased service that tipping can cause. Thank you
for your cooperation.
*condensed from Aesop's Fables
\wQs[
fejp[ ; KINGS Food Host U.S.A.
F 1802 W. Univ. 1430 S. W. 13th St.

I ROBBIES I
Best In
Meals. QWSendwichet
rCOLOR TV & BILLIARDS]
11718 W. University Ave.l
I *On The Gold Coast I

Tuesday, January 28, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 28, 1969

EDITORIALS

Did Nude Cause Firing?

The firing of University Report Editor
Scott DeGarmo from his job as a graduate
assistant in the research library raises some
interesting questions.
DeGarmos former supervisor, Dr. John
Veenstra, says DeGarmo was fired for
violating a trust by letting people in an
unauthorized area after it was closed.
If that was really the reason, has any
other employee allowed unauthorized
people in the restricted area after closing?
Has such information come .to the
attention of supervisors? If so, has any other
employee been fired from his job as a result?
Or was DeGarmo fired because be
allowed photographs of a nude girl to be
taken in the area and subsequently published
the pictures in his off-campus newspaper?
Were his supervisors offended or
embarrassed by the pictures and by the fact
that they were taken in the library?
Did they use violation of a trust merely

Hospital Needs Booster Shot

Quality medicine costs money, as does
quality education.
Medicine at the Shands Teaching Hospital
costs even more because the hospital exists
to instruct medical students, not to make a
profit. The majority of their operating funds
must come from budget requests and not
patient income.
This financial problem is further
compounded because of a lack of general
revenue support and the diversion of patient
income to other uses within the university
system.
The Board of Regents has requested
additional funds totaling $784,714 a
reduction of the $901,000 request made in
December from the state budget
commission. But as of Friday the
commission is still analyzing the request,

By MIKE HITTLEMAN
Second of Two Parts
In January a national meeting of
SDS voted to boycott the
inauguration demonstrations. Yet
hundreds of members of Ohio and
Michigan SDS came to Washington
last weekend and were among the
most vocal and militant of the
demonstrators.
This instance of individual action
and lack of a powerful national
organization seemed to me to
symbolize the deep divisions within
the New Left.
When I read of Mr. Hoover talking
of a nation-wide conspiracy to
disrupt colleges and start a
revolution, I can only agree with him
a little. It does seem true that most
groups are so upset with the system
that they want to end it, and put a
new system in its place.
But their tactics and actions differ
radically from organization to
organization and even within
chapters of the same organization.
The only real way to judge any
individual chapter of SSOC for
instance, is by what it has done in
the past, what it says it will do in the
future, and who are its present
members. Just because SSOC
headquarters says something or a
SSOC chapter at another campus
does some action, they can have no
relevance to our UF-SSOC.
But most groups are similar in the

SSOC'S People Non-Violent

as an official excuse to cover up the real
reason that DeGarmo was fired?
Is there any substance to DeGarmos
charges that he was canned because the
Report criticized too many administrators
too many times?
Did certain administrators take advantage
of this opportunity to try and muzzle the
Report?
Is publishing nudes not on the list of
officially approved student activities?
If DeGarmo had let a student into the
area to complete last minute work on a term
paper, would he have been fired? Would he
have been reprimanded? Would anything at
all have been said to him?
The questions deserve evaluation and
honest answering.
We doubt, however, that any
administrators, including Mr. Veenstra, will
have the courage to answer them in the
pages of this newspaper, under the careful
scrutiny of the public eye.

according to commission Executive Director
Wallace Henderson.
The budget crisis which almost closed the
hospital from last March to May has been
predicted to recur this year possibly as early
as February. But the budget commission
doesnt appear to know this, and is
proceeding without any apparent speed.
A report by a special legislative
committee last fall found the hospital in a
critical state, but Henderson has said he
has not studied the report yet.
We urge Henderson to read this report,
and quickly. The Shands Teaching Hospital
is sick and the situation doesnt need
analyzing to realize that.
But there is a cure money. And its up
to the budget commission to write the
prescription for it.

characteristics of their members.
Most have long hair, are young,
students, and have their own jargon,
including little restraint on the use of
profanity.
But there are some
misconceptions about them. Most do
take baths, are not amoral, and are
not Communists or mere
troublemakers. They seemed to
believe in making the world better
for the majority of the people by
revolutionary action, stopping the
system, getting the politicians and
rich capitalists out, and then having
some sort of wealth sharing system.
The rhetoric of the workers and
students joining to overthrow the
capitalists, imperialists, oppressors
sounds a lot like the Communist line.
But most of these people really
seemed to be closer to socialism in
their desire to spread out the wealth
and give the people power, after
smashing the present structure of the
state.
Even though they use familiar
Communist slogans and phrases,
much of this seems to be empty
words used to fire up the group.
From all I saw I believe that you can
be misled by just a quick listen to
their talk. When you sit in it awhile
and think about it, I really felt that
these people were not Communists
or Communist-inspired. But that is
only my opinion, Im sure Mr.
Hoover would heartily disagree.
When I heard talk of the coming
revolution, I really didnt know what

Like It Is

to think. I had visions of gun battles,
bombs, and mass destruction. But
after talking to many people, it
turned out that their revolution was
to be different than my first
impressions.
SSOC wants to educate and
organize the workers, students, poor
and alienated so that they can join
together to change the system. They
propose to do this by politicizing
people, making them aware of how
rotten things are, and how badly
radical change is needed.
Then a revolution can occur
without bloodshed. Strikes, massive
demonstrations, and voting in radical
political candidates and voting out
the system can occur when a
majority of the people have joined
the movement. SSOC feels confident
that once they have had enoughtime
to talk to and organize the people
that it will be easy to show that our
system is at fault for our problems,
and a new system of politics and
business is needed.
But the problem now is getting
the manpower necessary to sacrifice
time and energy to begin the
organizing of the people. The feeling
I got was that they definitely did not
have enough power or people, and
that the movement will probably
even lose people after their prime
issue, Vietnam, has ended.
The purposes of the Washington
demonstrations were stated as
showing Nixon that peace must come
soon, the United States must stop its

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
the exercise of responsibility."
yR3By Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
P U/kliuto Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
All
j' Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor
1 lys vl \, y K'*
7 Siry Crucify Bucher //e's Ruining Our Image

aggressive actions against Vietnam,
that there must not be turns toward
a police state to enforce law and
order, and that the black man must
be freed. It also was used to further
radicalize the demonstrators, give
them a feeling of unity, and affect
public opinion.
But it also showed that there are
deep divisions within the movement.
It might have been the last massive
demonstration, because for the
amount of time and money invested
in them they are not worth it
anymore. From now on the job of
organizing in the local communities
is the prime objective.
I hope that the UF-SSOC will be
allowed to be a recognized campus
organization. Our people are very
non-violent and are considered
moderate-radicals by many of the
other New Left groups. In their
desire to change the system through
legitimate means they have as much
right to this campus as the Young
Americans for Freedom or the
Young Republicans.
We should give them a chance,
because as a group of strongly
individualistic people you can be sure
that they will not be entirely similar
to groups on other campuses.
We can only judge them on what
they alone have done and will do in
the future. To say that we shouldnt
allow them here because of what
happened at Columbia or elsewhere
is just an incorrect and foolish
argument.



OPEN FORUM:
* AAtlWi OMjI UIAAMt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

3Sm
hsmsii
: yw Ctw jr'j-'f
1J
>

Alberts Placidness
Is Mere Intelligence

MR. EDITOR:
Concerning Miss Balkany and
her predilection for painting
poor Albert the innumerable,
and the thwarting of the
establishment. First I should like
to point out that this noble
creature, precursor of the
Hairless Ape, does not wallow
imperviously but rather
intelligently fully realizing that
beneath the placid water of his
pond he can escape the >
inhospitable elements and those
of your staff writers ilk that
persist in painting, poking and
popping firecrackers on the tip
of his nose (as evidenced by the
recent scar tissue in that
anatomical region and the
firework wrapping debris about
the cage).
Perhaps Albert being a
symbol of the University does,
at times, appear to be
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

surrounded by ineffective and
unconcerned apparatus but then
again, military initiates and cage
not withstanding, would Miss
Balk any really attempt to
oppose this formidable
adversary, who rarely gulps
marshmallows, even in the name
of peace and love ... ?
GUSTAVO VILLARROEL, 4JM
Burn Yourself,
Not Our Flag
MR. EDITOR:
On the eve of John Claxtons
trial it seems that a little
reflection is in order.
It is indeed ironic, and I
might add tragic, that while he
allegedly burns the American
flag in the name of freedom
and justice, students behind the
Iron Curtain are burning
themselves, and perhaps in vain,
to achieve the very freedom and
justice which he holds in
contempt.
In closing, I would like to
leave Mr. Claxton this additional
thought; perhaps John, you
didnt go quite far enough in
your objection.
RICHARD FOSTER, 4AS

Rathskeller Not Open
To All Os Faculty
MR. EDITOR:
Much has been written about the Rathskeller as a setting in which
the communication gap between administration, faculty, and
students may be broken down.
When I went to join the other day, I found to my chagrin that I
was barred from membership.
This was nothing personal; my ineligibility is shared with a large
percentage of the total faculty. The sponsoring Faculty Club, in
whose name the beer license was obtained, permits only those
professors who are its initiated, dues-paying, card-carrying members to
join the Rathskeller.
So be it; my purpose here is not to raise the issue as to whether or
not faculty members ought to join the Faculty Club. Publicity
concerning the Rathskeller, however, should make it clear that it is a
haven for students and for members of the Faculty Club, not for
faculty members.
OUTSIDER

Fluted Columns*

Administrative Paranoia

The Lavon Gentry Caper is just one more
symptom added to a long list. A diagnosis now
can be ventured.
This school is suffering from chronic
administrative paranoia. Note the circumstances:
middle aged, rather well educated,
socioeconomically prominent, at times
withdrawn and sullen (frat brawls in the street),
at times striking out with intense ferocity at
imaginary opponents (young Gentry).
One of the most telling signs was displayed
recently. Vice-President of Student Affairs Lester
Hale requested an investigation of the Alligators
journalistic ethics in the birth control series. A
clear example of defensive projection, seeing the
same faults in others in order to cover your own.
Ethics. A strange sort of word for the patient
to use in view of his recent past history. Little
wonder the patient hasnt bothered to expound
on administrative ethics.
Where was ethics for all the many years
when students and their instructors were calling
for the abolishment of compulsory ROTC and all
of its accompanying refinements, such as dress
requirements and drill sessions?
Where was ethics two years ago during the
Pamme Brewer farce when this institution was
made a laughing stock in learning centers and
intellectual circles throughout the country for its
relentless attempts to reinstill the morals of a
bygone era? Did the administration take the
stand in that student conduct court and testify
for an American citizen who was merely
exercising her rights? Did it even hint that some
error might have been made, some
miscalculation, accepted hastily?
Where was ethics last year when Marshall
Jones was denied tenure for his political views?
Did anyone really believe the him-hawing and
smoke-screening of the issues? Is there anything
ethical in having a college professor watched
and reported on as he goes about his business?
Can the administration deny this, after the entire
file on Marshall Jones activities was read into the
record of his trial? Did the administration
recognize the whole affair for the witch-hunt
that it was, could they hear the amused whispers
from more enlightened circles, Well, I see those
Florida red necks are at it again.
Where was ethics last year when the Dow
protestors were arrested and subjected to double
jeopardy in the form of both civil and university
trial? Was it the administration who spoke up in
their behalf along with student government

SSOC Speakers
To Charge Fees

MR. EDITOR:
Due to heavy pressure put
upon various radicals at the

Tuesday, January 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

leaders, journalists, and concerned students? UF
President Stephen C. O'Connell, a man of long
legal service, watched idly while another crime
against student rights was perpetrated.
Finally, where was ethics when Lavon Gentry
stumbled into the path of our unpredictable and
sometimes dangerous -patient? There he was,
unwashed, bearded, hoping to change the world
with a poster and a demonstration. Was he
hauled before a student conduct court as was
Pamme Brewer? Was he simply Maced and let
loose like those overenergetic frat boys? Or was
he subjected to both civil and academic trial? No,
this time the erratic administration chose to let
the civil authorities alone do its dirty work.
Perhaps Lavon should be happy that at least he
wasnt subjected to double jeopardy like the
Dow protestors.
The patient claims good motive; to make UF a
first-class university. It probable believes it is
acting in accordance with that motive. But a
paralyzing fear of new ideas and change is hardly
conducive to that end.
It was fear of an idea that led to the
persecution and banishment of Marshall Jones.
The concept that an idea, any idea, is inherently
dangerous tossed out of decent academic
circles years ago.
It was fear of moral decay that led to the
crucifixion of Pamme Brewer to set an example
for others who might venture down the path of
sin. It is the same fear that upheld Victorian
standards in UFs dormitories for so many years.
It was fear of campus rebellion that led to the
double jeopardy attempt to nail the Dow
protestors. Fear that one system of punishment
might not be enough in some situations, that
perhaps it should be ladled out with both hands.
It was fear of the label radical that led to
the Lavon Gentry Fiasco. Fear that perhaps a
young man with a beard and a poster might
somehow change this blissful world that led to
his clumsy, whimsical, and eventually
embarrassing prosecution.
The administration claims good motive. But a
First class university is not merely a matter of
money and new glass and stone buildings. It is a
matter of ideas.
UF may become a great university if it will
stop striking out randomly, inconsistently, and
with apparent vindictiveness at those people who
have the unmitigated gall to think that they may
claim a simply right.
The right to think.

University of Florida to speak at
various classes, meetings and
other gatherings, it has become
necessary for SSOC to initiate a
new program to furnish
speakers.
A speaker will be furnished to
any class, organization or
meeting upon three days notice
delivered by mail (Box 13636
University Station) or by phone
376-5044. The charge will be
$5.00 to any non-radical group.
A radical speaker will be
furnished on less than three days
notice for an additional $2.50
service charge.
Black radicals, at a premium
becuase of political suppression,
cost SIO.OO. To speak to a group
of over 100 people, there is an
additional charge of $.25 per
person. All proceeds go to a
non-profit, educational
organization, namely, SSOC.
JOHN F. SUGG, 4JM
SECRETARY, SSOC
P.S. This must be the only
country in the world where you
have to be a capitalist to be a
radical.

-By John Parker

Page 7



Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 28, 1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices Campus Calendar

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMS: Friday, Jan. 31, is the
deadline for receipt in the office
of Foreign Languages of the
application for all foreign
language functional exams to be
given Saturday, Feb. 8,1969.
VISTA: Representatives will
be on the campus Feb. 3-7 to
interview persons interested in
their programs. Representatives
will be available in booths
located at the Reitz Union,
Information Booth across from
the Hub and at the Law Center
between 9 a.m. and sp.m.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
DEADLINE: Feb. 7 is the
deadline for applying for
Graduate School for the 1969
Spring Quarter.
NOTICE
Student Government Production
Subscription holders who are
unable to attend the new
February 9th date for the
MAN OF LA MANCHA may
receive a refund.
PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
JAN. 2 8: FM C
CORP. usually interviews
technical majors.
JAN. 28-29: TRANE
CO.All engi. degrees.
HUMBLE OIL CO.All engi.
degrees.
JAN. 28-29-30:
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
MACHINES (IBM) usually
interviews for all majors.
JAN. 29: WEST VIRGINIA
PULP & PAPER CO.usually
interviews both tech, & non-tech
majors.

Y UR NEXT CAR T.OATSJ ggJl|Lir, i'll'lk-jM
computed aach month on tho unpaid halanti and
,SjFs |
GAIM ESv m LE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNIOM I
Ljjh Avenue g, the com.r of 12th Street Hours:B:oo o .n,. 3:30p m^^v \Luak O% I
' 1

JAN. 29-30-31
RADIATION, INC. All engi.
degrees, acctg., bus. ad.
JAN. 30: PURE OIL
DIVISION-UNION OIL CO. OF
CALIFORNIAAII business,
lib. arts, chem, ChE. BABCOCK
AND WILCOX CO.ME, ChE,
MetE, NE, CE, OR, Physics, IE,
EE. HONEYWELL, INC.EE,
ME.
JAN. 30-31: MCDONELL
DOUGLAS CORP.AE, EE,
ME, Eng. Sci, Eng. Mech, CE,
MetF. AETNA LIFE 8<
CASUALTY CO.All majors.
ORANGE & BLUE
PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb 4,7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with:
(A) report to Floyd 104 or 106;
(B) to Little 101 or 109; (C) to
Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121 or 125; (F) to Little 201,
203, 205 or 207; (G) to Little
213,215,217,219, (H) to Little
221, 223, 225, 227, 233, 235 or
239; (l-L) to Matherly 2, 3,4, 5.
6,7, 8,9, 10. 11, 12, 13, 14 or
16; (M) to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 111, 113, 115, 116, 117,
118 or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110, 112 or 115, (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to Flint
101, 102, 110 or 112; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
(W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 113 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb. 4,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Peabody 1,
2,4, 7, 10, 11; (M-Z) report to
Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208, or
209.

BLUB BULLETIN

MS 102 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 5,7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
MS 204 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Feb. 5,7 p.m. in
LIT 101, 109, 113, 121 and
125.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 6,7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
MS 301 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb. 6,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to LIT 101,
109, 113, 121 or 125; (M-Z)
report LIT 201, 203, 205, 213,
215.217 or 219.
MS 302 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Feb 6,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-M) report to MAT 2,3,
4,5, 6,7, 8. 9, 10, 11. 12, 13,
14 or 16; (N-Z) report to MAT
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119.
UNION BOX OFFICE
ACCENT '69, $3.00 General
Public, Includes all Events;
Faculty, Staff & Students,
Free. NEW FOLK $1.00;
Everyone. MAN OF LA
MANCHA Faculty, Staff &
General Public, $3.00, $2.25,
$1.50/U. of Fla. Students,
$2.50, $1.75, & SI.OO.
PHILIPPI DE VOSJALI U.
of Fla. Students, $.75;
Faculty, Staff & General
Public, $1.25. UNIVERSITY
FILM SERIES (10 films).
General Public, Faculty, 8t
Staff, $5.00, U. of Fla.
Students, $2.50, U. of Fla.
Students, 5 films, $1.50.
AUDUBON FILM SERIES
General Public, Faculty 8t
Staff, $1.25; U. of Fla.
Student, $.75, Children, $.50.
PRESERVATION HALL
U. of Fla. Student, $1.00;
Faculty & Staff, $1.50;
. General Public, $2.00.
GRAHAM AREA PLAYBOY
CLUB 55.00 per couple.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Tuesday, January 28
Student Government Book
Exchange, 206 Union, 3:00
p.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet supper.
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, Water colors,
C-4, Union, 7:30 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
MENSA Lecture, Speakers: Drs.
Sidney Jourard & Clifford H.
Swinson, "The Group
Phenomenon", 105 B, Fine
Arts Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept., Florida String
Quartet, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, January 29
Student Government Book
Exchange, 206 Union, 3:00
p.m.
AIESEC Meeting, 150 B Union,
4:30 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 245 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Stereophiles Meeting, 403
College Library, 7:30 p.m.
Circle K Meeting 362 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Florida Campus Federal Credit
Union, Annual Meeting of the
Membership, MSB Aud., 8:00
p.m.

Thursday, January 30
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Poetry Reading 8t Discussion,
Prof. Ed Ochester, "Three
Contemporary Poets", 121
Union, 4:40 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Christian Science Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Association Meeting, 347
Union, 7:30 p.m.
General Dames Bridge, 150 C
Union, 8:00 p.m.
V
Panhellenic Bridal Fashion
Show, Union Ballroom, 8:00
p.m.
Charms Classes, 118 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Forums: M. PHILIPPI T. DE
VOSJALI, University Aud.,
8:00 p.m.
Gainesville Little Theatre, "The
Subject was Roses", 8:30
p.m.
Friday, January 31
Student Government Book
Exchange, 206 Union, 3:00
p.m.
Dept of Engineering Science &
Mechanics, Speaker: Dr.
Bernard D. Coleman, 109
Little Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Movie, "Zorba the Greek",
Union Aud., 6:00, 8:30 &
11:00 p.m.
Chess Club, 418 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Arnold Air Society Dining-In,
Union Ballroom, Speaker:
Milt Caniff, creator of "Steve
Canyon", 7 pm.
Florida Players, "Telemachus
Clay", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Gainesville Little Theatre, "The
Subject was Roses", 8:30
p.m.



ator classifieds

FOR SALE |
Honda 450 Custom, must see to
appreciate. Call 378-5761.
(A-10t-70-p)
Electric bass guitar, 2 electric rhythm
guitars, 1 Yamaha amp, 1 harmony
amp. Brand new, best offer,
378-6562. Tues. & Thurs. after 5:30.
(A-st-67-p)
Hammarlund Hq-170, Dx-60 and
Vfo. Complete ham station, $220,
372-8129 after six. (A-3t-68-p)
Arrendonda Estates 69 Archer 2
bedroom 12 ft. x 60 ft. SSOO cash,
$86.33 month, local bank financing,
Lot $25 mo. 372-5604, 5 to 7 pm.
(A-st-68-p)
SPECIAL THIS WEEK: Aluminum
secretarial chair like new. Cost new
$47.50, NOW SIO.OO. JR Office
Furniture Co. 620V2 S. Main St.
(A-st-69-p)
Unitron refracting telescope with
finder scope, five eyepieces in
rotating base, slow motion controls,
two wooden cases for telescope and
tripod. $99.95. Call 372-5595.
(A-lt-68-p)
1967 Red Manx body on VW chassis,
SIOOO, hi standard supermatic
citation 22 cal target pistol S7O, mi
carbine SSO, TV S2O. 372-6722.

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 bqxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pjtt. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
<*> IO n
ll l| | rn £
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FOR SALE
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-66-p)
Hollywood bed twin size, mattress
& box springs, SSO; tv console RCA,
$35; Heath FM tuner S2O; Phone
376-7175 after 6 p.m. (A-st-70-p)
61 10 x 50 2 bedroom ft. kftch.
mobile home. Very nice, must sell.
$2300. After 5:30 372-5742.
Arredonda Estates. (A-3t-70-p)
Smith-Corona portable manual
typewriter, pica type, good
condition, best offer. Call 378-7571
after 1 pm. (A-3t-70-p)
FOR SALE: 17 ft. Cobia fully
equipped w/75 Evinrude, electric
starter, used 150 hours. Murray
trailer. SISOO. Call 372-5505 after 5.
(A-st-70-p)
Suddenly available, single bedroom
near campus, AC, Danish modern
sum. $lO3 per month, sub-let. 1624
NW 4th Ave. Apt. 111. 372-1714.
(B-st-67-p)
Must sublet 2 bedroom poolside
French Quarter apt. Call 378-8564.
(B-st-69-p)

Monday, January 27, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

FOR SALE I
?
Honda Sport 50. S9O firm. Call David
392-8280 after 5 p.m. (A-st-66-p)
fj TOR
Fum. 2 bedroom apt. SW 16 Ave.
$l2O mo. for 2. Feb. 1, occ.
370-3552, 378-2957.(8-3t-69-p)
Immediate sublet furnished eff. apt.
AC, gas, heat, $75. Convenient to
shops, school. Lease till June,
376-9936. (B-st-68-p)
1 bedroom furnished apt. w/w carpet
panelled central air/heat laundry, big
closets, convenient. Sublet sllO.
Feb. 1. Call evenings, 372-3771.
(B-3t-65-p)
Furn. 2 bedrm. apt. SW 16 Ave. $l2O
mo., for 2. Feb. 1, occ. 378-2957,
376-3552. (B-3t-69-p)
Sublet modern furn. eff. 2 blocks
from campus. AC, pool, utilities paid
except electric. Contact Paul
Westbury at University Apts, or call
376-8990. (B-4t-67-p)
IX XWQWB9B'iffIMBOCO< l oo'o6&O'iiyS3!iPflt6
WANTED
XttOTWQ 1111988 S BT9MM 8 XWffIWMaBB
One coed to share 2 bdrm. apt. with
3 other girls FQ apt. 72. Call anytime
after 2 pm, 378-9934. (C-st-70-p)
Housewife will iron in your home or
mine, free repairs, call before ten
p.m. 372-5269. (C-4t-60-p)
Roommates to share 2 br. house, 1
blks from campus, cheap for 1,
cheaper for 2. Call Van or Neil,
3 76-2729 eves, 392-1886 days.
(C-st-66-p)
Roommate male 2 blocks from
campus, AC, TV, stereo, 41.00 per
month as soon as possible. Call
378-9721 after 7 p.m. or come to
1105 NW 4th Ave. (C-st-68-p)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt.. Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-st-67-p)
Male roommate Landmark, poolside
apt. $45 mo. plus utilities after 7 call
378-3939 or apt. 112. (C-st-66-p)
gWWX^X.X.X.raSSSWIWCBBWB.B. VWWWI >
HELP WANTED j
IfamN.wmwiWs 11 ;
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Phone 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
J ..
WANT
Z-l-P-P-Y
RESULTS?
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Page 9

| HELP WANTED 8
Need office equipment Salesman In
Gainesville. | <~all 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-C).
Part time or full time positions open
for airline trained personnel.
Passenger sales, Salary open, Write
P.O. Box 2236 Univ. Station.
(E-st-67-p)
DELIVERY BOYS 11 am to 2 pm,
transportation provided, apply in
person LARRY'S PORE-BOY 1029
W. Univ. Ave. (E-st-66-p)
| AUTOS ;
:isss-:-x-x-x-x-xw-:%x-xx%--:->': :
Have 2 surplus cars, 1962 Plymouth
V/8 5325. 1964 Cadillac 51750.
Cali 372-9607 or 372-3251.
(G-ts-60-c)
Saab 1967 3 cylinder oil injection,
radio, heater, excellent condition.
$1375 Call 378-9512 afternoons and
evenings. (G-3t-68-p)
1965 Datsun 4 dr. sedan, very clean,
radio, heater, new tires, low mileage.
Top speed 90 m.p.h., 25 m.p. gallon.
$550 or best offer. Call 372-8246.
(G-st-68-p)
Dodge 57 Great engine, fair body,
poor chasis. Needs repair. Will sell to
Ist person wholl pay $125. Call
Howard at 378-8895 after 7:00.
(G-3t-70-p)
63 MG Midget w/llOOcc engine new
top & trans, blue metal flake paint,
sharp, call Jan at 376-5295, or
372-0126. (G-st-69-p)
1964 Merc, 390 super maruder
engine, power steering and brakes,
automatic trans. Must sacrifice S7OO
cash. Call 376-8912 after 6 pm.
Hurry!! (G-st-69-p)
65 Corvair automatic 140 hp conv.
Automatic, top SBOO. 372-7659 after
6 pm. (G-st-69-p)
Lotus Elan S-2 1600 1966 model.
Truly an exotic sports car at a
reasonable price. Inquires welcome.
Phone Bob, 376-4313. (G-st-70-p)
1957 wheel drive long bed jeep, runs
good but needs some minor work,
$450. Will trade for big bike. After
5:30, 372-5742. (G-3t-70-p)
Triumph Spitfire MK2 1967. Must
be seen to be appreciated. Less than
14,000 miles, R&H, WSW, $1,500.
Call 376-0911 after 5 p.m.
(G-st-70-p)
Former French Agent Philippe de
Vosjoli will speak January 30th 8 pm
University Auditorium Tickets at
door and Union Box Office.
(J-st-67-p)
Thru
nptfl
I \ M 3 the I
\ PAPER lion I
JP Technicolor
I /1
also dean MARTIN color!
"ROUOi^IOHM^ERICHoJ

uIRjIjmSjMBOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
SmtStH m irnM first run main feature
yiiiUMlinaliHi AT 7:00 AND 10:40
fhey II DO ANYTHING.. BARE ANYTHING!
Mure \
VIOLENT in anger

Use our handy
mail In order
j form.

K PERSONAL I
Presentation of available TRAVEL
plans to Europe, Asia, Middle EaA,
N. Africa, Thurs. nite, Jan. 30, 7:30
pm in 2nd floor Reitz Union
Auditorium. (J-4t-70-p)
Send living love. Broward offers
delivered carnations for Valentine's
Day 75 c. Order now in the
Broward Lobby 7*9 pm. Proceeds
donated to the Gator Loan Fund.
(J-4t-70-p)
Dearest Lover Paul: I think its over
for us now, but always remember
what I said I don't want no quail, I
want Paul. Love, yor huney.
(J-lt-70-p)
I LOST & FOUND |
Umbrella found after Furman
basketball game. Call Bob at
376-1153 to identify. (L-3t-68-nc)
Desperate parents desire info on male
cream colored short haired puppy
lost on 21 Jan. near sth Ave. and
15th St. Call 378-1131. (L-5tH69-p)
Five month old prippy German
Shepherd black and gray lost Wed.
eve. near McCarty Hall. Call
372-3839. (L-3t-69-p)
SERVICES I
OM! Guaranteed to bring relief froffew
all your suffering. OM! The answer to
the question. Any question! OM
loves you, can help you. OM.
(M-st-68-p)
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want your child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyn's Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center, 5240 NW Bth Ave., ph.
372-6667 0r376-6495. (M-st-66-p)
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,
prices from $250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-13t-61-c)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Ruby's alterations 1126% NW Bth SL
376-8506. (M-2t-65-p)
mrm
ISK
\ ir 1
I 1:36 3:40
5:40 7:46 M
I smEi
MCCUHEN I
I Tclr.fr.wf 171 7414 < |
2:00 3:55
5:50 7:45 1
beneath her icy corelay
a desperate desire to love. I
rirdsin Peru^



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 28, 1969

Page 10

Eliminate Frosh Football ?

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
National sport scribes and
officials hashed out the
feasibility Monday of freshman
participating in varsity football
and basketball and the waiving
of athletes tuition fees to
reduce the higher cost of
collegiate sports programs.
The ocassion was the NCAAs
fourth annual media seminar,
being held here through
Wednesday, attended by top

| Costs Going Up, |
| Athletics Needs Helps
j By Marc Dunnej
With 40-50 per cent of the National Collegiate Athletic Association
institutions operating in the red something has got to be done about
the rising costs of intercollegiate athletics.
What if you waive tuition for athletes and have the state defray the
cost?
Well you save, at UF, about $75,000 on a one million dollar
budget. Peanuts!
Then you could always lower the number of total grant-in-aids a
school can issue. Like cutting squads down to 90 or 100 men. The
theory here is that with fewer players on the squad expenses should
go down.
But what about five or 10 years from now when we find ourselves
in the same situation, because of more inflation.
What do we do then? Cut the squads size again, maybe in 20 years
or so we will be playing with seven man squads and football will be a
non-contact sport. Then cost would really be cut.
Other recommendations such as limiting the coaching staff,
limiting travel squads, limiting competition to the shcools region for
the minor sports or putting the clamp on recruiting, all would result in
the same problem in 10 years or so.
Dont get me wrong, these media conference proposals would be a
good start to bring the cost down. But not keep it down.
The big money for football comes from gate receipts, so lets open
up the gates. There are some students who dont give a damn and
never attend a sport event.
Lets make the athletic activity fee voluntary.
Some schools already have this policy, which bring them $6 more a
head. The Athletic Department could sell more tickets and make more
money.
Another proposal, that was made by UFs Ray Graves, was that
freshmen be allowed to compete in all sports including football and
basketball.
Now we are getting somewhere.
With freshmen eligible, then cutting the squad number wouldnt
hurt anything. Two platoon football could still be played, 30 recruits
a year are enough to man an offense and a defense.
We would also be able to eliminate a big expense, frosh equipment,
traveling expense and staff.
UFs frosh team costs the Athletic Department about S3O-40,000 a
y ear
This isnt going to do the job completely, but it will keep future
costs down. It is a step in the right direction.
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sport writers from across the
country.
Athletics is big business,
said opening speaker Bob James,
Commissioner of the Mid
American Conference. We must
find ways to meet the higher
costs of athletics. I would guess
that as many as half the athletic
departments in the country are
presently in the red.
Considered one of the most
feasible means of reducing the
costs was the participation of

freshman athletes in varsity
football and basketball,
suggested by UF Head Coach
Ray Graves.
Im for the elimination of
freshman teams altogether,
Graves said. These kids are
physically and mentally mature
enough to go right into
intercollegiate varsity
competition.
Current NCAA regulation
permit freshman to participate
in all sports but basketball and
football.
James said that the most
meaningful way to cut costs
would be to encourage
universities to waive athletic
scholarships in certain cases,
perhaps starting in the minor
sports.
Presently, state institutions
granting football scholarships
require the athletic departments

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SI.OO ADMISSION
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to remit funds into the
university.
However, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, did not
think the waiver ideas would
substantially reduce costs.
OConnell greeted the writers
at a noon luncheon.
These waivers would have to
go to any student whose
extra-curricular activities
contributed substantially to the
economy of the university,
Graves said, insisting that they
should not be limited to athletic
grants.
University of Washington
Football Coach Jim Owens, told
the conference that there was
little doubt the pressures of
college recruiting had injurious
effects on young prospects.
Owens is chairman of the
NCAA committee on recruiting
practices.

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Rebels Lose Another Game
As Gators Walk By 88-66

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
Neal Walk, with a season high
of 24 rebounds, hit the bucket
from all over the court Monday
night as the Gators ran away
from Ole Miss 88-66.

Judo, Frosh Track Win,
Grapplers Fall To MDJC

The UF Judo Club traveled to
Tallahassee this weekend for the
National Collegiate Judo
Tournament.
Among the colleges
represented were Louisiana State
University, F.1.T., and Florida
State University.
Three Gators out of eight
sent brought back trophies.
Nelson Mallo, first degree black
belt won first place in the
Unlimited Division, Rick
MacAleer, also first degree black
belt, placed third in the 154 lb.
division, and Pat Sullivan, brown
belt, took third place in the 176
lb. division.
Miami Dade Junior College
defeated the UF Wrestling Club
over the weekend by a score of
29-6. The only win for the
Gators came in the 145 and 160
lb. classes.
Bill Northup won a 64
decision in the 145 lb. class and
Jeff Shaffner continued to
remain undefeated in the 160 lb.
class with an 8-6 decision.
The UF freshman track team
scored a narrow victory in the
Second Annual Orlando Indoor
track meet last Saturday night,
winning over Miami-Dade North
by 42-39&.
The Gators were paced by
Nick Caswells victory in the
1000 yard run and a big win by
Gators Ink
JC Punter
The UF has signed kicking
specialist Terry Ash, from
Northeastern Oklahoma A & A,
continuing the tradition that
started with Don Chandler.
Ash was introduced to the
basketball crowd at Florida Gym
Saturday night.
The Gators also recruited
kickers Bobby Joe Green and
Don Ringgold from
Northeastern Oklahoma A & M.
MIAMI HERALD
Will have editorial and
advertising representatives on
the campus February 11 and
seeking summer interns
among juniors and permanent
employees among seniors. Dr.
Glenn Butler is arranging
appointments at School of
Communications.

UF was pressured by the #
Rebels for the first five minutes
of play but then five straight
field goals by the Gators while
the Rebels were held scoreless
put them out in front to stay.
Walk received considerable
support from Boyd Welsch, who
scored 18 points, and Andy

the 12 lap relay team comprised
of Bow Espy, Boyd Bagwell, Jeff
Doster, and Mark Whittemore.

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Owens, who came close to
equalling his season high with 21
points and 11 rebounds.
The Rebels got their best
performance out of 6-foot-5
forward Ken Turner, who put in
16 points. Two 6-8 centers,
Jerry Brawner and Tom Butler,
pulled down eight rebounds each
for Ole Miss, but were no match
for UFs Walk and Owens.
The Gators are now 96 on
the season and an even 44 in
the SEC, while the Rebels
slipped to a 4-9 mark on the
year and 1-6 in the SEC.
UF travels to Athens, Ga.,
Saturday for a regionally telecast
game with the Georgia Bulldogs.

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Tuesday, January 28,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 28, 1969

PRO DRAFT TODAY

This Is The Day
For Gator Trio

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
This is the day of reckoning
for three UF students.
Larry Smith, Jim Yarbrough,
Guy Dennis.
The names are about as
familiar to professional football
scouts by now as they are to
Gator football fans.
With the pro draft set for
today in New York, the
possibility that three Gators may
be selected in the first three
rounds might come as a surprise
to critics who considered the
play this year as mediocre.
Other state products must
also be considered 1-A among
the draftables notably,
Miamis Ted Hendricks and
Florida States Ron Sellers.
Theres little questioning that
USCs O.J. Simpson will be the
first to go to the Buffalo Bills,
who so aptly proved themselves
the worst pro team of the year.
The second choice is Atlantas,
desperately in need of a
quarterback and a powerful
running back.
Only 'speculation could tell
now who will get the Gators.
A closer look at the top
Gator trio shows why they
qualify among the nations
collegiate elite.
Only senior guard Guy
Dennis, 6-2, 252, who survived a
frustrating season without
serious injury, received national
recognition when he was
selected to a press association
All-America first team.
Dennis graded out as the
highest line blocking individual
UF history.

FOOTBALLS SELECTIVE SERVICE

Order of Picks
I. Buffalo
' 2.Atlanta
3. Philadelphia
4. Pittsburgh
5. Cincinnati
6. Boston
7. San Francisco
8. Los Angeles
9. San Diego
10. Los Angeles
11. Miami
12. Green Bay
13. Chicago
14. New York Giants
15. Houston
16. San Francisco
17. New Orleans
18. San Diego
19. St. Louis
20. Cleveland
21. Los Angeles
22. Oakland
23. Kansas City
24. Dallas
25. Baltimore
26. New York Jets

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All-America fullback Larry
Smith, hampered by a sore arch
since the fourth game of the
season, played sporadically on
his injuTy the final six games. Big
tight end Jim Yarbrough (6-8,
258) finished the seasons last
four games with a weakening
knee.
Nevertheless, Smith and
Yarbrough have won the
admiration of pro scouts despite
a fair season. Past
performances rank both among
the cream of the college crop.
And pros like the way both men
perform while injured.
Smith is tremendous at
playing with pain, Paul
Patterson, Chicago Bear scout,
commented. We all look for
that kind of player because we
know how rough it is in big
leagues.
Dennis will certainly be high
on the draft list, said Oakland
Raider scout Bill Hudson after
watching the UF-Miami game.
Dennis weak point is considered
his speed, Hudson said.
Yarbrough, who met
formidable opposition in
Miamis Ted He: idricks, has been
called a ready made pro by
Washington Redskin Coach Otto
Graham.
Smith, probably the finest all
around runner in UF history,
became the all-time leading
Gator rusher this year. He also
excelled in the passing
department and ranked as one of
the top Gator receivers and
blockers.
All three UF pro prospects
look to be objects of
considerable investment after
todays selections.

Consensus Top Choices
1. O. J. Simpson, USC, OB
2. Leroy Keyes, Purdue, OB
3. Terry Hanratty, Notre D, QB
4. Ted Hendricks, Miami, DE
5. Larry Smith, UF, OB
6. Ron Sellers, FSU, 1 FL.
7. Ted Kwalick, Pa. St., OE
8. George Kunz, Notre D., OT
9. Bill Stanfill, Ga., DT
10. Bill Enyart, Ore. St., LB
11. Jim Seymour, Notre D. FL.
12. Greg Cook, Cinci., QB
13. Paul Gipson, Houston, OB
14. Jerry Levias, SMU, FL.
15. James Harris, Gram., QB
16. John Didion, Ore. St., C
17. Wes Plummer, Ariz. St., DB
18. Joe Green, N. Tex., DT
19. Dave Foley, Ohio St., OT
20. Bobby iTbuglas* Kan., QB
21. Rufus Mayes, Ohio St., OT
22. Mercury Morris, W. Tex., OB
23. John Stunners, Xavier, OG
24. Dave Bradley, Pa. St., OG
25. Ron Johnson, Mich. OB
26. Elbert Drungo, Tenn St., DE

we care
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| iiii
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