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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Impressive Gast Headlines Accent '69

By
Alligator Staff Writer
The Accent 69 Symposium is only three
years old this spring, but even so an impressive
list of speakers is coming to the birthday party.
Justice William 0. Douglas, atheist Madalyn
Murray, and Playboy Public Relations Director
Anson Mount are three of the 13 announced
speakers set to come to the Accent rostrum Feb.
3-8.
These and other speakers are among the
reasons Accent Executive Committee members
say the Accent Symposium should be one of the
best student programs of its kind in the country.
Vanderbilt has lmpact, and the University
of Texas has its Challenge 69, says Ronnie
Bloom, Accent public relations director. There

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 69

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TOM KENNEDY
WALK REACHES FOR THE SKY
Gator center Neal Walk leaps high, but not high enough to block
Mississippi State's 6-foot-6 J[m Martin. Martin made the shot but
Gators won the game, 70-64, 4nd face Mississippi here tonight. See
n m .-
tiuiy i aye ;

The
Florida Alligator

NEW DIMENSIONS OF FREEDOM <

are a few other universities that have similar
programs, but they dont even compare to the
speakers weve already had accept oui
invitations.
The theme of this years symposium is
Dimensions of Freedom. The Responsibility
of Dissent was the 1967 theme and last years
was Politics: Impact on Youth.
Were having speakers on all aspects of
freedom, Bloom said, to investigate and
analyze every aspect of our theme, including
Vietnam, religion, drugs, sex, civil disobedience,
the cities, and legislation and the political
process.
Our primary goal is to develop a meaningful
and responsible dialogue among our speakers,
students, and our guests.
This years program should be outstanding in

University of Florida, Gainesville

MORE FUNDS ASKED

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
For the second time in less
than a year, the Board of
Regents has been forced to ask
the state budget commission for
additional funds to help UFs
Shands Teaching Hospital.
But commission Executive
Director Wallace Henderson had
nothing to report Friday.
No action has been taken,
he said. Its still being
analyzed.
The request last Monday for
$784,714 is a reduction of an
original $901,000 request made
in December by Dr. Samuel P.
Martin, who resigned Nov. 19 as
provost of the Health Center of
which the hospital is a part. He
is due to leave June 30.
Meanwhile the budget crisis
which almost closed the hospital
last March-May has been
predicted to recur this year
possibly as early as February.
When the Regents made a
preliminary request of $501,000
in December, Martin told the
Alligator, The original request
would have carried us through.
Accompanying the request is
a copy of a joint, ad4ioc
legislative committee report
made Sept. 14. It found hospital
conditions in a critical state.
It was the committees
recommendations and findings
that prompted the supplemental
fund request. o
However, Henderson said
Friday, I still have not studied
the report.
In the committees opinion
the hospitals fiscal problems
stemmed from;
Lack of general revenue
support;
§ Lack of flexibility in

Hospital Budget
Remains Critical

funding to permit the
application for federal matching
funds for service provided by the
medical center;
The diversion of patient
income to other uses within the
university system, and:
The excessive increase in

Library Fires
f eport Editor
By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
Scott DeGarmo, editor of The University Report, was fired from
his job with the UF Graduate Research Library Friday for allowing
unauthorized persons into a restricted area of the library.
We trusted him with a key to a restricted area and he abused that
trust by letting people in when the area was closed, Dr. John
Veenstra, assistant director of the library, said. 6
The violation came to the attention of library officials when the
Thursday issue of The Report, an off-campus newspaper, printed a
page of pictures of a nude girl taken in the P.K. Yonge Florida History
section of the library. The pictures were apparently taken after the
section closed at 5 p.m. but before the library closed at midnight.
The pictures showed the girl in various poses.
DeGarmo said he had talked to his immediate supervisor, Elizabeth
Alexander, Friday, and, although Veenstra was present, no mention of
his firing was made.
Later in the day, he (Veenstra) called me and told me I was
fired, DeGarmo said.
Veenstra said the decision to fire DeGarmo was his.
I cleared it with the director (Dr. Gustave Harrer) who is in
Washington, D.C., he said.
Veenstra said he had also conferred with Vice President for
Academic Affairs Fred Conners.
I told him what we were going to do, Veenstra said, and he said
it was up to us to decide.
DeGarmo said he had never entered the section after hours before
the pictures were taken, but admitted going in to have the pictures
made.
We went into that room and stayed maybe IS minutes, he said.
DeGarmo said he was fired because of the newspapers attacks on
(SEE 'DEGARMO' PAGE 2)

the sense that we have several participants in
several landmark Supreme Court cases appearing
here, said Jeff Weil, Accent speakers chairman.
For instance, Miss Murray (prayer in public
schools), Tobias Simon (the Gideon case) and
Justice Douglas.
Nobody can say how many landmark cases
Douglas has sat in on during his years as a
Supreme Court justice, Weil said.
The purpose of Accent is to hear the views
of the great speakers and to express our opinions
in the form of dialogue instead of
demonstration, Bloom said.
The Accent Symposium depends most on
participation and concern, according to Accent
General Chairman Larry Benin.
It depends on speaking out and questioning
those who are most qualified in their professions,
(SEE 'ACCENT' PAGE 2)

America's
Number I
Collage
Daily

Monday, January 27, 1969

patient charges.
Administrators in Tallahassee
agree there is a missing link in
getting a viable budget for the
hospital. When it makes out its
budget it is apparently adequate.
By the time it passes the
legislature it obviously is not
enough.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 27,1969

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VANILLA FUDGE IS COMING
The Vanilla Fudge will soon be traveling to the UF, for IFC's
Winter Frolics. Special guest star for the same concert will be David
Frye, a popular mimic.
The Vanilla Fudge was one of the first psychedelic rock bands to
make it big. They feature instrumentals and revisions of old popular
songs.
Degarmo Loses Job
PA6E ONE Jj
the UF administration.
We have been attacking the arrogant and absurd notion that
university governing bodies have the right to meet in secret,
DeGarmo said.
It was this issue which first disturbed a lot of thin-skinned
greybeards, he said.
DeGarmo said the firing was in effect an expulsion from school,
because the money is the only means of support for he and his wife,
also a graduate student.
Without the money, he would have to withdraw from the
university, he said.
Kiker Ruled Insane

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. John E. Kiker, 62,
accused of murdering his wife
Oct. 21, was legally insane at the
time of his wifes death, Circuit
Court Judge George Patten ruled
late Thursday.
The judge ordered Kiker
discharged from custody and
committed him to the Veterans
Administration Hospital for six
months of psychiatric treatment.
The judge based his decision
on reports by two Gainesville
psychiatrists Dr. John R.
Stiefel and Dr. John Nelson
who testified that Kiker was
unable to distinguish between
right and wrong the night his
wife was killed.
Mrs. Mary Hayes Kiker, 59,
was found. dead on the
bathroom floor of their
southeastern Gainesville home;
she had been shot once with a
357-magnum pistol.
Kiker had notified police and
called an ambulance, and he let
them into the house and gave

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United Stated Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
.than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must he give"

police officers the gun.
Stiefel testified that Kikers
judgment was so impaired that
night from anger and emotional
problems that he was unable to
judge right from wrong.
The judge noted that Kiker is
now able to understand the
nature of the proceedings against
him, but is suffering from a
severe depressive reaction
which is likely to cause him to
be dangerous to himself or
others.
Kiker is chairman of UFs
bioenvironmental engineering
department and was named
Engineer of the Year in 1966
by the American Society of Civil
Engineers for his work in
sanitary engineering.
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Accent Gets Big Names

FROM PA6E (Hit J
to answer the problems our
country is most faced with
today.
Speaking on legislation and
the political process are Sen.
Strom Thurmond, a Republican
from South Carolina; Sen.
Wayne Morse of Oregon, a
familiar figure in the U.S. Senate
before losing his seat in last
Novembers election; and
Douglas, who has served as
associate justice of the Supreme
Court for 30 years.
Another major speaker on
legislation and political process
is Julian Bond, a recently-elected
member of the U.S. House of
Representatives, who last
summer led the insurgent
Georgia delegation to the
Democratic National
Convention.
Louis Harris, noted pollster
and political analyst, will serve
as the keynote speaker,
delivering his talk Feb. 3.*
In addition, attorneys Melvin
Belli, William Kunstler and
Tobias Simon will participate in
a panel discussion of civil
disobedience and due process.
Belli served as the chief
defense attorney for Jack Ruby,
tried for the slaying of accused
presidential assassin Lee Harvey
Oswald. Kunstler is a noted civil
rights attorney and Simon is
most noted as the attorney who
successfully appealed the Gideon
case to the U.S. Supreme Court.
The moderator for the panel
discussion will be Larry King,
radio and TV commentator and
noted journalist from Miami.
Leftist author Michael
Harrington, usually considered a
leader in the creation of the War
on Poverty, will also speak on
poverty and the cities.
The speaker from the field of
religion, Miss Murray, is an
announced atheist whose law
suit in the Maryland courts in
1962 led to the Supreme Court
decisions banning written,
formal prayer in the public
schools.

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John Finlator, associate
director of the Federal Bureau
of Narcotics and Dangerous
Drugs, and Prof. Jean Houston,
director of the Foundation for
Mind Research in New York,
will speak on drugs, while Mount
will speak on the topic of sex.
Robert Shelton, whose name
appears on the myriad of posters
the Accent committee has
displayed over campus, will not
appear at Accent, however.
Weil explained that Shelton is
now in jail, awaiting the appeal

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Fewer Cigarettes Going
Up In Smoke This Year

By BILL KING
Alligator Staff Writer
More than 50 per cent of the
women on campus smoke while
38 per cent of the men on
campus are ex-smokers.
Vending machine cigarette
sales were down about 10 per
cent during 1968 according to
Steve Johnson, service activities
supervisor.
Harlan To
Voluntary
Hopes for a voluntary
physical education program at
UF are still alive, although a
Student Senate committee
recommended mandatory PE be
kept.
At a meeting last Thursday,
Joyce Miller, 3AS, chairwoman
of a committee appointed by
Student Government to study
the PE program, suggested to
Dean Dennis K. Stanley of the
PE department that mandatory
PE be kept.
Brace Harlan, secretary of
student activities who made the
original proposal calling for
voluntary PE, said he would still
work through SG for a voluntary
program.
I will follow the
committees recommendations
for the moment, but I will
continue working for voluntary
PE, Harlan said.
Harlan said he felt the
meeting was meaningful and
constructive in revising the
program, but he doesnt think
this is enough.
I still feel the voluntary
program is necessary.
Harlan said he still has the
support of Student Government
President Clyde Taylor and
would continue to work through
SG for his proposal.
Significant steps have been
made in the PE program. I am
divergent from the committees

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The results of a survey taken
on campus last week show 54
per cent of the women smoke
and 43 per cent of the men
smoke.
Os 375 students questioned
185 were men and 19Q were
women. Nearly half of the total
group now smoke.
In the smoking group 55 per
cent of 79 men smokers have at
least tried to quit. One-third of
Continue
PE Quest
ideas, but I am quite willing to
accept their proposal for the
moment, Harlan said.
Harlan said he would
continue to work with Stanley
and the senate committee, but
said I think I will wind up in
opposition to mandatory
physical education.
Wall Heads
Engineerings
1969 Fair
Planning for UFs annual
Engineering Fair will get under
way with the appointment of
Wayne- B. Wall as the 1969 Fair
Chairman.
Wall will head the 24th
annual event, which last year
drew 50,000 spectators. Wall
came to UF in 1966 from the
Boeing Company at Cape
Kennedy.
The fair will be held in April.
It includes displays from major
engineering equipment
manufacturers, as well as such
novelty exhibits as horse races, a
robot, and chess-playing
, computers.
Wall is vice president of the
Benton Engineering Society,
which sponsors the fair. He is
also a member of the Florida
Engineering Society, and Eta
Kappa Nu Honorary.

that group have cut down.
Once a woman begins
smoking she isn't Ucely to quit.
Os the 102 women smokers 84
per cent have never tried to quit
smoking and only 21 per cent
have cut down.
Os the 88 non-smoking
women only 19 per cent are
ex-smokers compared to 46 per
cent of 106 non-smoking men.
All the students who have
quit or cut down had reasons.
The most common reason was
not because of cancer, but
because of the price increase last
year from 35 cents to 45 cents
in the vending machines.
L SMOKERS NON-SMOKERS
MEN 75 57%
WOMEN 46%
BOTH 46% 52%
SMOKERS
TRIED To| NEVER CUT
QUIT QUIT DOWN
MEN 55% 45% 33%
WOMEN 16% 84% 21%
BOTH 35% 65% 27%
NON-SMOKERS
folT NEVER ShOEB
MEN 46% 54%
WOMEN 19% 81%
BOTH 32% 68% 1
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GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

Monday, January 27,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 27, 1969

FLOODS. MUD KILL 73

California Is All Wet

LOS ANGELES (DPI) The
worst flooding in more than 30
years racked Southern California
Sunday, already sodden from
nine straight days of rain which
contributed to 73 deaths and
caused more than sls million
damage.
President Nixon declared the
entire state a disaster area.
At least 6,000 persons were
evacuated from their homes
bacause of flood or mudslide
danger. Twelve persons were
suffocated by the slithering
earth.
Many communities were cut
off by rising waters. Southern
Pacific Railroad halted all train
service into the area Saturday
and could not say when it would
be resumed. Air traffic and
automobile transportation was
hampered by the storm.
Prospects for relief were dim.
Officials warned that additional
rain could touch off more mud
slides and flooding. The U.S.
Weather Bureau predicted heavy
showers at times Sunday.
During the latest storm,
rainfall for, downtown Los
Angeles reached nearly six
inches, bringing the season total
to more than 16 inches. Normal

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for the season is 7.20. Much
higher rainfall totals were
recorded in foothill areas.
One of the hardest hit areas
in Los Angeles was Topanga
Canyon where at least 500
persons were cut off by
mudslides and floods. The road
leading up the canyon from the
sea was washed out.
Lt. James Painter of the
Malibut sheriffs office said,
Some firemen tried to get
through this morning. But they
were going through mud up to
their waists and couldnt see the
end of it.
About 150 disheveled
residents fled from their
Topanga homes looking like war
refugees. They carried their
belongings under their arms,
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wrapped in plastic, as they
walked around cars half buried
in mud. One small bus was swept
into the sea and sank.
In the swank, Mulholland
Drive area north of Beverly Hills,
UP I reporter Vernon Scott
described the scene as reminding
him of the devastation of war.
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Law Center
Named For
Sen. Holland
The new Law Center on Feb.
1 will be named after Floridas
senior Senator Spessard L.
Holland, a 1916 graduate of UF.
Holland received his law
degree here and was president of
the student body. Both scholar
and athlete, he earned
membership in Phi Beta Kappa
and was first-string pitcher on
the UF baseball team.
Formal naming of the center
will take place during a
dedication convocation
beginning at 2:30 pm. in the
auditorium of the recently
completed $2,536,263 academic
building. U.S. Chief Justice Earl
Warren will make the dedicatory
address.
Holland first ran for the U.S.
Senate in 1945 and has been
re-elected for every term since.
He was governor of Florida from
194145 and served in the
Florida Senate from 1933-39.
A native of Bartow, Holland
served as prosecuting attorney
and county judge of Polk
County. He is the senior member
of the Holland, Bevis, Smith,
Kibler and Hall law firm with
offices in Bartow and Lakeland.
Events planned in
conjunction with the law center
dedication include a reception
and banquet Jan. 31 and a
seminar and luncheon Feb. 1.
UF Students
Better Off
Students entering UF in
recent years have been coming
from more well-to-do families
than ever before.
A recent report by William H.
Taylor, of the Florida Board of
Regents, showed the median
family income of new students
entering all Florida universities
has risen dramatically in the past
few years.
Results from a three year
study conducted by self-report
questionaires showed that
approximately 50 percent of the
incoming state university system
students receive a major
proportion of their support from
family income.

1232 UNIV AVE
376-7657

DROPOUTS

\ CAREFUL
60 Law Students
Hit Parking Fees

Approximately 60 UF law
students have signed petitions
posted on bulletin boards at the
new law center which state: We
are opposed to paying a fee for
campus parking.
Where the petition sheets
originated is a mystery.
Students at the center are
presently parking across the
street in the front yard of an
abandoned home, in a new
parking lot behind the center
and on side streets.
One of the petition signees
said he didnt know who posted
the petition sheets but he
thought it was a good idea.
Jeff Barker, 3LW, said he
didnt see why law students have
to pay a $lO parking fee when
there is plenty of off-street
parking near the center
Appearing on an adjacent
bulletin board near the petition
sheets was a sign saying,
Initiative parking spaces
available at $lO per month. All
rent will be refunded when you
graduate.
A call to the listed number on
the sign revealed that the
promoter was in the process of
removing his signs because of
lack of business.
Another student offered
marked down parking. The
original price of $8 a month is
now reduced to $5.
wvKw;m .v.vwy.Yv.:.:.y.w
v
S X
| Tickets On Sale
I |
Tickets are on sale for the g
g New January g
29, in the Reitz Union Box g
Office, the Gold Coast f
Restaurant, and the Hub at >;
$1 apiece.
j:
x*x*xx < x*x*x x*x'x*x*x*x*:*x*x ,, :*xv

Students jit the law center are
believed to be in favor of
holding an open meeting on the
parking issue but a spokesman
for the group was not available
Friday.
The UF Parking and
Transportation Committee
meets today at 3:30 pjn. in the
Presidents Conference Room to
consider suggestions made by
faculty, staff and students on
the proposed parking plan.

Do you know that your
Campus Shop and Bookstore
is open weekdays
8 8
' V
Saturday 9 til 12

STflKSHflK
I \|PR|/ Student Special
| (With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88< Steakburger
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| $1.03 Value Only 85< plus tax
I Steak ri Shake
1610 S. W. 13th St. Gainesville

Monday, January 27, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

BY HOWARD POST

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 27,1969

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
* *** exercise of responsibility/'
xfs3&ty Harold Aldrich
x/85Sx Editor-1 n-Chiet
I?UJtfkJlJuto Dave Doucette
. Mm Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor
*
a
But I Dont WANT To Come Reason Together
1 SG Wonders
v
v > :
I,
Some of our readers apparently believe
Student Government is not functioning as j
smoothly as it ought to. After an Alligator
reporter contacted SG President Clyde
Taylor Sunday we marvel that it works at ?
all. ¥
V
Taylor was asked for the address or
telephone numbers of either SG Vice $
President Gary Goodrich or his own §
Administrative Assistant Mark Glick. jij
Taylor didnt know either. §
~ V.VA, V., A V.V/AV.V.SyAy-y-Xvyv!'l

SSOC At D.C.: Unrealistic Dream

By MIKE HITTLEMAN
Part One of Two Parts
I went to Washington with 10 members of the
local chapter of SSOC for the counter-inaugural
activities during Inauguration weekend.
We went to Movement Workshops Saturday and
the first major demonstration was held. It was
outside the Washington Hilton, where a young
peoples ball was being held.
About 400 demonstrators chanted their
favorites, such as HO, HO, HO Chi Minh, NLF is
going to Win, Peace Now, and Jail Nixon, Free
Huey.
When club-wielding police arrived and a steady
drizzle and cold combined to end the
demonstrations, it became obvious the poor weather
and large security presence would keep things a lot
cooler than they were in Chicago.
But before the demonstration ended the first of
about 100 protestors to be arrested during the
weekend was taken in for tearing down some
fhg-hke bunting on the Hilton.
After strategy sessions for the Southern
Movement Saturday night, we were ready for
Sundays massive counter-inaugural parade from the
White House to the Capitol.
About 6,000 persons participated, representing

EDITORIAL

Some call it the communications
revolution. Others know it as the
communications gap.
Whatever its name, it is a paradox.
During an age when pictures of the moon
reach earth in seconds, we spend years
healing the wounds of a communications gap
on earth.
While television pictures flash instantly
from Moscow to New York via sattelite, we
spend months, perhaps years, talking in
Paris about a blood bath in Vietnam.
As young people vigorously call for
mutual love, trust and peace, a black civil
rights leader and a white senator lie dying,
their skulls shattered by angry bullets.
Yet we live in the age of a
communications revolution. Were told we
can call any place in the continental United
States for one dollar, or less, after 6 p.m.
We all know its the next best thing to being
there.
But where are we?
We talk and no one hears. We listen and
no one speaks. The young prophets of our
time sing but their words are the muted
Sounds of Silence.
The communications revolution
continues in our homes where color
televisions, push-button telephones,
micro-radios and wireless intercoms blare
continuously.
Simultaneously, while all this ferment
continues, a black student is spit upon, a
white student is arrested for exercising his
franchise of free expression, a visiting law
professor leaves town in fear of his life, and
we talk in a fanciful insulated world called
Action Conference.
No doubt there is another side to this
story. Only the foolhardy perceive life in a
single dimension.
No doubt students have a right to drink
beer on campus, and a right to have guests of
the opposite sex in their campus residences,
and a right to partially determine their own
futures, and the future of their university,
through increasingly student oriented
faculty-student committees.
But hate, fear, distrust and faithlessness
grow. Administrators fear students. Students
hate administrators. Faculty play both ends
faithlessly against the middle. And no one,
no one, trusts anyone else.
And the communications revolution

dozens of different groups. Waving Viet Cong flags,
banners representing anarchy and revolution, and
our own peace signs, we took a route down
Pennsylvania Ave. opposite the inaugural parade
route.
The march was peaceful until we reached the
Capitol. There some demonstrators locked hands
and tried to form a human chain. Police moved in,
shoving their clubs around, and then rocks and
sticks began to fly at the police. Several people were
arrested, and I saw four or five demonstrators
clubbed.
But the bad confrontation scene of Sunday
occurred outside a reception for Vice President
Agnew. Several hundred people tried to heckle the
arrivals at the reception, so mounted police moved
in to push them back.
Several people were hit by horses or clubs so the
protestors began throwing rocks, sticks, mud and
boards at the police. A policeman was pulled from
his horse and beaten, and about five demonstrators
were taken away for medical treatment.
None of the UF-SSOC people had any part in
this violence, or any I saw the entire weekend. The
violent protestors must have been 5 per cent or less.
Monday each group did their own thing with
very little organization. The UF-SSOC group got
free sl2 tickets for seats in the parade stands at
15th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue. Holding up
banners and saving our best jeers for Nixon, LBJ

Lets Communicate

LIKE IT IS:

continues.
Once, not so very long ago, before the
communications revolution ever began,
people talked. And people listened. Through
person-to-person communications they
learned about each others motives,
aspirations, fears and dreams.
Today they stalk each the other, like
assassins, transfixed by hate, stupified by
fear, intoxicated with mutual destruction.
And the communications revolution
continues.
Is it too much to ask that men come
together, personally, for an honest dialogue?
A university isnt really a very big place.
Not in the context of the world.
Nevertheless, the university is a leader.
Frequently it determines the course of world
affairs. Certainly it can, with resolve,
determine its own future.
We believe the time has come at our
university for a sustained and meaningful
first person dialogue between all segments of
university leadership left, right and center,
student, faculty and administration.
Therefore, we call upon either UF
President Stephen C. OConnell or Student
Body President Clyde Taylor to implement a
program
whereby a period of no less than 72
hours be set aside, at a place removed from
this campus, where leaders (not
representatives) of ALL factions at this
institution shall meet,
whereby such leaders shall begin an
ongoing free discussion of all problems, real
and imagined, at this university,
whereby a complete transcript of that
discussion be issued for the inspection of all
interested parties in the university
community,
t whereby present action be taken
immediately through such a conference,
and whereby a true communications
revolution, permanent in nature, be started
on this campus.
As a result of such a meaningful dialogue,
unlike the annual Presidents Retreat in its
diversity of views, we believe ongoing
committees and groups such as Action
Conference can find new meaning and
increased direction.
And our university will be a better
place for all of us.

Westmoreland and Wheeler, we made a lot of noise.
I was glad we were in the stands, because it was
scary watching all the police, Guardsmen, and
armed Army regulars patrol the parade. Also two
Army helicopters were flying overhead because
there had been rumors that snipers would try to
shoot Nixon. But, as in Chicago, the rumors proved
false.
During the parade several groups of
demonstrators tangled with the police. Some had
tried to enter the street and disrupt the parade and
others had thrown rocks, cans and eggs at Nixons
car.
As I dont approve of such things, and imagine
most people dont, I think it is important to reassert
that only a small portion of the demonstrators had
any part in the violence. Rumor had it the Ohio and
Michigan SDS chapters were among the most
militant, and that Mark Rudd had helped them get
organized on Sunday night. I saw Rudd cruising
around Washington in a large sedan.
These were the main events of the weekend. We
also picketed the FBI, circled the Washington
Monument to the amazement of tourists and had a
counter-inaugural ball on Sunday night. SSOC had a
raUy Sunday at Sherman Square to try to establish
its individual identity, and give it a more unified
feeling and show everyone although SSOC had a
moderate reputation it would do big things in the
future.



Parking Woes
Can Be Solved

MR. EDITOR:
With the controversy over
parking fees and regulations
rapidly engulfing the campus, I
have several suggestions to make
that I hope may ease the anger
of the interested parties and
possibly prevent a full scale
shooting war.
Firstly, all pregnant men and
women should automatically be
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers' names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space. *-
|

Test-Tube Babies
To Enjoy Peace?

MR. EDITOR:
The following is a part of a
letter I wrote recently to a
young Lieutenant in Vietnam, a
friend of mine, a future
architect, painter, story writer,
but now a platoon leader.
The facinating article on
Biological Revolution in the
Atlantics made my imaginations
dance wild like a mad clown.
Jere, just imagine what it would
be like in the year of 2000,
when the first test-tube-born
baby will appear fully tailored
genetically!
Most probably this big
Biological Engineering Job will
include the elimination of
aggressive tendency in human
character leading to hostilities. I
do hope, Jere, that you will be

Speaking Out

Debater Presented False Picture

I must respond to Mr. Wittigs letter
to the Alligator of January 21, as it
contains what is essentially a
misstatement of the concern and
financial aid extended to the Debate
Team by Student Government, of which
I am Vice-President.
I can objectively view she
controversy inasmuch as I was a debater
for two years at Miami-Dade Junior
College. I served in the Student Senate
at the University of Florida for three
terms and each year fought for the
increased funds for the Debate Team.
Despite my appreciation of our Debate
Team, the false picture you presented of
the relationship between SG and our
squad must be corrected.
' >
I begin with a statement of
recognition for the accomplishments
that you and the team have achieved.
The hard work and level of excellence
you have instilled reflects favorably on
the University of Florida. You contend
that our concern for fiscal
responsibility ignores the success and
prestige which has accrued to the
University... Will this argument stand
investigation?

given decals for the restricted
area at a cost of $.25 a day. This
money would be collected by
exact change toll baskets placed
at all entrances.
Secondly, all cars over 5.7
feet in length should be banned
so that many more parking
spaces per lot could be marked
off.
Thirdly, a subway should be
constructed under 13th Street
and University Ave. with a spur
line under Radio Rd. and
North-South Drive.
These solutions combined
with the safe, modern, and
dependable Gainesville City Bus
Service should certainly solve
the existing problem and any
that may arise in the future.
ARTUR FREINER

the last witness of a war between
human beings. And in 2000,
when we are still in fifties, you
will write the childrens bed time
stories on the beauty of war
(man takes every thing beautiful
which belongs to the past.
Right?).
I think it will be more
exciting and challenging to tell
of the beautified sentimental
version of war to the
test-tube-born children, than to
tell to the children of 7th Level
about the fairy-land we used to
know.
Seventh level is where the
push-button operators in
underground level operated the
total nuclear war in a story of
the same title.
CHANG SOOKIM, 7EGA

FACT:
Examine the following budget
figures for the past three years:
1966- $4,900
1967- $7,100
1968- $7,425
In addition to the above, you
personally appeared before the
Senate to request sufficient
funds to attend a national
tournament in March, 1968, and
die Senate took $923 from the
Women's Student Association to
insure that you could attend.
Let the Students judge if we
have ignored your success.
You further contend that the
attitude of SG is like that of one
member from over 70 student senators
who said, Why ddht you go out and
sell Krispy Kremes?
FACT:
At that meeting, you were there
to request funds for the national
tournament mentioned above.
The majority of Senators
supported you cause, as attested

OPEN FOtUM:
: I
Adoia cJi ViA&wt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."

Retaliate Where It Hurts:
. r . -a v- .
In Citizens Pocketbooks

MR. EDITOR:
The citizens, merchants, and businessmen of the
city of Gainesville seem remarkably unappreciative
of the University, and especially of the student
body.
Without the university, the city would be
nothing. It draws the major portion of its income
from the university. Its merchants are happy to
receive the money of the students while too often
providing sloppy and disrespectful service at
excessive prices.
Its businessmen increase their profits by
exploiting the need of the students for jobs through
hiring them at or below the minimum wage, despite
the knowledge and drills possessed by those
students.
At the same time too many of them consider the
students of the university as an unruly mob of
half-wild pests of varying degrees of repulsiveness
who need to feel the strong foot of authority in
their backsides. To suggest to the business
community of Gainesville that it owes it to the
university and to the student body to provide more
jobs at decent wages, to provide better service, and
to reduce prices would draw a negative response, if
any.
Therefore, I would like to suggest to the student
body at the University of Florida that the only way
that we can impress the business community of
their dependence on us is by formation of a
non-profit student-owned and operated cooperative
selling a wide variety of new and used goods.
I do not mean some dingy little hole-in-the-wall
of a store, but a big venture. We could well take
advantage of the skills of graduate students in
business management, business planning and
purchasing in planning, organizing and managing the
cooperative in such away as to employ the

to by granting the above amount
of $923. We further drafted a
resolution asking President
OConnell to grant you such
other funds as he might be able
to. As you might remember, I
arranged with you to have a
copy of that resolution ready
the very next morning so that
you might take it personally to
the President. I stayed until one
a.m. to type that document and
you failed to come by and get it.
Let the students judge if we have
relegated you to the position of
selling Krispy Kremes.
Finally, you present an incomplete
pirture with respect to the current yeai
budget because you were granted
barely 50 per cent of the requested
budget.
FACT:
You failed to present, let alone
emphasize, that the amount you
requested was more than double
the amount granted the prior
year. We felt you deserved that ...
and more. Yet, it is well-known

Monday, January 27, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

maximum number of students at wages
commensurate with ability and responsibility while
reducing prices.
Capital for the establishment of the cooperative
could be provided by selling membership to
students (half-time to full-time) of the UF. Such
shares would entitle the student to purchase goods
and to use the services at the cooperative.
As I picture it, such a cooperative would not
only buy and sell goods. There are many students
on this campus who possess special skills in
maintenance and repair work (typewriter, radio, TV
and electrical equipment repair, welding,
cabinet-making, carpentry, etc.).
The cooperative could either provide space for
such services or could maintain a list of such
individuals so that greater opportunities for student
income could be provided while allowing students
to save money by receiving these services at
reasonable prices.
As well, for services and goods not available
through the cooperative, a listing of businesses
which give students good and respectful service at
decent prices within the usual business community
of Gainesville could be maintained by the
cooperative.
The way to the heart and mind of the
businessman is through his pocketbook. If
successful, such a cooperative could serve to
increase the respect of the Gainesville business
community for students at the university, to
impress these men of their debt to the university
and students, and to promote student employment
at decent wages while reducing prices.
It is only an idea, but is it not worth
consideration and attempted institution? With
energetic and devoted student organizers, who
knows how much could be accomplished?
WALTER MICKLER 7ED

By Gary Goodrich

that every organization submits
much more than it expects to
receive in anticipation of being
cut. This year, the various
requests submitted by campus
organizations, when totaled,
exceeded the available funds by
a factor of two. The case, then,
is that we had exactly the same
amount of money as we had last
year, but requests for twice as
much.
Mr. Wittig, I say, Let the
students judge.
I can ease your anxieties as to
possible SG reaction to your criticism of
our admittedly imperfect budgeting
process.
I encourage you to continue reaching
for the stars in spite of institutions; to
accept the cold hard facts of limited
financial possibilities and to be more
accurate in your public statements.
In return, I promise you the
continued concern of my colleagues for
your program and increasing financial
aid commensurate with your
achievements and our monetary
capabilities.

Page 7



Page 8

V. The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 27,1969

10 Named UFs Sexiest

By LONNIE BROWN
Alligator Correspondent
The search is over. The 10
sexiest men on campus have
been found by a group of three
independent girls after
interviewing 70 applicants. The
winners are: Bob Leavy, 4ART;
Ronald Schram, ILW; Mike
Brown, 4JM; Ken Williams, 2UC;
Dave Ross, IMD; Ron Williams,
3JM; Bob Franklin, 3AS; Phillip
Klatt, 7EG; Ira Cor, 4BA;
Lowell Stanley, lUC.
It took us about 30 minutes
to pick the winners after the
interviews were finished, said
Marilyn Moore, 4HP. We had
five sure winners picked by
then.
The other two girls are Sandy
Ranson, 4HP, and Sharon
Garland, lUC, both from
Tampa, Florida.
If all the winners were
combined into one average
winner, he would weigh 170
pounds, stand six feet, and have
blue eyes. He might have either
blond or brown hair. He would
be single, although two of the
winners are married.
Pizza
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secret recipe . flavor
baked to perfection with
your choice of: cheese,
olives, mushrooms,
pepperoni, hamburger,
sausage or anchovies.
Special
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f
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NOW
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Good Only
Jan. 27,28,29,30
Ph. 376-4521
Bring this ad
316 S.W. 16th. Ave.
. mm mm wmm

One of the contestants
introduced himself as Larenzo
Ferlingetti, and was dressed in
Italian garb. He was
accompanied by two
bodyguards. As he finished with
his cigarette, one of his
bodyguards stuck out his hand
and Larenzo snuffed out his
ciagrette in his protectors palm.
The questionaires received
various answers from the
contestants. Do you use lines
and if so, what are they? got
responses like these:
UF Coed Is
Dairy Queen
Florida Dairy Princess, Miss
Margaret Toms, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. G.E. Toms of Miami
Lakes, Florida is a contestant in
the Miss Sunflavor contest to
be held Feb. 4-6, at the Florida
State Fair, Tampa. Miss Toms is
sponsored by the American
Dairy Association of Florida.
Enrolled as a freshman at UF,
she has a 3.7 grade average and is
a member of Alpha Lambda
Delta scholastic honorary and is
a little sister in Beta Theta Pi
fraternity.
Margaret, who is 5 ft. 5 in.
tall and weighs 113 pounds, is
19 years old. A recent graduate
of Miami Carol City High
School, her activities included
being a senior senator, Sorrota
Service Club member, Interact
Sweetheart, junior varsity
cheerleader and in the
homecoming court. Shes
sports-minded, loves horseback
riding, water skiing and is an
accomplished dancer.
As Florida Dairy Princess,
Margaret attends conventions,
fairs, expositions and makes
appearances on radio and
J ms
f§Pr
MARGARET TOMS
.. just another pretty face

'mm;. -J
m % Golden Fried I
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Mifi' potatoes and tangy M/m 1
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No, I just enjoy
conversation.
Yes, I play on the fact that
girls hate each other.
There are no effective
lines most girls worth going
with wont fall for lines.
The girls agreed that the
contestants were all serious and
very mannerly. They were very
nice. The contest was fun, they
added, but put them behind in
their studies.
Haw "%
Your Gonorator %
f OVERHAULED Special $
SASO i
INtUIOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
AVE. OAMCSVIUf
MON.-FRI. I AM-7PM SAT. Til S PM
370-4011

life J jH
***** by Campus Crusade far Christ
UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
8:15 P.M. JAN. 29, 1969
SI.OO ADMISSION
ON TOUR OF CAMPUSES IN CANADA & THE U S., THE "NEW FOLK" ARE A LIVELY MEW SOUND & SPIRIT IN FOLK MUSIC

| UFS REPRESENTAUVEaTi
T 1 '''7 Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
a c\,ff I Dan Sapp Bill Worsham
Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
w ir j George Corl Harold DeVane I
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FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE j
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-66-p)
Honda Sport 50. S9O firm. Call David
392-8280 after 5 p.m. (A-st-66-p)
Sell Honda C 8350 140 miles, perfect
condition. Very clean, very fast,
S6OO. Call Frank after 7 p.m., Lake
Butler, 496-3651. (A-4t-66-p)
1
ABSOLUTELY MUST SELL. By this
weekend Sears 50cc SBO or best
offer. Excellent condition, 3787358
3769365 Ask for Vic. (A-st-65-p)
1967 Red Manx body on VW chassis,
SIOOO, hi standard supermat ic
citation 22 cal target pistol S7O, mi
carbine SSO, TV S2O. 372-6722.
Apartment size washing machine,
excellent condition, portable, cheap
Call 376-8315 anytime. (A-3t-67-p)
Airboat 65 continental 12x4 ft. Steel
bottom. See Mike, Apt. 7, Colonial
Manor. 1216 SW 2nd Ave
(A-3t-67-p)
Electric bass guitar, 2 electric rhythm
guitars, 1 Yamaha amp, 1 harmony
amp, Brand new, best offer,
378-6562. Tues. & Thurs. after 5:30.
(A-st-67-p)
69 Datsun tudor with radio, balance
of warranty, mint condition. $1650,
a new car offer at a saving. Phone
376-4449. (A-3t-67-p)
Hammarlund Hq-170, Dx-60 and
Vfo. Complete ham station, $220,
372-8129 after six. (A-3t-68-p)
Arrendonda Estates 69 Archer 2
bedroom 12 ft. x 60 ft. SSOO cash,
$86.33 month, local bank financing,
Lot $25 mo. 372-5604, 5 to 7 pm.
(A-st-68-p)
SPECIAL THIS WEEK: Aluminum
secretarial chair like new. Cost new
$47.50, NOW SIO.OO. JR Office
Furniture Co. 620 J /2 S. Main St.
(A-st-69-p)
Unitron refracting telescope with
finder scope, five eyepieces- in
rotating base, slow motion controls,
two wooden cases for telescope and
tripod. $99.95. Call 372-5595.
(A-lt-68-p)
Blue Lustre not only rids carpets of
soil but leaves pile soft and lofty.
Rent electric shampooer. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-69-c)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading supplies,
custom, reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
Ml CANOPY 466-3340. (A-ts-69-p)
FOR RENT
~,
1 bedroom furnished.apt. w/w carpet
panelled central air/heat laundry, big
closets, convenient. Sublet sllO.
Feb. 1. Call evenings, 372-3771.
(B-3t-65-p)

I SOPHIA
LOREN
CHARTER FUQHT
A/ew YORK 7 M/LAM, ITALY
IO WEEKS 4- CALL (33)2-16&5
JUHg tv SEPT T4-&V Kl*|. 310 DNJON.
DEADLINE JAN. 31st
THIRSTY
ft GATOR ft
o
There May Be Some Things Better Than Sex, And Some
Things May Be Worse, But There Is Nothing Exactly Like It..
W.CMds b Alto AiTln
THIRSTY GATOR
Movies: 9pm ll pm 12:30 am
each Mon. Nite 11-2 6 days a week

WW |
To sublet lovely IBrApt. University
376 0657?ft mP i ete,y fum shed Call
376-0651 after 5 pm. (st-B-65-p)
Suddenly available, single bedroom
near campus, AC, Danish modern
sum. $lO3 per month, sub-let. 1624
NW 4th Ave. Apt. 111. 372-1714
(B-st-67-p)
Sublet modern sum. eff. 2 blocks
from campus. AC, pool, utilities paid
except electric. Contact Paul
Westbury at University Apts, or call
376-8990. (B-4t-67-p)
Immediate sublet furnished eff. apt.
AC, gas, heat, $75. Convenient to
shops, school. Lease till June.
376-9936. (B-st-68-p)
Must sublet 2 bedroom poolside
French Quarter apt. Call 378-8564
(B-st-69-p)
Fum. 2 bedroom apt. SW 16 Ave.
$l2O mo. for 2. Feb. 1, occ.
378-3552, 378-2957.(8-3t-69-p)
| WANTED I
Roommates ra share 2 br. house,
blks from campus, cheap for 1,
cheaper for 2. Call Van or Neil,
3 76-2729 eves, 392-1886 days.
(C-st-66-p)
Special offer. Coed needed to share 2
bdrm apt on SW 16th Ave.
immediate occupancy. Call Audrey.
376-1045 or 376-9348. (C-st-65-p)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
sum. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-st-67-p)
Male roommate Landmark, poolside
apt. $45 mo. plus utilities after 7 call
378-3939 or apt. 112. (C-st-66-p)
Roommate male 2 blocks from
campus, AC, TV, stereo, 41.00 per
month as soon as possible. Call
378-9721 after 7 p.m. or come to
1105 NW 4th Ave. (C-st-68-p)
;:*X :*>:-x-x-:vy-ssssss W i WWw-.*JW | AS
HELP WANTED j
&XW-X->>>>XXXX>K Oto*SSSXi-: W&i <
Part time or full time positions open
for airline trained personnel.
Passenger sales, Salary open, Write
P.O. Box 2236 Univ. Station.
(E-st-67-p)
Help! Desperately need tutor for
Spanish 134. Call Becky, 392-7648.
(E-2t-68-p)
Need office equipment Salesman In
Gainesville.: Call 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-c)
Several reliable students for part-time
work. Call Miss Giddens, 378-3070
Tues., Jan. 28, 9am l2. As many
hours as needed. (E-lt-69-p)
DELIVERY BOYS 11 am to 2 pm,
transportation provided, apply in
person LARRY'S PORE-BOY 1029
W. Univ. Ave. (E-st-66-p)

Monday. January 27, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

jH heTTwanted f
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4tlr
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-tf-55-c*
AUTOS ?
%!
Have 2 surplus cars, 1962 Plymouth
V/8 5325. 1964 Cadillac 51750
Call 372-9607 or 372-3251.
(G-ts-60-c)
Saab 1967 3 cylinder oil injection,
radio, heater, 'excellent condition.
$1375 Call 378-9512 afternoons and
evenings. (G-3t-68-p)
1965 Datsun 4 dr. sedan, very clean,
radio, heater, new tires, low mileage.
Top speed 90 m.p.h., 25 m.p. gallon.
$550 or best offer. Call 372-8246.
(G-st-68-p)
MGB 64, R&H, wires, new tires. A
great road machine, $985 or best
reasonable offer. 378-6917.
(G-2t-68-p)
63 MG Midget w/llOOcc engine new
top & trans, blue metal flake paint,
sharp, call Jan at 376-5295, or
372-0126. (G-st-69-p)
1964 Merc, 390 super rmruder
engine, power steering and brakes,
automatic trans. Must sacrifice S7OO
cash. Call 376-8912 after 6 pm.
Hurry!! (G-st-69-p) -<
1962 Rambler Classic 4 dr. hardtop,
radio, heater, good tires, newly
overhauled engine. Good
transportation, $l5O. Call Andy,
376-3424. (G-lt-69-p)
65 Corvair automatic 140 hp conv.
Automatic, top SBOO. 372-7659 after
6 pm. (G-st-69-p)
1 PERSONAL
X ;!
Dave go to University Auditorium
January 30th 8 pm de Vosjoli will
talk then. See posted notices for
details. (J-3t-66-c)
Umbrella found after Furman
basketball game. Call Bob at
376-1153 to identify. (L-3t-68-nc)
Join the i
MARCH OF DIMES DIMES£
£ DIMES£ I MM CT-MYN SVNOtCATC
Good Strvicf Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
806 E. Ontr. Ay. 972-4 ST

Page 9

i LOST & FOUND |
5 j*
; vxx*vx-:*x..-.xw.3
Former French Agent Philippe de
Vosjoli will speak January 30th 8 pm
University Auditorium Tickets at
door and Union Box Office.
(J-st-67-p)
Desperate parents desire info on male
cream colored short haired puppy
lost on 21 Jan. near sth Ave. and
15th St. Call 378-1131. (L-st-69-p)
Five month old puppy German
Shepherd black and gray lost Wed.
eve. near McCarty Hall. Call
372-3839. (L-3t-69-p)
Lost: small white cat around SW
16th Ave. Has one blue and one
green eye. Any information please
call 392-1938 before 5 or 378-3455
after. (L-2t-68-p)
J. Rigney F., belated happy 21st.
Head brewmaker if Macon isnt
profitable theres always a scummers.
Challenge peace the very Reverend
Fathers. (J-lt-69-p)
>v.w.v.vi.v.*x.*:*:o:..
1 SERVICES
x
.v:-x*xx.v.x;vx*:>>>:.x.>:.:.x.x<.x.x.x;xw X-.
OM! Guaranteed to bring relief from
all your suffering. OM! The answer to
the question. Any question! OM
loves you, can help you. OM.
(M-st-68-p)
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want your child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyns Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center, 5240 NW Bth Ave., ph.
372-6667 0r376-6495. (M-st-66-p)
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,
prices from $250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-13t-61-c)
IATWI
I 1103 THE I
Jv PIPER LION I
jP JjrW Technicolor 2
I /1
ALSO DEAN MARTIN COLOR I

MIBIPJIIBjiIM BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
BmifflMiW first run main feature
aiMMlllWlia at 7:00 AND 10:40
j They'll 00 ANYTHING. DARE ANYTHING!
i Audwtces^l
VIOLENT in anger
Climb aboard (
/ The S.S. Winnj ammer
y Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. w)
Dinners to 12:00 P M J/
f ft
I Bernie Sher at the Organ \\
n r
Thursday, Friday & Saturday V ( l
Oysters & Clams on the half shell
Michelob on draft * ?,
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty in
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M.
Reservations accepted j
| j v Harry M. Lanton, Manager VM/
Closed Sundays

Use our handy
mall in order
form.

| SERVICES |
Soc>wKftoa6iwiM9w
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Will proofread your thesis paper for
punctuation and grammar. 15c per
pg. Call 372-5762. (M-lt-69-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be J
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians
' 526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
|THRU
4:15.7:00
I 9:35
Ki.WMIi
I* . vi i / ..* i g m ; |
I * l
I steve 1
MCCLIEEIM I
BELEgIJ
wmimfiJ
2:00 3:55
5:50 7:45
beneath her icy core toy
a desperate desire to hue. I
:Birds in PeruV



Page 10

I, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, January 27,1969

Jourdan Vs. Fosbury!

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
Whos really the number one
high jumper in the world?
The winner of the Millrose
Games in New York City this
Friday could provide the answer.
UFs Ron Jourdan, who has
won six consecutive meets this
season with jumps over 7-feet,
will be competing against
Olympic Champion Dick
Fosbury, and John Caruthers,
Olympic runner-up.
Not even Fosbury has
jumped as consistently as
Jourdan, says UF Track Coach
Jimmy Carnes.
Lanky Jourdan thought he
had an American record Friday
night after he sailed over the
high jump bar in Philadelphia.
The bar was at 7-foot-314.
The crowd cheered. Jourdan
was walking away from it all
when the bar clanked
nauseatingly to the gymnasium
floor.
Ron brushed the bar on his
way over and it continued to
shimmer eventually falling
as the large Enquirer Track
Classic crowd roared thinking
he had cleared 7-314. Jourdan
still won with his previous jump
of 744 over West Germanys

Rebels, Referee Bello
Headline Cage Card
A hungry band of Rebel alligator poachers from Mississippi and
basketballs most colorful referee, Lou Bello, will be on stage tonight
at Florida Gym at 7:45.
It will be Coach Tommy Bartletts cage crew attempting to make a
clean sweep of Mississippis two top college teams in two consecutive
games when they face Mississippi, the Southeastern Conferences
celler dweller tonight.
The Gators toppled Mississippi State 70-64 Saturday night when
guard Mike Leatherwood, fouled in desperation by the Bulldogs in the
waning moments, dropped in four crucial free throws to ice the win.
All American center Neal Walk paced the Gators with 28 points, 22
of them coming in the first half.
Walk and the Gators outrebounded the Maroons 45-26. Walk got
18.
Paced by Gary Waddell's 32 points, the UF freshmen trampled
North Florida Junior College 105-83. The freshman dropped one to
Lake City Junior College the previous night 91-76.
Colorful referee Lou Bello will be back again to add his antics to
the contest in an attempt to keep things clean.
Mississippi, fresh from a surprisingly close loss to Georgia, 84-81,
Saturday night, carries a 4-8 overall record and a 1-5 conference mark
into the game.
Incidentally, the Rebels only SEC win came earlier in the year
against Mississippi State 67-60.
The freshmen will play Broward Junior College in the 5:30
preliminary.
SOUUMBIRGER ocates oil by lowering I
electrical, electronic and mechanical probes into wells f|
drilled by the major oil companies.
SQILUMBiRGER has openings for |
graduating engineers to perform this challenging }
work. 8
SCHLUMBERGER irochures are in the I
Placement and Career Planning Center. §
SCHLUMBERGER will be on campus for I
interviews on 1
MONDAY, JANUARY V \

IN MILLROSE GAMES FRIDAY

The
Florida
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Sports Editor
Gunter Spielvogel, fourth place
finisher in the Olympics.
There will be more pressure
on Ron than he has ever known
before. Im only hoping that he
will be able to do his best under
all of the pressure of 15,000
people and competing against
the worlds best, said Carnes. I
know hes physically capable, its
just a matter of getting himself
up under these conditions.
Nevertheless, Jourdan led the
Gator track team to an 89-60
victory over Ohio State Saturday
in an indoor meet in which the
UF won every event but the pole
vault and the 60-yard dash. His
jump of I-Y4 won the meet, his
second win in as many days,
over West Germanys Gunter
Spielvogel.
Freshman Ron Coleman

captured the brpad (22-714) and
triple (47-6) jumps while Joe
Schiller took both high and low
hurdles to pace what Coach
Jimmy Carnes called certainly
one of the most outstanding
efforts weve ever made here.
UF indoor records were
established by Jerry Fannin in
the quarter mile (49.0); Tommy
Brown in the 300-yard dash
(31.1); Schiller in the lows
(:7.9); and Bob Gallagher in the
60-yard dash (:6.2).
UF Track Club grad student
Jack Bacheler will also travel to
New York City this weekend to
compete in the prestigious
Millrose Games, and the Boston
AA meet on Saturday.
For A Happier
New Year
ptvtN 7
BIRTH / //
toners 7
JVATCHaJEWE LRY REI
DIAMOND MWCHAIOO 09 >IIMI ON
GORDONS
GAINESVILLE Center
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM-9:00 PM Mon-Fri

i Vt' Secretary Service I
| Now at KINGS FOOD HOST I
I Secretaries may reserve a meal. Just call either Kings I
m Food Host and give your order and the estimated time
m of arrival and well be ready for you and bring your I
( order immediately! I
I Kings Food Host l
1 1802 W. UMV. AVE. 372-6820 1
1 ** 1430 S.W. 13th ST. 378-1656 I

SALESSERVICERENT ALS
M "Authorized
BBS XWm. Smith Corint
SJtamit Dealer"
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Offica Equipment
ALIBI LOUNGE
EVERY MONDAY
29< HIGHBALLS
-f
7-' .
"Its a good excuse"

Join the Responsibles
fcf rom Rust
'
Our representative will be on campus Feb. 7, 1969



What s On A Recruits Mind?

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
Tuesday the professional
football teams gather for a
common draft of the nations
top college seniors, In this
situation the draftee hasnt any
choice as to which team he plays
for, except if he choses not to
play.
But universities recruit high
school athletes year round.
In this case there isnt any
draft, the athlete has a choice.
What does the recruit look
for in his choice?
Is it academics, the other
team members, the coach, the
schedule (what other teams he
will face and how much
travelling will he do), the
stiffness of competition,
parental pressure, or is it some
intangible?
Probably a combination of all
of these, but most of the top
schools are even in these areas.
What then is the deciding
factor?
Woody Blocker, an Atlanta,
Ga. boy, is one of the top tennis
42- Game Schedule
Faces UF Glovemen
UF baseball team will begin
practice today for the biggest
schedule in many years.
Coach Dave Fullers squad
will play a 42-game schedule.
Included in the schedule are
Southeastern Conference foes
Auburn, Georgia, Kentucky,
Tennessee and Vanderbilt.
Last season the Gators won
the Eastern Division of the SEC
as they compiled a 25-10 record.
In SEC play the Gators were
15-4.
Both the Gators leading
pitcher and hitter will return to
the squad. Centerfielder Nick
Nicosia led all Gator hitters with
a healthy .418 average. Pitcher
Glen Pickren, who compiled a
10-2 record, will head a fine
group of returning pitchers.

REDUCTION SALE ST
* BOOTS | |
* WESTERN WEAR \SH#|
H
Saddlery f |
Priced-to-move SAB, I
Finest Selection of Levi'*, 1 H I
Jeans, and Casuajs IS
In Gainesville Hr I
1 iiBB
tWI N.W. 6th Strt At Hiway 441 l
Open 8 AM to 6 PM Mondays through Saturday. I
_ Open Fridays Till 9 PM |

prospects in the country.
Woody, a short, dark-haired
athlete, visited the UF campus
this weekend.
Southern Methodist
University, Trinity College,
University of Michigan, Stanfoid
University, University of
Southern California and UF
have been recruiting Woody and
have met with the most success.
Woody, quiet and soft
spoken, has aspirations to be a
lawyer and so academics rank
high on his list.
I would like to go to law
school, he said. Some of the
guys on the team took me by
Floridas new law school and it
sure was nice.
But then UFs other
competition can offer the same,
none of them are second rate.
Woody has travelled a great
deal in his tennis career. He is
the 16 and under Orange Bowl
champ, the 16 and under N 0.3
ranked tennis player in the
nation, the 16 and under
National Clay Court champ, and
the 10th in the nation in the 18
and under category.
Playing the amateur tennis
circuit has taken him all over the
country. Woody started playing
when he was seven years old in
California, from there he moved
to Dallas where he continued his
playing.
In Dallas he became a pupil
of George Richey, before he
moved to Atlanta.
It doesnt seem that travel
would interest him greatly.
The competition at all of the
schools is also very similar.
UF is the SEC champ and a
topped ranked in the nation.
USC has the No.l team in the
nation, Trinity is a small college
power, Michigan is also one of
the topped ranked teams every
year and the same for SMU and
Stanford.
In the coaching area, Woody
couldnt ask for more. Coach
Bill Potter was the 1968 SEC
coach of the year and Assistant

IpL
TENNIS RECRUITING
. . Woody Blocker (left) and
UF Frosh Tennis player Charlie
Owens.
Coach Bill Chafin is one of the
best teaching coaches in the
south.
If you had to spend the next
four years training, practicing,
living and playing with a group
of guys, wouldnt you be most
interested in their personalities?
That is the clincher, if a
recruit likes the guys he may be
playing with, then he feels more
secure coming into his new
environment.
@ DELICIOUS |
STEAKS
FINE FOOD
at
student prices |
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

So we cbrit hand cdt I
the keys to just any mi
that comes along, m \
jM y Ifes
AjggfigHWmmHgU nj|
agjkgByHWH^FBgSBMHI^^y
S. *-- / vilr JBBfjr

I TODAY I
I .ST-* AQC I
Chicken W §
Tossed | 'JO Reach 1 9y
Salad Imm Pudding ICm H
I WEDNESDAY I
I v,al ADC I
Parmagiana
I ? 12*K 12* I
Slaw fc | cobbler Ifc
CHILD'S PLATE I
10 Years and under
Includes Beef Patties, M Y
Choice of Potatoes or Rice, Jw
I and Choice of One Vegetable. I
l I I
Ik I ; M University Av*.
BlMSfil Downtown
Gainesville

Monday, January 27,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

* The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 27, 1969

Campus Crier
# 1 0 itotnont ky (tiMam jj
W*>++*+****+*oiMl brf MMIIMMWWWWMKMMMWWWMIAfWWMWWWVWMMMWWWWVMMWt
accent 1969
PRESENTS I
Sen. Sfpom Sen. Wayne
Thurmond Mcpse
SPEAKING ON I
The Dimensions of Freedom I
AND I
Justice William
Douglas
Florida Gym. Sat., Feb. 8 I
7:30 p.m. I
Admission I
. v I
Students & Faculty : Free I
General Public $ 3.00 for all ACCENT Activities I

' I
... i have a question or a problem ? I
Want to JL cal
IMPRESS L>\ i
Your date STU j
TWICE THIS WEEK L^^^yjj^t^eav^jame^ddres^i^hon^na^
Try the lUtljgbtUer telemachus ciay I
by Lewis John Carlino |
Featuring this week i
Friday and Saturday, January 31 and February 1
TWO SHOWS 8:00 P.M., Constant Theatre '
MON. TUE.WED. LOCAL TALENT I
THURS. FRI. SAT. GAMBOL ROGERS Admission is free. |
bi|^^^^^FOU^OCKSINGER^^
a

NOTICES
THE BRODWAY HIT "MAN OF LA MANCHA
IS COMING. THE DATE HAS BEEN CHANGED
TO SUNDAY FEBRUARY 9, 1969. ADVANCE
TICKETS WILL GO ON SALE MONDAY JAN. 27
AT THE JWRU BOX OFFICE, BELK LINSEY AND
THE RECORDJAR^

TO ALL S.G. BUDGETED ORGANIZATIONS: I
ALL BUDGET REQUESTS FOR YEAR 69-70 ARE DUE I
IN THE OFFICE OF THE TREASURE OF THE STUDENT i
BODY BY FEBRUARY 15,1969. FAILURE TO COMPLY
WITH THIS REQUEST WILL RESULT IN A DELAY OF I
THE RELEASE OF FUNDS.
ALSO REQUIRED IS A BREAKDOWN OF ALL |
SOURCES OF INCOME AND AN ACCOUNTING FOR
FUNDS SPENT FOR SEPT. # 69
I
JOHN ENGLEHART
_SEC. Os >

1
SG Book Exchange [
i
The Exchange will be open from 3 PM to 5 PM in
room 206 of the Reitz Union on Monday, Wednesday
and Friday of THIS WEEK. If your slip number does
not appear below, your book was not sold and must
be claimed. ,|
l
56 667 1019-31 *334* 1687 I
104 670-1 1024-5 133 t 1690
142 673-4 1028-33 1356 1692
149> 678-81 1037-8 1361
SJ 41 ? * 1708
267 8 lit 1044-50 1370-1 1710
1057 41 1385-6 1717
2 22? 1063-5 1389-90
289* 2?2 a 1069 1392 1724
*qc !*? 1074-5 1400 1729-31 I
302-3 22a" 1079-83 1402 1734-5
111 731.3 1085 1405
~4.1 5 1087 1409 I
lit lit 109 - 6 1411
321-3 52-1 JJS Wit 4 1
329 31 1108-9 1423-4 I
337 809 10 1116 1428-30
340-1 htl 1118 21 1442 3 I
hil HU 1125 1445 6
348-351 lltll 1127-30 1448
355 6 HIV H 32 1450
360 MO 11345 1453
362 848 1138 40 | 455 |
364-5 852-3 1149 J
367-8 859=60 1151 I
371-2 864-5 1153 471 1
375-6 867 1155-9 4 9
378-80 869 1161-2 1484 I
383-5 871 1165-7 | 4 8
387-8 8 76-7 1169-71 1492
390-91 88Q.1 1173-5 1495
393-5 883-4 1177-83 1505-6
397-8 891-2 H9B 1508-12
400 905-6 1202 1516-7
409 915 1206 1520 I
4,7 920-1 1209-12 1524
420 927 1215-8 1528-34
432-4 929 1222 1536-7
436 931 1224-6 1539-40 I
437 934 1232-3 1548 1
442-5 937 1235-6 1553-5
457 939-40 1238 1558 I
459-61 946 1247-8 1562
466 948 1565
468 950-1 1251-2 1567
472-83 953.5 1271-4 1569 I
485 958-9 1276-7 1590 I
489 961-3 1280 1592
401 965 i 282 1600-1
493 969-71 1285 1 604
496-8 974-6 1287 1607-9
598 978-9 1291 1 620
623 983-90 1294-6 i 631
642 996 1298-9 i 6 46 1
644-6 999 1300 1652 |
650 1005 1306-10 1657-8
654 1007 1312-3 1667
659 1010 1316-8 1677
662 1013 1327 1683
664-5 1013-7 1332 1685
m m