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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
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Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol 61, No. 68

CHARTER STILL PENDING
Left-Wing Blanked
In Recognition Bid

RUSH CHOATE
. .. asks questions
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EDWIN KIRKLAND
.. hears replies
Board Questions
NP Spokesmen
Following an open charter hearing Wednesday night for Southern
Students Oiguni/ing Committee, the committee on Student
Organizations spent an hour questioning spokesmen tor New Party
(NP). another group seeking a charter.
The main question raised after the confrontation was NPs link to
ssocc
The party is not an extension of SSOC," Mrs. Judi Kurman,
steering committee member, said, although there is membership
overlapping."
Fight members of NP are also members of SSOC'.
NP was the second new group requesting an open hearing and the
organizations decided to hold hearings for both groups the same night.
Although more than 90 persons attended the first session, only 20
watched Mrs. Kurman. her husband. Mike, and Richard Troxell deliver
their reasons for charter.
NP is the same splinter group formed by presidential candidate
Eugene McCarthy supporters after the Chicago Democratic
convention.
Kurman said the party is a statewide organization and plans to run
a candidate for governor in 1970.
In the meantime, he said, it will enter candidates in local election.
Movies Cheaper For Students
On Monday the Plaza Theatre will initiate lower rates for UF
students.
Both afternoon and evening rates will be reduced by 25 cents.
All students must show their picture ID to receive the 25 cent
reduction.

I niversity of Florida, Gainesville

I riilax. January 24. 19b9

By OAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Members of UFs radical
left-wing scored a zero
Wednesday night in their
attempt to gain recognition
from the Committee of
Student Organizations.
But they didnt lose any
ground cither.
Usually huddling before
answering questions members of
Southern Students Organizing
Committee failed to make a dent
in the committee's stand that no
decision could be made until
testimony could be analyzed.
The committee listened to
more than 30 minutes of
statements from SSOC leaders
arguing for recognition, then
held two hours of interrogation
to help in making a decision
later.
SSOC delivered its reasons for
charter in the first open hearing
by the five-faculty, four-student
committee in recent history.
Although more than 90
persons attended the Reitz
Union ballroom confrontation,
only four SSOC representatives
were allowed to address the
committee.
SSOC spokesman Fd
Freeman, 4AS, was confident
the committee would endorse
the charter request, but
predicted UF President Stephen
C. OConnell would overturn the
decision. Agriculture
Engineering Prof. Rush Choate,
(SEE SSOC' PAGE 2)

Voluntary PE Undebated

By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writer
Expected debate over voluntary physical
education Thursday never developed between
Physical Education and Health Dean Dennis K.
Stanley and a Student Senate committee on PH.
Joyce Miller. 3 AS, chairman of the
committee, told Stanley the first point of her
committees proposal was to keep mandatory PH
for freshmen and sophomores.
A proposal was made earlier this year by
Secretary of Student Activities Bruce Harlan
suggesting a voluntary rather than required PE
course.
Harlans proposal was endorsed by Student
Government and the Alligator. A Student Senate
committee was appointed to make a resolution
to present to Stanley.
The recommendation was the first of seven
made by the committee. Other points were
onc-hour-pcr-quarter credit be assigned the
course, changing of the grading system to a
pass fail program, and a reassessment of the PH
program.
These are all reasonable proposals, but they
will have to be discussed with my faculty. They
have the last say, Stanley aid.
Stanley said the PH program must be fun.it
has got to be enjoyable, it has to be relaxing.
We need to get more of what students want,

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STEVE FAHRER (L), JOHN SUGG (R) OF SSOC
. . confer on group's recognition


but we cant do everything. Stanley said.
Major discussion was devoted to the aims of
the PI: department. Criticism was made of the
programs depth.
We are working toward the idea of letting
people pursue a sport in depth/ Stanley said. He
cited time, space and money as problems in this
area.
Stanley said his department is continually
making surveys to decide what curriculum
changes arc needed to give the best program for
students.
Only brief mention was made of Harlans
proposal to make PK voluntary. Harlan said he
was still working on the proposal.
But I am willing to go along with the senate
committees proposals at this time, Harlan said.
After he has met with the faculty Stanley said
he would again meet with the committee to take
further steps.
Stanley ended the meeting by commending
the committee for their proposals and the way
they presented them.
Ive heard one of the main problems on this
campus has been lack of communication between
students and faculty. find that I have made
better communication with these people than
any other student group I have met with.
Miss Miller said she felt a great deal had been
accomplished in the meeting and action was near.



Page 2

. Ttw Florida AW*lor. Friday. January 24,1960

I Applications Due
| Today is the last day for filing an application for upper
I division or changing upper division colleges for the 1969 spring
I quarter.
Students graduating in March who wish to continue taking
courses without entering graduate school must also apply by
I Jan. 24 for the spring quarter.
I The deadline for applying for graduate school for spring I
i quarter is Feb. 7. j
I All applications may be obtained in room 33, Tigert Hall. 1
Accent 69 Tickets
Tickets for the Accent 69 Symposium are now on sale to the
I general public at $3 at the Reitz Union Box Office. These
I tickets are good for all Accent speaking events.
| Students, faculty and staff are admitted free to all speaking
I events upon presentation of their IDs.
On-Campus Housing
Problems Surveyed

The Resident Staff Board,
headed by Bob Buck, is
proposing a Housing
Commission be set up to study
problems arising in on-campus
housing.
The commission would study
five different areas: rules and
regulations within living areas;
enforcement of rules and
regulations; the relationship
between housing staffs and area
governments; the role of
counselors, resident assistants,
and student assistants and the
criteria and methods used in
selecting these personnel.
Members of the commission
would come from several
different campus organizations.
The chairman of the Resident
Staff Board, the president of
Interhall Council, a
representative of the Division of
Housing, and counselors for

Arrendondo Room
Clientele Is 'Quiet
By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Business is not going well for the Arrendondo Room in the Reitz
Union.
We would prefer to have about four or five times the volume we
have now, Charles A. Dell, director of the Reitz Union food services,
said Thursday.
I dont like to see a whole buffet for about six people around a
table, do vou? he added.
The Arrendondo Room, on the fourth floor of the Reitz Union is
open from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
He doesnt see the Rathskeller as serious competition.
As ypu can see, he said, scanning the room with its blue drapes
and dark brown furniture, our clientele is quiet.
The buffet luncheon is more informal than the full service lunches
and dinners offered early last quarter.
Vegetables are about 20 cents. Salads, desserts, and soup average
30 cents. Entrees cost about 6S cents.
Dinners are no longer served in the evening hours. That time is
reserved for private parties, seated dinners and cocktail parties, Dell
said.
But we do need the business. Id like to see the room go on, he
said.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of thT
University of Florida and la published fhre times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida. 32601. The Alligator b
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

programming and
administration, would staff the
commission.
St
Also, representatives from the
Student Senate and the
Association of Women Students
would be members.
The Resident Staff Board,
which proposed the commission
in a resolution, also wants to
send members of the board to
meetings of dorm counselors
committees.
Three of the counselors
committees one studying
housing facOities, one dealing
with methods and criteria for
staffing the dorms, and the third
studying Orientation are those
which the Resident Staff Board
wnat to be permitted to attend.
We are interested in opening
lines of communication, said
Buck.

Conference Deals With Sex

By JO ANN LANGWORTHY
Alligator Corrapondont
A week-end conference which
dealt with subjects such as the
act of' intercourse,
masturbation and birth
control was recently presented
to members of the housing staff
and selected students from
residence halls.
This is the first time the UF
has ever has such a conference,
Infirmary Psychologist Carl T.
Clarke said. The presentation
of the subject was frank, open
and in-depth.
Gaike, who was one of the
programs planners, said the
conference wfll act as an
initiating point or kick-off
program for similar ones in
individual housing areas.
Through questionnaires and
conferences with students,
Clarke said it became apparent
to the housing and mental health
staff that the subject most
students were troubled over or
uneducated about was sex or
sexual identity.
The conference was
designed to meet this need,
Clarke said. Therefore the real
value of the conference will
come from the programs that are
developed and carried out this
quarter and next quarter by the
nucleus group who attended the
conference.
It is hoped that the frank
presentation of the subject will
enable student leaders, the
student housing staff and the
full-time housing staff to
speak more comfortably and
directly to each other and to
students who confront them
with question on sex, he said.
Clarke said the conference
was divided into three sessions;
each was two hours long with an
hour for small group discussions
following.
These small groups which
had an equal number of men and
women seem to have been the
most significant part of the
conference, Clarke said. They
provided the opportunity for
individuals to get involved by
discussing their reactions and
opinions to each session of the
conference.
The last group discussion,
Clarke said, was used by the
individual areas to set up
guidelines for a program dealing
wiht human sexuality.
No one program would be
appropriate for the needs of the
whole campus, Clarke said.
The conference has acted
hopefully as a stimulus to

I iWWHisGOMTIMEaiu J|
I^SaAXYS^jf
Ml JOIN THE FUHSCOME

leadership. It is now up to the
individual resident halls.
Clarke said feedback has
already reached his office
concerning plans by Rawlings
and Murphree Halls to have coed
programs and that many other
residence halls including
Jennings and the Towers Halls
were already beginning to plan
specific programs on sex
information.
Commenting on this, Tolbert
Resident Counselor Margaret
Bristle said, Precaution must be
taken to protect the hall against
the controversy that naturally
accompanies the subject.
In planning for those who
want to be involved, students

SSOC In Dark
On Recognition

non PtiUMt
Committee Chairman, said a
decision would be made as soon
as the committee can get
together in private session. No
date was given.
The hearing was marked by
relatively lukewarm discourse
sprinkled with emotional
outbursts from the crowd,
committee members and SSOC
representatives, Freeman, John,
Sugg, 3JM, Steve Fahrer, 3 AS,*'
and David Smith.
The Quartet requested three
procedural changes before the
hearing began:
Elimation of committee
member Bill Cross, assistant
union activites director .because
he is an administrator.
That the committees
executive session be thrown
open to the press and one SSOC
member under the Florida
sunshine law of open
governmental meetings.
Elimation of any
committee member prejudiced
by Board of Regents Chairman
Burke Kiblers recent statements
on radical groups.
Kibler said in an alligator
article Monday he would
personally oppose recognition
of Students for a Democratic
Socierty (SDS) or any similar
organization at any of the
states universities.
SDS has become a national
issue, he said, symbolic with
violence and student unrest.
SSOC was formerly affiliated
with SDS but dropped the title
in its name last quarter.

must also take into account
those who would be offended or
frightened by bringing such a
program into the hall, M Mias
Beistle said.
Although this specific
conference started in October
with joint planning between the
housing and health center staffs,
its impetus cam from a pilot
program conducted in Rawlings
Hall last spring.
Oarke said many of the
speakers and exhibits used in the
recent conference were also used
in the Rawlings program and
that plans were being made to
use them in a similar conference
next year.

During the course of the
questioning the SSOC
spokesmen repeatedly said they
would abide by UF rales to
-carry out their programs once a
charter was approved.
SSOC can be classified
amongst all the organizations of
what is known as the new left,
Freeman told the committee.
You are not judging the merits
of a name, SSOC, you are
judging the ideas of a new social
and political thought here at
UF.
One of the main questions
raised by the committee
members was SSOCs affiliation
with SDS.
There are no SDS members
in SSOC, Sugg said.
Choate asked if SSOC would
disassociate itself with force or
violence which he said SDS was
linked to.
Abiding by UF regulations
would preclude using force to
bring reform, Sugg said.
Committee member Jack
Funkhouser, director of teaching
resources, said he didnt think
SSOC was in the strictest sense a
student group since non-students
admittedly are allowed to vote
on issues.
Freeman mid he could not
deny the charge because SSOC
was baaed on participatory
democracy. Anyone can vote
on anything
In the event we are denied
chartcrship by the committee,
by OConnell or by Kibler we
shall continue to follow the
dictates of our ideology in a
responsible manner, Freeman
said.



isl. ; t
RALPH ABERNATHY
... has confidence in Bevel

Ci>
Union Appears
In Good Shape
t.
By CHRIS SC HA USE IL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Union is holding up pretty darn good, William J. Osborne,
assistant director of the Reitz Union, said Thursday.
He was not aware of the various complaints about elevators, doors
leading into the building that dont open, and the lack of office space
for all organizations that want it.
The elevators may not run as quickly as they do in other buddings
because theres a difference in programming, he explained.
We havent had too many people stuck in them.
The doors are locked because the staff requested it during
extremely cold weather. Hence the signs reading Please use other
doors.
They wont stay shut by themselves due to a faulty mechanism.
The Union asked the manufacturer to look at them three months ago
and he still hasnt shown up, Osborne said.
Additional office space has been requested, but the plans have not
yet been approved by the Union Board of Manager.
Measurements for extra offices have been taken. Original plans for
the building included office space in the open area of the Student
Activities Center on third floor.
Anyone who has complaints can fill out a pink work request which
can be obtained in the superintendents office, or he can put an idea
in the suggestion boxes at each desk in the Union.
We dont have much trouble with vandalism, but a suggestion box
was ripped off the wall not long ago, Osborne said.
The maintenance crew works about 110 jobs a month.
Work orders cover about 20 percent of the regular maintenance
work.
This is a good building and I have one of the best maintenance
crews there is, Wayne Wheele, superintendent of Union maintenance
said.
The building has its faults, but when you think ot how the union
was nothing but a mud pool and a few birch trees, I dont like to
complain because I dont like a few things, he said.
The upkeep is exciting and nerve racking, but it runs far
smoother than in other buildings hes been in.
Unobtrusiveness is an earmark of a good crew.
When the building is running smoothly, you never notice the
workers.
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Conspiracy
"If a conspiracy exists,
and I believe it does, it must
be fully exposed. I call
upon America's oppressed
and victimized to come to
the aid and defense of the
accused man.
7
Rev. Ralph D. A bemathy
January 23, 1969

SCLC Aide: Ray Innocent

ATLANTA (UPI) The Rev.
Ralph D. Abernathy said
Thursday he believes one of his
aides, the Rev. James Bevel, can
prove James Lari Ray is
innocent in the assassination of
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
I have absolute confidence in
his judgment and integrity,
Abernathy said of Bevel, the
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference (SCLC) leader who
offered to defend Ray last
Saturday.
If a conspiracy exists, and I
believe it does, it must be fully
exposed, Abernathy said.
1 call upon Americas
oppressed and victimized to
come to the aid and defense of
the accused man.
Abernathy made the
Replacements
Needed For
Senate Seats
Four student senate seats are
vacant and need replacements.
If students in the college of
journalism or living in Murphree,
Diamond Village or off-campus
are interested in becoming
senators, contact the Student
Senate office, third floor of the
Reitz Union, room 331.
Students will be asked to fill
out an application blank and will
be interviewed by the Rules and
Calendar committee, Senate
Majority Leader Charles Harris
said.

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statement in a telegram released
by the SCLC offices here.
Bevel, long time staffer under
King and Abernathy, is director
of nonviolent education and
direct action for SCLC. and
presently works in the SCLCs
Philadelphia office. In a
telegram to Ray last Saturday.
Bevel offered to defend him and
said. I know you are not
guilty.
Rays attorney, Percy
Foreman of Houston, has not
commented on Bevels offer of
help. Neither Foreman, who is in
Memphis, Tenn., nor Bevel, were
available for comment
Thursday.
Bevel has refused to elaborate
on whatever information he has.
Abernathys telegram statement
was issued after he. Bevel and
other SCLC officials discussed

Do Something Different This Summer
If you are between the ages 1830
In good health
Looking for a challenge
ISRAEL NEEDS YOUI
See Dr. DON A. HALPERIN in
Room 121 C Arch. Bldg. 376-5942
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Friday. January 24. 1969. Tha Florida Alligator.

the situation by telephone on
Wednesday.
Bevel had been subpoenaed as
a defense witness in the Ray trial
by Rays former attorney.
Arthur J. Hanes Sr., the
ex-mayor of Birmingham. Ala.
Hanes, in an interview after
Ray fired him and hired
Foreman last November, said he
had planned to prove that a
black power group with
Communist ties killed King, with
a goal of creating civil
disturbance in the wake of the
assassination.
fPffi

Page 3



Page 4

, Th# Florid* Alligator, Friday, January 24, 1969

Hollander
Leads Life
Os Variety

%
The Greek Way
By M,KE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writar

Sigma Kappa
In recent house elections, the
sisters picked their 1969
administration, to be headed by:
Jan Halker, president; Marie
Perrone, first vice-president;
Mary Ellen McGowan, second
vice-president; Kathy Jenkins,
treasurer; Carin Sargent,
recording secretary;AliceCulley,
rush chairman; Penny Millar,
corresponding secretary and
Mary Anne LaPointe, registrar.
Delta Sigma Phi
Rush and initiation were
highlights of the new quarter
with a beginning pledge class of
eight.
Brother Bob Fort was
honored for making the deans
list in pharmacy, and Little
Sister Elaine Howard was
featured in a gatorette solo
during a UF basketball game.
New house plans were moved
closer by putting the present
structure up for sale. The new
house, located at number 12
Fraternity Row, will be ready in
early September. It is hoped that
the Delta Sigs will be able to
remain in their old house until
September.
Theta Chi
Saturday, the brotherhood
will hold its annual Parents
weekend. Many alumni of Tau
chapter will also be there in
order to honor Dr. Marvin
Gleming, president of the Grand
Chapter and a 1949 graduate of
UF. As well as being an active
fraternity man, Dr. Fleming was
a member of Florida Blue Key.
Alpha Gamma Rho
Maynard Coe, our grand
national executive secretary will
soon be visiting UF. Coe will
spend about two days on
campus and will meet with
various university officials and
leading agriculturists. Meetings
are slated with UF President
Stephen C. OConnell. Dean of
Men Frank Adams, and AGR
brother John W. Sited, dean of
the Agricultural Experiment
Stations.
Phi Kappa Tau
Bill Ryals. past president of
Phi Tau and member of the
HO LY
TRI NITY
SUNDAYS
8*9 : 30ll
ALL KINDS OF
PEOPLE ARE
WELCOME
k II6NEIST
Jv EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
/

A native of the Netherlands. WUfT
Program Manager Mark Damon has been
on the UF campus since 1963.
Prior to his coming to the U.S. in
1957, Damon was in the business of
film-making throughout Europe. He was
connected with Toonder Film Company

Gainesville Bar Association, has
enlisted the support of Phi Taus
34 man winter pledge class to
aid in collecting for the March of
Dimes.
Brother Mike Taylor, our
newest student senator, is now
working with Student
Governments television scries
The Second One-Hundred.
Pi Kappa Alpha
The Pikes new officers for
the upcoming year arc: Charles
Brackins, president; Frazier
Solsberry. vice-president; Lon
Kilgore, social chairman; Phil
Armbrustcr, plcdgcmaster: and
Marc Sharpe and Mike Atwater,
hulo.iin.

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Ltd., located in Amsterdam and
London.
Duni World War II Damon served as
one of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhowers
public relations officers.
In the late 40s and early 50s he
worked as a European radio

ter arriving in America Damon joined
National Educational Television (NET)
and has remained with them.
On a special assignment for NET. he
traveled to Europe to report on the
European Common Market for national
viewing in the U.S.



oTuaenr Accountants Add $3,600
Award To Credit Side Os Ledaer

Florida firms Thursday night
awarded three outstanding UF
accounting students $3,600 in
scholarships.
Awards were made at the
annual initiation banquet for 18
new members of Upsilon
Chapter of Beta Alpha Psi,
accounting fraternity, at the
Reitz Union.
Recipients and donors were:
Jame/ T. Robey, $2,500
facultyfdeveiopment award from
WEEKEN
DOINGS
Ammarntwmmtm
REPUBLIC DAY
CELEBRATION: Indian
Republic day, sponsored by the
India Club. Program includes
Indian music and Indian style
dinner. Baptist Student Center,
Saturday, 6 p.m.
GAINESVILLE LITTLE
THEATER PLAY: The Subject
was Roses, by Frank Gilroy.
GLT Playhouse, 4039 NW 16th
Bhrd., tonight and Saturday.
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER DISCUSSION: Rabbi
Sidney M. Lefkowitz, speaks on
The Beliefs and Practices of
Judiaism. Rabbi Lefkowitz is
leader of the Ahavath Chesed
Congregation in Jacksonville.
Catholic Student Center,
Sunday, 7:30 p.m. CLUBS
STUDENT CHAPTER,
AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES
UNION: Law Professor Fletcher
Baldwin speaks on The
University and Civil Liberties.
Room 361 of the Union,
tonight, 7:30.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST: Alpha Tau Omega
social fraternity house, Sunday,
9:13 p.m.
JOHN MARSHALL BAR
ASSOCIATION: Sandy
DAleunberle, voted outstanding
freshman legislator of 1968,
guest speaker. Holiday Inn on
1-75, today,l2:3o p.m.
BADMINTON CLUB:
Norman Gym, tonight, 7.
CHESS CLUB: Union room
118, 7 p.m.
GATOR SAILING CLUB:
Ground floor of the Union,
Saturday, 10 a.m.
MUSLIM STUDENTS: Union
room 357, Sunday, 2 p.m.
G
GAffESVftif Sham GMer
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM-9:00 PM Mon-Fri

Haskins and Sells.
Curtis J. Green, Jr., 560 C
Haskins and Sells award for
accounting excellence.
Steven Skarda, SSOO award
from Ring, Mahony and Arner
of Miami for accounting
excellence.
Representing their certified
public accounting firms in
making the awards were Jack
Brooks, Jacksonville office of
Haskins and Sells, and Dennis
Folken, Orlando office of Ring,
Mahony and Arner.
Music Lovers
Plan Sessions
All music enthusiasts and
audio buffs are encouraged to
attend the Stereophiles meeting
Wednesday, room 403 in the
College Library at 7:30 p.m.
Qualified technicians will
conduct question and answer

I warn 4 a
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sessions throughout the quarter.
Varying types of music will be
the subject of discussion at the
organizations bi-weekly
meetings.
Members are afforded
discounts on sound equipment
from a local dealer.
Future Realtors
Elect Officers
The UFs Real Estate and
Urban Land Studies Society has
reorganized its program in terms
of more participation of
members.
At Thursday's meeting AU
Holland, 4BA, was elected
president. Tom Infantino 3BA,
was elected vice president and
Earl Sommers, 3BA, was elected
secretary-treasurer.
Membership is not limited to
real estate majors. All students
who have an interest in real
estate may contact Miss Gerry

Bourne, Room 202, Matherly
Hall.
Force Advises
Use Resourses
The foreign aid program of
the United States should place
more emphasis on human
resource development, says a
task force of the National
Association of State Universities
and Land-Grant Colleges.
The task force, including UF
Agriculture Provost Dr. E. T.
York, also recommended the
formation of a small, high-level
agency, separate from the State
Department, which would
assist development.
A position paper was
submitted by the task force to
the federal government
following a study conducted by
Dr. George Axinn, assistant dean
of the international programs at
Michigan State University.

Fridw, January 24, 1969. The Florida Alligator,

r
STUDY IN
CUERNAVACA
Lein to speak SPANISH
Intensive courts*, with drill*,
supervised lab*, and theory
taught by aipariancad Haiican
taachar*.
*sl3s par month.
StaUy hi the INSTITUTE TO*
CONTEMPORARY LATIN
AMERICAN STUDIES.
Examine thamas such a* "Frotest
and it* Craativa Expression in
Latin Amarica and "The Role
of Education in Social Change'*
in 10 to 30 new course* each
month.
Accost to aicailant library.
S3O par credit.
Live in CUERNAVACA
Near Maiico City, at 4,500 foot
elevation, with Maiican families
or in dorm* or bungalows.
Approi. $lO par month.
Request catalog from
Registrar Cidoc W.
Godot, Apdo. 479,
Cuornavaca, Moxlco
L A

Page 5



Page 6

. Th Florida Alligator, Friday, January 24. 1969

Accent Tickets
Now On Sale
Tickets for Accent arc now on
sale at the Reitz Union Box
office for S 3 each. These tickets
are for the general public only
and arc good for all speaking
events.
UF students, faculty and staff
are admitted to all speaking
programs free upon presentation
of their IDs.

Univ. Os Georgia Drops
'ln Loco Parentis Idea

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Aaociete Editor
Two years ago when the UF
was embroiled in the Pammc
Brewer indicent, the in loco
parentis idea of the universitys
handling of students raised its
head, only to be cut off amid
statewide controversy.
The monster has again raised
its head, but this time in
Georgia, and this time its demise
was a quiet one.
The University of Georgia
administration has decided to
throw out the idea in favor of
if a student gets in trouble off
campus, its his bag.
I think more and more the
conduct of a student off campus
is measured against the state law
and his personal conduct rather
than any special university
regulation, UG Dean of Men
William Tate said.
The UF problem arose after
Miss Brewer, then a UF coed,
posed nude in an off-campus
humor magazine.
She was brought before the

Accident Takes Life
of Freshman Coed
Funeral services were held Thursday at the Catholic Student
Center for Carla Claire Hembree, IUC, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
J. D. Hembree of 1137 NW 51st Ten., Gainesville.
Miss Hembree, 18, died at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
on Tuesday as a result of a fall while horseback riding on Jan.
12.
The service was conducted by Rev. George Kirkpatrick of the
Catholic Student Center. Miss Hembrees sorority sisters of Chi
Omega attended wearing black ribbons behind their pins.
Burial will be in West hills Cemetery under the direction of
Johnson-Hayes Funeral Home, Gainesville.
Miss Hembree attended Gainesville High School. Her brother
and sister attend UF.
BEFORE GOING TO
THE RATHSKELLER, STOP
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Faculty Disciplinary Committee
for indiscreet and inappropriate
conduct, found guilty and
placed on disciplinary' probation
by then UF President J. Wayne
Reitz.
The main issue was the UF
took over certain
responsibilities, such as those of
a parent, and therefore could
take certain disciplinary action.
Because of Miss Brewers
insistance tbit UF was not her
parent and therefore should not
oversee her moral health,the in
loco parentis idea was thrown
out in place of individual
responsibility.
Georgias renaissance came
about much more peaceably
though.
Tate evidently made the
decision to make the
changeover.
Were living in a day when
student rights -their civil
rights are stressed, he said.
Instructions we get about
student conduct, the policy that

we are setting and some of the
decisions by the attorney
generalall are beginning to
remove some of the regulations
which we have for problems
off-campus, he said.
Were living in a day when
there is a de-emphasizing of the
old view of in loco
parentis- -that the university
should take the place of the
parents of the students, he said.

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u s >> sHHB jlr
By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Faaturas Editor
Some comments which were overheard concerning some pertinent
issues of our time:
Concerning the photos of the nude girl (?) in the Jan. 23 issue of
The University Report : It just goes to show that most girls should
keep their clothes on.
They re evidently trying to create an issue in order to keepalive.
Sensationalism, that s all. Wouldnt it be funny if OConnell kicked
them off campus?
I thought it was in very poor taste. The girl thoroughly grossed me
out.
It wasn t even art for arts sake. It was just to start an issue.
Concerning Raul Ramirezs in-depth interview with Carol
Thomas:
excellent.. .just great. Too bad the woman cant live up to the
picture that was drawn of her.
How can any competent reporter try to make an agitator like her
into a saint with a cause?
Something s wrong somewhere. Shes evidently full of hate and a
troublemaker. Leave it to the Alligator to tell it like it isnt.
Hxccllent reporting and writing. Really fantastic.
Concerning Servomation Mathias, Inc. (alias University Food
Service):
I want to know why the 15 cent drinks went up to 20 cents.
Im not taking my tray back. Why in the hell should 1? These
arc making enough money off the students, let them pay the
help to do it.
I was really disappointed in the food. Ive eaten in some lousy
restaurants in my time but this beats em all (two businessmen talking
together).
Concerning the Rathskeller:
What a joke. Another university-sponsored project that fell on its
face.
I thought it was just groovy. It beats any of the bars in town.
We had a real good time. Everybody was friendly and the
entertainment was really enjoyable.
I wouldnt go near the place for all the free beer I could drink.
Concerning various and sundry THINGS:
. . the successful capitalist is a crook, a thief. He must be in order
to succeed. His chief concern is stealing from the poor and giving to
himself (this was said with a heavy European accent).
Youll never find another place in the world like Gainesville. The
local citizens are all redneck farmers and the college kids are all wierd.
They work against each other and there is a mutual hatred and
mistrust.'
Shes nuts, thats all. She smiles all the time. Definitely a little
off.
I dropped out of school when 1 discovered it interfered with my
education.
Its no big thing, man. Everybody blows grass. Even the cops.
College Os Education
Aids New University

UFs College of Education is
doing its share in improving
inter-American relations.
Drs. Bert Sharp and Emmett
Williams will be in the
Dominican Republic today
through Sunday, meeting with
administrators of the
Universidad Nacional, the
Dominican Republic's new and
rapidly growing university.
We are overcoming the image
created in the military

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intervention in 1904. Williams
said. The Dominican Republic
is a sore spot in our hemisphere,
and were trying to improve
relations with them.
The purpose of the visit is to
help the administrators of the
new university plan their higher
education and teacher training
developments. An exploratory
meeting will be held to discuss
negotiations of a contract for
long-term assistance.

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Friday. January 24. 19M. Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



1, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 24.1969

Page 8

Weak 'Why' Uncertain How

The reporters stock cliche is the simple
phrase who, what, where, when, why and
how.
Traditionally the inclusion of these
factors in any news report makes, for a
sound, complete story.
Although most newsmen probably give it
little thought, these six elements of the news
story are probably essential to every
meaninful institution of mankind.
Certainly every institution has its who
(human components), its what (meaningful
form), where (location), when (time in
history), why (reason for being) and how
(method of execution).
And institutions which lack clear
definition of these elements frequently prove
to be of inferior quality.
Student Government is an example ot an
institution which, like a mediocre news
story, needs a clearer definition of its parts.
Too frequently Student Government
functions with a weak WHY and an
uncertain HOW. These factors need new
clarity.
WHY: Why does Student Government
exist?
Much like the federal government.
Student Government exists, or should exist,
to serve the people. But, much like the
federal government, too often we find the
people serving the bureaucrats in Student
Government.
An elementary concept of civilization and
ordered liberty is that government exists to
serve men all men and not just small

r=Staff Writings T1
Special People I
Neal Sanders si

I cant help but wonder what
goes on in the mind of the
average Florida student.
We all hear about him, or her.
He is the one that lives out on
16th Ave., doesnt vote in
elections, comes to campus
every day for classes, then goes
home, gets drunk on weekends,
and really has no part of the UF
in him.
The Alligator, Student
Government, and endless
committees have attempted to
reach this apathetic group, shake
them out of their lethargy, and
make them an active part of the
campus.
They havent succeeded. The
average student doesn't write
letters to the paper, doesnt run
for office, and doesnt volunteer
for Project Concern.
I suspect that the reason for
this is because there is no
average student at Florida.
Each student, in his own way,
does his part for the university,
and is very satisfied. We dont
read about these students,
because they never have their
names mentioned in the paper.
It takes a certain flair to
achieve publicity. Every students
on this campus has done his
thing, regardless of whether the
Alligator has reported it or not.
I remember reading an article
about chains of friendships. A
letter was handed to someone. It
would be addressed to someone
important in another part of the
country.
. - y r :

The person would send it to
someone he knew in the general
direction of the eventual
recipient. Letters seldom passed
through the hands of more than
five people before they found
their owner.
A campus is much the same
way. Each person knows
somebody on the inside, and
has at some time contributed to
that persons thinking.
The person, whether he votes
or not, holds opinions, and
voices them. People listen, and
so there are outspoken people
among the non-spoken ones.
Every person is a radical
sometime, and whatever it is for,
he is remembered in that way.
I would close by adding that
the Alligator and student
government are not to be
criticized for looking for
non-existent average people.
We, of the Alligator, and
those across the hall in Student
Government, live in our own
special world. We are surrounded
by people like ourselves.
Yet, we have hundreds of
friends who we know well that
would be classified as average
by those around us who do not
know them. We dont see them
as average because we know
them, and see in each one,
something special that sets that
person apart from every other
one.
Sometimes it takes a while to
open your eyes.

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedew
is the exercise of responsibility*
Harold Aldrich
PtflfejJuA/ Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor
self-serving segments ot society.
When governments are corrupted, either
to serve a military-industrial complex (on
the fede ra I 1e v el) or self-interested
leadership cliques (on the university
level), they cease to be of importance to that
broad section ot society which makes the
social compact possible.
Realistically such corrupted governments
must be short-lived and undistinguished
unless the people are finally and fully made
subservient in spirit as well as in fact to the
masters of power.
HOW: How can Student Government
attain its true goals?
Here is the key. Particularly for Student
Government.
It is too easy to suggest that the problems
of Student Government can be solved by
renewed dedication to the goals of student
leadership or through an end to political

EDITOIHAL

IM
7 Think He s Glad To Be Here

meddling." .... .. ,
For though politics be a dirty word to
some, it is an essential to all government.
Persons in government are by definition
politicians.
Plattitudes aside, the only way Student
Government will ever be really improved is
through pressure v direct pressure from the
people. Such pressure consists of more than
angry letters to the editor, or cynicism, or a
vote to abolish the whole mess.
Such pressure consists of positive and
active involvement by the apolitical section
of student society in that societys political
affairs.
The politicians who serve themselves
alone will not be ousted by words. These
politicians will, if they are ever to be evicted
from their halls of power, be moved by flesh
and blood people.
No other solution is imaginable.
No other solution is possible.
We can reform and streamline the
structure of Student Government from now
to eternity but we will have no real
changes in style until new hands direct the
retooled machine.
And if the day ever comes, when, the
students of this university begin to sincerely
give a damn about what is happening to their
government, the student leadership orchard
will bear more handsome fruit.
For in the final analysis the problem is
people.
The solution is the same new people,
people who really care.



Speaking Out
Placated /Masses
By Michael T. Baird
MR. EDITOR:
The Alligator, in its front page editorial (1/17/69) failed to thank a
few other parties who were instrumental in the success which Joe
Hilliard achieved. You should have thanked Alan Levin, Lucian Cross,
the Freedom Party, SDS, Pamme Brewer, Berkeley, Columbia, FSU,
the French student uprising, riots in the ghettos, and numerous
others.
Anyone who fails to realize that these people and events are
instrumental in all of the changes which the administration has been
forced to grant, is blind. Without them the administration would be
no more responsive to student leaders than they were in the SOs or
early 6os. The administration, Board of Regents, and State
government are desperately attempting to head-off a radicalizatjon of
the student body. They have seen that many of the moderate and
even some conservative students are waking up to the autocratic
reactionary nature of our educational system and especially this
university.
It is significant that the outgoing President of Interfraternity
Council should say I am totally drained of any faith in the
administration at all. (Alligator, 1/17/69) The administrators have
seen, by the change in the national attitude toward Viet Nam, in the
past three years, that protests and demonstrations can influence the
great apathetic majority. The college campuses are beginning to
awaken with students who see our social system as exploitive and
authoritarian. Middle class students are not only smoking pot but
what is worse, they are calling into question some of the basic tenants
of our society.
The administration and the State government is attempting to sifen
off or neutralize the influence of the radicals by a few concessions
such as abolishment of curfews for women and a beer garden on
campus. What better way to seduce the majority of students than by
letting him drink beer on campus? It was unexpected by most; it has
not been demonstrated for; the fraternities will like it and it may
quiet the cry for open housing rules or more self-regulation; it can be
defended as a means of communication between students and
faculty; some professors may go there instead of the A.F.T.
meetings; and it can be proclaimed as the result of men of goodwill
reasoning together. What a warm feeling it will bring to all, knowing
that we live in a just society with such rational and benevolent
masters.
Thus, you play into their hands with your editorial about ... men
who seek forward movement through peaceful means and ... that
constructive change is still possible within the established
institutions.
They are attempting to emulate Charles DeGaulles tactics in giving
a few concessions until they can ride out the storm and consolidate
their power. Then, when the masses are placated and all are again
apathetic, the lid of reaction can be clamped on anew.
Intellectual Sickness

MRMSDITOR:
Mr. Pierleonis derogatory
column on the citizens of
Gainesville (p. 12, Jan. 13),
evidently the first of a series, is
as tasteless and as inexcusable as,
for example, a similar column
derogatory to our brown or our
black associates. (Incidentally, I
am native neither to Gainesville
nor the South).
Attacking all people who
happen to live in a region reveals
the same prejudice and
intellectual sickness as an attack
on all people who happen to
have brown skins.
Perhaps the columns final
claim that its purpose was to
create an understanding of
Gainesville history was
supposed to make the whole
thing humorous. But to me this
was jut as funny as the clai;.

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business. Advertising offices in Room 330. Reitz Union. Phone
392-ISBI. 392-1682 or 392*1683.
-Opinion* expressed in the Florids AlJ or are those of the editors or of
fee writer of the article id not those of the University of Floods

educational purpose following a
Klu Klux Klan statement I saw
about 20 years ago on Negro
savagery, or a similar claim
following a statement I saw
about 10 years ago on President
Eisenhowers loyalty to
Communism.
- The disturbing difference was
that these statements were sent
out in unmarked envelopes
whereas Mr. Pierleonis was part
of a universitys newspaper
and ours at that.
If, through higher education,
men could approach an
understanding of history, many
of our problems would be
solved. But Mr. Pierleonis brand
of understanding will, instead,
create problems.
HERBERT A. SAWYER, JR.
PROFESSOR

OWN FOtUM:
Adoiaml V'tMtot
"There is no hope for the complacent man."
PONT GENERALIZE
Test For Peacefulness

MR. EDITOR:
This letter concerns the most
recent controversies over the
official admission of radical
organizations on this and other
campuses. I find it strange whern
many students, administrators.
Help Boycott
Table Grapes
The Geritol Generation of
tired Americans has accused
those of us who say they want
to improve America of all sorts
of evil things.
Lest it be said that such
idealists are protesters without a
cause, I would like to suggest a
sincere avenue of action for
those who give a damn about
The Other America: Support the
Grape Workers Strike
(Huelga! as the Chicanos call
it) for better working and living
conditions.
Students for New Party is
coordinating a boycott of
California table grapes in
support of the efforts of Cesar
Chavez and others to unionize,
be heard, and earn enough wages
so as to stave off starvation
conditions.
I wont repeat the details that
Lewis Rothlein mentioned, but
Ill add just one: At present rates
a farm worker who is fortunate
enough to work 40 hours a
week, 52 weeks a year would
earn $2386. If you have several
children and you earn less than
S3IOO a year, you are
indigent, according to HEW.
And not every farm worker is
fortunate enough to earn the
magnificent sum of $2386 a
year.
It is terrible that, in this
great land of ours, conditions
such as this should exist. But the
ugly truth is that the plight of
these workers is no better than
30 years ago, when John
Steinbeck was called
Communist for sympathizing
with the wretched of the earth.
Open your eyes, people; you
dont have to read Franz Fanon
or Oscar Handlin to come into
contact with abused, harassed
souls. But, of course, if you so
desire, you may retreat into
your self-centered world of
oblivious security, there to
dream about the greatness of
America, right or wrong.
Its easy to generalize about
the things that are wrong with
this nation. Its much more
difficult to do something
constructive in the way of
changing today's inequities.
If you give a damn about your
fellow man. Call Mike or Judy
Kurman at 372-6819 and ask c
what you can do. If you dont
give a damn, then just continue
to ignore the All-American
squalor all around you.
DAVID MILLER

and Board of Regents personnel
take an immediately negative
attitude toward the admission of
such organizations as the
Students for a Democratic
Society and the Southern
Student Organizing Committee.
If these and other people
would carefully study each
admission proposal, they would
probably find that the
organizations in question differ
- radically from
campus-to-campus. Those who
have taken the time to do a little
research have found that the
SDS and many of their affiliates
are organized on the basis of a
crude confederacy of local
chapters; there is little
policy-making authority invested
in the national offices located in
Chicago.
Consequently, chapters may
be violent in regards to their
form of protest, or quite passive
- depending, on which one

Interfraternity Wants
Headline Clarified

MR. EDITOR:
The purpose of this letter is to
clarify certain points brought up
in your article of Tuesday, Jan.
21, INTERFRATERNITY
COUNCIL BLAMED FOR
RACIAL PROBLEM and Wed.,
Jan. 22, IFCS ZACK
ANSWERS CHARGES.
1. It seems that whoever
dreamed up this headline
never read the editorial in the
IN TER N A TION AL REVIEW
Were Tired
Os Hypocrisy
MR. EDITOR:
Surely Mr. Clark you must
realize that other Americans are
also tired tired of hypocrisy.
All Americans say that
America is great. Well, almost
all. Naturally, those few who
believe differently should not be
brought into the system and
allowed to corrupt it. Their ideas
might start people thinking, or
even worst, questioning!!
I can partly understand the
misty feeling that overcomes
you when you view the Stars
and Stripes fluttering in the
breeze. But of course, I cannot
be moved as deeply as those who
have more practice in being loyal
to countries. You see, I do not
have a giant flag of the
Confederacy on my wall, nor do
I pounce religiously to my feet
whenever Dixie is played.
DAVID BURDETTE, 2UC
P.S. Where was the word
equality, in your letter on
Americas greatness?

Friday, January 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

youre considering. This is why a
peaceful chapter at the
University of Florida may not be
at all like the violent one at
Columbia.
A good test for
peacefulness would be to get
the organizations to agree to a
policy of refraining from the
violent overthrow of the United
States government and any of its
agencies. Os course this should
be applied to all other groups
seeking admission on an official
basis, also.
I dont consider myself much
of a radical. I have often
supported causes of radical
groups, but condemned the
Brownshirt tactics of some of
them. But I do consider myself
rational enough not to submit to
a policy of fear and
generalization when evaluating
controversial issues such as the
above.
STEPHEN W. McGUIRE, 3ED

(Tuesday, Jan. 14, 1969) or if he
did, misinterpreted the points
stated.
2. An Alligator reporter
spoke to me on the phone
Thursday, Jan. 16, and said she
would call back to read the
article that was going to be
printed. She never did;
therefore, I never authorized the
contents.
3. I expressed as much shock
as IFC President Steve Zack, at
the article since I never blamed
the IFC for the racial incident.
4. My editorial stated that
this program would close the
communications gap between
foreign and American students;
the Alligator reported that the
IFC neglected to take action on
a proposal that might have
averted the incident. Its clear
that even if the program had
been adopted in the Fall, the
incident could have happened
anyway.
5. In the editorial and in the
conversation with the Alligator
reporter, I mentioned some
fraternity houses that I knew
had made plans for the program;
this they managed to leave out
of Tuesdays article.
* 6. I had spoken to Steve Zack
on Thursday, Jan. 16, and he
gave complete support to the
idea.
In conclusion, the Alligator
has built up a lot of adverse
publicity for the IFC and for the
foreign students, and I believe
they owe both an apology and a
retraction of Tuesdays, Jan. 21,
headline.
I hope you publish this letter
in its entirety, and in the future
please have your reporters
obtain consent before printing a
story.
MICHAEL T. BAIRD, 7ED

Page 9



Page 10

>. Tlm Florida AMgator. Friday. January 24. 1960

PARIS (UPI)-US. and
South Vietnamese negotiators
reached full agreement Thursday
on how to handle the Vietnam
conference beginning Saturday
with North Vietnam and the
Viet Cong. High diplomatic
sources said the Allies favor an
early cease-fire.
President Nixon's new chief
negotiator, Ambassador Henry
Cabot Lodge, reported the
accord after a 90-minute
conference with Pham Dan Lam,
the South Vietnamese delegation
leader at the talks that will seek
an end to the Vietnamese
conflict.
Diplomatic quarters said that
in their opening statements
Saturday, Lodge and Lam would

Nixon Creates, Meets With
Council On Urban Affairs

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon met for the first
time Thursday with his council
on Urban Affairs and assigned
subcommittees to tackle
immediately short range
problems in housing, hunger,
crime and transportation.
First, Nixon signed the
executive order officially
creating the council and then
met with its members for more
than two hours to discuss urban
needs.
Creation of the council,
chaired by Nixon and composed
of Vice President Spiro T.
Agnew and seven Cabinet
members, was an effort to give
urban problems the same degree
of White House attention given
to national security matters.
Even though 73 per cent of
Americans live in urban areas,
Nixon said in a statement, the
American national government
has responded to urban concerns
in a haphazard, fragmented and
often woefully shortsighted
manner. .. what we have never
had is a policy: coherent,
consistent positions as to what
the national government would
hope to sec happen: what it will
encourage, what it will
discourage."

fRO^
BIRTH DEFECTS! id
MARCH OF DIMES Vj|
* ' .v
Published as a Public Service by The Ffbrida Alligator

Allies Favor Early Viet Cease-Fire

place the blame for the costly,
bloody war squarely on
Communists.
'There are no disagreements
between us, Lodge said firmly
as he emerged from the U.S.
embassy meeting with Lam. He
said the two delegations had
reviewed all the topics which
might come up.
To em p hasize their
newly found unity of view,
Lodge disclosed he would head
the welcoming party at Orly
Airfield Friday morning for
South Vietnamese Vice
President Nguyen Cao Ky, who
is returning to Paris as supervisor
of the Saigon delegation.
Lodges presence at the

Daniel P. Mohnihan, Nixons
urban affairs adviser and the
councils staff chief, said Nixon
created eight subcommittees
headed by council members to
deal with pressing, short term
matters that require immediate
attention.
He listed the subcommittees
as:
Model Cities, headed by
George W. Romney, secretary of
housing and urban development;
Minority Business, headed by
Commerce Secretary Maurice H.
Stans; Welfare, headed by
Robert H. Finch, secretary of
health, education and welfare.
Others were Crime, headed by
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell;
Voluntary Action, headed by
Romney; Internal Migration,
Surplus Food and Nutrition,
headed by Agriculture Secretary
Got a Sick Car?
Our 5 skilled
Mechanics have
over 80 years
experience
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
Corvair Specialist
1031 So. Main 376-7771

DIPLOMATIC SOURCES REVEAL

airfield was in fact a breach of
agreement between the Allies
not to send top-level parties to
airfields for departing and
arriving delegation heads. Lodge,
twice an ambassador to Saigon,
apparently wanted to underscore
both his close personal relation
with Ky and their dose
cooperation on the eve of the
critical talcs.
Lodge and Lam will sit down
to a round table with North
Vietnam's minister of state,
Xuan Thuy, and the Viet Cong
delegation leader, Tran Buu
Kieni, at the Majestic Hotel
Saturday.
Lodge said each side will be
free to talk about whatever it
wishes.

Clifford M. Hardin; ami
Transportation, headed by
Transportation Secretary John
A. Volpe.
In addition, Nixon created
another committee of White
House staff members to
determine what, if any. plans
should be made for the
transition to a peacetime
economy when the Vietnam War
ends.

zp-:; ;?V
l|P& Ist
* IL,. H
* \-y v., v \V V 4
I
*

>4 MARY AMANN
: xq
*
4 Selling at the
* library
4

m
t j a | I e r a i r
f f y V I L I J l Y§ I I bp^l
: MondayFriday 10am % pm
*
* ALL \ :.;
% V 1 v a I ft d
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The American delegation was
reported to be anxious to arrive
at an early de-escalation of the
conflict including a cease-fire,
but Communist negotiators
appeared determined to discuss
political issues.
Under an accord reached at a
procedural conference last

BARGAIN HUNTERS SKCUI
EVERY
MONDAY NIGHT i-spa OMY
M C Ist GARMENT REG. PRICE
2nd LIKE GARMENT
| 4 DAY SERVICE |
makes'recular dry cleaning obsolete
IF YOU HAVE WHITE yR
ELEPHANTS AROUND
YOUR HOUSE, WHY DON'T V MU
USE GATOR ADS? M t fiSST

SUSAN WITHERS
AAA
Selling at the
Service Booth across
from the hub

Saturday, the Viet Cong
delegation will speak first,
followed by Hanoi, then
Washington and Saigon.
Today's working session
between the Allies wass attended
by all key delegates. It closely
reviewed the files on military
and political issues to come up.



Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC.FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices'

PRE MEDICAL &
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS:
Students must register with the
Pre-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 105 Anderson
Hall by Jan. 25. Be sure to bring
with you the full names of all
your instructors and the course
and section numbers.
FOREIGN LANGUAG
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMS: Friday, Jan. 31, is the
deadline for receipt in the office
of Foreign Languages of the
application for all foreign
language functional exams to be
given Saturday, Feb. 8,1969.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
DEADLINE: Feb. 7 is the
deadline for applying for
Graduate School for the 1969
Spring Quarter.
VISTA: Representatives will
be on the campus Feb. 3-7 to
interview persons interested in
their programs. Representatives
will be available in booths
located at the Reitz Union,
Information Booth across from
the Hub and at the Law Center
between 9 a.m. and sp.m.
JANUARY 24 DEADLINES:
Last day for filing an application
for Upper Division or a change
from one Upper Division College
to another for the 1969 Spring
Quarter.
Last day for applying for
Post-Baccalaureat work for the
1969 Spring Quarter. Any
student who graduates in March
and who wished to continue to
take courses, but who does not
wish to apply for Graduate
School must make this type of
application.

FOR YOUR NEXT CAR LOAN... jA
\B( U/ fffiV BCJfr i wWb till fl j
- Interest is HlHaE^mm Mltf^M WUjyp^B
\ computed each month on the unpaid balance and
*=>l If do you aver save when you trade or pay ahead!!
z
yJmmr wM I anywhere else. Payroll deduction avail able for
vV\\ lV--share and loan payments.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION ) A I
sth Avenue at the comer of 12th Street Hours:8:00o.m. 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday ~

BLUB BULLETIN

PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
JANUARY 24: CAMPBELL
SOUP CO. Animal Sci., Bact.,
Chem., Dairy Sci., Food Tech.,
Poultry Husbandry B,M
Degrees. Dec., Mar., June, and
August Grads. Food Product
Dev. Tech., Quality Control
Chemist.STATE HIGHWAY
DEPT, of GEORGIA, CE, B.
STONE & WEBSTER ENG.
CORP. ,BBC, CE, EE, ME, NE,
B. FIRST RESEARCH
CORP. Bus. Stat., Eco., Math
PAN AMERICAN WORLD
AIRWAYS Stewardesses.
ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL
CORP. Medical-Detail
Sales All majors.
ARMOUR-DIAL, INC. Bus.
Adm., Mkt. B. INGERSOLL INGERSOLLRAND
RAND INGERSOLLRAND CO.-IE, EE, CE, ME.
B,M. SCHLUMBERGER WELL
SERVICE EE, ME, CE.
JANUARY 27: AMERICAN
ELECTRIC POWER SERVICE
CORP.-EE, ME, CE, B, M.
SCHLUMBERGER OFF
SHORE SERVICES-,EE, ME,
CE, Bldg. Const., Phy. Math, B.
ASSOCIATED COCA-COLA
BOTTLING CO.,
INC. Accounting trainee, B.
SQUARE D CO. EE, ME, IE,
B. FIRST'UNION NATIONAL
BANK Bus. Adm., Fin., Acct.
Prefer MBA will consider B.
SPERRY MARINE SYSTEMS
DIVISION-EE, ME, B, M.
RING, MAHONY AND
ARNER B, MBA.
LOCKHEED GEORGIA &
LOCKHEED MISSILES-Us MISSILES-Usually
ually MISSILES-Usually interviews technical
majors. SIMMONS
CO. Usually interviews for
sales and non-tech, positions.
AMERICAN SUGAR
CO. Usually interviews for
both tech, and non-tech majors.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Friday, January 24
Union Movie: "Under the Yum
Yum Tree", Union Aud.,
6:00, 8:30 & 11:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movie, 3
shows, Ist show, "Laurel &
Hardy, 7:30 p.m., 2nd show,
"The Victors", 9:00 p.m.,
3rd show, "Godzilla vs. the
Thing", (Horror Movie),
12:00 midnight, South Hall
Movie Room.
Bowling League Organizing, 118
Union, 9:00 p.m.
Saturday, January 25
Gator Sailing Club, Meet:
Ground Floor, Union, 10:00
a.m.
India Club, India's Republic Day
Celebration, Baptist Student
Center, 6:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movie, 3
shows, Ist show, "Laurel &
Hardy", 7:30 p.m., 2nd
show, "The Victors", 9:00
p.m., 3rd show, "Godzilla vs.
the Thing", (Horror movie),
12:00 midnight, South Hall
Movie Room.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Miss. State, Florida Gym,
7:45 p.m.
Union Movie, ''The
Carpetbaggers", 3:00, 6:00&
9:00 p.m., Union Aud.
Sunday, January 26
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C Union,
1:00 p.m.
University Film Series,
' I nternational
Underground," Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Dept, of Interior Election
Commission, 355 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Monday, January 27
Student Government Book
Exchange, 206 Union, 3:00
p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 254 & 245
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.

Friday, January 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Self Defense Lessons for
Women, C-4 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs. Ole
Miss, Florida Gym, 7:45 p.m.
Tuesday, January 28
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet supper.
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, Water colors,
C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
MENSA Lecture, Speakers: Drs.
Sidney Jourard and Clifford
H. Swinson, "The Group
Phenomenan", 105 B, Fine
Arts Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Dept, of Music, Florida String
Quartet, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for:
Preservation Hall, Jazz
Concert, M. Philippi T.
deVosjali, Audubon Wildlife
Film Series, University Film
Series, The New Folk, and
The Graham Area Playboy
Party.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

nrVVWVVVWW.V.VAJWWUWWWWUUWWVW
FOR SALE I
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-66-p)
Boa constrictor & accessories
excellent hobby. 378-6577 evenings.
(A-3t-65-p)
Honda Sport 50. S9O firm. Call David
392-8280 after 5 p.m. (A-st-66-p)
Sell Honda C 8350 140 miles, perfect
condition. Very clean, very fast,
S6OO. Call Frank after 7 p.m.. Lake
Butler, 496-3651. (A-4t-66-p)
Gibson guitar model E5335. Cherry
red finish. Custom made, includes
Bixby-tremlo bar, case and more. Call
Ocala 629-5981 After 5 pm. (A-4t-65
ABSOLUTELY MUST SELL. By this
weekend Sears 50cc $8( or best
offer. Excellent condition 3787358
3769365 Ask for Vic. (A-5 :-65-p)
Honda 50 good condition. Helmet
and bookrack included. $l2O. Call
Tom, 376-3184. (A-3t-66-p)
1967 Red Manx body on VW chassis,
SIOOO, hi standard supermatic
citation 22 cal target pistol S7O, mi
carbine SSO, TV S2O. 372-6722.
Apartment size washing machine,
excellent condition, portable, cheap.
Call 376-8315 anytime. (A-3t-67-p)
Airboat 65 continental 12x4 ft. Steel
bottom. See Mike, Apt. 7, Colonial
Manor. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
(A-3t-67-p)
Going road racing at Daytona. Must
sell scramblers: 350 cc Honda
scrambler, Harmon Collins cam close
ratio, X-mission, very competitive.
$550 Honda 175 Scrambler
extensive head work, very fast, $325.
392-8775 evenings. (A-2t-67-p)
BICYCLE: Schwinn Varsity the
best by Schwinn! Excellent
condition! Contact Greg Marshall,
Murphree M, after 7. 372-9364.
(A-2t-67-p)
Electric bass guitar, 2 electric rhythm
guitars, 1 Yamaha amp, 1 harmony
amp, Brand % new, best offer,
378-6562. Tues. & Thurs. after 5:30.
(A-st-67-p)
69 Datsun tudor with radio, balance
of warranty, mint condition. $1650,
a new car offer at a saving. Phone
376-4449. (A-3t-67-p)
Must sell 1969 Honda CI-175. Brand
new, no miles, $525. 392-8775
evenings, Steve. (A-2t-67-p)
Hammarlund Hq-170, Dx-60 and
Vfo. Complete ham station, $220,
372-8129 after six. (A-3t-68-p)
Arrendonda Estates 69 Archer 2
bedroom 12 ft. x 60 ft. SSOO cash,
$86.33 month, local bank financing.
Lot $25 mo. 372-5604, 5 to 7 pm.
(A-st-68-p)
Unitron refracting telescope with
finder scope, five eyepieces in
rotating base, slow motion controls,
two wooden cases for telescope and
tripod. $99.95. (A-lt-68-p)
FOR RENT
To sublet lovely IBr. Apt. University
Gardens Choice
BuildingCompletely furnished. Call
376-0651 after 5 pm. (st-B-65-p)
Suddenly available, single bedroom
near campus, AC, Danish modern
furn. $lO3 per month, sub-let. 1624
NW 4th Ave. Apt. 111. 372-1714.
(B-st-67-p)
Immediate sublet upstairs poolside
2 bedroom Village Park Apartment.
January rent paid, will transfer
damage deposit, lease till June,
378-8382. (B-st-64-p)
Sublet modern furn. eff. 2 blocks
from campus. AC, pool, utilities paid
except electric. Contact Paul
Westbury at University Apts, or call
376-8990. (B-4t-67-p)
1 bedroom furnished apt. w/w carpet
panelled central air/heat laundry, big
closets, convenient. Sublet sllO.
Feb. 1. Call evenings, 372-3771.
(B-3t-65-p)
I BCHNIE
AT 1
I
WAREEM
BEATTY I
PAYE.!
BUWWAYI
HI* ALSO felt I
MJVkJk nrwuat I
i no usjwwrt
STaieeKeiMrois

I FOR RENT I
Immediate sublet furnished eff. apt.
AC, gas, heat.f $75. Convenient to
shops, schooh Lease till June,
376-9936. (B-StJ6B-p)
| WANTED
&:mw!9Woicm is gma.i.Bs
Male roommate to share 3 bedroom
IV2 bath house with central air and
heat, separate bedrooms. Occupancy
Feb. $50.00/month plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 378-7041. (C-st-64-p)
Roommates to share 2 br. house, .
blks from campus, cheap for 1,
cheaper for 2. Call Van or Neil,
3 76-2729 eves, 392-1886 days.
(C-st-66-p)
Female roommate for 2 bdrm. Vill.
Park apt. 95 for winter and spring
quarters. Call 3628663 anytime.
(C-4t-65-p)
Special offer. Coed needed to share 2
bdrm apt on SW 16th Ave.
immediate occupancy. Call Audrey.
376-1045 or 376-9348. (C-st-65-p)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-st-67-p)
Wanted: mature male roommate
quiet wooded area behind So.
Holiday Inn, AC, carpeted, stereo.
Call Ralph, 378-4311. SSO per
month. (C-2t-67-p)

OR
"TH^mWMOUNDWrmwSltllEM^S^s^?^
ALSO AMERICAN INTERNATIONALS
liMINKIKIRrMOBmf
|m| inCOLOR BY PERFECT

REITZ UNION THEATRE Admission 40t
4 A it is unlikely that you will experience in a lifetime
all that you will see in... ||jr
feunwra:
iIiTIN BALSAM MTffl ARCHE MOORE
Paul Lynde-Roberblansingandwymmcirls BAKER, m |
l JAn. 24 6mo. B:oO. ll:QO P.M. I SATURDAY JAN. 25 3:00. 6:00. 9:00 P.M.

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 24, 1969

Page 12

WANTED
i'i*x*x*x*x-v.xx*x*x-xt'x*x*x-x.v;vx*xs*xi
Male roommate Landmark, poolside
apt. $45 mo. plus utilities after 7 call
378-3939 or apt. 112. (C-st-66-p)
Roommate male 2 blocks from
campus, AC, TV, stereo, 41.00 per
month as soofE as possible. Call
378-9721 after 7 p.m. or come to
1105 NW 4th Ave. (C-st-68-p)
ii
MEN AND WOMEN SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT CAM P"
PINE WOOD for boys and girls,
Hendersonville, N.C. (June 17-Aug.
23) General Counselors needed to
live with and care for campers.
Specialty Counselors to teach
Boating, Canoeing, Sailing,
Swimming (WSI), Horseback Riding,
Skiing (be able to drive a boat), Arts
and Crafts, Archery, Riflery (NRA
Inst), Nature, Overnight Camping
(able to drive a truck), Tennis,
Dancing, Drama, Golf. Salary based
on age, education, abilities and
experience also includes room, board,
laundry and other extras. Apply for
applications to T.R. Robertson,
Camp Director, 1414 Felch Ave.,
Jax, Fla. 32207. (E-6t-59-p)
Part time or full time positions open
for airline trained personnel.
Passenger sales, Salary open. Write
P.O. Box 2236 Univ. Station.
(E-st-67-p)
Help! Desperately need tutor for
Spanish 134. Call Becky, 392-7648.
(E-2t-68-p)

HELP WANTED
Need office equipment Salesman in
Gainesville. Call 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply. Personnel Director, Alachua
GeneraL Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)

THRU SAT
ff ttk b< Jhton
T OTOOLE
panavision*
-^4: 15 7:00 9:40 mt'lJ*' ~M
The International
I
Underground theater I
SUNDAY JAN 26
showing twice at 7:oopm and 9:lspm
*
LAST NITE FOR SINGLE ADMISSION OF 50C
SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE AT DOOR
presented by THE UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES

Use our handy
mall In order
form.

l. HELP WANTED I
fes!s!ra< < >:*>>K*>^ B ,s 9l9,wwc4lfl DELIVERY BOYS 11 am to 2 pm,
transportation provided, apply in
person LARRY'S PORE-BOY 1029
W. Univ. Ave. (E-st-66-p)
..k.ww^* wWWA%k w sS,w '' 1
AUTOS I
AH Sprite, 1967 convertible w/boot
& tonneau cover, meichelin x tires &
radio. See Steve, 472 Murphree D or
call 372-9289. (G-st-64-p)



G AT O R CLASSIFIED

f 1 11 autos |
Have 2 surplus cars. 1962 Plymouth
V/8 *325. 1964 Cadillac *1750.
Call 372-9607 or 372-3251.
(G-ts-60-C)
CORVATTT 700. automatic, 4-ooor, n~
& H, good mechanical condition,
*195 or best offer. 376-8039.
(G-2t-67-p)
Saab 1967 3 cylinder oil injection,
radio, heater, excellent condition.
*1375 Call 378-9512 afternoons and
evenings. (G-3t-68-p)
1965 Oatsun 4 dr. sedan, very clean,
radio, heater, new tires, low mileage.
Top speed 90 m.p.h., 25 m.p. gallon.
*550 or best offer. Call 372-8246.
(G-st-68-p)
MGB 64, RBiH, wires, new tires. A
great road machine, *985 or best
reasonable offer. 378-6917.
(G-2t-68-p)
1963 MG Midget sports car in
excellent condition, red, wire wheels
- *6OO. Call 372-7219 or 3855 ivT,
17th Ave. (G-lt-68-p)
VW '62: radio, new speaker 8>
battery, 2 owners, 62,000 miles,
motor recently reconditioned, clean
interior, *6OO. 372-7215 before 5
p.m. (G-6t-63-p)
ninnn waQPnnoonnnfTni rfrrnnnnnrTnnnir
| PERSONAL |
Anyone interested in forming a
boxing team at the University of
Florida, contact Rick, 392-7505,
Tower B. (J-3t-66-p)
Dave go to University Auditorium
January 30th 8 pm de Vosjoli will
talk then. See posted notices for
details. (J-3t-66-c)
Former French Agent Philippe de
Vosjoli will speak January 30th 8 pm
University Auditorium Tickets at
door and Union Box Office.
(J-St-67-p)
Friends of Laura and Helen and all
Plaza people come to the picnic at
the Plaza at 11:00 til forever. Bring
food, friends, love, drink, etc. Wear
your finery! Sat. (J-2t-67-p)
The Friday afternoon club will meet
today 5:00 7:30 at Lamplighter.
All single students, grads, faculty and
staff Ladies' drinks 20c.
(J-lt-68-p)
The worid
is wider
than a window
H *!v
The quarter of a million of
our children born each year
with birth defects deserve
more than mere existence on
the fringes of a fast moving
world.
At more than 100 March of
Dimes Birth Defects Centers
across the nation, teams of
medical experts strive to cor correct
rect correct or moderate nature's
mistakes to give these chil children
dren children their chance for useful,
satisfying lives.
You can help birth defect chil children
dren children open their window to the
world by supporting March of
Dimes programs of research,
medical care and education,
jpgi

I PERSONAL i
t a
Anniwarury party for Killy and Rich
O. They made it one year! Sat. Jan
25 after 9 pm til ? 919 NW Bth PI
3/6-2912. 8.Y.0.8. (J-3t-6fe-p)
MONSTFp~T n T tne ~ GREEN
MONSTER. Love and thanks for a
ann*?h y Mrty H W t* oo having
L lost a found I
Umbrella found after Furman
v?l k # icV' 9ame Ca Bob at
3/6-1153 to identify. (L-3t-68-nc)
Lost: small white cat around SW
16th Ave. Has one blue and one
green eye. Any information please
call 392-1938 before 5 or 378-3455
after. (L-2t-68-p)
SERVICES
>:
OM! Guaranteed to bring relief from
all your suffering. OM! The answer to
the question. Any question! OM
loves you, can help you. OM
(M-st-68-p)

RAZOR CUTTING H
LONG HAIR STYLING
APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
Woom SIM'S BARBER SHOP
817 w. UNIVERSITY AVE
aiiiij
STEVE I
| I IV|CQUEEI\ I
NjliliVflU AS]
| I 'BULLITTI
2nd WEEK!
The word
3:40 Jr 1
5:40 jKgm
all over m^^k
something JjHHRJHB
more
puzzling aHHHjHK
kj m H
I
ROBERT VAUGHI\
JACQUELINE BISSET DON GORDON ROBERT DUVALL SIMON OAKLAND
norman fell- ::: cr.;
gmesni m mrm mmmi TECHNICOLOR* FROM WARNER BROS. SEVEN ARTS
IJfir/MhPJ PERSONS UNDER
pSKtSfST (X) 1/not ADMITTED
TjUjNmjWWWljjjjJ
BIRDS IN PERU
beneath heriey eore lay a desperate desi/e to love
JeanSeberq Maurice Ronei Rerre Brasseur "Birds in Peru"

r SERVICES
Soc<^v.v.v>;wmvVww/-v/A
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want your child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyn's Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center. 5240 NW Bth Ave., ph.
372-6667 or 376-6495. (M-st-66-p)
/
Interested in EUROPE this summef.j
travel alone, on tour or for credilf
prices from *250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-l 3t-61<)
IRONING: If you have saggy shirts
or wrinkled dresses, bring them to
Paradise Tr. Court, NW 13th St. Lot
36. 15c each, 20c starch. Hurry!
(M-2t-67-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)

I add*g Ckmlr /fmUU
"This is one of the most powerful and
deeply moving motion pictures / have ever 1
seen. Harold Aldrich. Editor
THE ALLIGATOR §
"One of the ten best of the year. A I
dramatic study of human courage. |
Definitely worth seeing." I
David Doucetta, Managing Editor 1
THE ALLIGATOR I
"A stark portrayal of man's inhumanity to j
man. Alan Bates' performance will make
this an all-time classic. Norman Going. Editorial I
Advisor THE ALLIGATOR I
The Fixer, Vw
based on tKeVjvJR
Pulitzer Prize Prizewinning
winning Prizewinning novel by
Bedard Wm
Alan Bates
Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith. Elizabeth Hartman,
lan Holm, David Warner, Garol White
*TfX> G GENERAL eud.enc.tl
ISGI PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND I
ISMqJtMt1 SMqJtMtt |
K* w
L^lli
McNAlc.it Ci la i; OHKiu:s(u MN fflfNIiJS
I ICiOR ai MS'VAS
|l¥irMNIU. tUCNIWI IIHHIi I I

January 24. 1969. The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



, The Florida Alligator, Friday. January 24,1969

Page 14

VIETNAM CASUALTIES SOAR
'.'. .* \
196 Americans Killed In Weeks Action

SAIGON (UPI) Allied
efforts to thwart a Communist
buildup around Saigon cost both
sides heavily last week, the U.S.
command reported Thursday. In
the air war, American
headquarters announced the loss
of two more jet fighter-bombers
to Viet Cong marksmen.

Jax Brothers Sought
In $363,051 Theft

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
(UPI) The FBI issued arrest
warrants Thursday for two
brothers, one a bank teller and
the other a one-eyed former
contender for the middleweight
boxing title, in a $363,051 bank
burglary her Jan. 9.
But one source said that
the men had hopped a jet td
Miami Jan. 9, the day of the
theft, and the FBI feared they
might have made it out of the
country.
"They had reservations to
leave the country from Miami,
Mid the source, who adted not
to be identified, but they never
picked up the tickets.
Charged with the burglary of
the small bank at the
Jacksonville Naval Air Station
were Francis Xavier Kilday, 44,
a former teller at the bank, and
John Joseph Irish Johnny
Kilday, 46, once a professional
boxer.
The burglars broke into a
back window of the World War
II wooden structure, operated

a nf ~T
OP ELEMENTARY ;
The Most Student-Minded Businessmer
ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
Whats MEW at tNt
Vf/JP BOOKSTORE*?
MY FLORIDA (in paper & hard back) LYONS
THE PRESIDENTS' MEN ANDERSON
ANTI-MEMOIRS MALRAUX
LORD OF THE LOOMS O'CONNOR
BANKERS, BONES & BEETLES HELLMAN
THE NEW FRENCH REVOLUTION ARDACH
MEN AND AFFAIRS BINGHAM
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THE CHURCH TRAP HERZOG
SACHA GUITRY HARDING
' 0
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
# Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
I Campus Shop & Bookstore

The Allied casualty report for
the seven-day period ended last
Saturday said 196 Americans
were killled and 1,277 wounded.
The US. death toD was the
highest since the week ended
Dec. 14 when 222 Americans
were killed.
The report said 292 South

by the Barnett First National
Bank of Jacksonville, opened the
vault, safe and a lockbox with
three different combinations and
took the cash, most of it in
hard-to-trace $lO and S2O bills.
Francis Kilday had been an
employee for the Barnett First
National for nine years unti he
was fired for taking too much
time off the job last Dec. 20. He
had access to the combinations
while a teller at the naval air
station facility.
John Kilday fought under the
name Irish Johnny in Florida
in the late 1940s and early
1950s and was known for his
murderous left hook. He was at
one time a top contender for the
middleweight title, the FBI said.
The FBI said the Francis
Kilday had a minor police record
including larceny and that John
Kilday had been arrested for
driving while intoxicated in
Ocala several years ago.
The FBI recommended that if
the two men are arrested, they
be held on $500,000 bond each.

Vietnamese troops were killed,
943 wounded and 32 missing,
heaviest toll for the South
Vietnamese army in four
months.
Communist losses were placed
at 2,240 North Veitnamese and
Viet Cong killed, highest in two
months.
U.S. spokesmen said the Allies
had been putting increased
pressure on Communist units,
particularly in areas north and
northwest of Saigon where the
Reds were believed rebuilding
for possible new attacks around
the capital.
The two aircraft losses
reported Thursday brought to
five the number of American
planes shot down over South
Vietnam this week.
Spokesmen said an Air Force
FIOO Supersabre was downed
Monday in the Mekong River
Delta 65 miles southwest of
Saigon. The pilot bailed out and
was rescued. A Marine Corps F 4
Phantom was hit and crashed 19
miles south of the old imperial
capital of Hue. The two men
aboard parachuted and were
picked up.
Meanwhile, American
headquarters issued a report
EUROPE
Absolutely unlike any m
1 otner tour. Write to: j§
1 Europe Summer Tours
I 255-C Sequoia
Pasadena, Celif. 91106 B

i J So high up when they jump that they will light i
I [ torches to help you spot them, jumpers Bill e u, w
J l Booth, Harold Stewart, Jack Cabot, and Bob
| Adkins will attempt to form the difficult Four
* | Man Star" while falling almost two miles, at w J
J i speeds in excess of 120 miles per hour. Their
1 2 target will be to land at the starting line just l
J i before Elimination Racing Begins. J
RACING SUNDAY A PURSE OF SBSO
| There will be a Round Robin of A good car that loses early gats another
i j Racing in street and super-stock -J chance to race. That's the name of the
J i Masses for a PURSE of SBSO game. The best cars run many times. Bo j
Many fans think this is the best Laws and Ns record holding Corvette will 1
ij program drag racing has to offer. be here, along with other outstanding i
j i Well tuned and modified cars that race drivers in the Southeast. N.H.R.A.
| S you can identify with. Cars and Cups and Bucks competition and stock
I I drivers are top performers. elimination plus, E.T. bracket will be 1
! j running as usual. j
GENE OWENS WILL HAVE HIS SHOE IN THE
'SATAN SHAKER AGAIN.
j GEN ADM $2.00
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE WITH PARENTS ;!
!j PRACTICE & TRIALS 11:00- 1:30 ELIMINATIONS 2 P.M. jl
j J GAINESVILLE DRAGWAY P.O. 1646 Gainesville, Florida 32601 J
i J Phone: 904 378-0046 Three and one-half miles north of the Municipal
J i Airport on State Road 225. i J

Thursday which said 6,894
persons had been detained for
questioning in the Allied sweep
of Cape Batangan, a cordon
operation that began on Jan. 12.
The sweep involves troops
from the U.S. American Division
and units of the South
Vietnamese armys 2nd Infantry
Division.
Allied spokesmen said 59
North Vietnamese and Viet
Cong troops have been killed
thus far in the push across the
narrow red clay peninsula. U.S.
losses were placed at five dead
and 36 wounded.
Another report by the U.S.
command Thursday said the
South Vietnamese armed forces
increased in strength by 29 per
cent in 1968. Officials said the
force grew from 634,000 men at
the beginning of the year to
820,000 by the end of
December.
Such a buildup, plus increased
combat efficiency, has been
cited as a major factor to be
DELICIOUS I
il ffi ill steaks I
I fine food I
ffHODSF/J
student prices I
Breakfast served j
daily.
1614 N. w. 13th ST. I
378-0955

considered in any reduction -of
the 535,000-man U.S.
expeditionary force in South
Vietnam.
McDonalds.
Cheeseburgers
As you like em!
... Cheddar goodness
... nippy n tangy
...grilled to taste
...with 100% beef
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McDonalds.
. teygyrkJnd of place.
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CMcOcviim, ro>. tM
201 N.W. 13th St.



f Dimensions Surveys Economic Problems

~ By Alligator Services
Problems surrounding the role
of the United States government
in Latin American economic
integration are critically
surveyed in the current issue of
Dimensions.
The publication, issued
monthly by UFs Bureau of
Economic and Business
Research, contains an article by
William and Helga Woodruff
which attempts to show how the
United States should assess the
economic development of Latin
American countries.
The authors say the U.S.
government should realize that it
cannot set itself up as

Subscriptions Now Available
For University Film Series

Sunday night is movie night
again at the Reitz Union. The
University Film Committees
Subscription Series is now being
organized. Films for the first
third of the series have been
selected and include
International Underground
Films on Sunday; The Best of
Laurel and Hardy, February 2;
and Greta Garbo in
Ninotchks, March 2.
Eight additional films will be
scheduled between March and
June. These will be selected by
vote of the subscription
membership.
Subscriptions are now
available at the Union Box
Office. The cost of series
admissions is $2.50 to UF
students; $5.00 to all others. A
special price of five admissions
for $1.50 if offered to university
students only.

... b
WEEKEND? 0 U ,HB WHAT WE OSLSSS '""
YES aiwaysoo. WOW!
_ a : -f. ''?"'' '* ''_' ._... -r- -; . .
* ~
,<..
> |
P.S. Calling all unattched girls, i.
dont think the Rathskellers not aof FacultyClub lnc dglf)
for you.unattached Florida men JXfltf)fiitiollor
dont! .. ( 7jj[ i

step-by-step- example for
economic success. The
circumstances and historical
situations of the Latin American
countries and the United States
are too different for a do as we
do policy, they point out.
Economists must realize that
it takes an already rich country
to industrialize and eat at the
same time, say the
Woodruffs he is a graduate
research professor of economic
history at the University.
The authors conclude with six
points they feel must be
considered in the assessment of
the Latin American economic
integration problem. They are:
The ceonomic problems of
Latin America are too vast and

On January 26 there will also
be door sales at $.50 each. All
showings after that date will be
by subscription only.
In addition to the regular
series, a special showing of new
kinetic films is planned, and a
student film festival showing the
best student produced films
from all over the country will be
held in the spring.
Special discussions and
seminars will be scheduled
during the year.
Experimental film making is
also projected. James Jobb, a
member of the committee is
currently producing a special
film for ACCENT. When this is
completed, a group will be
organized to shoot a five minute
color film. Those interested in
working on this film are asked to
contact Dwight Godwin of
teaching recources, who will be
the consultant.

complex for the action of the
U.S. government to have
anything but the slightest effect.
The problems of these
people are not to be understood
in a purely economic context.
The core of the problem
lies in the individual
countries even more so in the
mental outlook of the different
peoples not in grandiose
schemes for integration.
A shift in United States
policy is needed from
universal, idealistic solutions
towards indigenous economics.
American economists
should stop claiming universal
validity for industrialization as
the key to economic
development.

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend"
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N. Main St. Phone 376-7581
1 -" 1

Hopes for the expansion
of the internal and external
trade of Latin America,
especially in industrial products
(as a result of economic
integration), are unrealistic.
Dimensions" includes The

#r STCfIK $ HRK
Student Special
( (With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88< Steakburger |
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink ]
| $1.03 Value Only 85{ plus tax
I Steak ri Shake j
1610 -S.W. 13th St. Gainesville I

Friday, January 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Latin American Frame of
Reference by Dr. Raymond E.
Crist, graduate research
profressor of geography at
Florida. The article explains how
and why a people live and see
life as they do.

Page 15



Page 16

i. TNt Flood* AHitor. Friday. January 24,1969

'* -V JmP' > > v i
<# mSH'
,a "^.
4r AMam
jir HHHH
~ ~x

TH SfeiS. '!. HM
GARLITS-BUILT DRAGSTER
... viewed through fisheye lens
Fast Action At Ship
Super stock dragsters will highlight a round robin* elimination
program at the new Gainesville Dragway Sunday at 2.
A purse of SBSO is expected to attract some of the states top
drivers including Bo Laws, of Orlando, in his high powered Corvette
and Rich Bennett and his Gariits-built dragster.
Round robin racing in street and super stock classes offers one of
the most exciting spectator and participant thrills in the sport.
The round robin allows a good car that loses early another chance
to race. The best cars end up running many times under the system.
Elapsed time runs are also slated with a maximum handicap
available of 9.99 seconds. Any ET participants who run better than
predicted times are disqualified.
Frosh Get Numerals

Freshman football numerals
have been awarded 44 members
of the 1968 Baby Gator team by
the UF.
Numerals went to Fred
Abbott, Carlos Alvarez, Jimmy
Barr, Richard Buchanan, Andy
Cheney, Harvin Clark, Jerry
Coker, Tom Condon. Bruce Cox,
Bruce Cutright, Robbie
Dobclstein, Bill Dowdy, Tommy
Durrance, Mike Dwyer, David
Edmonds. Jim Getzcn, Keith
Gilbert. Tim Good.
Bob Harrell. Charles Hood.
Dale Hutcherson, Gary Kadric,
Richard Kcnslcr, Steve Noriega,
David Peek. Gary Peterson, John

ALL WEEK SPECIAL
7 Hamburgers for For 99{
OFFER GOOD JAN. 24-26 FRI-SUN
ALL DAY AT BOTH LOCATIONS
'Ufs AN
Go To
Burger Chef \ uemmuwWJ
1412 N. MAIN ST. liffiEL / I
NEXT TO THE *ls NW 13th S.
OAINESVXE SHOPPING CENTER

Reaves, Mike Rich, John
Schncbly, Doug Sorenson,
Coleman Stipanovich, Eric
Taggart, Norm Tarquinio, Roy
Newsome, Bob Latimer, Frank
Hancock, Billy Latsko, Jay
Lane, Boyd Bagwell, Mark Cope,
Steve Deloach, Bill Gunter and
Bill Franco.
UF Bounds High
The UF has pulled well out on
the other SEC teams in
rebounding, now sporting an
average of 51.9 per game.
Georgia, at No. 2, rates 47.9 and
Kentucky 47.7.

The
Florida
Alligator
MARCDUNN MLL DUNN
fa irti EJfeu 9 0 OrtBEdkmr
Rebounding
Defined
Since there has been much
debate in recent years over the
definitions .of rebounds,
turnovers and assists in college
basketball, Edward S. Stcitz of
Springfield College, editor of the
basketball rules, has tried to
clarify the situation.
He has defined problem areas,
in the hope that the three
categories can be scored
consistently.
His definitions:
A rebound must be credited
for every missed goal if the ball
becomes or continues to be
alive.
A rebound is credited to a
player who recovers a live ball
which has missed scoring a goal
(field or free). The recovery may
be accomplished by gaining
control of the ball by tipping or
batting the ball in an attempt to
score a goal or by tipping or
batting the ball to a teammate so
that teammate or another
member of his team is the first
to gain control of the ball.

It does 0 to 150 A
in 21 seconds. W
Sowedorit hand cdjer
the keys to just any Up
that comes along.
SEE THE "FLY NAVY" TEAM M
on campus' JAN. 27-31 mii&B&mm*:
FLV

' .* / SB
SCH LUMBER GER locates on by lowering I
electrical, electronic and mechanical probat into walls I
drilled by the major oil companies. I
SCHLUMRERGER has for I
graduating engineers to perform this challenging |
work.
SCHLUMIERGER brochures are in the I
Placement and Career Planning Center. |
SCHLUMBERGHt will be on campus for I
interviews on I
MONDAY, JANUARY V \
} Climb aboard **<£s*% V
ll % M
/The S.S. Winnjammer
- Luncheons served from 11 OOAM. W)
Dinners so 1 2 00 P M Ji
t ((
\ Barnie Sher at the Organ
" \ ;\
Thursday. Friday & Saturday
Oysters & Clams on the half shell M
Michelob on draft
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. (\
Reservations accepted W
closed Sundays



Gator Targets: Maroons, Buckeyes

Two big track meets in the
chilly north and a crucial
Southeastern Conference
basketball game headline the
Gator sports weekend.
Now practicing to the tape
recorded soul music of
Mustang Sally and Land of a
Thousand Dances the Gator
trackmen are more relaxed
than ever as they travel to
Columbus, Ohio to duel the
Buckeyes of Ohio State
Saturday.
Latest innovation on the track
is Coach Jimmy Carnes* tape
recorder through which he pipes
sweet soul sounds while his
men warm up for the weekend.
Carnes says he made the move
to pick up the pace of practice.
The new technique was tried
earlier this year by Penn States
basketball team with much
success.

The Florida Alligator
Ipf SPORTS

Dear Editor:
In reference to your reaction
to a recent Fellowship of
Christian Athletes meeting, we
wish to say we regret that you
received the impression you did
as to what the speaker implied,
and, also, how unfortunate it
was that you conveyed this
misconception to your audience.
Perry McGriff, city
commissioner and local FCA
committeeman, was the speaker
so quoted as to say that no one
could be a good athlete without
being a Christian. No other
attendant at the January 16
FCA meeting can remember Mr.
McGriff saying anything more
than that his faith in Christ had
nude him a better athlete.
Obvious to most people,
Christianity is not a wonder drug
that guarantees a starting
position on the varsity squad or
immunity to the Hong Kong flu.
It is merely a search for God
based on the teachings of the
Bible and life of Jesus Christ.
No man can judge as to your
knowledge of God, Mr. Editor.

Campus
Interviews
with
Georgia
Outstanding career opportunities are open
Georgia for Aeronautical, Civil, Electrical and Mechanical
Engineers. Lockheed-Georgia offers a unique combination
of career opportunity and extra-curricular appeals: con convenient
venient convenient resort areas, major league baseball, basketball,
soccer, and football, pleasant year-around Jimate, and
opportunities for post-graduate study.
SEE YOUR COLLEGE PLACEMENT DIRECTOR
FOR AN INTERVIEW ON
JANUARY 27
If an interview Is Inconvenient at this time, you are invited
to mail your resume to: College Relations Coordinator,
Lockheed-Georgia Company, 2363 Kingston Court, S. E.,
Marietta, Georgia 30060. Lockheed is an equal oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity employer.
AIRLIFT CENTER OF THE WORLD
LOCKHEED-GEORGIA
A Division of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

High jumper Ronnie Jourdan
*nd the two mile relay team of
Bob Lang, John Parker,
Eammon OKeefe, Ken Burnaed
will participate Friday night in
the Enquirer Games in
Philadelphia before joining the
rest of the team in Ohio.
Coach Tommy Bartlett's
basketball Gators will be seeking
revenge against the Mississippi
State Bulldogs Saturday night in
Florida Gym.
Bartlett is not sure what his
basketball players have been
eating for pre-game meals the
last two games but as long as
they continue on their hot
streak its okay with him.
The Gators have been
bothered by cool shooting all
season but have suddenly found
the range.

It may seem naive, illfounded
and based merely on you and
your concepts of yourself and
your environment. That would
not make your belief any less
real.
As for us, we are not so easily
satisified. We want proof.
We wish only to help further a
knowledge of God and share His
love. We pray that you will sec
this and see the way may very
possibly be Christ. We believe it
is.
The Fellowship of
Christian Athletes
Rocky Doddridge, Chairman
(EDITORS NOTE: Rocky,
Im glad that you agree that an
individuals belief is up to him
and that each person must find
his own way. As to Mr.
McGriffs comment, it is human
nature to remember only what
you want to remember. I did not
convey any misconception to
my readers, and God knows
this. As to the details of your
faith, I respect them.)

TRACK TEAM FINDS SOUL

In the Gators one point loss
to the Vols they shot a fantastic
.634 from the field. In last
Saturday's 110-65 win over
Furman the Gators shot a
hot .519 from the field.
In the two game scoring spree
Ed Lukco shot a healthy .685.
He hit 17 out of 28 attempts
from the field.
Lukco is our best outside
scoring threat, says Bartlett.
We knew all along he could hit
from the outside now lie is
making believers out of our
opponents. It was his shooting
that kept us in the Tennessee
game.
Andy Owens, 6 5 forward,
has been the top Gator shooter
in the two games. The Tampa
junior hit 13 out of 19 attempts
for an excellent .684. He added
36 points in the two nights and
Bette's Hairstylist
1620 W. Univ. Ave.
University Plaza
Ph. 378-2244

Afll tOVE MAKES
THEDATSUN
T GO ROUND
A DATSUN DRIVER AND ASKEM
ABOUT IT
ASK ABOUT HIS OVERALL PLEASURE WITH DATSUN.
ASK ABOUT THE KIND OF SERVICE NOW SPEC!AUZED
TO DATSUN ONLY AND AVAR.ABLE WITH A SMILE.
ASK ABOUT WARRANTY
ASK ABOUT PARTS
AND ABOUT OAS MILEAGE
ASK ABOUT THE 96-Hp OHC ENGINE
GO AHEAD, ASK HIM WHY HE CHOSE DATSUN
OVER EVERY OTHER MAKE THERE IS.
EACH OWNER HAS HIS OWN REASON. AND
t: \
EACH DATSUN HAS SOMETHING TO MAKE
ALMOST EVERYONE LOVE 11.
TWO TRUCKS NOW AVAILABLE, GOOD SELECTION OF
2-DOOR AND SEVERAL 4-DOOR SEDANS
TWO 4-WHEEL DRIVE DEMONSTRATIONS AT REDUCED RATES
A FEW AUTOMATICS
A FEW WAGONS
COME SEE OUR SPORTS CARS (4 and 5 speed)

pulled down 16 rebounds.
MbriNippi State carries a 4-8
overall record and a 2-4 SEC
mark into the game with leading
scorer guard Chuck Wade pacing
the Bulldogs with a 15.8 average.
Last season MSI defeated the

ItWBP UFs MFRBIMTAirrK|
Mel Ward Jim Harriett I
I '3*-- Ajttt I Dan Sapp Hill Worsham
j" prA\ftf Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
George Corl Harold DeVane
I Fidelity Union Lite Inaurancu Co. iM w. umv. at*.
I NO WAR CLAUSE 376-4208
ASIA, OR'
THE MIDDLE EAST....
AND SIX CREDIT HRS
HWv CoA
n wtltv *-t cone L) T2m. 3
Friday. January 24. 1969. Thu Florida Alligator.

UF 66 65. in the Gator Bowl
tournament consolation game,
then km>cked off the Gators
twice during the regular season.
The freshmen will meet
North Florida Junior College of
Madison in the preliminary.

Page 17



Page 18

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 24, 1969

NEW YORK (UPI) Ashland
College, where defense is the
name of the game, is beginning
to make menacing moves
upward in the weekly United

Clipboard : ** s K ** : ::: : ff:^
>: !v
Bunkers, Splinters And Pizzas (
v!

Within a decade or so, look
for the sandtraps at the UFs
golf course to be colored orange
and blue.
Already being manufactured
experimentally are colored sand
granules for the traps.
Dont adjust your television
sets Feb. 8-9 if youre watching
the Bob Hope Desert Classic
Golf Tournament over NBC. The
sand traps will be red, white and
blue. The patriotic bunkers will
be red on par five holes; white
on par fours; and blue for threes.
We had to have something to
compete with Doug Sanders
attire, explained Hope, Our
traps make the NBC peacock
look anemic.
* *
Also something to look for is
baseball coach Bill Fullers secret
invention that is supposed to be
a device to aid young potential
big league pitchers. Fuller has
kept the project hush-hush for
some time now, apparently
perfecting the device and
obtaining a patent on it.
* *
Latest trend in the stadiums
and ball parks across the country
is solving an old problem of
splinters poking avid spectators
in their buttocks.
Warped and deteriorating
boards are being replaced by
modem benches made of steel,
laminated wood, plastic, fiber
glass and even outdoor
carpeting. Gator stadium
maintenance men, take note.
* *
If and when the UF is ready
to begin construction on a new
indoor swimming pool, perhaps
it will be best for the pool to be
built separately from the
proposed coliseum, according to
swim coach Bill Harlam.
Harlan proposes two-phase
construction, the first of which
would be an indoor pool
followed by the coliseum.
Reason: Government grants are
available that would pay for the
pool if it were used for
instructional purposes at least

(V.. _o_ j
1 i KH| -~.~Sn §
^CS) ?' \=Sl&u L1 =? 0 h

ASHLANDS FOES GET 31.8 POINTS A GAME
Defense Is The Name The Game

Press International small college
basketball ratings.
Ashland, the nations
defensive leader the past three
seasons, has used the same

part-time and for which no
admission was charged for
entrance into the building (a
necessity for a basketball gym).
Another reason: Coliseum
construction would take at least
two and a half years. An indoor
pool could be built in a year.
**
Already underway is a
re-evaluation of amateurism in
American sport.
Hilmer Lodge, chairman of
the U.S. Olympic committee has
already asked President Richard
Nixon to call a nation White
House conference on the matter.
At present, a track athlete
who sells sporting goods in the
off-season is considered a
professional and can be
disqualified from participation
in amateur athletics because of a
techinal fine point in the rules.
Lodge says he does not favor
payment to athletes but we
should implement our rules and
change them with the changing
times.
* *

/^jazz^tg||f
ft/ in the
/ ORIGINAL STYLE W^
I PRESERVATION i
I HALL I
V\\ Reitz Union Ballroom iKr
\v8:00
Students SI.OO Staff & Faculty $1.50
General Admission $2.00

formula to compile a 14-1
record while limiting the
opposition to an incredible 31.8
points a game.
The Eagles displayed their

Someone was listening to
Lodge. The Rules of Amateur
Status governing amateurism in
America put into effect this
month a revision on the amount
of retail merchandise an amateur
can win witout losing his status.
Value was increased to S2OO
effective Jan. 1, and reflected a
return tp the limit that existed
prior to 1968, when a SIOO limit
was imposed. After numerous
complaints, the rules committee,
agreed to the figure but expects
pressure for a further increase.
* *
BOWLING
SUNDAY
SPECIAL
35< per game
or 3 games SI.OO
ALL DAY
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

defensive prowess again last
Saturday by beating West
Virginia Tech 37-18.
The Ohioans, finished fourth
in last seasons NCAA College

Concession boss Bill Squires
says there will be more pizza
pushers in the stands next
football season. Trial contracts
were handed out this season and
things went so well that Pizza
Joe of Jacksonville has been
asked to expand his services at
Florida Field next fall.

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jj^J ~feJrsa!?§s & *>*
||i At your feet, a triumph of Trotter handwork! I
IS The Decanter with handsewed-at-the-sole look. 1
S In Hand Stained Hippy Leather with thats I
W right a hand-polished ornament. The happy I
result? Fancy footwork thats winning the ap- I
plause! Oldmaine Trotters for you gals who want I
an original now, not a copy next season. Choose I
yours in Tabac, Broth or Chili Orange. 8
i v e rs it

Division championships.
While Coach Bill Musselmans
squad stayed at fifth in this
weeks poll, the Eagles did
receive a first place vote from
the 35-member UPI Coaches
Rating Board.
The defensive record
compiled by the Eagles this
season is the best in the 22-year
history of college-division
rankings. They won the
defensive crown last year with
an average yield of 42.7 points a
:ji



4
A Two Votes Against Orange |
* By Beth Graves <

Suggestions for the improvement (sometimes referred to as
4 cr *t* c sni ) n stages of the game of football at the UF have
4 ,been the topic of conversation prior to, throughout and since
J ( the closing of the 1968 season. One of particular interest that
J has been a focal point in the athletic department is the
i introduction and use of orange in the uniforms.
2 Thc idea has bcen tampered with periodically but was
4 recently publicized by two Tampa architects Russ Minardi and
4 Albert Picallo. They have not only voiced their opinions but
4 *have sketched out their ideas and forwarded them to head coach
4 Ray Graves. In short they felt that orange would be an exciting
4 and stimulating color, as well as promoting the state of Florida
,and its citrus industry.
A stimulating idea, agreed, but there is reason and
4 ,background to substantiate the selected apparel of the players.
! f ln the 1960 season the team donned orange uniforms, but they
' 'preferred the white ones (even for home games), so the orange
Trset was shelved.
4 After an outstanding record in 6O, the white jerseys were
4 carried over for 6l use, which resulted in a 4,5-1 tally, and as
4 superstition would have it, blue uniforms gained priority for thc
, home games.
, To date, the Gators have more or less won, lost and tied in
j f every color possible; however new designs are constantly on the
drawing board to create a different effect and possibly a
*' winning mood.
4 UFs name has achieved greatness nationally and with that
' prestige has come televised coverage; this has led to a set
4 standard of dress on the field. A dark jersey is required for the
4 home team (generally the schools basic color) and white for the
4 opposition. For such a production the network cannot afford to
t present a program to the public where both teams appear to
have the same color on (recalling that colors come across a black
and white screen grayish). So, regardless of any favorite
' colors, white uniforms must always be in stock.
According to Graves, the team and coaches always
jT experiment during spring practice with uniforms, headgear, etc.,
to see which combination brings forth the best results from the
S players.
We are attempting to achieve a permanent identity with the

SEC Banks Sport Scholarships

NEW ORLEANS (UPI) A
sweeping change in football
scholarships that would enable a
Southeastern Conference school
to bank up to five grants from
one year to the next and do
away with the league's
controversial overall limit was
approved Thursday by SEC
coaches and athletic directors.
The plan, an adaptation of a
proposal made by the University
of Alabama, will be offered
Friday to the presidents of the
Auto Rally
Saturday
The Hart Rally Team will
hold a Mission Impossible auto
fun rally Saturday.
The rally will begin with
registration at 4:30 p.m. at the
Engineering parking lot. south of
the Reitz Union.
Participants should bring a
pencil, paper, flashlight and spy
kit. Entry fee is SI for members
and 51.50 for non-members.
Good Strvict Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
t;
.
SALES-SER VICE VICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS VICEREPAIRS
r CRANE IMPORTS
-306 E. Untv. Ave. 372-4373
I

10 SEC schools when they hold
their annual winter meeting
here. Only the presidents can
take official action on the
proposed change.
The proposal would keep the
current limit at 40 new football
grants at the start of any
two-year period but allow the
school to give up to 45 such
scholarships the second year
provided it gave out no more
than 35 the first.
W n have spent about a dav

I 69 is the year of I
the CUBANA I
I Order Out or Visit I
H H
I The number I sandwich shop in Gainesville I
I Find out why more and more people are saying I
IA lans Cu banal
I Has the best sandwiches (all kinds) I
[378-1230 [FREE DELIVERY] 378-1252 |

uniforms, Graves said, but we always want the team to look t
sharp and impressive on the field.
If the Gators were to come up with a dazzling, new orange ]
uniform, which seeks to be unique, they might find a closed J
door. Consider that in the SEC that Tennessee is known as The *
Big Orange, and that Auburn University has the identical 4
set-up of the UF, orange and blue. 4
Perhaps a blue uniform with more orange worked into the 4
trim will be suitable to the public, but as for straight orange 4
attire, two votes are already cast against it. 4
First, thc television networks would request a dark-shaded t
orange, which could lead to rust (which is far off thc beaten T
track, and away from the point), maybe even corrosion. J
Secondly, a few years back, the department ordered a sample 4
orange jersey that was to say thc least, flashy, even gaudy, and 4
thc players didnt like it. 4j
Psychologically, blue has been a winning color since 62 when 4
Florida beat Penn. State in the Gator Bowl, and its counterpart, |
white tends to make the Gators look larger and more 4
determined.
Thc Bull Gator summed thc whole matter up appropriately
when he added, I always appreciate suggestions for
improvement, and I agree with thc architects to Give me thc *'
Orange, Shed the Blues. More important, though, its whether
you win or lose, not how you wear thc colors. 4
SHED THE BLUES 2
.. .card sent to Graves by two Tampa architects. 3

at each of our annual meetings
arguing about grants. said
Auburn athletic director Jeff
Beard who is chairman of the
AD coaches group. It's been a
continuous bone of contention
ever since we first set a limit
back in 1956.
The present rule, adopted at
last years meeting in Tampa sets
a limit of 40 new football
scholarships each year with a
total of no more than 1 **s

football players on scholarship
in school at any one time.

SALESSERVICEKINTALS
J WmjMD Authorized
\ V-fiiiiii'y- Smith Corine
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Off lea Equipment

Friday. January 24. 1969. Thu Florida Alligator.

Attendance
Figures High
The 1%8 football season
produced another high year in
attendance for the t'F. Over
460,000 people came to see the
Gators play ball this year.
Home game attendance for the
four home games went over the
222.000 mark this season, for an
average of 55.500. Last season
UF ranked tenth nationally in
home game attendance. For st.\
home games. 355,496 attended
for an average of 59.249.
The largest crowd for the
Gators this season was the
Gcorgia-UF game in
Jacksonville. 70,000 braved the
weather for that one.
The second largest crowd of
the year came to the
Homecoming game against
Auburn, where 63,122 were in
attendance. This was an increase
of two thousand above last
years Homecoming game
These high attendance figures
coincide with the high NCAA
attendance figures for the past
season. The NCAA reported that
the top ten games of the eleven
weeks of the regular season drew
6,861,830, for an increase of
236,573 over last year.
The NCAA also reported that
the top game of the year for
attendance was the Michigan St.
at Michigan game which drew
102,785. fourth largest in the
history of the NCAA.
- Hull
(Your GtMvtttr \
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
%

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida Alligator. Friday, January 24, 1969

I m <1 ineres
Â¥ Never f\ one in every
s '?r io T i
waist ',ll |A ygM
PLAYER of rh-WEEK
Creators of Arby's 1968, **- I B I
ING TO Theres orfe in every crowd who didnt
* JBJE '*l|j§ g et y ear b o k- Theres one in every
H| JV (gj crowd who wants a yearbook. The
w Mm Seminole has a limited number of 1968
vj|g' 'l||. Seminoles for sale in Room 330 in the
BOSTONIAN Neal Walk textbooks-
FLEX-O-MOCS rMeai vtuik new and used
with the reptile I ARCHITECTURAL
This weeks Alligator Player of the Week is Neal Walk for his I IIDMCKIT AMnCIIDDI ICC
lOOk sparkling 35-point performance against the Furman Paladins I w AWU Jvr rLltw
ynht ART SUPPUES
The luxury look and durabil- Walks season high sparked the Gator round bailers to a CTIIHV I A UDC
ity of genuine alligator, at a 110-65 decision over Furman. SIUUT LAMPS
realistic price. Authentic moc- aiitcitc
casin construction .. genuine credentjals also sport a number 6 position jn the GYM OUTFITS
handsewn ron seam ... NCAA statistics for rebounding, with a 16.3 average per game. CIAIC ATCLIIDTC
fashion touch of a tassel-all & F 6 SWEATSHIRTS
superbly crafted in imitation
alligator. Makes good sense! J h e A"-Amencan leads the team m both statistics COLLEGE PETS
Makes good walking pleasure, and P; bemg an inspiration not only to the rt
team, but also to the student body. pa p pp
too! Our ats off to Neal. I COLLEGE SEAL I
MASCOT STATIONERY
sl9 95 FILM AND DEVELOPING
BOOKSTORE
BRANCH STORES-MEDICAL CENTER, BROWARD,
225 w. UNIV. AVE. | TR| SHOP. JENNINGS. TOWERS & The UNION