Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 61

w*
SOUL
"Violence is the only
alternative," said civil rights
activist Carol Thomas when
she left jail earlier this month.
For a profile on one of
Gainesville's most
controversial figures, see page
5.

Supreme Court Justice
Added To Accent Rolls

William 0. Douglas, a liberal Supreme Court justice, world traveler
and author of 20 books, has been named latest prominent speaker for
Accent 69.
Douglas will speak Saturday, Feb. 8, following talks by Sen. Strom
ThrumonH of South Carolina and ex-Sen. Wayne Morse of Oregon.
Douglas has served as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme
Court since his appointment by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in
1939.
A specialist in the relationship of law and business, he received his
law degree from Columbia Law School in 1925, Where he also served
on the faculty.
From 1929-32 Douglas conducted various studies in bankruptcy
for the U.S. Department of Commerce, Yale Institute of Human
Relations and the National Commission on Law Observance and
Enforcement.
Douglas is an avid mountain-climber and world traveler and has
written of his travels in such books as Os Men and Mountains,
Beyond the High Himalayas, and Russian Journey.
This moves the number of accepted speakers to 13 and we still
have a few others to announce next week, said Jeff Weil, Accent
speakers chairman.

Athletic ID Could Solve Problems

By MARGOCOX
Alligator Staff Writer
Problems of cashing checks at the UF
Student Depository without a fee card
have apparently been solved for the
1969 fall quarter.
Joe Hough, director of finance and
accounting, announced that an athletic
ticket identification card would be

k EEP TH IS CARO FOR
ACQU IS ITI OAI OF
ATHLETIC TICKETS

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ATHLETIC TIOCEWDENTtf ICATION CARD UNI VfcKSJ>Y FLORIDA
PRINT
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-MmA \ V ' VlOlATlob onUNIVERSITY REGULATIONS ANO SUBJECTS THE
V -r- T- -Vl J - 1 f 4 \ 'NUH-DEA ACTION
I 1 \ 1 f F \ A>HAAGC oAsi WILL BE MADE FOR REPLACEMENT Os THIS CARD

The
Florida Alligator

'LACK OF COMMUNICATION
Student Senate May
Ignore Faculty Action

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The student senate Tuesday
night declared itself not bound
by any matters the faculty
senate passes unless three
demands in a 331-word
we-mean-b usiness resol ut ion
are met.
The senate prepared the
resolution in response to a lack
of communication between
students and faculty and
evident ignorance of a Board of
Regents revision that gives
students the right to express
their views on matters pertinent
to them.
Student Senator Clyde Ellis,
student rights committee
chairman, and Senate Majority
Leader Charles Harris prepared

CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION

riuiunt lUCRIIMLAIIUN CAHUd Anc ncuuincu A 1 nt
U OF F. ThESE WILL BE MADE WITHOUT CHARGE TO FIRST
TIME STUDENTS FROM MONDAY. MHITHRU FRIDAY
mmmmm in the gymnasium basement.
A $5 CHARGE WILL BE MADE FOR PICTURES TAKEN SUB SUBSEQUENT
SEQUENT SUBSEQUENT TO THESE DATES FOR ADDITIONAL
CALL TEACHING RESOURCES 373-637/

University of Florida Gainesville

issued for the 1969 fall quarter. This
policy would be followed each fall and
the athletic ID would be the only ID
accepted for issuance of football tickets.
The plan has met with the approval
of UF officials. Business Manager Tom
Wells said he was delighted that it had
been worked out and felt it would meet
the need of the student.
The athletic ID will be part of the

KEEP THIS CARD FOR
identification
PURPOSES


the resolution when a faculty
senate member refused to tell
Ellis the revisions that had been
made in the Greenman
resolution.
Emotions had been brewing
since a former faculty senate
meeting when Harris and several
senators attempted to attend a
faculty senate meeting.
Senators at that meeting tried
to oust the students. After
discussion and a two-thirds vote
from the faculty, the students
were allowed to remain.
We were escorted to the
front of the room where we
were hardly able to see, said
Harris.
All we are asking is that the
faculty senators allow us to
present our views on the matters

Ft v
m
W
W N n -
WILLIAM DOUGLAS
... liberal Justice

Thursday, January 23, 1969

that concern the students," said
Ellis.
What we have is taxation
without representation of sorts,
said Senator Bill Sadowski.
I consider this resolution a
mature, levelheaded approach to
a problem. I hope the faculty
senate will react to it in the same
mature, levelheaded manner,
said Sadowski.
But whether the resolution
was rebellious or levelheaded
was a topic of heated discussion.
This is rebellion, and its the
only kind of leverage we can use.
If they dont consider our
desires then we dont have to
uphold their bills, said Senator
Bill Modlin.
Senator Harris said the
resolution does not advocate
open rebellion. We just want the
rights we havent received yet.
We have to hit the mule over
the head and get his attention,
said Harris.
If the faculty senate chooses
to ignore us, then the trouble
they may cause was brought on
by themselves, Ellis said.
Urgency was stressed in
passage of the resolution.
The faculty senate will be
voting next week on pertinent
student matters, and if we dont
pass this now it may be too
late, Ellis said.
The resolution calls for
student representation at the
faculty senate meetings with an
official able to voice student
opinion/
It also calls for the faculty to
provide students with copies of
pending legislation, to allow
entrance to meetings to students
and allow students to consult
about student-pertinent matters.
Other business at the senate
meeting included the appointing
(SEE 'SENATE', PAGE 2)

dual certificate of registration sent to
students prior to the beginning of the
fall term. Both cards will be validated at
the same time when fees are paid.
The new card will carry the same
penalty charge of $5 for replacement as
do the other two ID cards.
During the past fall quarter, students
had trouble cashing checks and
withdrawing money at the depository
because the fee card was being used for
block seating for football games. This
meant the student was without his fee
card for almost a week prior to each
home game.
Because the depository has so take
strict precautions in cashing checks and
allowing withdrawal of money, it is
necessary for them to require students
to show both the fee card and the
picture ID.
It was decided that the depository
would accept the picture ID but this
meant the tellers had to check the ID
against the quarter roll of all UF
students.

America's
Number I
College
Daily

I r
* '*
I -g
i dsi, 1

' .'\y j /,
CHARLES HARRIS
... lack of communication"
Relaxed UF
Print Holes
Proposed
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The Action Conference Task
Force on Freedom of
Expression unanimously
proposed Wednesday the UF
make no rules restricting the
publication, sale or distribution
of literature by students, faculty
or staff.
The proposal states:
This shall be construed to
mean within the academic areas
of the university, that is, the
exterior grounds surrounding
academic buildings and areas
where appropriate.
The right to sell or
distribute within dormitory or
other living areas of the UF shall
be determined solely by the
governing body of the living
area.
The administration of the
UF may enact certain rules
restricting littering of campus
areas, but these rules shall in no
way restrict the right to
distribute or sell literature on
campus.
The proposal will be
presented at the Action
Conference meeting next
Wednesday.
Presently, the provisions
regulating freedom of expression
in the Student Handbook
require requests for sale of
literature in the residence halls
on campus must be directed to
the vice president for student
affairs Lester L. Hale.
The handbook says no
literature can be left in stacks
unattended. Tables, chairs or
signs used in the exercise of free
speech are also not to be left
unattended.
Free speech literature
should be distributed on a
T~* ~r~
person-to-person basis, the
handbook says.
Dean John Paul Jones of the
College of Journalism and
Communications, a member of
the task force, said Wednesday
he had some reservations
concerning the proposal.
I feel that were opening the
door for all sorts of commercial
literature. Most committee
members felt it wouldnt
happen. I hope theyre right, he
said.
Other members of the
committee could not be reached
for comment Wednesday.
(SEE 'LITERATURE', PAGE 2)



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23, 1969

Honor Students Can Get
Cheaper Auto Insurance

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Th9 college male, who
typically pays the highest auto
insurance rates, is getting a break
these days if hes an honor
student, that is. A number of
national companies with
branches in Gainesville are

Senate Resolution

FROM PAGE out
of Howard Rosenblatt as
secretary of academic affairs,
Ralph Nobo to the cheerleading
board of directors and Leslie
Perry to the board of student
publications.

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the full text of Student Body Bill
69-1012, the Student-Faculty Senate Cooperation Resolution,
introduced by Charles Harris and Clyde Ellis.)
THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RESOLVE
THAT:
Whereas, effective communication between faculty, students, and
administrators is vital to the preservation and growth of any
great university as demonstrated in the spirit of the Action
Conference; and,
Whereas, the increase in the size of the University of Florida student
population has terminated direct contact between many
students, faculty, and administrators; and,
Whereas, this lack of contact has generated much misunderstanding,
confusion, and overreaction, especially in those areas of
student conduct so important to student life; and,
Whereas, the Board of Regents Operating Manual revisions passed
September 28, 1968 specifically state that, Student
Government should have clear and defined means to
participate in the formulation of institutional policy
affecting academic and student affairs; and,
Whereas, the Faculty Senate of th£ University of Florida has
continually and conspicuously failed to recognize the vital
need and right for student participation in the areas of
student conduct and academic life; and,
Whereas, the Faculty Senate in particular has made it extremely
difficult for students to receive information concerning
Faculty Senate business and has openly questioned the right
of students to attend Faculty Senate meetings, even when
legislation pending before that body is of significant interest
to the student body; and,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED:
That should the Faculty Senate continue to show bad faith
to the students of the University of Florida by:
1. refusing to provide students with copies of pending
Faculty Senate legislation; and by,
2. ignoring student requests to be consulted on matters
of student concern; and by,
3. alienating, if not refusing entrance to, students
desiring to attend Faculty Senate proceedings,
Then the Student Senate, as the duly elected representative
of the Student Body, shall not consider itself bound by any
matter affecting students passed by the Faculty Senate,
unless students, or their representatives are allowed to
present their views in the consideration of the matter; and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED:
That the Student Senate firmly believes that Student
Government, representing the Student Body, has a right to
send official student observers to any Faculty Senate
proceedings, and that one of these observers should be
permitted to address that body when duly recognized by its
presiding officer; and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED:
That the Student Senate extends such a privilege to the
Faculty Senate.

m

offering discounts to students
who have a 3.0 average or better.
State Farm Insurance, with
rates applying to those under 26,
gives a 25 percent discount for a
B average and an additional 10
percent off if the student has
had drivers education. United
States Fidelitv and Guarantee,

A Birthday Bill was also
passed with the joint
sponsorship of Senators Bruce
Broudeau and Clyde Ellis.
January 21 the day of the
Senate meeting was UF
President Stephen C. OConnells
birthday.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

the Insurance Company ot
North America, Great American,
and Phoenix of Hartford all
offer approximately 20 percent
off the regular rates for the
student with a B, with 10
percent more for drivers
education.
Nationwide Insurance is
contemplating the discount idea
and new and reduced rates for
honor students will be going into
effect sometime next month.
Why do the intellectuals get a
reduced rate? Bruce Courtney of
State Farm Insurance felt that
college and high school students
who make good grades must
spend a lot of time studying, and
therefore have less accidents.
Howard Adams of Adams
Insurance Company, however,
thinks that college students all
have more accidents. Its the
feeling of most of the companies
that instead of a discount there
should be a surcharge.
Allstate Insurance doesnt
quite go with the good
academics equals less accidents
idea, either. It bases its rates on
driving record rather than
scholastic standing. After a
student has driven safely for
three years, he gets a 15 percent
discount, with an additional 15
percent off for drivers
education training.
One company which offers a
big discount but gets few comers
is Cotton States Insurance. We
get mostly farmers here, the
receptionist reported. That
company offers a whopping 45
percent honor discount.
When asked the requirements
to qualify, the woman answered,
I guess itd be about a 3.5; we
havent ever written up a policy
for anyone under this discount.
The student who feels hes
getting a raw deal on his policy
can change and cash in on good
grades if he has them.
Literature
Distribution
L HtOH P*6t OWE
The task force also passed
two other proposals:
The right of UF students
to assemble and be recognized as
campus organizations shall be
determined solely by students,
through appropriate student
government bodies.
Organizations meeting
minimum numerical membership
requirements shall be recognized
as campus organizations
receiving approval from
appropriate student government
channels.
0 Be it resolved that the UF,
through the office of its
president, strike all
unconstitutional clauses from its
loyalty oath.

I Experimental
Classes Begin

By SUZI WHALEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Approximately 300 students
are beginning classes in the
Florida Experimental College
(FEC) this week. Fourteen
sections are meeting including
four added due to the
overwhelming response the
college received at registration,
Douglas Tedards, chairman of
the FEC executive board said
Tuesday.
These sections include
Creative Writing, Basic
Marxism, History of the
Radical Movement and possibly
Zen-Buddhism.
A number of sections have
split into additional groups
because of the number of
students interested in them.
Trends in Contemporary
American Fiction and Radical
Change have been divided into
two discussion groups.
Greatest response was given
to Hank Goochs section, An
Investigation into Sex and
Sexuality, which split into
three groups.
Most groups meet at the
religious centers in the area.
We certainly do appreciate
the various religious centers off
campus allowing the FEC to use
some of their rooms for our
courses this quarter, Tedards
said.

Were Not Jurt ||L
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It helped eliminate a major
problem we had foreseen in
getting the FEC underway, he
said.
Dr. David R. Kurtzman,
coordinator of the group on
Contemporary Philosophical
Ethics and Social Morality,
said his group of 25 to 30
students met in his home
Sunday.
They discussed issues such as
relativism and moral judgments
in applying standards.
In the future Krutzman said
he hopes to investigate what
contemporary philosophers are
saying about social justice and
its relation to radical politics.
Kurtzman said he is pleased
with his group because it is so
variated. The class members
range from UF students to older
people and graduates interested
in learning for their own
enjoyment.
5 ?
Senators §
Absent
!! *1
These senators were absent :
from Tuesday nights Student :j
Senate meeting: Barbara :j
x Baxter, Ronnie Bloom, Tom :
Cone, Marshall Constantine, :j
Mike Hill, Sam Hudman, Bob
Marshall, Lois Ottinger, Jake >|
X Schickel and Alan Starling. ;



Residence Halls May Get
New Judicial System

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Because there is no
organized way to handle
problems in the dorm Interhall
and the Senate Judiciary
Committee are working on a
revised judicial system for the
residence halls, Marvin Sylvest,
chairman of the judiciary
committee said Tuesday.
We are looking for a fair
system with routes of appeal,
and methods for defense, he
said.
Presently, if the floor does

Voluntary Phys Ed
Apparently Hopeless
By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writer

A proposal to make UF physical education voluntary has been
dropped in an attempt to gain credit for the course, a reliable source
in the PE department reported Wednesday.
A Student Government committee will meet today with Physical
Education and Health Dean Dennis K. Stanley to discuss a six point
proposal which would include keeping physical education for
freshmen and sophmores mandatory.
Joyce Miller, 3AS, chairwoman of the committee, would make no
comment on the meeting. Stanley, who retires July 1, could not be
reached for comment.
The committee was formed after Secretary of Student Affairs
Bruce Harlan presented a resolution to Student Senate asking that
mandantory physical education be dropped.
Harlan's proposal was backed by SG President Clyde Taylor and
several other SG officers and was the topic of an Alligator editorial
endorsing the resolution.
A committee was formed from the Student Senate to follow up the
resolution and Miss Miller was appointed chairwoman. Committee
members concerned with the proposal are Ralph Nobo, 3AS, Chuck
Riggs, 3ED, and Sam Davis, 1 UC.
The committee met last Thursday to make suggestions and plan
their arguments to Stanley. A report of their plans to meet with
Stanley was made at Tuesdays Student Senate meeting.

Only One Day
left To Buy
SG Insurance
Friday is the last day students
may purchase student health and
accident insurance for coverage
through Sept. 16, 1969.
Students currently carrying
this insurance have reportedly
not been following the correct
procedure for making claims,
Bob Mandell, SG secretary of
insurance said Wednesday.
Three situations which have
caused problems for the student
and the insurance company are:
1) The student must get a
referral from the infirmary
before he can claim a bill from a
downtown doctor.
2) It is essential to file a claim
to collect. The student must get
a claim form from the infirmary
and send it to the claims office.
3) When filing a claim from a
hospital, send the hospital bill
directly to the claims office.
Students interested in
purchasing the insurance can
contact Karl Scarborough, P.O.
1407, Gainesville.
DEL,C,OUS
k rj STEAKS
TOlOtyj! F| NE food
aHOUSF'i!
$ student prices
Breakfast served
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1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

not accept a decision, it goes to
the area or hall judiciary. If it is
not settled there it goes back to
the floor, he said.
He mentioned kangeroo
courts as a method sometimes
resorted to in residence areas.
The preliminary draft,
submitted by Interhall to the
committee, will be studied and
revised during the next two
weeks, Sylvest said.
Under the current draft the
hall judiciary would cover:
disturbances disrupting the

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hall, floor, or individuals
0 violations of housing
0 property damages
Floor judiciaries would also
cover the first two disputes.
There is a contradiction
between the jurisdiction of these
two bodies which will have to be
cleared up, Sylvest said.
Actions that could be taken
by the area judiciary are
suspended privileges, warning
letters to parents, disciplinary
room transfer, or referral to a
higher body.
The draft does not specify
what privileges would be
dropped.
A student could also be
referred to a counselor or
administrator who may drop all
proceedings against parties
involved on the counselors
request, the draft stated.
For property damages a
student would get a bill through
the proper university channels.
What we want are a lot of
routes of appeal, Sylvest said.
Creation of a campus
judiciary is a possibility, but
functions of this body are vague
in the draft.
It might replace the
Committee on Student Conduct
and handle all appeals from hall
judiciaries and the Student Code
of Conduct, Sylvest said.
The campus judiciary could
expel and recommend severe
reprimand.
But the campus judiciary will
be pending until the Action
Conference proposals for
reorganization of the UF judicial
system are made.

THIS PROCESS 378-3119
MAKES DRY CLEANING
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Thursday, January 23, 1969, The Florida Alliqator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23, 1969

Phi Kappa Theta Cant
Colonize Locally Yet

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Phi Kappa Theta, a national
social fraternity with such
distinguished alumni as John F.
Kennedy and Eugene McCarthy,
wont be colonizing at UF or
at least not for a while.
The fraternity, announcing
that it would have 30 days to
rush, apparently did so without
permission from the
Interfraternity Council, or the
Dean of Mens office.
In a letter to the editor
appearing in the Jan. 14 Florida
Alligator, Tom Ratican, rush
chairman for the fraternity,
stated that the fraternity had
been sanctioned, and given a 30
day period to build membership.
Dean of Men Frank T.

SG Exchange Books
Available Today
The Student Government Book Exchange has released the list of
books sold. Unsold books may be picked up in room 206 of the
Reitz Union from 3 to 5 pm Thursday and January 27, 29 and 31.
Checks for sold books will be mailed to students sometime next
week.

1368 1724 661
1370-1 1729-31
1385-6 1734-5
1389-90 56 lift'
1392 ,04
1400 142 5
1402 ,49 500
25361 702
!??? 265 711-3
? 720-1
f o 276
!!i* 286-7 731-3
1423-4 289 736 9
1428-3 295 7
Util 302 3 800 1
310 803
314-15 8 05-6
[? 5 ? 319 809-10
? 53 3 21- 3 812-8
[? 55 325-6 82 0-2
\AI 329-31 8 2S-32
JJJ 9 337 834-7
340-1 840
1478-9 343-5 8 48
348-351 852-3
!? 6 355-6 859=60
J? 92 360 864-5
1495 362 867
1505-6 364-5 869
1508-12 367-8 8 71
1516-7 371-2 876-7
1520 375-6 880-1
1524 378-80 883-4
1528-34 383-5 891 2
1536-7 387-8 905-6
1539-40 390-91 915
1548 393-5 920-1
1553-5 397-8 9 2 7
1558 400 929
1562 409 931
1565 417 93 4
1567 420 v 937
1569 432-4 930-40
1590 436 9 4 9 4
1592 432 9 48
1600-1 442-5 950-1
1604 457 953-5 s
1607-9 459-61 958-9
1620 466 961-3
1631 468 965
1646 472-83 969-71
1652 485 974-6
1657-8 489 978-9
1667 49 1 983-90
1677 493 996
1683 496-8 999
1685 598 1005
1687 623 1007
1690 642 1010
1692 644 6 1013
650 1013-7
1706 654 1019-21
1708 659 024-5
1710 662 1028-33
1717 664-5 1037-8
. 'tfc
miner Brown
I ONE MILE I
NORTH OF IW/
THE MALL
I 37M5H SST

Adams, when contacted by the
Alligator, stated that no
permission had been given to
any fraternity to colonize at UF.
We have a waiting list of five
fraternities which would like to
get on campus, Adams said.
For that purpose, we have an
expansion committee. Each
prospective colony is
interviewed, and a
recommendation is made to this
office and the IFC.
At this time, the committee
has not interviewed any
fraternities, so there has been
given no permission for
colonization to Phi Kappa Theta
or anyone.
Ratican would not comment

1042 1149 1251-2
1044-50 1151 1271-4
1057-61 H 53 1276-7
1063-5 1155-9 1280
1069 1161-2 1282
1074-5 1165-7 1285
1079-83 1169-71 1287
1085 1173-5 1291
1087 1177-83 1294-6
1090-6 n 9B 1298-9
1100 1 202 1300
1103 1206 1306-10
1108-9 1209-12 1312-3
1116 1215-8 1316-8
1118-21 1222 1327
1125 1224-6 i 3 32
1127-30 1232-3 1334-5
1132 1235-6 i 337
1134-5 1238 1356
1138-40 1247-8 1361

ROBBIE'S I
Best In
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*COLOR TV & BILLIARDS]
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a a|| Real Italian Meat £
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on the progress made by the
fraternity on campus to date.
We will have something to
report next month, Ratican
said, but right now, publicity
cant help us any.
We will be going before the
expansion committee soon, and
several national officers of the
fraternity will also come to help
us out.
However, there is nothing to
say about what the fraternity is
doing now.
IFC President- Steve Zack,
commenting on the prospects
for Phi Kappa Theta, or any
fraternity, colonizing at UF, said
that the IFC should put their
own houses in order first.
I stated in my inaugural
address, said Zack, that I
would be against colonization
until we have every existing
house strong enough to stand on
campus. This certainly isnt true
today.
Phi Kappa Theta, while not
having done anything
specifically illegal in attempting
to colonize here, did sidestep the
accepted path, and so, may find
themselves slowed up when they
are up for approval in the near
future.

Vets Learn Os Benefits
!! S
More than 150 veterans and guests are expected to turnout |
j:j ton ight at 7:30 p.m. in room 310, Electrical Engineering jS
|j Building, south wing, to hear Dwight Sullivan, Alachua Countys jS
Veterans Service officer, talk on vets benefits.
jhe event is sponsored by the UF Veterans Club. John Brett, ;S
£ club president, said he hopes more can make it. jj
£ There are approximately 1,300 Vietnam-era vets going to UF $
on the new G.1.8i11. *i
§ Benefits are available primarily for vets with more than 180 |
£ days service, war orphans and widows of vets who died of $
service connected disabilities.
£ A question and answer period will follow Sullivans talk. All |
£ vets are invited and married ones are encouraged to bring their :
£ wives, Brett said. :
ABC:
The Most Student-Minded Businessmen
ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
; Mothers-to-be j
Come in and see
the latest in
i maternity fashions.
f 4 ,Sm- We carry a
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All Fall and 1
Winter dresses \
reduced 33 1/3% \
anc j £Q(y o |
EXPECTANTLY YOURS
\ 706 W. Univ. 372-3850
Sfree diaper
r t--
>1



wmmmemrr mr @ v
: "V'# 'l^pf'tT* JMjfjfe 4fy ; &>JR. Wk MlfHip.
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m i
FROM WHITE TO BLACK
... she has "soul"

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Despite her White skin, Carol
Thomas has a Black soul.
But it hasnt always been so.
The shades of the controversial
civil rights activists inner world
once resembled that of her skin.
But from the ethnic
neighborhoods where she grew
up in Detroit, to the streets of
Nashville to the somber
sidewalks of Gainesvilles Negro
ghetto to a small cold cell in
Alachua county jail, the texture
of Mrs. Thomas soul hardened
and gradually darkened.
There was a time, Mrs.
Thomas says, when she believed
in non-violence as a somewhat
bumpy but fairly direct road to
integration.
But there was before the
sit-in demonstrations in
Nashville, the endless pleas
before city, county and state
authorities, before the long
nights in jail.
Now she speaks of violence as
the only alternative. She talks
of revolution. She echoes Black
Power feelings.
How did this metamorphosis
of a soul come about? Why did
Mrs. Thomas exchange soft
appeals to reason for militant
slogans?
The daughter of a buyer for a
supplies company, Mrs. Thomas
was born in Ohio 35 years ago.
Her parents third generation
Germans moved to Detroit
when she was still a baby. The
motor Capital was to be her
home for the next 19 years.
It was there that Mrs. Thomas
first met prejudice face to face.
We lived in various ethnic
neighborhoods, she says,
always close to the Black
ghetto.
1 had this long horrendous
German name, she adds. That
was during the forties the
years when Germany was at war
with the United States.
She has vague memories of
rejection because of her name.
But that was a long time
ago another world, she adds
softly. I really wasnt aware of
anything.
After graduating from a
Detroit public school, Mrs.
Thomas entered Wayne State
University. She never followed a
line of study toward a degree,
merely taking courses in
sociology, political science,
Russian.
It was at Wayne State that
she met and- married another
student, Billy Thomas, now a
UF Assistant professor of
physics and astronomy.
Phofos By
Nick Arroyo

4 ... I think this is one of the most hopeful, challenging and tragic
periods in history. And I want to live it. And I want to help make it.
Carol Thomas,l 969.

The Thomas moved to
Nashville, Tenn. in 1952, where
both enrolled at Vanderbilt
University. Six years later the
couple moved to Chicago for a
brief stay and then returned to
Nashville in 1958.
It was in the late 1950s that
the first seeds of the Civil Rights
movement germinated. Billy and
Carol Thomas joined in the
struggle.
They participated in sit-in
demonstrations and joined the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People.
And Carol Thomas soul
acquired a greyish aura. She was
caught in the outer rims of a
whirlpool that was to slowly
draw her whole being into it:
The struggle to reach a
far-fetched ideal.
She now speaks of those early
days in the Civil Rights
movement:
I was driven by just a
humanitarian feeling a
concern for other human
beings, she says. I didnt really
know what I was doing or why I
was doing it. Im still not sure I
do.
In 1960, Dr. Thomas joined
the,' UF faculty. The couple
moved to Gainesville, a few
- blocks from the Negro ghetto.
I had never seen true racism
until I came to Gainesville, she
says. Until then, I was only full
of good intentions.
And Mrs. Thomas uphill
battle -a struggle that would
take her into the ghetto, to city
commission meetings, to
confrontations with police, and
to jail began.
She continued to work with
the NAACP, joined the citys
bi-racial committee and woiked
with other groups advocating
racial harmony.
But she slowly drifted away
from them.
I tried to start lobbying for
something that could answer the
needs of the people as I saw it,
she says. But even the so-called
white liberals didnt want
anyone to rock the boat.
I realized none of the
agencies were doing the job that
needed to be done, she adds.
Whites were not aware of the
Black problems and didnt want
to be, she says.
TTie White liberals tell the
Negroes: Were going to do you
good bring you up to our
standards, Mrs. Thomas says.
But that just doesnt work.
You have to meet human beings

|
v.\v.vA\v.v.v.v. .w.\w.%v;v;w;ojooowoKMoa{wwyjw
Carol Thomas;
Metamorphosis
Os A Soul

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T FROM SIT-INS IN NASHVILLE TO GAINESVILLE'S GHETTO
... a life-long struggle for Carol Thomas

half way. People who scuffle to
survive cant live up to our
standards.
But she remained involved.
Demonstrations, demands, came
one after another.
Then Jack Dawkins came to
Gainesville.
Dawkins is the man that in
less than a year became a
legend among city Negroes. He is
now being sought by the
Gainesville police, charged with
first degree arson and possession
of a firebomb. The Eighth
District Court also wonders
where Dawkins is. He skipped
out on a contempt of court
conviction.
I had met him a couple of
times before he came here, Mrs.
Thomas said.
She and Dawkins soon
became familiar faces around the
ghetto, the city commission,
and later, the county jail.
Then came November of
1967.
A Negro woman charged that
she had been sexually abused
while held at the city jail.
The pair drafted statements
condemning the Gainesville city
commission for its alledged
inaction to the charges.
We had asked for a police
review board twice before and
gotten nowhere, Mrs. Thomas
says.
A Grand Jury investigation
was initiated. But Mrs. Thomas
was skeptical.
I knew theyd never find out
the truth. It wasnt the tradition
of the Black people in
Gainesville, she says.
And, while the Grand Jury
was in session at the county
courthouse, Mrs. Thomas and

Dawkins circulated a
crudely-printed newsletter titled
Black Voices in which they
accused the Jury of being
racist and Klan-infested.
Negro members of the Jury were
labeled Uncle Toms.
Circuit Court Judge James C.
Adkins, recently elected to the
Florida Supreme Court,
convicted the pair of contempt
of court, calling the article
inflammatory and an
obstruction of justice.
A long chain of appeals
finally ended when the U.S.
Supreme Court refused to review
the contempt conviction.
And Mrs. Thomas entered the
County jail. A jail so cold, she
says, that numbed the fingers.
We started a fire in a trash
box to keep warm and they
wanted to charge us with arson,
she says.
Finally, a protest which
police claim was initiated bv
Mrs. Thomas developed into a
near-riot.
After the riot, Mrs.
Thomas says, Wow! We had
heat, blankets and all you
needed to keep warm.
You learn that kind of thing
in jail, she said pensively.
She looked down to her
chubby hands. It was stupid,
very stupid, she whispered.
Mrs. Thomas has now
returned to her three children,
aged 6, 8 and 9, and her small
second-floor apartment a few
blocks from the UF campus. She
spends most of her time meeting
with local Black militants.
Violence is the only
answer, she told newsmen

Thursday, January 23, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

jffmk lk
MRS. THOMAS SPEAKS REVOLUTION
... "the only alternative"

when she left jail early this
month.
Why violence?
Because all solutions we
have tried have not worked, she
says. A lot of people in the
ghetto live for nothing. They
might as well die for
spmething.
But she is not totally
convinced that even violence will
bring equality.
I don't knipw that there's a
solution to racism, she
says.To be born blade in this
country is to suffer profound
scars.
She doesnt think years of
struggle have accomplished
much.
In a tangible way, weve
accomplished very little, she
says. But as far as awakening
people, we have gone a long
way. When I got out of jail Black
consciousness seemed to have
really fermented in the
community.
I remember people telling
Jack and I: 'You have awakened
us, she smiles.
She shrugs off criticism that
she often neglects her children:
I dont want my children in
the type of world thats open for
them, she says. I want to
make it a better world for
them.
But she is not even sure how
much can be accomplished.
Im very tired, she says
softly.
But I think this is one of the
most hopeful, challenging and
tragic periods in history, she
adds. And I want to live it. And
I want to help make it.
She added quietly:
I dont expect it to be a very
glorious ride to wherever it is.
Its going to be very difficult.
I expect to be an outcast.
Maybe thats what I already
am, she said.

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23, 1969

WW.VWWW.V.V.WVAV.\VA%VJ
j KAs Lock A Lot f
Kappa Alpha fraternity is §
§ looking for a place to put c
§ their new house.
The house they have had
I designed is too large for the
I present lot, KA brother Bob $
§ Norton, 2UC, said Tuesday. |
The University Avenue lot ji;
? is for sale and the fraternity is §
ij considering purchasing a lot §
$ on Fraternity Row. |

Education Post Filled
Dr. Emmett L. Williams has been named assistant dean of the
College of Education by UF President Stephen C. OConnell.
Williams, who has served since last March as assistant to Dr. Bert
Sharp, dean of the College of Education, has been an associate
professor of secondary education at UF for the past five years. He is
director of the University-to-School project, in which Latin American
teachers and administrators receive in-training experience, and
recently was director of UFs Middle school Institute.
Before coming to UF, Williams was a curriculum co-ordinator at
Nova School, an experimental, advanced-concept school in Fort
Lauderdale.
Williams also served as assistant to the president of Peabody
College in Nashville, Tenn., where he received his 8.A., M.A., and
Ph.D.
Sharp, speaking of Williams appointment, said We are fortunate
to have Dr. Williams assume these responsibilities. His personality and
experience are great assets to the college and the University.

Border Zone
Drivers May
Need Decals
By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Proposals to drop the UF
restriction prohibiting freshmen
and sophmores from driving in
Alachua County and to
introduce a border zone decal
for students who never park or
drive on campus will be
presented to the SG Parking and
Transportation Committee,
Monday at 3:30 p.m. in the
Presidents Conference Room.
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich and Avery Weiss,
a member of the vice
presidential staff, will make the
formal request.
We want to exempt those
students who dont park or drive
on campus from the new traffic
fees, Goodrich said. He will
suggest at the meeting these
students not be required to
register their cars.
Goodrich said Student
Government may have to
compromise with the Parking
and Transportation Committee
for the sake of traffic and safety
planning. These planning
programs require knowledge of
the number of cars in the
county.
A student (with a border
zone decal) may have to register
his car but will not pay the fee,
Goodrich said.
Goodrich explained that he
and Weiss are making the
requests to the Parking and
Transportation Committee
because the student members of
that committee have not yet
been approved by the Student
Senate and UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
1 1 1 i ii
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS

SAL ES-BER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Unlv. Aw. 872-4873

DROPOUTS
CUtf, WHAT ANI OPP BiRP/ / is£
- X £' \ PO YOU HAPPEN TO / .v. ft ''
~ \ \ KNOW IT SSOWG? J Q^)
...., - w >

RCA
On Campus
Interviews
? v
February 3 & 4
9
Engineering Rotational Computer Systems
Programs or Direct Assignments and Sales
BS and MS candidates in Engineering BS candidates in Engineering, Science,
can talk to RCA, on campus, about our Business, or Liberal Arts and MBAs can
Engineering Rotational Programs, talk to RCA, on campus, about our
Manufacturing Management Development Computer Systems and Sales Program
Program or Direct Assignments in the The Program consists of ten weeks of
area of your skills. Openings are in orma | training at Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Research, Design, Development, that provides you with a broad knowledge
Manufacturing Engineering, Purchasing. 0 f the field of your choice followed by
or Materials Management. a systems assignment at one of our
offices located throughout the
United States.
See your placement officer to arrange an
interview with the RCA Representative.
Or write to RCA College Relations,
Building 205-1, Cherry Hill,
New Jersey 08101.
We Are An Equal Opportunity Employer
IICJI
i '

HI hw
- |
I I
Jmam
DR. EMMETT WILLIAMS
... asst, education dean

BY HOWARD POST
p i'tM 'hi
- jjjr ' j ==^|
c im b, u.id >!' '-. rwr t \N />
SA/le / n / A
Pre Inventory (MfflL
Continues ffffl
SALE 7
20% OFF £
ON ALL HAIR GOODS
1013 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 372- 1189
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS



Thursday, January 23.1969, Tha Florida Alligator.

f Jl PRICES EFFECTIVE
dairy iprrlali
??"'~r^ SeUltS 4 aT !I! SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. / sWy* BU.
Mt'mL h!!? 3 ~ INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE *"* M ** "** PW *"*
s LS. h 22, se * 59 *2*'* **? tmn Breasts (h 2), Thighs
Cheese Dips 55* SMoilt SICOkS ... s l BlffilW n r rum ,* ie k.
.- w £*£?. **** r i M.f9r 59-
c 3 %ob 6 Steaks .- *r FryerWings 29*
Marshmallow Salad .... T 49* Swift's premium Proten Steak* | 1 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
C! Corned Beef Round 72 59* *-w. rl L. cm.
frozen toots Sliced Bacon £ 69* I '"lsm^T 0 1
Frozen Limeade ... 6£ 69* / j^KSSC&ESfS^w^u i i o aa £ i r 1L AQt I 1 (BM r *
MMote Mold CaacMroMd Seyrfw l I 1 *_"...:. * *fi*ine*eenftfinnnnn-V
Frozen Lemonade .6 Z> 69* f i i ir MH r *f 1 "' p,ump N J ky i FF.T.I extra
ggsrjate-k PflaSBBKl d taste.-!-**; ~ *** IffiMaMfima
Yellow Cup Calces .. 'Ut 59* j Sliced Bologna M. 55* I Sinl*.n'. Family Pack
s JP ars *** ** nmt I* Ima- Copeland Wieners 'iT 39* 1,. J.*Artfc- |
SnMer.... 49* i' Carolina Oysters 1 *1 M Rsh Sticks £ 59* Smoked Mullet 79* | I
health A beauty alts T V >Oi f ** r or hon
Mouthwash 'iZ 69* rw nwi w- #J#J Buy 6 tot t Free I 'AZZZIZ. |
EirTmv'*" M-do* Cream Style Com 19* nnri. extra
Ha,r Spray A #JM si CandyT BaT Sale M^GreenStampsM
a Green Peos § com # i 7 w...*e.w o. inaa
Perfect With Fried Chicken, McMuUen I Dial Spray Deodorant
White Acre Peas .4 i. $ 1 I 1 i 4. <.
Heim Rich Red Flavorful dOWH WOdUCC lOMB | 4 <, ' r **
au # h I 14 m. OEd xaaaeeaeeeeee>aaaal>aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa*f
Tomato Ketchup bat. ZD* U.S. #1 Rad Emperor FTTI EXTRA W*
Grapes 7 23* lllllW^GreenStampspg
jkA ILJLJ aim vmii coupon ano porcnaii of IBhUfl
U.S. Commercial North Dakota ...
Red Bliss 20 £ 89* I
Carrots 2 23* I I
mwwwm Potatoes 10 i!., 79* friTjlj*i/Gn!BnStd(nDsF*^
loWl Sweet Potatoes K! 12* t {.iri'hM'toiinAfni
WSZ /TTFIT'v Tomatoes 29* i 12... P k. I
he Cream * Efil^WGreenStamps
Prune Juhe J# 1 Swift,# premium **'
74fM-bIl! uil Pimm, Kraff. HLUIjBH / jRW SHeed H r eY f #PPer
Mayonnaise .... 49* j p I 7 J
ftSSTSm. yKtii fcJpTPflB UA-rB
Soft-Weve Tissue V? 19 ~^s^^.^,.
Ira/ Towels .. .J 7.
SISdSS. 49- Hk^s^hfES
'' jMrss si ...(jwsi^i.Twj
Beef Stew 2 r 59' PeanUt Bars K 53* pBH..., u aim ex I
For Hurry-Up Brmkfents, Plllebury pf 1 "* n* M# IV/1 IN. MAI IN m I .xnnnnnnnnAnnnnnnnnlhnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnr
SSBfeft; ; ~ j|;; KPUBUXN I2S * *" srHteiSbp
Family Nankins 3 hS? Fruit Cocktail 5 s l ll /I I Stouffer'a Quick Froxen
rumilf BWU/IBUm tl ' cot ~~ I Macaroni & Beef
Don't Forget Yeur Scott Instant Potatoes ... rb*. 58* /MaOJU | 11 Vi O*. pkg.
Towel Holder .. 49'

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23, 1969

Page 8

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
4DVr* WMfcvf s th exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
PjKtflKidltA Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
. Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor
p Staff Writings"'* 11 =?
Sadder Days Still
By Uncle Javerneck
There were some of us who, after Robert Kennedys assassination,
cherished only the hope that Richard Nixon would never reach the
White House.
And there are some of us who think that if Monday, January 20,
was not the saddest day in Americas history, it is only because
Nixons hand in government will produce days still sadder.
And I think most of us hope were wrong.
But its hard to wipe out the old image. One reads of or
remembers the driving repetitious hard line of Senators Nixon, Taft,
and McCarthy that anything short of victory was cowardice, that the
soft line stank of treason, that failure in Korea was an inside job.
Can history so easily be expunged that we lose sight of the eager
Vice President whose voice during the mid-fifties was one of the first
to suggest the sending of troops to Vietnam?
Can we forget the hot face, the quivering jaw, and the belligerency
in debate that easily matched Khruschevs?
Can we forget the stinging bitterness with which he lashed out at
the press after his defeat in the 1960 campaign?
There are those who are assured that Nixon is a changed man; the
type sos man that his smoothly-run campaign portrayed. Yet
controversies surrounding some of the very men he has chosen to aid
and advise him suggest otherwise.
Nixons no. 1 challenge is to rise above himself.
And if he can become even a mediocre president he will have been a
truly remarkable man.
[Staff Writing s
The Wooden Rifle
Caron BalkanyJ

Military takeover, I
muttered as I snuck up to Albert
the Alligators cage. The armed
guard stood at attention,
white-gloved hands clutching his
rifle. Albert wallowed
imperviously, gulping
marshmallows.
I was determined not to let
the military establishment stop
me; I wasgoing to paint Albert
with yellow peace signs and
flowers in psychedelic colors. He
would be beautiful, a love gator,
inspiration for every student on
campus and a warning to a
thwarted establishment that
their days of power are
declining.
I approached the cage. The
guard spotted me at once, and
then pretended to ignore me,
but 1 fielt his eyes follow me and
my cans of paint. He remained
at attention.
I set the cans down at his feet.
Im going to paint Albert, I
announced, waving a paint brush
under his visored face.
The guard was silent.
Albert munched.
Didnt you hear me? I
asked a little louder. Im going
to paint the Alligator. I swished
the brush insultingly under his
upper lip.
The guard remained at
attention.
I was furious. It was a trap.
The establishment was trying to
frustrate me into neglecting my
task. I decided to dupe them

superbly.
Listen, you war-monger,
you: Im going to paint that
Alligator and theres nothing
you and all your establishment
hatred can do to stop me.
Understand?
Go ahead, he said quietly.
I was stunned. I stood silent
before I realized it was another
plot.
Whaddya mean Go
Ahead? I muttered.
Just what I said, maam. Go
ahead. I wont try to stop you.
Why not? I screamed
furiously. Arent you supposed
to be guarding the alligator?
No, maam, he answered.
Im just standing here. Im an
initiate of the Billy Mitchell Drill
Team; this is just a tradition
they have. Im not really
guarding the Alligator, so go
ahead.
You mean you wont stop
me? I screamed. You mean
youre standing there in full
dress uniform with a rifle and
youre not really guarding the
alligator?
Rifle? he laughed.
I looked at it again. Wood. A
wooden rifle.
Its like a pledge paddle, he
explained, still staring fixedly
ahead. Part of initiation.
The farce was complete. I left
the cage mystified at the ways of
the war-monger establishment.
Albert remains his same drab
alligator color.

EDITORIAL
Public Hearing Needed

Plans for increased parking fees, slated to
be implemented at the start of next quarter,
have caused a small but growing groundswell
of dissent and anger around the campus.
The Department of Zoology publicly
condemned the plans when they were first
announced last quarter. Plants and grounds
employees have hired an attorney to
represent them in discussions with the
administration about the pending plane.
Faculty members in practically every
college and department have been asking
their colleages to sign petitions protesting
new parking fees. Several faculty, students
and staff have written letters to the editor
opposing what they consider a graduated
tax on employees of the university.
Still others are indignant that faculty will
be required to dish out the dough to solve a
student parking problem.
Amidst all the hullabaloo, one thing is
clear. There is a decided lack of
communication from the administration
about the new plans, how and why they
were formulated.
If for no other reason than trying to
improve everyones understanding of the
myriad problems involved and the differing
points of view present in the controversy,
the issues should be aired at a public meeting
where all can have their say.
Maybe no one will change his mind.
Maybe no differences will be resolved.

Writings 1 mbdbbpbhp=o|
I We Care Whats Printed I
LaMMwaBBBaaBH Clint Duke

Any ardent reader of the
Alligator has noticed the
constant number of gripes
printed on the editorial page.
These are letters from readers
who feel the need to criticize the
Alligators choice of copy.
Some people seem to think
the Alligator staff never bothers
to think about what they write,
edit and print, but Ive got news
for em.
About twice a month an
entourage of students flock to
the third floor office of the
student newspaper for a staff
meeting. They come in every
shape and form.
Fearless Leader Aldrich calls
his staff to attention with a rap
of his ruler on the nearest desk,
typewriter, or head. After telling
us what we are doing wrong, in
his opinion are usually many,
the staff is given a chance to
defend themselves and give any
opinions they might have.
This part of the meeting,
officially known as the bitch
session, has often dragged on
for over an hour. Almost every
topic is discussed, and
considered by those present.
There is just as much
disagreement between staff
members as to what is being

printed, as there are from
readers. The pill issue was
discussed, the Dawkins story,
and many other major stories
come under scrutiny.
And there are many variations
of opinion among the staff.
There have been calls for the
paper to move more to the right
or more to the left. And they are
thought about.
So, before being so willing to
judge the Alligators choice of
copy remember that the staff
does at least as much thinking
about what goes into the paper
as you do. We care just as much.
If you cant believe in sincerity,
remember that most of the staff
hopes to make a living pounding
a typewriter for some
newspaper, and for the purely
capitalistic reasons we have to be
careful what we do.
The Alligators purpose is not
to disrupt and confuse but
inform and clarify. Most of us

The Florida All igator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Burinaas, Advertising offices in Room 330. Rato Union. Phone
392-1681. 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article end not thorn of the Univerdtv of Florida.
-a

But at least the disgruntled can express
their feelings and they who are responsible
for the new plans can explain their thinking
and justify their decision. Publicly.
We therefore urge Mr. Ellis Jones and Mr.
Arnold Butt, two men who have been
instrumental in formulating the plans, to set
a date for a public meeting, a beef session
for all who are concerned about the
pay-to-park plan.
Accent Great
ACCENT is coming.
And it promises to be one of the best
programs ever. Just check off the list of
speakers coming:
Anson Mount, Lou Harris, Jean Houston,
John Finlator, Madalyn Murray, Julian
Bond, Michael Harrington, Melvin Belli,
William Kunstler, Tobias Simon, Strom
Thurmond, Wayne Morse, William Douglas
and others.
The ACCENT committee turned down
some big names because of insufficient
funds: Hubert Humphrey, Edmund Muskie,
Walter Cronkite, Sen. Edward Brooke and
several others.
The ACCENT committee, headed by
Larry Berlin, has worked hard for many
months and a tremendous program is on tap
for the students because of their efforts.
All the program really needs now to be a
complete success is participation. Those who
participate are certain to learn something.
So mark it down on your calendar: Feb.
3-8. And then be there.

believe in this, and work for that
principle.
Were certainly not working
for the monetary rewards this
paper doesnt give.
However, when the talking is
done and a choice made, the
editors and writers do what they
think is best for the student
body and the university. When
this final decision is made, the
staff stands behind it 100 per
cent.
There is one thing that all
newspapers must consider in
their choice of material fqr
printing; it must be interesting
and informative to the reader. If
it is not, the paper will cease to**
exist. On the other hand, the
more informative a paper, the
more readers it will have and the
longer it will last. The one
over-riding factor editors and
reporters must consider in
keeping a paper interesting and
informative is truth. Accuracy is
a must.



Rid Our Campus
Os Dail y Dirges

MR. EDITOR:
We have heard rumors that
the now internationally famous
tower chimes imported from
Trevers Point, Greenland, are
about to resume their daily
dirges.
We are writing to deplore the
resumption of these inane
ditties. In our research, we have
found that this campus is so
involved in great debate that
the really important issues are
forgotten.
In the past we have endured
such moving melodies as
Suwannee River and Hail,
Florida, Hail. We were
awakened by them, marched to
classes by them, chewed gum by
them, and went to sleep by
them. In our opinion, there is
nothing esthetic about them,
there is no melody worth
remembering, the tone of the
chimes is cheap, and there is
absolutely nothing pleasureable
about what they connote.

Nixons Not Guilty
MR. EDITOR::
On Jan. 20, a terrible injustice was committed in Washington, D.C.
5,000 jurors found Richard M. Nixon guilty of a crime he had not
committed.
The demonstrations which took place the day of the inauguration
were meaningless and contradictory to the causes of the radical
movement in the United States. We as radicals have for many years
demanded a fair chance for all men, and I think we should give
Richard Nixon that chance.
I did not want to see Nixon elected as President, but now he is
President I feel we should give him a chance to prove himself.
MICKEY KAPLAN, lUC

p=Staff Writings=^^=^==^=^=-
Prisoners Os The Greedy Sand
By Linda Miklowitz

When the tide rushed
underneath and around my car
early Saturday morning, we
knew we were in trouble.
We surveyed the shoreline of
Crescent Beach merging into
blackness in both directions and
spotted no one who could join
us in the battle of man vs.
nature. There slowly sank my
car a prisoner of the
deceptively soft sand.
At 5:30 in the morning even
the sea gulls were asleep.
This was the ending of an
evening of the movies, visit with
friends, a trip to Mieanopy, and
then the idea of going to the
beach to see the sunrise.
We had not gone very far,
perhaps 10 yards, when we got
stuck. Another set of tire tracks
indicated someone had been
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

As far as we are concerned,
these jingles are nothing but
noise which prevents
contemplation, interrupts
whistling of more enjoyable
melodies, and discourages use of
the Plaza of the Americas by
speakers and loafers.
As a constructive alternative,
we suggest, instead of a new roll
of bell jingles, a large diesel
engine be put in the Plaza. This
machine would make a terrible
noise which would be a welcome
change from these silly tunes.
This engine could be manned by
volunteers from fraternities as a
community service. This
machine might well become a
national shrine, the first of its
kind.
We are appealing to the music
department not to waste their
jingle money, but use it more
constructively.
- PAUL RICE, 2UC
VICTOR RAMEY, 2UC
ED NICKELS, 3AS

there not too long before. We
wondered if he had made it.
Trembling from both the cold
and nerves; I remembered the
jack in the trunk. He set it up
and began to crank up the car.
But as it began to slowly rise,
the jack sank into sand.
That idea went the same way
as the ones of putting towels for
traction in the gullies made by
the rear wheels or rocking the
car from reverse to forward gears
to create a pendulum
momentum, a la driver
education movies.
The tide would ebb far away,
but every time it flowed, it
reached farther up the beach.
Now it was rushing around our
ankles and splashing up against
the jight side of the car. I
thought of the rusted hulk of a
six-month-old car.
Lights shone from the
windows of a beach house in the
distance. Help perhaps. We ran
along the beach, across the
dunes into thorns and briars, to
reach the cottage. No one was
there; the lights were apparently
turned on automatically.
So we trotted back to the
main road and the telephone
booth we spotted earlier. Fingers
fumbled with coins to call the
sheriffs office. A sleepy,
drawling voice answered.

I OPEN POtUM:
AAtiUiml ViMMt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."
Alcohol Worse Than Pot,
Yet UF Drinkers Go Free

MR. EDITOR:
This letter is directed toward Mr. Morrison of the
University Police Department. As I was looking
through some old editions of the Alligator, I came
across an interview of which you were the subject.
In this interview you pointed out the fact that
alcohol merely depresses but marijuana distorts,
impairs judgment and memory, and unleashes all
sorts of inner tensions that wouldnt upset the
normal person.
I would like to point out that alcohol does the
same things, and many more, which you said were
among the properties of marijuana. For example, in
a state of intoxication, due to alcohol, the user very
often loses his equilibrium and may stumble around,
possibly injuring himself.
His ability to speak intelligibly is often impaired,
memory is affected to the extent that in some cases
the person may not even remember what he did
while he was intoxicated, and also his sense of
judgement and reaction rates are impaired.
But the worst effect of alcohol is that a heavy
drinker may become an alcoholic, and in some
cases, hallucinations are known to occur. Thousands
of deaths are recorded on our highways each year,
and many are due to the drunk driver.
Yet, much to my dismay, I have seen no evidence
pointing to the fact that anything is being done to
prevent the illegal use of alcohol on campus. But
users of marijuana, a much less dangerous
intoxicant, are being sought out and punished
according to antiquated and ridiculous laws.

Youve got to help me. My
car is stuck on the beach, and
the tide is coming in.
He suggested a wrecker
because he said by the time his
men reached us from town, they
would be on overtime.
Yes, a wrecker. Anything!
By the way, do you know when
high tide is?
Not off hand ... wheres the
water now?
Under the car, I answered
weakly.
Well send someone just as
soon as we can. Just sit tight!
As I hung up, visions of a
beautiful new Mustang setting
off on its maiden Atlantic
voyage danced in my head. I
shuddered.
More than 30 minutes we
waited by the roadway in the
night. Our shoes were soaked
and packed with sand. It was in
the 50s.
To keep our morale, we both
tried to convince each other how
much worse it could have been.
It could be raining, he
suggested, eying the clouded sky
uneasily.
We could have gotten stuck
farther down shore, I added.
The car does seem
watertight, he returned.
Where was that blasted truck?
Then it came chugging down

the road. We waved wildly. It
had seen better days, but who
cared. It ran and had a crane.
At the landing to the beach,
our rescuer could not find the
car with his spotlight. My heart
sank. Then there it was, now
smartly decorated in sea foam.
The garage man drove in
reverse until he was about 20
feet away. Then he extended a
chain from a wench in the truck
and attached the hook to the
rear axle.
I got into the car and started
slowly in reverse as he towed it
parallel to shore. Both vehicles
spinned their wheels, but we
managed to make progress. The
truck strained as it turned away
from the shoreline. It went a few
feet before its rear wheels began
to spin. Deeper and deeper they
dug.
And there two lonely vehicles
sat in the dark, wind whistling
around them. The rescuer and
the almost-rescued. Now both
prisoners of the greedy sand.
The garage man left his truck
and ran to the pay phone on the
main road. It would be a long
night.
As light slowly filled the
eastern sky, three figures sat
hunched on a wooden fence
watching the sea gulls hunting

Thursday, January 23, 1969 t TKelFlorida AlligatorJ

In the interview, the fact was mentioned that any
information concerning drug use would be
appreciated. I wonder if any information concerning
the illegal use of alcohol would be appreciated? If
so, here is some information which is, I am sure,
known to you already countless numbers of
violations occur in almost any fraternity house or
dormitory, especially on weekends.
Now that you have this information, will you,
Mr. Morrison, or anyone else of the Police Force, do
anything about these violations, or will the Force
continue to do the same thing it has done in the
past nothing.
CHARLES ALAN LOE, lUC
/Murray Flurry
MR. EDITOR:
The programmers for Accent 69 should be
congradulated on their intestinal fortitude in
scheduling Madalyn Murray. Her appearance will
stimulate religious thought thus advancing a
doubting student body on a road to conclusions
similar to those of St. Thomas.
However, I must admit my first reaction was to
instruct the programmers To go to HELL, my
reason being simply that she will be appearing There
in a few years anyway! Having reconsidered may I
just say Keep up the good work and wish Miss
Murray all the happiness in the world.
TIMOTHY ZEDALIS 3AS

for breakfast. This was the
sunrise we had come to see.
Forty minutes later the
garages second truck came, an
even older one than the first. It
pulled the first truck, which
pulled the car sort of a
beachcombers answer to a
railroad train. At one point as
they were dragging the car over a
sand dune, it almost flipped over
with the driver inside. I shouted
as I stood by helplessly.
Fortunately the car bounced
back on its other two wheels.
By 8 a.m. the drama was over.
We had learned driving is no
longer possible at Crescent
Beach.
With a car interior soaked
with salt water and sand, a
twisted section of metal from
the towing hook, and a S3O bill,
we headed back to Gainesville.
We were desperately in need of
breakfast, a shower, and sleep.
We spent the afternoon
dismantling the interior of the
car including removing the seats
to roll back the carpet to clean it
and remote the sand
underneath. That evening the
reverse gear went. Now' the car
moves in only one direction and
the brakes hiss.
And it hadnt even been much
of a sunrise. Too many clouds.

Page 9



Page 10

, Th# Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23,108 ft

1
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| W VMacaroni | fSALTINES |/Vplfj? 11 A
I I I I perchete mMlm clhiuHw
Na Vi Con RED BIRD IMITATION VIENNA Bii-oz. JIFFY CORN 20-0 PANTRY MAID
_ Sausage 10* Muffin Mix....10* lunch Bags... 10*
ASTOR Cl AO CTAY
a Zl FLAP STAX No. 21! Can DOLE PINEAPPLE
Salt 10* Pancake Mix 10* Juice. 10*
f nrnncD i F00d... 10 Hot Sauce 10* Potted Meat 10*
I rtr R I Pepper 10* Steak Sauce 10* Sardines 10*
M W COTTON PICKING .no arrow W4P O W
K M #1 I A 4 BA RRO A THRIFTY MAID TOMATO
V V /I?!?'*"'*'"* 10 Hoplnns 10* Sauce 10*
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i f S EO .. _- W-0 BRAND LEAN BEEF
I DHAM *' mow mu 59* ngoKant w
|iil||^ IWA 8-oz. BORDENS LOW CHUCK STEAK * LB LBf
f LBf TISSUE i St:; w SS smioAsfr. w
( SS~2T 1 3 IW aNHMIOi, Ro | U J 3, RoUND sf EAK 51.09
I A I PORK HAMS 59* DAISY CHEESE. ,79* riiir te*W i .a
\ ! PORK STEAKS 59* STEAKETTES SI 79 InlT&iri, <1
a i n 0... oi,/v STRIP STEAK > $1.99
SLICED 8AC0N.... 98* CANNED HAM Si \9 pTlke *,
PH CANNED HAMS $2.99 FISH FILLETS 45< Pk*.
M CR^,^ D X W USD CHO,C
f BISCUITS | (WHOLE BEEF Rls\
V imm M\ DELMOtSco 7, II AV f%% J| 1 fV^ri I
RIB jHifi/iSSSS! iyO# m. STEAKS IKis "Hr' M^WrM
OCLMONICO OR ... Irc
.r.r;;.T:;... Ji
1-Lb. AUNT JEMIMA
QUICK or REGULAR !| f |T|W EXTRA I f lTl¥^ jr *1 IBV WSr 'MI "" fn
mbJLmm b s-.ack pkg ; HjdMM ' tc ? p value stamps 111 fIT |V tE X I R/% I;
lints :Br 'W§ -£££- i mm S aasiH, f
%4# H -NBsct 2 ; Jemxm a f '-<>lWhip r l*-rno. w.o e.\Ho I.
Six. 2/33i...80th Size iunv TTTrT *^ l 1 ~ .....IvflS^B-, | | |*' l '?' | r* -* l MBbB I*
Safeguard Soap 2/45i Liguid Detergent... SSi Duz Detergent 91. P^f '"~|
Tide Detergent 8 7i



J APPLE thristy
If Al # CUT GREEN % ARROW
f S 4M| E VBEANsV SS£ VBLEACH A
No. 311 Con C& G POTATO ~ ...
C|!pL # A i Can THRIFTY MAID GREAT NORTHERN No. 300 Con SHOWBOAT\
He 10* Beans... 10* Saaahetti 10*
Both Six. JERGENS No. 300 Con THRIFTY MAID p51 | ClII 11l
Face Soap 10* Navy Beuns.,.lo* DoaFood io<
S.O.S. Pads... 10' Blackeyes 10 Cal Food 10< f
U>* P*Wes 10* Tomato Soup 10* | QLfO \
Sponges 10* Pork & BeanslO* VegetrSow 10* l m*k I
Cleanser IQ* Beans IQ* Gelatin 10* V lUy
US. Na 1 REGULAR Half Got. SUPERBRAND ICE CREAM or ~
Potatoes 20 89* Sherbet 59* Rich 2/Sl ___
Lettuce 2/49* Meal Pies 5/sl. Pofafoes.i/Sl.
Cauliflower.;. 39* Dinners 2/89* Pizza Pies.... 79* f DAiifl c 1
Apples 29* Cr. Pies 3/sl. 5fi5p.:...51.99 | |
Beans 2 49* Pie Shells 3/sl. Waffles 49* Vl /
GRAPEFRUIT or 5-0. Pkg. WD BRAND FRESH FROZEN P R M
m rRESH FROZEN Poly Bag
Oranges.... 2/sl. Steakettes 88* Berries 49*
RED EMPEROR SWEET JUICY 16-oz TASTE O SEA FISH ~
A J FISH - Ho,f * BREAKSTONE all flavors
Grapes... 4 sl. Steaks 2/sl. Yogurt 2/29*
Pr,ces Good AII Week Thursday thru Wednesday, Jon. 23 29
G RIPE EN X FRESH R HEADs\ SWEET nAprn'n^^^V
/BAN AN AS A /CABBAGE A f utabagasVr ADISHEs\
. STAMPS VALUE STAMPS j TOP VALUE STAMPS :t [l JIF rofr WLLIfIE STAMM ' S'ueberry, Raspberry or Mople Crunch
White AcrVPea* \MjM "CheVDrinkr iMjM Arrow
fl r ,M ujA 2 ;Ky ~. a, T _ooe fHwuj,m" 2e ? .- n ooo p o t^u" \tmw c .'rf: & jr!; r : tc riiiUj
- *'44 ...j ~ ,*-;r-" 11 iiTii'-T.j".
COMET Bathroom Six* 4/45 1 **9 Size 3?C...Gt. Size BZ< King Sue SI 47 S Family Sue DOWNY 17-ox. 47C...33 ox.
Cleanser Bold Detergent... $2.89 Fabric Softener 83< DetergTnT Tabletss2.3s
~ ~ lOxydol Detergent 87
Thursday, January 23,1969, Thu Florida Alligator.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-66-p)
Boa constrictor & accessories
excellent hobby. 378-6577 evenings.
(A-3t-65-p)
1965 Allstate Scooter, $l5O Helmet
& Shield included. 378-6577
evenings. (A-3t-65-p)
Honda Sport 50. S9O firm. Call David
392-8280 after 5 p.m. (A-st-66-p)
Sell Honda C 8350 140 miles, perfect
condition. Very clean, very fast,
S6OO. Call Frank after 7 p.m., Lake
Butler, 496-3651. (A-4t-66-p)
Gibson guitar model E5335. Cherry
red finish. Custom made, includes
Bixby-tremlo bar, case and more. Call
Ocala 629-5981 After 5 pm. (A-4t-65
Sears forecast 12 port, manual
type, pica type, good condition, must
seir, will take best offer, call Janis
Eggartat 372-1212. (3t-A-65-p)
ABSOLUTELY MUST SELL. By this
weekend Sears 50cc SBO or best
offer. Excellent condition, 3787358
3769365 Ask for Vic. (A-st-65-p)
Honda 50 good condition. Helmet
and bookrack included. $l2O. Call
Tom, 376-3184. (A-3t-66-p)
1967 Red Manx body on VW chassis,
SIOOO, hi standard supermatic
citation 22 cal target pistol S7O, mi
carbine SSO, TV S2O. 372-6722.
Apartment size washing machine,
excellent condition, portable, cheap,
Call 376-8315 anytime. (A-3t-67-p)
Airboat 65 continental 12x4 ft. Steel
bottom. See Mike, Apt. 7, Colonial
Manor. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
(A-3t-67-p)
Going road racing at Daytona. Must
sell scramblers: 350 cc Honda
scrambler, Harmon Collins cam close
ratio, X-mission, very competitive.
$550 Honda 175 Scrambler
extensive head work, very fast, $325.
392-8775 evenings. (A-2t-67-p)
BICYCLE: Schwinn Varsity the
best by Schwinn! Excellent
condition! Contact Greg Marshall,
Murphree M, after 7. 372-9364.
(A-2t-67-p)
Must sell 1969 Honda CI-175. Brand
new, no miles, $525. 392-8775
evenings, Steve. (A-2t-67-p)
Electric bass guitar, 2 electric rhythm
guitars, 1 Yamaha amp, 1 harmony
amp, Brand new, best offer,
378-6562. Tues. & Thurs. after 5:30.
(A-st-67-p)
69 Datsun tudor with radio, balance
of warranty, minfocondition. $1650,
a new car offer at a saving. Phone
376-4449. (A-3t-67-p)
SSmBSI NOW!
1:35 3:40 5:40 7:45 9:50
STEVE
IMCOJEEIM
AS,
'BULLITT
2:00 3:55
5:50 7:45 9:40
"Birds in Perub
A REGIONAL FILM RELEASE IN COLOR
beneath her icy core lay
a desperate desire to love.
Jean Seberg Maurice Ronet
."Birdsin Peru
Danielle Dameux
/J\ PERSONS UNDER
V£/ 17 NOT ADMITTED

[w Ml Itoh HD
[ I7I Kl 4 |

WANTED I
i 9 WWW ii nwx :w< Roommates to share 2 br. house, 2
blks from campus, cheap for 1,
cheaper for 2. Call Van or Neil,
3 76-2729 eves, 392-1886 days.
(C-st-66-p)
Male roommate to share .3 bedroom
IV2 bath house with central air and
heat, separate bedrooms. Occupancy
Feb. $50.00/month plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 378-7041. (C-st-64-p)
Male roommate Landmark, boolside
apt. $45 mo. plus utilities after 7 call
378-3939 or apt. 112. (C-st-66-p)
Female roommate for 2 bdrm. Vill.
Park apt. 95 for winter and spring
quarters. Call 3628663 anytime.
(C-4t-65-p)
Special offer. Coed needed to share 2
bdrm apt on SW 16th Ave.
immediate occupancy. Call Audrey.
376-1045 or 376-9348. (C-st-65-p)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-st-67-p)
Wanted: mature male roommate
quiet wooded area behind So.
Holiday Inn, AC, carpeted, stereo.
Call Ralph, 378-4311. SSO per
month. (C-2t-67-p)
- i*iVe*X # X*X # X*!*X*XV*VM 2 l 2 W*X*X*3*X*X i SERVICES
Si £
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
Satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services,
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,
prices from $250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-13t-61-c)
IRONING: If you have saggy shirts -
or wrinkled dresses, bring them to
Paradise Tr. Court, NW 13th St. Lot
36. 15c each, 20c starch. Hurry!
(M-2t-67-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST for
quality repairs, call 376-0710.
(M-7t-63-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-C)
What /JL 10:40
one JiP the
wont Jaik other
d 0... ll|||| will!
L :>v jBHt
' j||k
AN AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL RELEASE
Tom NARDINI Patty McCORMACK
m ALSO AT 9:00

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23,1969

Page 12

SERVICES |
Wanted Laundry by the bundle.
Wash and iron. Will pick up and
deliver. S. W. 16th Ave. area. Call
378-5933 after 4:00 b-m. (M-3t-65-p)
|£CNNIE 1
I SSCIdTEE I
afl / WAKKEN I
BEATTY I
FAYE I
I EIJITWAYI
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"TEXe&'ased on the Mitze, p'rize'
iwiwl jyuh it novel by Bernard Malamud.
the fixer |
Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman,
lan Holm, David Warner, Carol White
-TSfft PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB
| 233 W. UatvtrsWy Aw M
I MADE WITH JWBh NERVE...
1 MUSCLE, fiy HI SHOCKS' f
I to kill my wife who raped and l liUUlLll^n
I or get dragged ki,,e f ,her
W Inuoflucinq
t'il ,t Hi mo<( JB 9 I
makes her AN INSIANI StX SIAR' YB, I M
I |i Ny husband h
I MCuAh Ht would never harm me T 3L matter whatbut
r l never... would he? l|| there's so much about

| AUTOS |
VW '62: radio, new speaker &
battery, 2 owners, 62,000 miles,
motor recently reconditioned, clean
interior, S6OO. 372-7215 before 5

p.m. (G-6t-63-p)
THRU SAT
BURTON
rOr oTOOLE
jjggvi n^ioouMiolf^
PANAVISION
.7;00 9:40 W
SMTC

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

AUTOS
&x*:*x-x<*:*-v*^
CORVAIR 700, automatic, 4-door, R
& H good mechanical condition,
sl9s' or offer. 376-8039.
(G-2t-67-p)



!v?X*X*WX*e # iVeS*iyeVeV#v%v.v*%v T
-* vv%vvY#>y%yyy%v.vvv*v.vA t !w vavav.v.v.v.va*-*.*.*:* t#vvvvav.va < !WX*T'
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS |
Have 2 surplus cars, 1962 Plymouth
V/8 5325. 1964 Cadillac 51750.
Call 372-9607 or 372-3251.
(G-ts-60-c)
AH Sprite, 1967 convertible w/boot
& tonneau cover, meichelin x tires &
radio. See Steve, 472 Murphree D or
call 372-9289. (G-st-64-p)
.iSX-XtoXiNNWX'X'X^X-X-MiSYX'X'X'X'X'Nv?
FOR RENT -1
v ;J*
To sublet lovely IBr. Apt. University
Gardens Choice
BuildingCompletely furnished. Call
376-0651 after 5 pm. (st-B-65-p)
Suddenly available, single bedroom
near campus, AC, Danish modern
furn. $lO3 per month, sub-let. 1624
NW 4th Ave. Apt. 111. 372-1714.
(B-st-67-p)
Immediate sublet upstairs poolside
2 bedroom Village Park Apartment.
January rent paid, will transfer
damage deposit, lease till June,
378-8382. (B-st-64-p)
Sublet modern furn. eff. 2 blocks
from campus. AC, pool, utilities paid
except electric. Contact Paul
Westbury at University Apts, or call
376-8990. (B-4t-67-p)
I PERSONAL I
Anyone interested In forming a
boxing team at the University of
Florida, contact Rick, 392-7505,
Tower B. (J-3t-66-p)
Dave go to University Auditorium
January 30th 8 pm de Vosjoli will
talk then. See posted notices for
details. (J-3t-66-c)
In from Columbia THIS WEEK more
RUANAS, Ponchos, and Capes 100%
wool. Gorgeous COLORS. The
Spanish Main, 105 W. University Ave.
(J-3t-65=p)
Anniversary party for Kitty and Rick
O. They made it one year! Sat. Jan.
25 after 9 pm til ? 919 NW Bth PI.
376-2912. 8.Y.0.8. (J-3t-66-p)
m _ A, mm mm mm mm mm mm. mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm m.

| So high up when they jump that they will light a , torches to help you *x>t them, jumpers Bill wt u* J
i Booth, Harold Stewart, Jack Cabot, and Bob O ij
| Adkins will attempt to form the difficult "Four J
Man Star" while falling almost two miles, at % i 1
i speeds in excess of 120 miles per hour. Their {
J target will be to land at the starting line just j
i before Elimination Racing Begins. i J
! There will be a Round Robin of A good car that loses early gets another j!
| Racing in street and super-stock chance to race. That's the name of the j|
classes for a PURSE of SBSO .... flame. The best cars run many times. Bo !|
! Many fans think this is the best Laws and his record holding Corvette will 5
| program drag racing has to offer. be here, along with other outstanding ;!
Well tuned and modified cars that race drivers in the Southeast. N.H.R.A. i|
you can identify with. Cars and Cups and Bucks competition and stock ||
! drivers are top performers. elimination plus, E.T. bracket will be J,
running as usual. J
GENE OWENS WILL HAVE HIS SHOE IN THE
'SATAN SHAKER AGAIN.
GEN ADM $2.00
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE WITH PARENTS
| PRACTICE & TRIALS 11:00 1:30 ELIMINATIONS 2 P.M. J
GAINESVILLE DRAGWAY P.O. 1646 Gainewille, Florida 32601
| Phone: 904 378-0046 Three and one-half miles north of the Municipal [
Airport on State Road 225. j J
Wwm HJL m ~ mm mm *** wAAVWWWWWWWVWWVVWWWtfAW

;.*VWXYX*XC*XX*X*X*X<<.X.:<..
PERSONAL |
St
Bear of mine: no more problems for
us. Nobody's problems for us. Why
are we so lucky? Happy third and a
yf' f : ,Q v e you so. YOUR BABE.
(J-lt-67-p)
Friends of Laura and Helen and all
Plaza people come to the picnic at
the Plaza at 11:00 til forever. Bring
food, friends, love, drink, etc. Wear
your finery! Sat. (J-2t-67-p)
Former French Agent Philippe de
Vosjoli will speak January 30th 8 pm
University Auditorium Tickets at
dor and Union Box Office.
(J-st-67-p)
;:<-xx-xv.:.:.s:.wsss?i'B; i g
HELP WANTED
Need office equipment Salesman in
Gainesville. Call 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
DELIVERY BOYS 11 am to 2 pm,
transportation provided, apply in
person LARRY'S PORE-BOY 1029
W. Univ. Ave. (E-st-66-p)
Part time or full time positions open
for airline trained personnel.
Passenger sales, Salary open, Write
2236 Un,v s,a,lon s,a,lontj*rf%%NW?;ss?w,w*;,x*x*x*x*xx!v.%svx,wj
tj*rf%%NW?;ss?w,w*;,x*x*x*x*xx!v.%svx,wj s,a,lontj*rf%%NW?;ss?w,w*;,x*x*x*x*xx!v.%svx,wj
I LOST 4 FOUND I
Purse stolen at research library
contained SIOO, identification,
glasses, etc. If found, at least return
glasses and identification. Call
Annette Morroni, 376-8514
(L-st-63-p)

liililliill*! 11l
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v.v...v.vX.XvXv:.; vXvX
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BIRTH DEFECTS! M
MARCH OF DIMES 4|
Published as a Public SeivicebyTheFterid^
JACKSONVILLE fIKSJQBESIVI
CIVIC AUDITORIUM
i
| PRICES 5.004.003.00 |
Ticket* new on Sale Jax Civic I*§g| Mil
Auditorium, Hemming Park \
Ticket Office and Coliseum
Reservations Accepted Jp
PFt'bne Auditorium 354-2041
Ticket orders accepted hv mail. Send
check or M. O. to Civic Auditorium and yH||H||||||
enclose self addressed stamped envelope. jfl ,jg> "JlA.*
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
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DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* W K> ft
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Thursday, January 23,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



, Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23,1969

Page 14

Future Teachers Tour
Gainesville Housing

By VICKI VEGA
Amctant News Editor
Poverty can influence a
childs entire outlook on life
including his attitude towards
school.
And after a 3-hour
eye-opening tour of Gainesvilles
high and low spots Wednesday
there's 42 teacher hopefuls at
UF who are convinced of it.
, The education scholars visited
the local slum areas,
rehabilitated and new public
housing facilities.
The tour, directed by John
W. Howze, chief housing
inspector, was arranged by
education instructors Eleanor'
Brown, G.D. Baker, Charles
Durrance and Betty Plunkett.
Gainesville is a small scale of
our entire society. The problems
right here are the same as those
everywhere else, Baker said.
At one of the stops
Kennedy Homes, a new
rent-supplement project the
students met VISTA aids Mark
and Linda McGrath. The
McGraths explained an area
tutoring program in reading.
Protect SAMSON is also
helping teach children to read,
Mark McGrath said. Those
interested were encouraged to
volunteer a few hours each week
by the VISTA couple.
The Federal Government
recently appropriated $9 million
for Gainesville public housing,
without any strings attached.
Were improving the housing
situation all over town thanks to
that appropriation," Howze said.

%
11 cures
for student
unrest
. v
" : r .. '-
4

The brooding palace and
beehive tombs of Mycenae.
The royal apartments of the
Sun King. Tutankhamen's
treasure. The Temple of Venus
at Baalbek. The Labyrinth
on Crete. The teeming bazaars
of Cairo. The Blarney Stone.
Archaeologists who tell
you more about a ruin than
just who ruined it.
That's just a small sample
of what's included in Olympic's
11 Student Tours. We figured

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VICKI VEGA
EDUCATION STUDENTS OBSERVE SLUM DWELLING
... on a bus tour of Gainesville housing
.. <.esi jh
g.. a v
VICKI VEGA
LAKE VIEW: A HOUSING IMPROVEMENT
... new low cost subdivision in northeast Gainesville.

that students are a lot more
adventurous and curious than
most travelers. So we weren't
afraid to be a little far out when
we planned our itineraries.
But of course we didn't
neglect any of the more down downto-earth
to-earth downto-earth details. Like deluxe or
first-class hotels throughout.
Departure dates that fit right
into your spring or summer
vacation. From 15 to 60 days.
And, of course, Olympic's
special student prices.

See your travel agent or
mail the coupon.
Olympic Airways
647 Fifth Ave, New York,N.Y 10022
I'd like to see which cure is right
for me. Please send complete in information
formation information on your 11 Student
Tours.
Name
Address
City
State Zip
ocmnc
4/** 4 t 9
i

ACLU Plans Election;
Speech By Baldwin
Members of the Student Chapter of the American Civfl Liberties
Union will elect a new president and hear a talk by Prof. Fletcher
Baldwin at a general meeting of the UF ACLU Friday evening.
The election was scheduled by the ACLU Board of Directors after
Jerry Buttrey, who took office when the chapter was formed last fail,
resigned. He is leaving Gainesville to teach and do research in Latin
America.
The sucessor elected Friday will serve out the rest of Buttreys
one-year term. TT . ..
Baldwin, a UF law professor, will speak on the University and Civil
Liberties. He is a noted scholar and active contributor to civil liberties
work.
The meeting will be held in room 361, Reitz Union, at 7:30 pjn.
HELP WANTED
On Campus Booking Agent Needed
For Established Jax Rock Band
Write: Joe Miller
2256 Jose Grde Sooth
Jacksonville, Fla., 32217
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i*HOTOGRAPHY BY GUS MISS ARLENE KRAMER 3
| Why not be a 'Pace Seller" 1
| in fashion? Mr. Anthony \
| makes it easy with a \
| tarpe assortment of Casual & Evening \
| Ensembles in the latest styles \
l .Ml a I
I ORIGINALS |
I- JHSL s -, Wh SBMZ J



r^ri
I By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Features Editor
I 1 Temperance Leagues, Civitan Clubs and other such
I P Ca ] y ,' s SU r ia rganiZa iom have n common? One thing is
I heir Anti-Smut Campaign, otherwise known as Get All the Fun and
I Cames Off the Bookshelves Effort." These civic-minded groups have
I exerted a tremendous amount of pressure on local governments all
I parties'* C Untry re f u,tmg m arrests investigations and book-burning
I However, one sordid group of publications has cleverly managed to
I escape their scrutiny .Disguised under the pretense of being aimed at
I the college girl and the career girl thing, this clannish collection of
I perversion and prurience has nourished and grown to amazing
I numbers. 6

I Reference here is being made to the so-called womans
magazines you know the ones 100 Ways to a More Flattering
j Figure, Holiday Recipes to Help You Keep Your Cool During the
Summer, and so on, all hiding behind this facade and, naturally that
innocent- looking model on the front cover.
One of the most popular of these magazines found in all the
newsstands this month turns out to be a real gem from cover to cover.
So we 11 call this column an anonymous womans magazine review.
The cover is an eye-catcher: it shows a blonde model wearing a
transparent purple dress. Everything from the waist up is exposed
in living color. (Note: it should be pointed out that I have nothing
against naked women Im just telling you whats there for the
benefit of Civitans, etc.). The following articles were noted while
thumbing through this magazine:
The Flat Sexy Stomach this article has a photo of another
woman, only she isnt wearing anything and shes on her back. The
article gives tips to the reader on how to have a flat sexy stomach.
The January Horoscope this article tells the reader her future,
fashion, who she will meet, what to say in class, grades, and so on.
Winner of the month is Capricorn. All Capricorns are advised to wear
. .shaggy furs, knee-high kid boots, angora wools, leather and suede,
chain belts, jet earrings, garnet beads.. .Mexican embroidered blouses,
full bright colored skirts (so pretty with bare feet) a sari or tunic-like
wrap-around in India print or Greek-key design. Funny coincidence
here. Almost all of these items are advertised in the magazine.
Why Package Sex in a Love Bag? This beauty aigues that love
isnt necessary for sex, so why all of todays puritanical fuss?
Love Letters a handy dandy guide which teaches the reader
how to become an expert writer of love letters how to enrich your
love life and find emotional and sexual happiness through their
understanding and erotic uses.
The Ostentatious Orgasm Getting there is Often Half the
Fun a real hon of an article dealing with sexual climaxes. Check
out some of the subheads: The Sex-Queens Adventures, Earth
Mother Style, Obligatory Orgasm, Therapeutic Bonus, Meet
the Challenge, Simultaneous and Colossal, 14-Karet, Classified
Top Secret, Competitive Under-Covers and The Spiritual
Symphony.
Another interesting item is Exciting Days.. .Exciting
Nights.. .The Life of a Playboy Bunny. That speaks for itself.
See you at the newsstand.
I THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY I
11/2 ROAST CHICKEN ( k 1 a/- I
Iw/ SAGE DRESSING $ .40 I
I Salad, Potafo, Vegitable I
IK.C. STRIP STEAK COMPLETE DINNER 1 '
Iw/Pie or Ico Cream I
I VEAL PARMIGIANA $1,351
I w/ITALIAN SPAGHETTI I
I Soup or Salad I,
| WONDER |
I HOUSE I
I RESTAURANT I
I4S.W. l*tSt. I
I AMPLE PARKING m I
lwonderl i I 1! sw '*> AVE I
LhquSE [J | I* HOUSE I

'Steve Canyon 9 Creator To Speak

The creator of the Steve Canyon comic strip,
Milt Caniff, will address the UF Arnold Air Society
January 31.
Caniffs talk will be part of the Dale Mabry
Squadron dining-in ceremony, to be held at the
Reitz Union for the members of the Professional
Officer Course, Angel Flight and UF Air Force
officers.
Caniff is the originator of Terry and the
Pirates as well as Steve Canyon. Beginning his

Little Theatre
Will Present
Comic Drama
The Subject was Roses by
Frank D. Gilroy will be
presented at the Gainesville
Little Theatre Jan. 23, 24, 25,
30, 31 and February 1 at 8:30
p.m.
The play, directed by Dr.
Craig Hartley, president of the
Little Theatre, is a comic drama
concerning a sons readjustment
to his parents when he returns
from war and their readjustment
to him as a young adult.
The cast of only three players
includes Rob Sharkey as the
father, Norma Dew as his wife
and John Adam as their son.
Mrs. Dew and Adam will appear
on the Little Theatre stage for
the first time.
Reservations may be made by
calling the Theatre and must be
claimed at the box office by
8:20 p.m. on the night of the
performance. Thursday tickets
are $1.50, Friday and Saturday
$1.75. Students receive a 50
cent discount.
Great Lake
Lake Superior, largest of the
Great Lakes, is 383 miles long
and has a maximum depth of
1,333 feet.

PS
I THING YOU
CAN LEAN ONI' I
* 1 7 * ~ : > I * : :*

I SOPHIA I
LORIN
CHARTER FLIGHT
A/aw YORK 70 M/LA/V, ITALY
IO WEEKS CALL. (39)2- 1655
jDNg-msePT ro km. 310 union
DEADLINE JAN. 31st
SCHLUMBIRGER
locates oil by lowering I
electrical, electronic and mechanical probes into wells 1
drilled by the major oil companies. 8
SCHLUMBERGER has openings for l
graduating engineers to perform this challenging
work. 1
SCHLUMBERGER brochures are in the I
Placement and Career Planning Center. 1
SCHLUMBERGER will be on campus for
interviews on
MONDAY, JANUARY 27 |

Thursday, January 23, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

career as a contributor to the Dayton, Ohio Journal
when he was 13, he later worked for the Columbus,
Ohio Dispatch.
He opened a commercial art studio in Columbus
and a year later started working for Associated
Press, drawing comic strips. He started Terry and
the Pirates in 1934 and continued with it until
1947, when he introduced Steve Canyon.
At the Arnold Air Society National Conclave in
New York City, Caniff was named National
Honorary Commander for 1968-69.

Page 15



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23, 1969

Page 16

'Skidoo World
Premiere Review
Skidoo, Otto Premingers latest release, saw hundreds line 71st
and Collins Avenue while Larry King (radio and television moderator
and noted journalist) emceed. On hand was the Sounds of 6B
providing music.
A limousine procession arrived in front of Wometcos new
Byron-Carlyle twin theaters. Decked out in tuxes, press associates,
critics and executives from Paramount flowed into the cinema.
Suddenly, The Great One Jackie Gleason arrived. Alongside
producer-director Otto Preminger was Tiny Tim. George Kirby, Louie
Nye and Kim Novak joined the festivities.
Inside, Mayor Dermer presented Gleason and Preminger with a
plaque signifying Skidoo Week in Miami Beach.
Ceremonies drew to a close . the audience silenced . the
curtain began to rise ... a word premiere began.

A cavalcade of stars, pretty
girls, hippies and gangsters make
up this fun flick release from
Paramount.
Jackie Gleason, the headliner,
tees off a zany escapade of
espionage. Co-stars such as Carol
Channing, Frankie Avalon, Peter
Lawford, Ceasar Romero, Frank
Gorshin, Burgess Meredith,
George Raft, Mickey Rooney
and Groucho Marx round out
the cast.
The action deals with a
sophisticated computerized
crime syndicate and a group of
non-committed hippies. The two
clash head on and watch out!
Confusingly, but not
surprisingly, the going becomes
more complicated and before
long it turns into mass hysteria!
Skidoo is pure fun, pure
entertainment and a poor excuse
for a motion picture.
Gleasons lead role is
considerably dwarfed by the
onslaught of name stars, most of
which are miscast. The team of
Channing and Gleason is
positively ridiculous.
Hollywoods successful
producer-director Otto
Preminger (Exodus, The
Cardinal, The Man With the
Golden Arm) has either lost his
touch, has money to bum or was
fast asleep while producing this
one. Preminger and Skidoo
dont mix.
With all its shenanagins, the
plot is outworn and water thin
with few bursts of original
dialogue.
There is one assailing
contribution: the music
composed by Nilsson is catchy.
Behind all this barrage of
nonsense, one sequence will
impress a few. The special
effects artists give the audience a
first hand look at an LSD trip
(no social comment whatsoever,
although Preminger could have
easily taken some) via the
impressios of Panavision and
Technicolor.
Without undue respect this
is no Academy Award Winner,
unless the Academy falls prey to
some unusual mental illness.
There are no hidden meanings,
no social criticisms, and
absolutely no point, other than
holding its own to the bad guy
who gets it in the end and the
washed out theme that love
conquers all.
See it if you dare.

) ALIBI LOUNGE j
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Shakes 25< &35< fN j or VVy
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fc

SEX TALK PLANNED

Married Couples Only

Father Michael Gannon, UF
Religion instructor and priest at
the Catholic Student Center,
announced a talk on The
Sexual Dimension of Marriage
to be given Saturday evening.
Father Henry Sottler, a noted
author of marriage course and
sex education books, gave his
talk in Jacksonville earlier this
week. Gannon described it as a
fresh, positive approach.

All married couples are
invited to hear this talk
sponsored by the Catholic
Student Center Council. The

If youre looking for for
- for Routine work assignments
2. A job without responsibility
3. A9 to 5 atmosphere
Fine! ButnotatFMC
At FMC Chemicals, growth in sales volume has been unprecedented in recent years.
Everybody has contributed to this growth . through research, manufacturing
innovation and unique marketing techniques ... the result of new ideas, resourceful resourcefulness
ness resourcefulness and hard work. Would you fit in a team like this? If so we have a challenge
unequalled in the chemical industry.
We need people for: With disciplines in any
Sales of the following:
Process Engineering _. c c ou n
Maintenance Engineering Chemists 8.5., M.S., Ph D.
Design Engineering Chemical Engineers-B.S M.S., Ph.D.
Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineers-B.S.
Mining Engineering Mining Eng,neers-B.|
Projecf Engineering Industrial Engineers-B.S.
Electrical EngineersB.S.
At these locations:
Sales Nationwide
Research and Development Princeton, Carteret, N.J.
Baltimore, Md., Middleport, N.Y.
Manufacturing Buffalo, N.Y. S. Charleston, Nitro, W. Va.
Vancouver, Wash. Modesto, Newark, Calif.
Green River, Wyo. Pocatello, Idaho
Carteret, N.J. Baltimore, Md.
Lawrence, Kansas Bayport, Tex.
n Would you like lo learn more about how you can contribute to FMC's progress ?
rile lo Recruiting Manager, Industrial Relations Dept.
MU FMC CHEMICALS
633 Avtnut Ntw York, Ntw York 10017
wHHBHP An Equal Opportunity Employer
Our Interviewer Will Be On Campus On: January 28

preservation will be at 7:30
p.m., Saturday in the Student
Center Lounge. Admission is
free.



Ur Co-Hosts NCAA Media Seminar

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
UF will co-host with the
National Collegiate Athletic
Association its Media Seminar
on campus Jan. 27-29.
The Seminar will bring
together top officials of the
NCAA, several of the coaches
and commissioners in the
country and 18-24 of the
nations top sports reporters in a
frank, give and take series of
sessions on intercollegiate
athletics.
The Alligator Sports Editor
and Assistant Sports Editor have
been invited to sit in on all the
sessions.
All sessions will be held in the
J. Wayne Reitz Union starting
Monday morning. Four general
topics of discussion are
scheduled.
Robert C J ames
Commissioner of the
Mid-America Conference, will
moderate The Increasing Costs
of Intercollegiate Athletics,
while like roles as moderator will
be taken by James Owens, Head
Football Coach at the University
of Washington, on Recruiting,
and George H. Young,
University of Wisconsin, on the
NCAA Enforcement Program.
Young, a Wisconsin law
professor, is chairman of the
NCAA Committee on
Infractions.
Complete final reservation list
is not ready as yet, but those
now confirmed to attend
include: Jerry Uhrhammer,
Eugene (Oregon)
Register-Guard; Ernie Roberst,
Bost (Mass.) Globe; George
Bugbee, Memphis (Tenn.)
Press-Scimitar; Edwin Pope,
Miami (Florida) Herald; Ed
Chay, Cleveland (Ohio)
Plain-Dealer.
Jack Hairston, Jacksonville
(Florida) Journal; Larry Birleffi,
Wyoming State Journal
(Cheyene, Wyo.); Mel Derrick,
Charlotte (N.C.) Observer; Tom
Kelly, St. Petersburg (Florida)
Times; Ray Marquette,
Indianapolis (Indiana) Star; Joe
Halberstein, Gainesville (Florida)
Sun; Walt Dunbar, WFGA-TV,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Souths Top
Tank Teams
Clash Here
Coach Bill Harlans swim
team, undefeated in three duel
meets, will face its toughest
challenge of the season Friday
when it takes on the only team
to beat it last season, the
Wolfpack from North Carolina
State.
In 20 Years as coach at N.C.
State, Willis Casey has never had
a losing season and in seven
seasons has gone undefeated in
duel meet competition.
In all, Caseys won-lost record
at State is 174 victories and 24
defeats. His Wolfpack swimmers
have won or shared 10 Atlantic
Coast and Southern Conference
championships and probably
rate along with the Gators as one
of two top southern
swimming teams in history.
The Wolfpack will bring to
Gainesville three intercollegiate
All-Americans Bob Birnbrauer
(freestyle), Jim Coyle (butterfly)
and Tom Falzone (breaststroke).

Jim Minter, Atlanta (Georgia)
Journal. Herman Helms,
Columbia (S.C.) State-Record;
George McClelland, Norfok
(Virginia) Virginia-Pilot; Gene
Buonaccorsi, Providence (R.1.)
Journal-Bulletin; Smith Barrier,
Greensboro (N.C.) Daily News.
Walter Byers, Executive
Director of the NCAA; Tom
Hansen, NCAA Director of
Public Relations; Larry Klein,
National Collegiate Sports

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Engineers, Mathematicians:
At NSA, our successes depend on yours.
Because of the nature and scope of systems. You may also participate in will follow systematically as you assume
the National Security Agencys related studies of electromagnetic additional responsibility. Further, you
mission, our successes are in direct propagation, upper atmosphere will enjoy the varied career benefits
relation to your achievements. phenomena, and solid state devices and other advantages of Federal
At NSA, we are responsible for using the latest equipment for employment without the necessity of
designing and developing secure/ advanced research within NSAs Civil Service certification.
invulnerable communications and EDP fully instrumented laboratories. Check with your Placement Office for
systems to transmit, receive and MATHEMATICIANS define, formulate further information about NSA, or write
analyze much of our nations most vital and solve complex communications- to: Chief, College Relations Branch,
information. The advancing technologies related problems. Statistical National Security Agency, Ft. George
applied in this work are such that mathematics, matrix algebra, and G. Meade, Md. 20755, Att: M 321.
they will frequently take you beyond combinatorial analysis are but a few An equal opportunity employer, M&F.
the known and accepted boundaries of the tools applied by Agency Campus Interview Dates:
of knowledge. Consequently, your mathematicians. Opportunities for
imagination and resourcefulness are contributions in computer sciences and FEBRUARY 4, 5
essential qualifications for success. theoretical research are also offered.
The Career Scene at NSA Career Benefits
ENGINEERS will find work which is NSAs liberal graduate study program
performed nowhere else . devices permits you to pursue two semesters of
and systems are constantly being full-time graduate study at full salary.
developed which are in advance of any- Nearly all academic costs are borne by
outside the Agency. As an Agency NSA, whose proximity to seven
engineer, you will carry out research, universities is an additional asset.
design, development, testing and Starting salaries, depending on
evaluation of sophisticated, large-scale education and experience, range from HAtiAllfll
cryptocommunications and EDP $8845.00 to $15,000.00, and increases iiaUlllial
security
agency
where imagination is the essential qualification

TOP SPORTS REPORTERS MEET

Service, New York, N.Y.; Bob
Cheyne, Chairman NCAA Public
Relations Committee,
Fayetteville, Arkansas; Robert
James, Commissioner of the
Mid-America Conference,
Columbus, Ohio.
- James Owens, Head Football
Coach, University of
Washington, Seattle, Wash.;
David Nelson, Director of
Athletics, University of
Delaware, Newark, Delaware;

George Young, University of
Wisconsin, Madison, Wise.; Cecil
Coleman, Director of Athletics,
Fresno State College, Fresno,

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Thursday, January 23,1969, The Florida Alligator,

California; Ray Graves, Director
of Athletics, (UF), and Norm
Carlson, Director of Athletic
Public Relations, (UF).

Page 17



Page 18

. Tht Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 23, 1969

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Jack Bacheler races the clock.
Two laps to go. Walter Welsch,
Assistant Track Coach, keeps up
the tension: "Go!"

Photo Story By J. D. Lindstrom

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Track assistant Don Hale and
O'Keefe
round the first turn. For 600
yards they run "all out."
Freshman O'Keefe won.

TRACK...
a matter of time

Compared to much of the USA, its
always Spring in Florida. While Jim Ryun
may be plowing through knee-deep snow in
a Kansas cornfield, the Gator trackmen are
probably tripping lightly under a warm sun.
This is a great selling point for Jimmy
Carnes, as he attempts to build a powerful
team.
The season gets off to a fast start here. As
another contrast, the fairly noted Oregon
Ducks, pervesely staying north, are forced
to wallow in rain, sleet, and muck
throughout the Winter. It's tough to get in
condition wearing soggy sweat pants and
padded parkas. Your legs stay raw-red and
numb anyway.
Carnes and men are blessed, provided
they dont get lazy. That is, comfort can be
an opiate too. (And adversity can be a
challenge: when you MUST run to keep
warm )
So far, the team *s fine performances have
earned them invitations to many of the
classic indoor meets coming up, including
the Enquirer Games in Philadelphia this
weekend. More good showings are
anticipated.
REPORTER CHECKS WITH CARNES
.. .fastest three-mile in th
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v.v.v.-.T hfi Clipboar : ;
(Pf* What A Drag!
Bill Dunn**l

For one who had never seen
cars race except in circles and
ovals, the writer jotted down his
first impressions of drag racing
for what they would be worth.
He was at the Gainesville
Dragway, a $600,000 complex
consisting of a 5000-foot strip,
freshly paced, a pit area, control
tower and concession stands that
occupied a 197-acre area north
of Gainesville Airport on SR
225.
It is the newest addition to
the sport in the South.
When you go to the strip as a
spectator you will notice the
noise.
You will see lots of students
both watching as well as running
their cars, chiefly in the pure
stock category for un-modified
street cars.
You will soon realize that
organized drag racing has
suffered from a misconceived
S
stereotyped image that pictures
it as a sport for careless
hoodlums. The sanctioned strip
replaced the highway as a place
for racing and it stresses safety
first.
MSU Readies
For Florida
And Walk
Mississippi State 4-8 for the
season returns to basketball
action Saturday facing the UF in
Gainesville after a lengthy break
for semester examinations.
Coach Joe Dan Gold will
reassembl his squad Monday to
begin preparations for the
second half of the 1968-69
campaign.
After upsetting Tennessee,
58-57, Jan. 4, the Bulldogs have
dropped their last two starts,
losing to top-ranked Kentucky,
91-72 and Ole Miss 67-60, the
latter game on the road.
In the loss at Ole Miss the
Bulldogs suffered when their
two big men, center John
Guyton and forward Jim Martin
got in foul trouble early and sat
out most of the second half.
And poor shooting did not help
the State cause. The Bulldogs
shot only 25 per cent the first
half.
The Gators carry 7-6 overall
and a 2-4 SEC record into the
game.
This past season MSU
defeated Florida, 66-65, in the
Gator Bowl tournament
consolation game, then knocked
off the Gators twice during the
regular season.
Senior guard Chuck Wade is
the leading MSU scorer with a
15.8 average. Senior forward
Manuel Washington is averaging
12.1, junior center John Guyton
11.9, junior forward Jim Martin
11.1, and sophomore guard
Donnie Black 6.4. Guyton paces
the bulldogs in rebounding with

You are intrigued by the
handicap docking system that
permits cars of different calibres
to race each other. Its a
handicap system that cant be
matched for precision in any
other sport golf and horse
racing included.
Its a sport that gives the little
Volkswagen a chance to beat a
Hemi-powered factory
Barracuda by giving the VW an
accurately computed head start.
You are curious about a
$7,000 lighting device called a
tree that consists of 16 lights
(eight per driver), which is
programmed by computer to
give the drivers the proper
handicapped starts.

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If IU l. the street
University GATOS SHOPS

Because of the strips central
location, programs attract many
national record holders. Racing
now is on Sunday afternoons.
The color of the pit area
where drivers work on their cars
and trade gab is a photographers
dream plenty of curious
designs and human interaction
between drivers, machines and
their women.
Speaking of the weaker sex,
there are a handful of regular
female drivers competing who
are among the crowds more
favorite chassis.
Cycles and go carts are also
allowed to participate. Some
go-karts turn the quarter mile at
55-60 mph and thats a lot of
bugs in your teeth. Before long,
someone said, theyll have a
classification for turtles.
FinaDy, in drag racing, the
rails are kings. A rail is the sleek,
streamlined skeletal chassis
guided by supercharged engines
looking together like a 40-foot
go-kart.
Some of these eclipse the
distance at 215-230 mph and all
have to be brought to a standstill
by dragging parachutes.
If you think watching a good
tennis match is hard on the
neck, then prepare yourself for
watching these whining blurs
that travel 1/4 of a mile in 6.5
seconds.

Orange Race Tight
Pi Lam and Sigma Chi moved into third and fourth place
respectively in the Orange League as each scored quarter final victories
in bowling.
The Pi Lams scored a 1762-1418 win against the Pi Kappa Phis as
Mark Yeager and Danny Herman each rolled 201 games. The Sigma
Chis, led by a 202 game and 395 set by Skip Frink, skipped by the
TEPs despite a 223-371 set by Jan Seiden.
Last place Kappa Sig moved convincingly out of the cellar with a
devastating 1801-1687 win over The AEPis. Four Kappa Sigs scored in
the 200s as Ed Morris hit a 226-392, John Moore scored a 217-375,
Phil Morley tallied a 207-376, and Dick Sprinig recorded a 201-334.
Pi Kappa Alpha scored a 1642-1576 win over league leading Beta
Theta Pi in the only other game. Pi Kappa Alpha now faces the Pi
Lams and the Kappa Sigs face the Sigma Chis. All action is scheduled
for today at 4:15 at Palm Lanes.
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Thursday, January 23, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

JhjFjgrjd Alligator. Thursday, January 23. 1969

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