Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 66

| IFC's Zack
I Answers |
| Charges j
By WILLIAM MAROEN
Alligator Staff Writer
IFC President SteVe Zack
today expressed shock at an
article appearing in Tuesdays
Alligator blaming the IFC for a
racial incident that occurred last
year.
The incident involved Fred
Kanali, a black graduate student
from Kenya, who left the UF
last November after being spat
upon by several white males.
The accusation made by Jose
Sarasua, editor of the Council of
International Students, official
publication was that the
IFC negelected to take action on
a proposal that might have
averted the incident.
Zack said he knew nothing
about the proposal until last
Thursday, when he met Sarasua.
The proposal involved the
institution of a joint program
between the CIO and the IFC in
which fraternity houses would
invite foreign students for dinner
and parties.
At that time, Zack said, he
agreed that the idea was good
and promised to try to
implement it. Several fraternities
have already made plans for the
program even without the
backing of the IFC.
Zack said there have already
been professor nights at
fraternities, where professors
were invited to dinner and to
talk to students. The same idea
can be applied to foreign
students, Zack said.
This idea was approved last
Thursday, Zack said, and was
not put into effect because of
pressure from the Alligator
article.
The point of the program will
be to show foreign students that
brotherhood is not simply
something that is spoken about
in fraternities.
Fraternities believe in
brotherhood, Zack said.
Zack said he plans to invite
Sarasua to Sundays Fraternity
President Council to attempt to
avoid future Kanali-type
incidents:
'
VTOjaggy.. T
STEVE ZACK
... answers charges

The
Florida Alligator

NEW PARTY ALSO APPLIES
SSOC Gets Charter Hearing

wm .
|
|K.
j| m 11 am bU 1 m iiirl U 1
LET'S MAKE THIS MORE INTERESTING!
... this heated rivalry may get even warmer with FSU in the SEC
OConnell Urges Entrance
Os Florida State Into SEC

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will recommend at
the Southeastern Conference
(SEC) annual meeting this week
in New Orleans that Florida
State University be admitted to
the SEC the Alligator learned
Tuesday.
OConnell said he would
propose a constitutional
amendment that the FSU
Seminoles be invited for
membership in the conference.
The president and Athletic
Director Ray Graves will depart
today for the four-day meeting.
FSU President John
Champion provided OConnell
with exhibitory information
earlier this week to be used in
support of the motion.
It will be the fifth time the
Seminoles have applied for
membership, the fourth under
UF sponsorship. In 1964 when
Georgia Tech and Tulane
withdrew from the Conference
and Vanderbilt speculated upon
withdrawing, FSU was given
consideration for the first time.
When Vandy decided to remain,
the Seminoles efforts were
thwarted, officials wishing to
keep the size at ten teams.
Speculation has arisen each
winter when the meeting
approaches but most has come
from sportswriters. No official
from FSU has initiated work on
formal admission until now.
During the past several years
Florida State has established its
image as a worthy candidate for
selection to the SEC,
Champion said in a letter to
OConnell Jan. 16. The letter
stressed that FSU has met

University of Florida, Gainesville

conference standards in the areas
of: size and academic standards,
athletic standards, scope of
intercollegiate athletic prograns,
and geography.
The first meeting will be held
Wednesday night.

aeagg
---^A... ifi Aiv
p% ^-''ifi.^'ji^C+^%:: s*'v VV"?"-~1~tC^Vi:f;^.';/fE?Jj^ e
|| WDVH disc jockey Steve Allen finds himself trapped by
I Graham bunnies Ellen DuPuy, Debby Puls, Alice Raulerson,
I Lisa Nesbeda, and Michele Goding. Wipe that smile off your
I face, Steve.

FSU is an institution of
16,000 students. For the past
twelve years it has adopted all
major regulations of the SEC.
The Seminoles athletic budget of
$1,350,000 annually compares
(SEE 'FSU' PAGE 2)

Americas
Number I
College
Daily

Wednesday, January 22, 1969

See Editorial, Page 6
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
For the first time in recent
history the Committee on
Student Organizations will hold
an open charter hearing tonight
for two student groups seeking
recognition.
Both the Southern Students
Organizing Committee (SSOC)
and New Party requested the
hearing. Members of both groups
are scheduled to attend.
However, only three
representatives from each group
will be allowed to address the
committee.
The presidentially appointed
committee of five faculty
members and four students
makes recommendations to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
He has the final say on a groups
charter.
Something that must be
clear, said Agricultural
Engineering Professor Rush
Choate, committee chairman, is
that no decision will be reached
tonight.
The meeting will adjourn
when the questioning is over,
he added. A decision will be
made in the next few days.
SSOCs charter has been
discussed on campus for some
time. The 72-member group
originally requested official
recognition last quarter when it
was still affiliated with Students
for a Democratic Society (SDS).
SSOC later dropped the SDS
title.
An SDS chapter at Florida
State University last week was
denied recognition by
administration officials because
they said the national
organization advocates violent
overthrow of the government.
Newly-elected Board of
Regents Chairman Burke D.
Kibler said in an Alligator article
Monday he would personally
oppose recognition of SDS or
any similar organization at any
of,the states universities.
New Party is a statewide
political organization, steering
committee member Mike
Kurman, 2UC, said.
The partys ideology is about
the same as SSOC, he
explained, although as faculty
adviser David Kurtzman, a
philosophy professor, said, Its
tactics may be different.
Kurman predicted that
McCarthy may run for president
in 1972 on the New Party ticket,
tie said the party will attempt to
enter candidates in local
elections in the meantime.
He said the state party will
definitely run a candidate for
governor in 1970.
One of the privileges that goes
along with a groups charter is
use -of, Reitz Union facilities.
SSOC uses the union frequently
for meetings.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 22, 1969

Student Pav Tods Scholarships

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
More that $1,000,000 wiU be paid out to UF students employed in
on-campus positions this year a figure about 20 times larger than
the $60,000 awarded in undergraduate scholarships.
Only the amount awarded in student loans about
$3,000,000 provides more financial aid for the student body.
These figures come from the office of Student Financial Aid, which
administers a student employment program in addition to
scholarships and loans.
More than 2,000 students are hired for on-campus jobs each year,
according to Ira D. Turner, directoe of student financial aid.
Os these 2,000 students, about 1,500 are in state-financed positions
and another 500 are under the College Work-Study Program, which
has 80 per cent of its funds from the federal government, the
remaining 20 per cent comes from state and local sources.
The work-study program aims to assist students from families
whose gross annual income generally does not exceed $7,200, Turner
said.
Exceptions can be made in certain circumstance, he said.
Higher income can work in relation to the number of children in
the family. For instance, we could consider a family with eight
SG To Make
Poster Decision

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale has directed
a communication to the Student
Senate requesting that Student
Government develop regulations
for posting signs on campus.
We are aware of the need for
additional posting places on
campus, but it is obvious that
there needs to be some control
of the posting to keep the
campus from being littered and
the messages up to date, Hale
said.
Hale said the green boards
used during Student
Government elections are being
erected as a temporary solution
to the posting problem.
Campus architects are
designing permanent bulletin
boards to be placed at strategic
traffic points on campus.
Gary Goodrich, student body
vice president said Hale
contacted him Tuesday and
asked what Goodrich felt about
the administration implementing
sign-posting regulations and
discipline procedures. Goodrich
requested the entire area be
turned over to Student
Government, since there
already are student body laws on
posting signs during elections.
I felt this problem and many
others like it could best be
handled by students in as much
as it is primarily students who
are involved. Goodrich said.
I think the Lavon Gentry
case brought the sign posting
problem to a head. Nobody
knew about it before, because
regulations were non-existent
and ambiguous, Jack Vaughn,
president of the senate said.
Once the senate receives the
letter, the proposal would
probably go to the judiciary
committee, Vaughn said.
An SG committee has studied

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz. Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

the campus traffic pattern to
determine where the permanent
bulletin boards should be
constructed to be most effective,
Hale said.
The study, revealed the center
of campus activity has moved
away from the main cafeteria
and the iibrary to Little Hall,
Matherly and the Union, and it
is in these areas additional
bulletin boards have been
recommended.
The proposed permanent
bulletin boards are open-faced
Hale explained. This way no one
would need a key to post
anything, and anyone in the UF
community would have access at
any time.
Im very pleased to see the
administration taking this
approach of handing problems
to the student government and
asking us to solve them rather
than issuing a statement of
administrative policy in specific
areas, Goodrich said.

FSU Pushed For SEC

f FROM PA6E ONE J
with the majority of SEC
schools and is better than
several, Champion said.
Against SEC teams, FSU has
compiled an all-time all sports
record of 372 wins, 251 losses
and ten ties for a .605 winning
percentage.
Against all opponents, the
Seminoles have won 1490
contests, losing 769 and tying
24 for a .658 percentage.
The Seminoles have had their
most success against conference
teams in swimming (won 72,
lost 13) while having the least
success over the years in football
(won 12, lost 2t>).
If the Seminoies are admitted
to the conference, the annual

.**- ur t; zSZSzSsSZZ-
a family of 10 children with $8,5000, or someinuig
of jobs 32 with experience can probable be used m many of
th me T oTh r ew'de*ane.y of educational experiences going on over
this campus, we have more prefessions represented than the average
""Rarely does a student bring a drill to campus that cant be utdized
in one of the varied job areas we have.
Students have been placed as electronic technicians lab technicians
and in secretarial and clerical positions. Turner cited the husband o
an employee in his office who had been an X-ray technician before
returning to school.
Hes now working part-time as an X-ray technician at the
Infirmary, Turner said.
Wed like to emphasize that employment is a continually changing
thing it isnt static, he said. Our situation changes daily one
day we can have absolutely no openings and a day or two later we
have 10 or 12 positions to be filled. m
Obviously the big time to find a job is in September, Turner said.
However, jobs fall open all through the year.
Also, it is the most frustrating time to look for a job, since we
have 500-600 students coming in to see us. The smart student is one
who is persistent and keeps checking back later even though he may
not find anything the first time.
There are two basic ways to make the first contact for
employment, according to Turner. The first if to go to the financial
aid office in Tigert to be referred to a job listed with the office.
The second way is for the student to inquire in the departments
with which the student might be familiar, since some departments
prefer to select student employeed with experience and knowledge in
their particular area.
Student Adjustment
Subject Os Study

UF freshmen are being asked
to participate in policy-making
affecting student adjustment to
college.
The Department of Student
Mental Health is trying to
determine how effective the UF
and Florida high schools are in
helping freshmen adjust to
college life.
Selected freshmen, graduates
of high schools which annually
send more than 20 students to
the UF, will meet with UF
administrators and their former

UF-FSU rivalry will have the
added furor of a conference win
riding upon it. The Gators hold a
8-2-1 domination of the heated
series.
Biggest obstacle in the way of
passage will be another
amendment expected to be
presented by conference
commissioner Tonto Coleman
.that calls for a standardization
of scheduling, whereby over an
eight year period all member
institutions will have played
each other.

| ANNOUNCING A
SMOKE -1N
WED. JAN 22 AT 7:3OPM ROOM 355 RE|TZ UN)ON

guidance counselors in four
Transition to College
Workshops.
The first of these workshops
was held Monday and Tuesday
in the Reitz Union. Participants
were guidance counselors and
graduates from 10 Alachua,
Duval, and Volusia county high
schools.
The program included an
orientation session Monday for
the 19 visiting administrators.
Dr. Ann Q. Lynch, workshop
director, and other UF personnel
explained some of the services
offered to freshmen and the
problems encountered.
Interviews were held Monday
afternoon when the students
filled out questionnaires and
discussed university life with
their high school counselors.
Questions centered around how
the student was prepared by his
high school for UF academic,
social and personal life.
Following meetings with
students, high school counselors
discussed their observations with
representatives of University
College. Tuesday each counselor
was asked to turn in a written
report, including
recommendations for changes in
both high school and UF
policies.

m
HR
-^H
We&
r
fSSragfjfSt Se fl^Hv
JIM HOLMES
... to produce series
Jim Holmes
To Produce
'Second 100'
Jim Holmes, 4 LW, has been
named executive producer of the
Second One Hundred-a
Channel Five WUFT telecast
sponsored by Florida Blue Key.
Holmes has planned a new
format for the monthly series of
half-hour film documentaries
relating to the university
campus.
In the past, he said,
programs were filmed and
produced for eduational
television although they were
shown on commercial stations.
It is the theocythat people dont
turn on their T.V.s to be
educated.
This year, the new format will
deal with subjects from the
student point of view. For
example, the first show will
present an objective view of
sorority rush on the UF campus.
With this production, we
have cooperation from some of
the sororities but with such a
program we need cooperation
from all of them, Holmes said.
Other programs will show the
students in community service,
the Accent program, and the
Law Center dedication and a
projection of the UF law school
of the future.
In our reorganization
program, we are getting away
from the political orientation of
appointments to positions in the
series directorship, Holmes
said.
We are getting more
technical personnel and more
assistance from the broadcasting
students of the College of
Journalism and Communi Communications,
cations, Communications, he said.



'Rat Opening:
Food, Fun,
c
And Beer
Wk 1
3MB& HHk '\,_- v v w,'
?JH* '%#,, j^Bf
v! : :%w. >: x '' >. y
Ul
CLYDE TAYLOR HEADS FOR REFILLS
.. beer flowed freely Thursday night

-
M fo* MRS^h z^l\ . JCw? jjT' ~l
PRFSIDENT AND MRS STEPHEN O'CONNELL ENJOY ENTERTAINMENT
... as Clyde and Bunny Taylor look on

mmm&?. mM
m. 1
rjil i K Hi. I?WBBmt% u
i #mi -I -fiSKlf > > fl|
% 9:
'MUSTACHE' SINGER LEADS AUDIENCE IN A SING- A LONG
.. she sported 'the world's shortest green miniskirt'

f&ss*-'£!T&
jj Wy B ,y*/&;. ja^B
Im A^l^m^v
bK BbkW
mm K^m
m
-.g- gBF\ .. yy/'y-'.--^^B
, .]BJ JflBT ;1H
BByijMfc '" '--< ,;^B:
O'CONNELL CHEERS FOR 'YOUR FATHER'S MUSTACHE'
. . group's music was well received at opening

Wednesday, January 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

II J
* 7^^g^gjfiK|^g|^|^
3graH&jjg^
jSKp
Hup .-,
j/P%y 3s&: : /JPBnjBB y y *mr
/ '"ss*** '' mm
FRAULEIN BETTY JO PADRON
. . serves German buffet

Page 3



Page 4

l, Th* Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 22, 1969

Full-Scale Peace Negotiations Begin Saturday

PARIS (UPI) Allied and
Communist negotiators agreed
Tuesday to begin full-scale
Vietnam peace negotiations
Saturday.
The decision was reached
after President Nixons newly
appointed delegation chief,
Henry Cabot Lodge, conferred

BY PUEBLO SKIPPER
Captivity Confession
Reversed Under Oath

CORONADO, Calif.
(UPI) Cmdr. Lloyd M. Bucher,
who confessed in captivity
that he spied in North Korean
waters, swore under oath
Tuesday that the USS Pueblo
never came within the claimed
territorial limits of the
Communist nation.
The 41-year-old skipper told a
Navy court of inquiry that he
never approached closer than
13.1 miles of the North Korean
coast and he denied 17
intrusions of the 12-mile limit
claimed by the Communists.
Capt. William Newsome, the
court counsel, produced a map
of the Korean coast with 17
marked spots where Communists
claimed the Pueblo had intruded
well within 1 2 miles.
As Bucher indicated each spot
with a pointer, Newsome asked
whether he had made such an
intrusion.
No, sir, 1 did not, Bucher
replied.
At no time during the
conduct of my mission did I
penetrate or intrude into the
He Went
Thataway?
JACKSONVILLE (UPI) A
cool gunman wounded a hotel
clerk during a robbery early
Tuesday, then calmly directed
police on a wild goose chase as
lie pumped gasoline at a service
station around the corner.
He also robbed the service
station.
The thief, who shot room
clerk James H. Bordeaux, 69, in
the stomach, ran from the hotel
and around the corner.
Two policemen in a patrol car
pulled into a service station
around the corner from the
hotel to find a Negro man
pumping gas into a customers
car. He told them he had seen a
man running by the station a
few minutes before.
The patrol car left in a hurry,
only to receive a report from the
police radio dispatcher that the
station-had just been robbed.
When the patrolmen returned,
the man who had been pumping
gas was gone
Got a Sick Car?
Our 5 skilled
Mechanics have
over 80 years
experience
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
Corvair Specialist
/
1031 So. Main 376-7771

for more than an hour with his
South Vietnam counterpart,
Ambassador Phan Dang Lam.
The agreement was officially
announced by a U.S. delegation
spokesman after North Vietnam
and the Viet Congs National
Liberation Front (NLF) agreed

claimed territorial waters of
North Korea which would be 12
miles off shore.
In films and recordings made
by the Communists while
Bucher and his 81 surviving
crewmembers were held for 11
months in captivity, the captain
said he did make such
penetrations.
On his release at Christmas
Bucher said he always had faith
the American government and
people would understand his
motives saving the lives of his
men.

I I
I I
11
I I
I Join us as a I
PAN AM
I TV STEWARDESS I
|
' 4M Fly to Africa, Europe and Asia
jflpvj or the glamorous cities
I lit oif Latin America I
I 0 The capitals of the world I
I W jf soon become I
I as f am 'l' ar as your own I
I / home town. I
I %Z> *\ CAMPUS INTERVIEWS I
I jg JANUARY 24,1969 I
I '.i 1
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT
I L CENTER I
I: \ I
I\ > I
\\
I \ 41 I
I '& AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER I
AIVfERICA.IV
WORLDS MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE H

to begin the conference
Saturday.
Lodge said he and Lam were
in full agreement to begin
substantive talks with the
Communists, presumably on
both political and military
issues.
The South Vietnamese and
North Vietnamese delegation
each issued separate
communiques agreeing to open
the peace conference.
U.S. officials indicated Lodge
would try to go into substantive
discussions immediately in an
effort to avoid bogging down
into a long wrangle over an
agenda.
A U.S. official said Lodge and

Tulm
is like intelligence.
You wake the most
of what you have.
We can help you be the best
for $14.00 to $90.00
I 1228 W, University Avs.

Lam were hoping to sidestep any
concrete agenda so that each
side can raise any points it
wants.
The Communist delegations
were expected to demand that
the first item of discussion be
the withdrawal of U.S. troops
from South Vietnam.
Tran Buu Kiem, the head of
the NLF delegation, will be the
lead speaker when the
negotiations open in the former
Majestic Hotel, the French
government-owned International
Conference Center. The center
was the site of the initial
six-months
diplomatic joust which laid the
groundwork for the peace
movement.

Kiem will be followed by
Xuan Thuy, the North
Vietnamese delegation chief.
The Allied side, headed by
Lodge and Lam, will then reply.
In subsequent sessions, the
speaking order will be altered.
OMMM9NO mMONAIBB gg AMfIMBA
GSRDON 9 8
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM-9:00 PM Mon-Fri



WHAr$
HAPPENING
__ By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN WORKING FOR
PEANUTS: The President of
Schultz Instruments, Inc. (his
name is Charles Shultz, Jr.)
speaks to a group of prospective
employees tonight when he
addresses the Florida
Engineering Society of the
subject Computers: The
Communication Gap.
Mr. Schultz will be speaking
in room 347 of the Reitz Union
at 7:30 tonight, and his talk is
open to all students and faculty
in Engineering.
IN BLACK POWER: Mighty
SAMSON Student
Governments give-a-damn
project, meets tonight in room
121 and 122 of the Union at
7:30. (I said that yesterday, but
I liked it so much I thought Id
say it again.)
IN THE KINDA LOYAL
OPPOSITION: The Young
Democrats Club meets tonight in
room 357 of the Union at 7:30
to plan what action they should
take in preparation of being on
the outside for the next four
years.
AND SPEAKING OF
ACTION: The Student Action
Committee of the College of
Education meets in room 158 of
Norman Hall tonight at 7:30.
Accent Posters
Due Thursday
Thursday is the last day to
submit entries for the Accent
69 Symposium Photography
And Poster Contests, according
to Tom DeMarco, Accent
technical chairman.
All photo entries must be
color or black and white photos
8 by 10 inches or 5 by 7 inches in
size.
Entries for the poster contest
must have copy reading Accent
69 Dimensions of Freedom,
Feb. 3-9, and must be
printable.
Prizes are being offered for
first, second, and third places in
both the photography and the
poster contests.
All entries should be turned
into room 313 of the Reitz
union. Judging will be Friday,
and results will be announced.

f TODAY!! 1
5 'MIN JANE 3
$ ITS A DRESS
i IT'S A RAIN t SHINE J
* coatii IT'S CUTE ffL. 9
in 4 colors
Heavy poplin J
|i Brass Trim 3
jf Comp. $14.95 |
J $ 3 75 |
1 |
j 1236 NW 3RD Ave Jj
4 Open House jj
j| Fri. Night goodies* j]

DROPOUTS
WAS Art OLIVE-COLORED
fiPECIMEN, PRESERVED /
I A 74cf

Seminar Discusses
US Latin Students

A representative from UFs
admissions office was one of 22
Americans who recently
returned from a workshop in
Puerto Rico dealing with the
admission and placement of
Latin American students in
American schools.
James B. Parrish, associate
director of admissions, said the
basic problem when foreign
students apply for admission to
U.S. colleges and universities is
how to evaluate their academic
work.
Their (Latin American)
schools differ in terminology
and the way their systems
operate, he said. They dont
grade with A,B,C or D; they use
descriptive terminology which
may be used by only one
institution.
Another complicating factor
is many students go into
vocational training schools
rather than academic high
schools.
Parrish said this workshop,
sponsored by 1 the National
Association for Foreign Student
Affairs, is the third of its kind.
The first two were concerned
with students from Western
Pacific and Asiatic countries.
They select people in
admissions at representative

f You might saY it A
A RATHER RESEMBLED
4jk I A <3REAT, UGVf. I

universities which normally
accept students from the area
under consideration, he said.
We do have many applicants
from Latin America.
Universities from Venezuela,
Columbia, Brazil, and a specialist
on Central America from
Panama represented Latin
America. The 22 U.S.
universities included the UF,
Stanford, Georgia Tech, and the
University of Texas.
I n#fri I
j Sedans, Wagons, Sports
9 Cars, Trucks, 4-wheel 9
I dHve I
1 No. 1 in Japan
1 Codding & Clark I
I Motors I
1 1012 SOUTH Main St. I
fl Open 8 A.M. 8 P.M. 8

Want to I
IMPRESS I
Your date I
on I
WED. I
THURS. I
FRI. I
SAT.? I
Try the EatfjsifeeUer I
I
Featuring this week I
THE LEE SHAW TRIO I
Jazz from New York
&
GRAYSON & COSTELLO J \ I
the comedy duo from Miami Beach I
IJ of F. Faculty Club, Inc
ftatftgfeeUer |

MUthm'i
All conditioners
Zi Price
Now through February
All operators (except owner)
giving special discounts
to students and other patrons.
7:00 am 7:00 pm
1250 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 378-6811
RAMAOAINN

Wednesday, January 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

BY HOWARD POST

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 22^1969

Page 6

TShe Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
* th exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
PaartuflJtfA/ Dave Doucette
. .. Managing Editor
Ml
. Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor
-Staff Writings
* y.
Pin Disease
By John Parker

While great strides are made
yearly in the field of medicine in
order to prolong mans life,
equally great strides are made in
the opposite direction to cut it
in half.
Such miracles as penicillin,
Dristan, and sneeze-proof
Kleenex are counter-balanced by
the likes of air polution, the
destruction of national forests,
and the flouridatio'n of our
water supply by the Jewish
Pinko Commie Fascist element.
Byway of example: The people
in the town of Possum Walk,
N.C. had their water flouridated
as early as 1822. Do you know
that not one of those people is
alive today? But 1 digress.
As if these new evils of
mankind werent enough, a
totally new affliction has arisen
out of our modem way of living
and has taken its place as
another weapon in the hands of
the Four Horsemen.
. It is a disease so hideous in
form and so malingering in
effect as to make its victim
almost totally incapacitated for
the duration of his troubled life.
Dr. Clarence Nopill of UFs
infirmary describes the
affliction:
it is a mechanical type of
disorder rather than viral or
bacterial. It typically strikes
females between the ages of I 1 )
and 22, and it is only found in
the chestal area."
It is quite clear now what we
are speaking of. The dreaded
malady now known to science as
Sorority-Oirl Breast." Dr.
Nopill continues:
lt is a terrible thing to see,
these young girls. They come in
here with the affliction and
there is really nothing we can
do.
The problem is caused by a
tremendous amount of weight
being exerted unnaturally on the
left breast of the victim; usually
in the form of a diamond and
ruby encrusted gold and silver
sorority pin, an equally ornate
and heavy symbol from her
pin-mate, and generally a nice
assortment of smaller pins

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Buaina, Advertising offices ir. Room 330, Rtz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida AlJigator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the w tic Is and not tboee of the Unhrenitv of Florida."

signifying such things as
membership in a fraternity little
sister organization, homecoming
sweetheart candidacy, or
participation in last years
ground hog Day.
The real tragedy of the thing
is that the ailment could be
cured if the girls would shed just
one or two of the pins. But they
insist on wearing them at all
times, even in the bath. This
leads to some complications
such as infection and loss of
blood. They become hysterical if
we try to remove some of the
pins..
The disease generally
manifests itself in a tremendous
sagging of the breastal area.
Attempts have been made by
famous clothing engineers to
come up with a bra which could
take some of the strain off the
overworked left breast, but the
results were negative.
They tried to apply the
brunt of the weight to the rest
of the body by means of a
fantastically intricate
undergarment with thousands of
tiny levers and pulleys, but it
didnt w'ork. Such is the force
exerted by the pins that after a
time the entire body begins to
sag and finally caves in. That is
the magnitude of the problem.
Since the field of medicine
has yet to come up with a
solution to this pressing"
(sorry) question, perhaps the
field of journalism may offer
one.
Sorority (and even trat men if
so inclined) could have specially
constructed trophy cases built
on wheels to be pushed about
the campus in front of the proud
chapter member. Not only pins,
ribbons, anchors, arrows and
little chains could be lumg
therein, but also pictures of past
conquests, present sweethearts,
momentos from gay carefree
evenings, and a bottle cap or
two.
That way we could get it all
out in the open. Not to mention
taking the pressure off that'all
important left breast.

EDITOR/Al
Grant SSOC Charter

In its edition of Nov. 25 the Alligator
suggested that the local chapter of SSOC be
granted a charter as a recognized student
organization.
Tonight SSOC members will meet with
the Committee on Student Organizations to
present their request and explain to the
committee why they think they should be
given official university recognition.
The Alligator today reiterates its position:
SSOC should be allowed on campus. The
committee, chaired by Dr. Rush Choate,
professor of agricultural engineering, should
submit a favorable recommendation to
President Stephen C. OConnell.
OConnell should then have the courage
to add his stamp of approval to allowing
SSOC on campus.
Hopefully, both the committee and
OConnell will approach the question more
discerningly than did new Board of Regents
Chairrrran Burke Kibler, and with more
sophistication than did FSUs vice president
for student affaits.
Kibler told the Alligator last week that he
would personally oppose official recognition
of SSOC or its sister organization, SDS. His
reason was that SSOC (or SDS or whatever
else you want to call it) has shown
nationally that its members are willing to
employ violence and terrorism in pursuit of
radical reform.
FSUs uptight administrator caused a
campus controversy recently when he
overruled the Student Senate and denied
*
SDS the privilege of being a part of the
university. His reason: SDS is synonomous
with violence; there is no place for violence
in an institution of higher learning.

The Fifth Column 1

...In The Road, Baby

0-blah-dee, 0-blah-dah, . life goes on .
VVliat happens is that you are always looking for
more. You set yourself a goal(s) and then bust
hump to make it.
Take a good look around you, . silly girl.
And the feeling upon making it is, . well, l know'
what it isnt. It isnt surprise. Rather its Well yeah,
this is about what I expected, and if you were to
think about it you would expect to be disappointed
I oL yCA. M
V j yj L Jr w 'i Ke |:
JÂ¥ ShSKI C' I vV IGSPr^uCh
iMfin OH TV mSm m u S waM- Ict
IjKKoBw- \

Both Mr. Kibler and the FSU
administrator have apparently committed an
error in reasoning. They have concluded that
what may be true of the group as a whole is
also true of its individual chapters and
members.
Any beginning student in logic can see the
fallacy.
The truth is that the members of the
local SSOC chapter do not fit the mold of
the national image. They are, plain and
simple, non-violent, in philosophy and in
practice.
They have asked to become a legitimate
part of the university community; they have
asked permission to join the
establishment.
Instead of arguing whether violence is
good or bad, the university should be
welcoming the group with open arms.
History teaches us that violent acts are
usually committed by people who feel they
are out of the system, like they have no
legitimate claim to acceptance as individuals.
Meaningful participation rarely precipitates
violence.
The time to decide that SSOC should not
be allowed official membership in the
university community is AFTER it violates
the rules of working for constructive change
through established channels, not BEFORE.
If SSOC is given a charter and its members
in any way impede the normal academic
functions of the university, then and only
then whould they by denied the privileges
afforded to student organizations.
Wc strongly urge the Committee on
Student Organizations to consider these
points before they decide SSOCs fate.

By Jason Straight

because elation can never be achieved, it jusl
happens. But you're not really disappointed because
you knew all along it wouldnt be that big a thing.
No-one will be watching us . .
So youre never satisfied, but never depressed,
because long ago you realized you would never be
satisfied. Rather if you're going to spend any time
at all thinking about it seriously (and you rarely
do), you just sort of casually wonder is there
anything anywhere that really does it? Really makes
it?
A person. An activity.
A sport. A town.
A drug. t An act.
A religion. \A course.
A philosophy. A career?
Maybe you decide to just push everything to the
limit.
Your time Your head Your friends
Your girl Your promises Your body
Your car Your memory Your lies.
And then when it/they break you take quiet
pleasure in handling the ensuing hassle; for at least
you ve created an artificial moment something
demands attention, requires effort and skill.
Youre doing something.
When you find yourself in the thick of it,
help yourself to a bit of what is all around you
And maybe you ve long ago given up
the worthiness of your actions because you know
that questions of worth are never resolved, and
heaven and hell sure dont keep you awake at night.
Hold your head up you silly girl. LOOK
WHAT YOUVF DON F.
S. heres Gainesville with its 40.000 ciii/ens and
-0,000 students and life s a stage and you're dead in
forty or four depending on how you drive and
O-btah-dce.



Speaking Out;

Responsibility To Rat

Several angry people gave bus boy Robert
Sistrunk static because he finked. Turned them
in to a Rathskeller bouncer. These people had
violated one of the Rats rules.
Watch out for these things (1,2,3, etc.) bus
boy Sistrunk was told by Paul, his supervisor
Bus boy Sistrunk watched for these things as he
bussed for the capacity crowd.
Most people behaved themselves. They acted
responsibly. However, a small minority made
trouble. This is when bus boy Sistrunk did his
job.
He finked. He turned them in.
Bus boy Sistrunk squealed because he knows
the great sweat it took to get the Rat on campus.
Because he knows the Rat is a vanguard beer
serving club that must succeed here at UF if
there rare to be other Raths on other Florida
campuses.
Bus boy Sistrunk tattled because if violations
are caught by beverage agents the Rat folds.

Tired Os Being Told
Americas Not Great

MR. EDITOR:
I am a tired American. I am
tired of know-it-alls like David
Miller who tries to tell me the
way things are.
I am tired of the righteous
hippies who claim they represent
the NEW America and who sneer
at the virtues of honesty,
integrity, and morality on which
America grew to greatness.
I am a tired American who
is tired of having my parents and
soon me, supporting families
who havent known any other
source of income other than
government relief checks for
three generations. Most of these
people that live in the slums
dont want to get ahead. Why
should they: They receive a
good salary without lifting a
finger.
I am tired of groups like the
SDS who say they want to
improve America. I am glad that
the President of our University
sees through this facade into the
turmoil that any left wing

Awaken To Sounds
Os ROTC Practice

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to direct my
most humble and civilian thanks
to those special ROTC units
who insist on drilling their units
outside my room. Special
recognition goes to the Gator
Raiders for their 6:30 a.m.
Saturday performance and to
the Billy Mitchell Drill Team, to
whose voices I awoke at 5:30
Monday morning.
Many thanks, also, to the
ROTC officials who suggested
that if I didnt like the noise I

radical group would create if
allowed on our campus or any
campus.
I resent strongly this group of
people who try to tell me that
capitalism is a dirty word and
that free enterprise and private
initiative are only synonyms for
greed. They say they hate
capitalism, but they are
screaming for all the advantages
of our great system.
I am tired of being told that
America is not the greatest
nation on the earth. America is a
generous nation dedicated to
helping the have-nots attain
some of the good things that our
free enterprise has made.
1 am a tired American who
gets misty when I hear the Star
Spangled Banner and see my
flag rippling in the breeze.
I am a tired American,
thankful I was born an American
in a nation with truly liberty and
justice for all.
RONNIE CLARK, lUC

might give them some other
ideas as to where they might
drill. Stand tall men.
RICHARD HAMANN
TOLBERT HALL
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

By Robert Sistrunlc

From 6 pjn. Friday till 2:30 p.m. Saturday
bus boy Sistrunk saw a capacity audience
enjoying themselves at a campus club. He saw
Joe Hilliards dream coming true (a place where
students can meet each other and enjoy
themselves).
Bub boy Sistrunk sacrificed the trouble-making
minority so that this UF project wouldnt go up
in smoke.
Now, lets stop speaking in the junior high,
high school, and all too often college language of
squeal, tattle, fink, rat, or sell out. Lets grow
up and use the right word: responsibility.
RESPONSIBILITY!
Bus boy Sistrunk ratted responsibly to put
down the minority trouble shooters. He could
have stood by and let a few rebel rousers lacerate
the Rat with their ugly switchblades. However,
this would probably have given him bad dreams
and a sick stomach.
Bus boy Sistrunk will continue to turn in
violators of the Rats regulations. And the life he
saves may be the Rats.

MR. EDITOR.
Anyone who is looking for a
new word to substitute for love,
need look no further. There is
no reason for a replacement.
The author of A New Word
For Love? seems to have
forgotten the significance in the
expression love.
Websters defines love as a
passionate affection. The word
love depicts an emotion, a
feeling.
How can a feeling be
worthless or trite?
Arent hundreds of words
interchangeable?
A quote from the recent
editorial read, Now love, a
word that should have remained
sacred, must be included with a
list of terms that can, and often
do, mean anything and
everything all at the same time.

Swimmers Hindered
By Bad Facilities

MR. EDITOR:
I took great pride in watching
my first swimming match this
past weekend: Fla. 63 l /i FSU
4954. However my pride was
twice overcome with
embarassment when fair play
was halted due to Floridas
deplorable swimming facilities.
First, FSUs champion
one-meter diver had to chase

OKN FORUM:
A&aiumi Vlm t£
There is no hope for the complacent man.

ITS GOT FEELING
'Love Can't Be Trite

Its time I made a statement on the Gentry controversy.

Dont many words mean
everything and anything
simultaneously?
It isnt the word love that is
sacred. It is the act, the
passionate affection that is holy
and venerated.
Love is also a score of zero in
a game of tennis. Does this
illustrate a prostitution of
love? Are we taking advantage
of love when we play tennis?
Love is not a nothing word.
It is a word that can be
interchanged with like, admire,
respect, and desire.
It is a word with the
prominence of such words as
cute, tough, neat, cool and jazz.
It is a word that represents
zero in a much-played sport.
It is an emotion, a feeling,
that hasnt and never will loose

away a wasp that had perched
on the boards end, and
secondly, a broken overhead
rope plunged into the water
during the 200-meter freestyle,
causing a restart of the race,
after a five minute rest period.
President OConnell
witnessed it. I wonder what he
felt?
CHARLIE STONE, 4FY

Wndnwday, January 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

the power it holds. It is still
reserved for those special few in
our lives.
Those who deem it necessary
to find a new word for love,
are wasting their time.
ELLEN BAROCAS, lUC
A Big Hurrah
For Saviors!
MR. EDITOR:
Monday was a great day for
OUR NATION. Mr. Rion and
Mr. Wheeler are heroes in the
finest tradition of BRAVE
AMERICANS. As president,
secretary, and groundskeeper of
SANE (Students Advocating No
Excretion), I wish to
congratulate these FINE MEN
for dramatically foiling a MAD
COMMIE PLOT!
There was a COMMIE
CONSPIRACY planned by
SHAGGY COMMIF,
ANARCHISTS to flush all
toilets during OUR
PRESIDENTS inauguration in
an attempt to back up the
Potomac River and assassinate
OUR LEADER. However, due
to the fearless*bravery of two
FINE AMERICANS, the
Potomac did not back up and
OUR PRESIDENT was saved!
All SANE students commend
these two FREEDOM-LOVING
DEMOCRATIC AMERICANS!
RICHARD DAVIDSON, 2UC

Page 7



Page 8

. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 22, 1969

IIP 1 I 1
I K: : v I S, b
MSS 8 M ' '
I I Wk & I I*l
tit 11 /a
I
M
**^~ -' :|
;' .. ' 4^% j*
... ** v yi^^P#^SeiM?^W v
STOP... THE UNIVERSITY SHOP
Young Edwardian presents
a bonded acrylic mini dress
featured in a rainbow of
colors trimmed with white.
Modeled by Sally.
l jj^^^t-
: '~ '--* w
- i| £_£> ,H'
' r^rV^v^-^^ ny||H2^|^
* w'
F..- .*
1 :m: (
> 'difl&t* Jlf, r^fec
-t: < |mi' : Ute
' I < .
A $$*1 :; ' .3 Mbr. : x iglgp:;;
*||* 'l> ; : f ****
- v *fcvJllS y W^P
m]it/VSili|Wi 1 11 MiMflMfc n :$
V
fenfl s i Hk
: : : Bkw ,, Vr^
lis
JAUiMMLVA .'.'.U l .^^^W fc^KkSel'
Ifr&IJl* 1 BetrBiia |<|
- : :
I
b* '-'
#- '' \ m
H
1 I 1 Im
STOP .. STAG AND DRAG
An Edwardian deep
neckline and sleeve
treatment is just in time for
Valentines Day. The dress
print features "little
hearts." Modeled by
Wendy.

latert

STOP ... DONIGAN'S
An outfit for at home or
entertaining, by Lanz. A
multi-colored pants skirt is
accentuated by a bright
yellow blouse. Shoes by
Etianne Aigner and
accessories by Accessocraft.
Modeled by Penny.
>

--
jfl
W iHBR
phlp ;: ? v --^1
- Jr. \& :
- ~ JW&ii>: '|§fL
'
V PBhBbK .jO
p yA. > JH SfMk. JH, ||h£z|: &2L. III
jgra&P n
.^n|

£*\ 1
m \ Sflm
JL ;< W jf
B ' ip jf ''- v*. *>
ipfc fr i: JMr
JP|S iPjP f y
SI JR*r ~
j mmmm
rn&mgm .Jm. wm^mkm
MgwJmi R
r
Hk -^Bf
1 I Si . JEr
Bk I
STOP ... MASS BROTHERS
A'n Jr. creates this look of
softness. A floaty voile with
peasant sleeves. It is
trimmed with a colorful
garland of flowers. Hope to
see you at Mass Brothers
Saturday ar 2:30 for the
Sun Seekers Fashion Show
the very latest in swim
suits! Modeled by Linda

m

rs
l <
at t

<8 M

&



jjTjj

rl\

he

... ; r ~- 1 t

ti. \ t &* '& I '* ft §! 1 'M"" %
& i
Mj^pL I i *Hh
HR&r A -V .'s s 'j*-'ksL
S|v 1- jMp\-
; W Ms v fl
, <: ^py^WWWW|^r | .. -.s ,;>: 1.
STOP... COLONY SHOP
Little fun things for
summer. A pastel printed
pant suit with wing point
sleeves is created by Bobbie
Brooks. Modeled by Patti.
L
k *Tiiiiiit' i pr*lty ***- ,s
%' |p|ll '^fag^
Bfo/ 'P%M'iFj*''%' *#% £ fl t/ y^
~BsgS& : < &# > --v i
--
HfcjM i yjji- *
-97 *' ? " v C , i
... jp,. '.
STOP ... TWIG
A body shirt of white amel
and acetate is worn with
blue and white printed bell
bottom jeans. The outfit is
trimmed with a leather belt
which tops off the new
look. Modeled by Marti.

iHL
§3
.jgSSSjHJr
WssL
I I
ill^^mMbl
r l^mm
H f
wfflSK^Mbs^K^nKsajsk
l I 1 li ~~ I
Hr. H
Y 1
STOP... SUSAN SCOTT
Black and white always
great, are together aged*
This time in a black crepe
body shirt that softly hugs
the curves and super bell
bottoms. The bells are a
veritable light stow of
white dots o|j|black f
flashing finMniing i jplham
in spiral swi& v We're
certain when ye* wear
these dots with e dash,
they'll get the wessage.
Modeled by Joyce.,
jyN^\YH3HH\ ; 88 ~~ |T|Trfrr|TrpTrrrn .. nn |TT -jv --^ inn^ .....
i tij/u jiNiStji^k
. \\ a ii M'-p d£rj\/ /
( ivj \ \i\
& il 4 VmsjaiUt&rf/ m*> I> & \ \\\.
'Sk \| .-.' . Jjjk
V ~./ '> <\M V j n|M|
peg4. |yyjijy^jy||^
-j~ r^y^* i >Jr ||||pr ;^
jjjm
;' "N^~ v; >
-sx /?.- trwmWW y#
*&vr %-,&' v : dy&fegy-,
, y& a^eW
- iSgjcr
STOP ... SILVERMAN'S
A Tootique three piece
slack outfit. The long sleeve
gold blouse of 100% nylon
is set off by high-waisted
bell bottoms and a
sleeveless short balaro
jacket of 100% cotton in a
black, brown gold and beige
Indian print. Modeled by
Carol.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY ...
FASHION LAYOUT BY..

The

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

IwaWX'XwW-v.va'.-. .-.v.v.v.viv/ivlvj;
FOR SALE
! C*
vw%v. >>>x*>v*vw ; q : : xww*w .v.v;
STEREO COMPONENT AM-FM
multiplex radio. Brand new, was
$499.95 * Sacrifice $250. Call
Sandy, 4 7 pm, 376-1536.
(A-st-62-p)
Boa constrictor & accessories
excellent hobby. 378-6577 evenings.
(A-3t-65-p)
STEREO Tape Recorder for sale.
Roberts 770 X with cross-field heads.
Excellent condition, good price. Call
Chuck at 372-9609. (A-st-65-p)
Quick sale! Honda 50 2 years old,
step threw frame, helmet included.
Price SIOO. Call 372-7550.
(A-st-54-p)
Gibson guitar model E5335. Cherry
red finish. Custom made, includes
Bixby-tremlo bar, case and more. Call
Ocala 629-5981 After 5 pm. (A-4t-65
Sears forecast 12 port, manual
type, pica type, good condition, must
sell, will take best offer, call Janis
Eggart at 372-1212. (3t-A-65-p)
ABSOLUTELY MUST SELL. By this
weekend Sears 50cc SBO or best
offer. Excellent condition, 3787358
3769365 Ask for Vic. (A-st-65-p)
Basenji Pups AKC champion lines
red/white, barkless, odorless, wormed
& shot. Call 472-2408 after 5.
(A-st-66-p)
Honda 50 good condition. Helmet
and bookrack included. $l2O. Call
Tom, 376-3184. (A-^|t-66-p)
1967 Red Manx body on VW chassis,
SIOOO, hi standard supermatic
citation 22 cal target pistol, S7O,
mi-carbine SSO, TV S2O. (A-st-66-p)
1965 Allstate Scooter, $l5O Helmet
& Shield included. 378-6577
evenings. (A-3t-65-p)
Honda Sport 50. S9O firm. Call David
392-8280 after 5 p.m. (A-st-66-p)
Sell Honda C 8350 140 miles, perfect
condition. Very clean, very fast,
S6OO. Call Frank after 7 p.m., Lake
Butler, 496-3651. (A-4t-66-p)
FOR RENT
v.v. v£
To sublet lovely IBr. Apt. University
Gardens Choice
Building Completely furnished. Call
376-0651 after 5 pm. (st-B-65-p)
1 bedroom furnished apt. w/w carpet
panelled central air/heat laundry big
closets convienent. Sublet sllO. Feb
first call evenings 371-2771.
(B-3t-65-p)
Immediate sublet upstairs poolside
2 bedroom Village Park Apartment.
January rent paid, will transfer
damage deposit, lease till June,
378-8382. (B-st-64-p)
Must sublet 1 bedroom apt. pool, ac,
near campus. Colonial Manor,
$115.00, 378-0531. (B-3t-64-p)
WANTED
fossai,? WWWWWWiSIM
Roommates to share 2 br. house, 2
blks from campus, cheap for 1,
cheaper for 2. Call Van or -tyeil,
3 76-2729 eves, 392-1886
(C-st-66-p)
Male roommate to share 3 bedroom
11/?l 1 /? bath house with central air and
heat, separate bedrooms. Occupancy
Feb. $50.00/month plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 378-7041. (C-st-64-p)
Need two female roommates now!
Luxurious 2 bedroom, 2 bath &
dishwasher. $55 per month. Call
376-6870 preferably after four.
(C-3t-64-p)
Coed roommate wanted for French
Quarter apt. furnished one bdr. 67.50
per month, immediate occupancy.
Call Mary Jo 378-0359, Linda
378-9162. (C-st-62-p)
Roommates wanted, 1 or 2 to share 2
bdrm. apt. Gatortown, SW 16th Ave.
$42.50 mo. Call Ralph after 3 p.m.,
378-8525. (C-3t-64-p)
Male roommate Landmark, poolside
apt. $45 mo. plus utilities after 7 call
378-3939 or apt. 112. (C-st-66-p)
1 B4DNIIIE, I
*or gKeESOB I
V WAEKEN I
BEATTY I
FAYE I
nu away |

WANTED
Female roommate for 2 bdrm. Vill.
Park apt. 95 for winter and spring
quarters. Call 3628663 anytime.
(C-4t-65-p)
Special offer. Coed needed to share 2
bdrm apt on SW 16th Ave.
immediate occupancy. Call Audrey.
376-1045 or 376-9348. (C-st-65-p)
HELP WANTED 1
Need office equipment Salesman in
Gainesville. Call 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
MEN AND WOMEN SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT CAMP
PINEWOOD for boys and girls,
Hendersonville, N.C. (June 17 Aug.
23). General Counselors needed to
live with and care for campers.
Specialty Counselors to teach
Boating, Canoeing, Sailing,
Swimming (WSI), Horseback Riding,
Skiing (be able to drive a boat), Arts
and Crafts, Archery, Riflery (NRA
Inst), Nature, Overnight Camping
(able to drive a truck), Tennis,
Dancing, Drama, Golf. Salary based
on age, education, abilities and
experience also includes room, board,
laundry, and other extras. Apply for
applications to T.R. Robertson,
Camp Director, 1414 Fetch Ave.,
Jax, Fla. 32207. (E-6t-59-c)
DELIVERY BOYS 11 am to 2 pm,
transportation provided, apply in
person LARRYS PORE-BOY 1029
W. Umv. Ave. (E-st-66-p)
;wKv?;vrtv;vv.v.v.v.v.vftv. ,v,.
AUTOS |
1958 Triumph TR-3 Runs well but
needs body and transmission work.
Excellent for rebuilding or beach
buggy 3927553 Don SIOO cash.
(G-2t-65-p)
AH Sprite, 1967 convertible w/boot
& tonneau cover, meichelm x tires &
radio. See Steve, 472 Murphree D or
call 372-9289. (G-st-64-p)
VW 62: radio, new speaker &
battery, 2 owners, 62,000 miles,
motor recently reconditioned, clean
interior, S6OO. 372-7215 before 5
p.m. (G-6t-63-p)
Have 2 surplus cars, 1962 Plymouth
V/8 5325. 1964 Cadillac 51750.
Call 372-9607 or 372-3251>
(G-ts-60-c)
I PERSONAL |
We hijacked Autumn help us deter
spring. Its a bigger job, requirements
a gentle mind and a big suitcase.
Contact Helene or Marla at
392-9290. (J-3t-64-p)
In from Columbia THIS WEEK more
RUANAS, Ponchos, and Capes 100%
wool. Gorgeous COLORS. The
Spanish Main, 105 W. University Ave.
(J-3t-65=p)
Mata Heri competition arriving Bpm
January 30th Look for notices giving
details. (J-2t-65-c)
Congrats to Pig-Man No. 2. You join
a long and distinguished line (or is it
pedigree?) Beta Pi sends their love to
L.B.H. (J-lt-66-p)
Anyone interested in forming a
boxing team at the University of
Florida, contact Rick, 392-7505,
Tower B. (J-3t-66-p)
Anniversary party for Kitty and Rick
O. They made it one year! Sat. Jan.
25 after 9 pm til ? 919 NW Bth PI.
376-2912. 8.Y.0.8. (J-3t-66-p)

SAT
ff BURTON
PJ OTOOLE
i. TECHNICOLOR- PANAVISION"
^4: 15-7:00*9:40 W -,^
1 ;

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 22, 1969

Page 10

PERSONAL
Dave go to University Auditorium
January 30th 8 pm de Vosjoli will
talk then. See posted notices for.
details. (J-3t-66-c)
| LOST & FOUND |
M ... v
, >X'XW>x XvXWXwX-X i ;'iiijy'V ''w; A
Blue jacket lost at Matherly
contained glasses, watch, etc. If
found, at least return glasses. Call
Tom Stone at 378-6465. (L-lt-66-p)
Purse stolen at research library
contained SIOO, identification,
glasses, etc. If found, at least return
glasses and identification. Call
Annette Morroni, 376-8514,
(L-st-63-p)
;;;;vi,:vx*x*xx*xwi,;*K,;,wx*x*x*x-.*x*xx ;;;;vi,:vx*x*xx*xwi,;*K,;,wx*x*x*x-.*x*xx---|
--| ;;;;vi,:vx*x*xx*xwi,;*K,;,wx*x*x*x-.*x*xx---| SERVICES
$ V
Attention Working Mothers: If you
want your child to have the attention
and loving care as at home, take them
to Evelyns Kiddie Kort Child Care
Center. 5240 NW Bth Ave. Ph.
372-6667 or 376-6495. (M-st-66 p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
Satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services,
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
Wanted Laundry by the bundle.
Wash and iron. Will pick up and
deliver. S. W. 16th Ave. area. Call
378-5933 after 4:00 p.m. (M-3t-65-p)
liiligg
IMllll
X%ylvX\v>X*XvXv*vXv!vXvX yXyXyXyX\\yXyXyXyXvX;XvX\yX\y XyXy
XyXy>lyX;>Xj>X*X*XyXyX>lyXyXv yXyX
XvXvXvXvXvXvXvXvXvXvXXvXvXv *XvXv
||||a|
y ggg T v \ 4 ,-*/ *j v

I4IM'

SERVICES
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,
prices fiom $250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-l 3t-61-c)
Now theres an Avon representative
on campus to bring you q lity
products for men and women at low
prices. Contact Linda, 392-9357.
(M-st-62-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
| Downtown Galsvllb 1
| WW. Uwlvmlfy Avt. \
M *l* L*l*m > I* f > A j
METROCOLOR,
- T
DAVID'NIVEN
ICI MnjfflCoSp' \
ft*
JK the fixers
Based on the Pulitzer
r ze winning novel
by Bernard Malamud.
Mtiocoloi @

SllfSTlklftlM buX w,i|CE STARTS
Km*l*!kWfal SHOW STARTS 7:00 TODAY
MEffiagMCHigal FIRST RUN IN GAINESVILLE!
Theyll DO ANYTHING, .or DARE ANYTHING!
a They run in packs...and what
they do makes headlines!
WW & 10:40
Joanna FRANK
: Wy ** "THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION"
HOOUCIDWOMXCIiDB. MT|I 1, B PERFECT
_ Yv MAURY DEXTER JAMES GORDON WHITE MAURY DEXTER i|
One for each of the Deadly Sint also
r- ' AmCiCAN'iiiiEnriATiofijAi. b> PERFECT
iOBERT WALKER larryBISHAP anaM RfIARKF SlJ>/ Suggested For Mature Audiences

Use our handy
mall in order
form.

SERVICES I
, :>>: >xM | Mi*W 9 fW >!4 | wS
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST for
quality repairs, call 376-0710.
(M-7t-63-p)
I
llM I 1:35 3:40 5:40
7.45 9:50 I
STEVE ft
MCQUEEN I
AS
'BULLITT
TECHNICOLOR FROM WARNER BROS. SEVEN ARTS V?
|m] SUGCf S'tD FOR MATURE AUDIENCES X
BSlfj STARTS
!TZ IT J TODAY
2:00 3:55 5:50 7:45 9:40
BIRDS
IN PERU
beneath her icy core lay
a desperate desire to love.
Jean Seberg Maurice Ronet
,"Birds in Peru"
Danielle Dameux
PERSONS UNDER
V£/ 17 NOT ADMITTED



%,
I
'< -. v. *. IB^sg
''Wfc. :-<
*' aM Mrimfiin
Bh|^ [ .|,i !s&&' y Ik #S? F At&sUSik
fl& .9 Hp JH
HIGH SCHOOL TO COLLEGE
The good and the bad of high school counseling comes out as
George W. Thomas (second from right) Gainesville High School
counselor, discusses problems in the transition to college with his
former students, now freshmen at the UF. Participants in a two-day
workshop at the university included (from left to right) Martha
Parkinson, Linda Mathis, John Harper, Thomas and Roger Sims.
Students, all university freshmen, are graduates of Gainesville High
School.
UF Press: Outlet
For Faculty Members
A
With 25 new titles and more than 30,000 volumes sold each year,
the UF Press moves into its 24th year as a creative outlet for UF
faculty, authors of Florida history and culture, and scholars in all
fields from throughout the Southeast.
One-half of our books have been written by UF faculty members,
said William Harvey, press director, but their work is not given
special consideration. Because we are a part of the university they
naturally turn to us, but we look for quality works which we feci will
make a genuine contribution rather than just re-wording old facts.
The press is a division of the UF controlled by a 15-member faculty
board of managers chaired by Dr. Aubry Williams, professor of
English.
A budget of more than $95,000 of state funds is allotted to the
Press for the present state fiscal year. Expected expenditures from
funds which it recicves in revenue is $215,000.
Founded in 1945 under the direction of then UF President William
Tigert and Gov. Spessard Holland, it has published over 350 books.
Dr. Lewis F. Haines, currently a professor of logic was
editor-in-chief and director of the press for 22 years from its
beginning until Jan. 1, 1967.
Most of the press's books are scholarly works and are used chiefly
by professors and college libraries, Harvey cited one book which had
proved most successful in terms of circulation to the general public.
Your Florida Garden, by Prof essors of Agriculture Emeritus
John V. Watkins and Herbert S. Wolfe, now in its fifth edition, is
considered a standard by Florida horticulturists.
We have mauv titles in the life sciences and agriculture. Harve\
said. Am universiiv press will tend to relied the schools strong
points.
H this car looks like
you cant alii >l*l it
;/ .
yK *> ¥
look ajrain
( umlcr S 2 f(K>)
HrrrVimt'?.pi>rts ar that din 'll t cost likt- 'i ,,n n, l ll 1 l l r 11
a sport> car ifn- now '<>9 Spithri MkS. liratlio-t'. I'-atl" i Il_ .
Taki-s\nu to <*o in 1 S scronil' Four for pi-noil -I i ip>- *"t> w\ t 1 J
want spoot i;oar b<>\. raok-amf-pinion otpnpni'r.i 1 -nn - 11 I
- stoorinp. four-whoof uufopondont Mi'pon iti'at to- -outturn: fv pt 1 l ri
CRANE TRIUMPH 506 East Univarsity I
IMPORTS

No Plans For Selling
Tlayboy* On Campus

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Playboy magazine, the
reading delight of millions of
male enthusiasts, is not sold in
any'of the Campus bookstores
and there are no plans to sell it
on campus in the near future.
There is no university policy
against selling it (Playboy) as
far as I know, Sam P. Getzen,
director of the Bookstores and
Campus Shops said.
Getzen explained he
considered UFs no-policy,
policy his responsibility to
avoid selling anything that might
cause embarrassment to the
university.
We have so many visitors to
campus it would be hard to hold
onto the magazine. We dont
want to cause any
embarrassment by having any
parents or clubs call and
complain about it, he said.
Last spring, when the Towers
opened, Getzen said the,
magazine suppliers
inadvertantly put it out there
and it was sold for about three
days. We discontinued it after a
few days.
Were not denying the right
to read it as far as merits go, I
have no prerogative to censor
anything students can read
anything, Getzen said.
Playboy is available near
campus at flic stores on
University Avenue, he stressed.
Have
Your Generator \
OVERHAULED Soecial
saLso i
INC LABOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
iO* NW th AVF. ~ GAINESVIIIf
MON HI. I AM-7PM SAT. TIL 5 PM
37*

    I HOUSE OF TRAVEL I
    I complete travel services lr
    I credit cards accepted \
    specializing in cruises / B
    representing all major J /If** I
    no service charge f S
    I DIAL
    1 1 i 111
    I [378-16011 j! HI fi 5*E OF TRAVEL II;
    B OPfcNDAIL't. 34 i S W. UNIVERSITY AVE 8
    J
    | SATURDAY WEST SIDE B
    I 9 A.M. NOON SHOPPING CENTER |
    B
    B
    II II 111! 1 mi. I !! ! II 111 I immmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm i

    TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS
    SALES SERVICE RENTALS
    Your EXCLUSIVE
    OLYMPIA DEALER
    KISER'S OFFICE EQUIPMENT 604 N. MAIN
    WED. NITE SPECIAL^
    \2> FRESH GROUPER OR SEA SQUAB
    ALL YOU CAN EAT!
    Including CHILDREN Sl.ool
    SKS. ADULTS $1.50
    Pira+oc Qlauu
    PIRATES COVE LOBSTER HOUSE
    SEAFOOD FRESH FROM THE SEA
    SERVING DAILY FROM 5 P.M.
    OCALA GAINESVILLE
    HWY. 301,441 OPEN SUNDAY 4-10
    3500 S. W 13th ST.
    ol ON BIVAN ARM LAKE
    PHONE 622-6556 PHONE 378-2931
    Mrnrnm

    Wednesday, January 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

    Page 11



    , The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 22,1969

    Page 12

    Astronomer Enthusiastic
    About South Pole Work

    Travel agents get few requests
    for the South Pole, but theres a
    UF astronomer who has been
    wantingio go there for years.
    Dr. Frank Bradshaw Wood,
    director of the Optical
    Astronomy Observatory, got his
    wish last November when he
    spent four days in Antarctica
    setting up an experimental
    optical observatory. He took a
    small telescope to test the
    feasibility of setting up a
    permanent station with a larger
    telescope.
    Ive had the idea for a
    number of years that Antarctica
    would be a good place for
    astronomical work. There are a
    number of reasons for having an
    optical observatory there.
    The air is very dry, so there
    is little absorption in the
    infra-red, in most places the
    humidity blocks out this part.
    The clarity of the skies helps in
    observing. And with six months
    of night, you cant go wrong,
    Wood said.
    Although enthusiastic about
    the station, the problems of
    working at 60-80 degrees below

    WUFT Only Licensed
    FCC Station In Area

    More than 100,000 people in
    the Alachua County area have at
    their fingertips the only licensed
    FCC television station in
    North-Central Florida.
    WUFT, a National
    Educational Television affliate,
    originates from the Florida
    Stadium daily at 8 a.m.
    Daytime programing is aimed
    at Alachua County public
    schools. Channel 5 (WUFT)
    augments classroom instruction,
    with assistance from NET.
    Public affairs and cultural
    enrichment highlight nighttime
    viewing, which concludes at 10
    p.m.
    A telephone survey in 1966
    rated WUFT second in the NET
    chain of 150 stations.
    Our audience is primarily
    informed members of the
    community and families
    associated with the UF campus.
    Students tend to tune out
    Channel 5 because the
    entertainment has an
    educational tone. After a day of
    classes and hours of study, a
    students free time is generally
    occupied with other things,
    commented Mark Damon,
    WUFTs program manager.
    Presently Channel 5 is caught
    in the national conversion of

    JML l STEAK HOUSE
    FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
    OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
    Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
    3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

    zero are very serious ones, he
    said.
    Just try to work in that cold.
    It takes a few weeks to get used
    to it. Its very dry and theres
    and altitude problem. Being
    about two miles high, it takes a
    lot of adjusting, Wood said.
    A problem encountered by
    Wood was trying to get to the
    base where he was staying.
    There were sunspots, so
    communications were bad. It
    took four days to get in.
    Once Wood got to his station,
    conditions improved. The base,
    run by the Navy and the United
    States Antarctic Research
    Program (USARP), had all the
    luxuries of an ordinary Navy
    base.
    Living quarters were inside a
    trench dug into 6OQO-feet of ice.
    The temperature was kept at a
    comfortable 75 degrees, and
    one of the best cooks in the
    Navy cooked the food.
    Club 90 was the center of
    entertainment. Open 24-hours a
    day, the club has no bartender,
    just bottles sitting on the bar.

    black and white to color
    programing.
    Within the next two to five
    years there will be no black and
    white syndication. The trend is
    toward total color. NET has
    already made the switch and we
    are attempting to cope with the
    problem, Damon said.
    SG To List
    Sold Books
    The Student Government
    Book Exchange has completed
    cataloging books not sold in the
    sales at the beginning of this
    quarter.
    Unsold books may be picked
    up in room 206 of the Reitz
    Union beginning Thursday from
    3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
    Checks for sold books will be
    mailed nest week. A list of
    unsold books will be published
    in Thursday's Alligator.

    We played pool there every
    afternoon, and they showed
    movies at night (there was
    24-hour daylight when Wood
    was there).
    The worst inconvenience was
    the water shortage, Wood said.
    Because everything was frozen,
    there was a problem in keeping
    fresh water. Signs advised people
    to limit their showers to one a
    week.
    To give the desolate Antarctic
    base a touch of home, Wood
    said, people had put up signs
    pointing to well-known cities
    and their distances. London,
    New York, and Chicago
    signs became common sights.
    But the one that caught Woods
    eye was the one which
    said,Zephryhill, Fla. BOOO
    mi.
    Wood came to the UF in
    September from the University
    of Pennsylvania, where he was
    the Director of Astronomy for
    18 years.

    lenses are your eyes But now improper storage between wear wearof
    of wearof modern plas- there's Lensine from mgs permits the growth of bac bactics
    tics bactics which have en- l ,he makers of tena on the lenses. This is a sure
    tlrely different charac- Murine. cause of eye irritation and. in
    teristics than the tissues #ii^for contact com- 'some cases, can endanger your
    and fluids of the eye. Conse- fort and convenience. vision. Bacteria cannot grow in
    quently your eye cannot handle Lensine is the one solution Lensine because it s sterile, self selfthis
    this selfthis foreign object without help for complete contact lens care sanitizing, and antiseptic
    So, in order to correct for Just a drop or two of Lensine coats Let caring for your
    Mother Nature's lack of foresight. and lubricates your lens This al- \ contacts be as conven convenyoJJ~have
    yoJJ~have convenyoJJ~have to use lens solutions to lows the lens to float more freely s tent as wearing them,
    make yourcontacts and your eyes in the natural fluids of your eye Get some Lensine .
    compatible. Why 9 Because Lensine is an "iso- Mother's little helper
    There was a time when you tonic solution, very much like
    needed two or more separate your own tears. Lensine is com-
    oatiblo with the eye.
    Cleaning your contacts with
    Lensine retards the build-up of
    foreign deposits on the lenses t lit l j
    Mother Nature
    never planned on
    contact
    lenses
    a
    'C
    . : ^. ; : 1 2 : i
    * : \

    I nan Slaoo BillWorsham
    I Tom Stewart ArUe WatWnjjon I
    I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 163$ W v
    I NO WAR CLAUSE I
    I DE FE RREP_Pj[£M_UJM_PAYM£NT^_J

    SCHLUMBERGER ocates oil by lowering I
    electrical, electronic and mechanical probes into wells I
    drilled by the major oil companies. I
    SCHLUMBERGER has openings for I
    graduating engineers to perform this challenging |
    work. I
    < a B|
    SCHLUMBERGER brochures are in the I
    Placement and Career Planning Center. I
    SCHLUMBERGER will be on campus for I
    interviews on I
    MOHDAY, JANUARY 27 |



    , >
    , M: v
    ' 9^^V'>i : l f | I S S
    iti
    i/ f ; ,i : / H : fey -i- S |
    mum
    NEW FOLK TO PRESENT VIBRATING SOUNDS
    ... for the university community Wednesday, Jan. 29.
    New Folk Plan Concert

    By SUZI WHALEY
    Alligator Staff Writer
    From the famous steps of Sproul Hall at the
    University of California at Berkeley to the shores of
    Daytona Beach at spring break, the vibrating sounds
    of the New Folk have turned on hundreds of
    thousands of college students.
    The New Folk will appear in concert here,
    Wednesday, Jan. 29, at 8:15 p.m. in the University
    Auditorium. Tickets are $1 and may be purchased
    at the Reitz Union Box Office, the Gold Coast
    Restaurant, and the Hub.
    The New Folk sing under the sponsorship of
    Campus Crusade for Christ International, which is

    Greeks Help
    Dime March
    For the students who have
    doubts about their grades,
    Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity
    will have a wishing well in front
    of the Hub this week. Actually
    the wishing well will be for all
    university students and the
    proceeds will go to the March of
    Dimes Campaign.
    Students can also contribute
    to the Dimes March by buying a
    ticket to the Gainesville Drag
    Strip during the next two
    weekends. Half of the ticket
    price will go to the March of
    Dimes. These tickets are being
    sold by the Alpha Epsilon Phi
    Sorority on campus. You can
    also drop by their house and
    pick tickets up.
    Saturday, the Phi Taus will be
    joining the fund-raising drive by
    collecting money from
    motorists.
    So make your wishes and buy
    your tickets to the drags. A
    contribution to the March of
    Dimes is a good investment for
    the future.
    Good Service Starts
    at
    CRANE IMPORTS
    SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
    RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
    CRANE IMPORTS
    505 E, Uatv. Ave. 372-4373

    ifecWff ** *
    p" S .feaafeMg I
    The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, despite the seemingly blank faces,
    promise a lively musical performance in the old New Orleans
    tradition, Feb. 1. This presentation is a part of the Union Program

    active on well over 500 campuses in 40 different
    countries.
    Campus Crusade was founded in 1951 by Dr. Bill
    Bright at UCLA with the goal of presenting Christ in
    the students perspective.
    An active chapter of the Campus Crusade exists
    here under the direction of Ander Crenshaw, a law
    student from Jacksonville. College Life meetings are
    held Sunday nights at 9:13 p.m. at fraternity and
    sorority houses.
    Activities include singing, guest speakers, and
    timely skits from the College Life Players. There are
    no dues and no formal membership but
    approximately 150 students gather weekly to
    participate in the meetings.

    REVIEWS
    f Bui lit Is Aimed
    At Entertainment

    By MIKE SIMMONS
    Alligator Rcvtewar
    There are bad cops and there
    are good cops and then theres
    Bullit (from the films
    promotional advertisements).
    And there are bad movies and
    good : movies, and theres
    Bullit, resting somewhere
    between.
    From a quick look at what
    Hollywoods offering us these
    days, it would seem that the era
    of action-adventure and
    entertainment films has all but
    left us, giving way to a seemingly
    significant variety that justifies
    its existance with symbols and
    messages. This is all right, and
    probably is a step in the right
    direction, but somehow it feels
    as if something is being lost.
    For many people still like to
    visit the movies simply to be
    entertained. Its quite an
    achievement for the motion
    picture people to discover that
    they can enlighten their
    audiences, but they shouldnt
    forget that films have also
    functioned well as a medium for
    release and enjoyment.
    In the minority, the makers of
    Bullit were apparently
    shooting with this near-forgotten
    function in mind, and they come
    pretty dose to their target.
    Bullits sole purpose seems to
    be achieving a total release of
    thoughts and cares by the
    audience in exchange for an
    immersion in the action.
    This is accomplished with
    enough finesse (via the apt
    talents of director Peter Yates
    and cinematographer William
    Fraker) that the film abounds
    with almost aching suspense and
    a cinematic control guaranteed
    to carry the audience over every
    bump and around each turn of
    the films extremely harrowing
    chase scene.
    RECRUITMENT
    VISIT
    This Friday, only
    (January 24)
    Wm. F. Mitchell, President of the
    First Research Company, business
    research specialists of Miami, Fla.,
    will be at the University
    Placement Office here from 9 am
    to 5 pm this coming Friday,
    January 24, only.
    If you would like an interview
    to be considered for training as a
    Consultant with First Research
    Company, please register in
    advance.
    First Research Company is a
    leader in the USA in business
    research financial, economic
    and marketing. It helps a wide
    variety of clients solve problems,
    make profitable decisions.
    Since its founding in 1950,
    more than 3,000 studies have
    been completed for 1,600 clients
    in the USA, Canada, the
    Caribbean and Latin America.
    o
    Please Register in Advance
    FIRST RESEARCH COMPANY
    Business Research Specialists
    2500 SW 3rd Avenue,
    Miami, Fla. 33129

    Wedneeday

    Its all well and good, and if
    thats all youre seeking youll be
    well satisfied. However, if you
    include an interest in the
    characters as part of your
    enjoyment Bullit just might
    miss with you. The actors
    especially the starring McQueen
    - move through their exploits
    with no more motivation than
    avoiding puppet-lice deaths and
    finishing the movie.
    Steve McQueen plays Frank
    Bullit exactly as he did Thomas
    Crown, and his other roles in
    The Great Escape and The
    Sand Pebbles simply mirror this
    one. The other stars revolve
    around him like props, with the
    notable exception of Jacqueline
    Bisset who barely exists at all,
    giving the impression that she
    was sketched in at the last
    minute for no other reason than
    to show that Bullit has a love
    life.
    Everyone exudes that
    understated Supercoolese that
    McQueen cant seem to get away
    from, with the whole film rolling
    under the auspices of a
    successful format and not
    bothering any more than its star
    to try something new.
    Thus, theres a certain amount
    of honesty lacking here, an
    ingredient that might have
    detracted from the action but
    which might have added to its
    believability.
    All things considered, youll
    like Bullit.
    Fum w.. tl
    McDonalds
    French Fries
    The best of the very best!
    . . made from
    Idaho Premiums
    . . prepared with
    extra care
    ... crisp and golden
    brown
    . . served piping hot!
    Youve never had French
    Fries so good. Come in
    any time and bring the
    family for a treat in food
    n fun. McDonalds means
    goodness in food and
    lots of it.
    McDonalds,
    is your kind of place.
    201 N.W. 13th St.

    Page 13



    Page 14

    l,Th Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 22, 1969

    God Is Fabulous
    laaa By Marc Dunn aBBaaeJI

    I HttuOe a meeting last week of the Fellowship
    jof Christian Athletes, as a guest.
    Beforehand my thought on this group ranged
    from a bunch of Yon Hall jocks who get together to
    do community service projects to some athletes who
    gather for religious activities. But whatever the
    purpose or makeup I thought it was worthwhile.
    The meeting began with the chairman, Rocky
    Doddridge, reading from the Bible. He read John
    13:35:
    By this shall all men know that ye are my
    disciples, if ye have love one to another.
    Next Rocky called on one of the members to tell
    the group of an experience he had. It seemed to me
    that what had happened to this young athlete was
    he thought he was in love with a girl, but then
    he discovered love for Jesus. He came to the
    conclusion that he hadnt really known what love
    was until he found his Saviour, that his previous
    love had nothing really to it.
    There was some more reading from the Bible and
    discussions on brotherhood and also how their
    group could help those less fortunate than they
    were.
    Another visitor to the meeting spoke for a few
    minutes on how Christ had used him as a witness
    and helped him excell in athletics and the work he
    was doing now. He went on the say that his
    becoming a Christian had changed the course of his
    life.
    To say the least I was overwhelmed. The faith
    that this group displayed was beyond belief to me
    As I looked from face to face I sensed a need oi
    longing in their eyes.
    But then my admiration was brought to a sudden
    standstill.

    Blue League Leaders
    Keep Rolling Along

    League leading Chi Phi and
    second runner Phi Gamma Delta
    both moved into the semi-finals
    of Blue League bowling as third
    place Delta Chi fell by the
    wayside.
    Chi Phi whipped Phi Ep
    1506-1355 to earn a berth
    against DU who upset Delta Chi
    by two pins, 1500-1498. Henry
    Adorno who had bowled a 201
    in the first game came through
    with the winning strike in the
    last frame that clinched the
    victory for the DUs.
    The FIJIS pulverized the
    Delta Sigs 1583-1278. Actually
    Hann Leads
    Tennessees Bill Hann pulled
    ahead of LSUs Pete Maravich in
    the matter of assists this past
    week. Hann set up his
    teammates to score successfully
    18 times against Georgia and UF
    while Maravich made ten on
    Vanderbilt and Auburn. Wally
    Tinker of Auburn makes 4.5
    assists per game, Mike Casey of
    Kentucky 4.1 and Tom Hanan of
    Vanderbilt 3.4.

    slcle OA |
    Pre Inventory OrMHa
    Continues Jwl
    SALE \ /
    20% OFF L
    ON ALL HAIR GOODS N|&
    1013 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 372- 1189
    2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS

    the Delta Sigs contributed the
    most to their own defeat as they
    were led by big Herb who came
    in with a tournament low of 78.
    e "i-
    Gym Exits
    Improved
    The Florida
    undergoing a $5,000 to $15,000
    renovation to improve the
    present system of exit.
    Fire doors, exit signs and
    battery powered emergency light
    units are presently being
    installed in the first of a three
    phase operation by the UF
    Physical Plant Division,
    according to engineer John
    Opdyke.
    Present conditions in the
    gymnasium are good and meet
    all of the national fire code
    regulations but this new
    renovation is an effort to relieve
    the crowded conditions at the
    front exits after the basketball
    games by making it clearer to
    people that there are other,
    faster exits

    This other gentleman I have mentioned earlier
    made another statement:
    He said that to be a good athlete you must be a
    good Christian.
    To be a good athlete you must be a good
    Christian?
    Does that mean that if you are Muslim, Buddhist
    or Jew you cant be a good athlete?
    Or does it mean that Gators like Neal Walk and
    Steve Tannen arent good athletes?
    How can a person in one breath proclaim his love
    for mankind and then in the next breath say as long
    as he does it my way?
    I believe in living for the moment, because to me
    what may happen in the future is very unsure. Os
    course I make plans for the future, like going to
    school next term or getting married this summer.
    But I dont dwell on these things, I try to make each
    moment count asj am experienceing it.
    Now for some people this may not be the way to
    live, and Im sure it isnt for a great many. That
    doesnt make them any less of a person in my eyes,
    nor do I feel pity for them. As a matter of fact each
    individual must find his own way to live his life,
    because that is the only way he will be happy.
    What difference does it make if you are a
    Christian or not?
    People who believe that their way to live is the
    only right way, and that all should live in their way
    are the ones who are causing the ills that plague our
    country.
    If you are honest with yourself and your fellow
    man, then God will love you as much as the next
    fellow.
    Why?
    Because God is fabulous.

    Lienhard No. 2
    Georgia giant Bob
    Lienhard rings up the field goals
    as efficiently as anyone in the
    nation. In last weeks NCAA
    statistics he was No. 2 in the
    nation in field goal pet., between
    A1 Kroboth of Citadel and Lew
    Alcindor of UCLA. This week
    his 62.6 per cent will rate in that
    area also.
    Lienhard leads the SEC, of
    course, with 62.6 per cent. Dave
    of LSU is second on
    58.9 per cent.
    B DELICIOUS I
    STEAKS I
    FINE FOOD I
    student prices
    Breakfast served 1
    daily. I
    1614 N. W. 13th ST. I
    378-0955 I

    >:-.

    J.WaynRitaUnionJ.WavnRinUnk>ivlVvnninJ.WavnritaUnion
    m mb #
    B
    J THE MIDDLE EAST
    I AND SIX CREDIT HRS
    I j o C oUL (39)2-ife&s
    5. r e*
    J.WayneeitzUnionJ.WayneeitzUnionJ.WayneeitzUnionJ.WayneeitzUnior
    I LUNCH and DINNER SPECIALS 1
    P lip
    I TODAY I
    I Veal I
    I Parmagiana I
    I sr I2*b io I
    I Slaw * | Cobbler I
    I THURSDAY I
    I Ole Southern Style JM x I
    I Chicken & 4sf I
    I Dumplings I
    I Crisp Brown Betty I
    I Carrot 1O p Style Fruit 1O Y I
    I Salad Imm Pudding I
    I CHILD'S PLATE g%g\ A I
    10 Years and under ^b^B^_
    Includes Beef Patties,
    Choice of Potatoes or Rice, jmW
    and Choice of One Vegetable.
    I 1 I
    University Ave.
    J H* 1 Dow nlown
    Gainesville
    I PLENTY OF FREE PARKING IN REAR I



    fittANTS INCREASE ON AGENDA
    SEC Meeting Opens

    UF President Stephen C.
    OConnell and Athletic Director
    Ray i Graves depart for New
    Orleans, La. today to attend the
    annual Southeastern Conference
    meeting.
    The four-day gathering
    continues through Saturday at
    the Sheraton-Charles Hotel and
    will provide separate sessions for
    presidents, athletic directors,
    football coaches, business
    managers, athletic committee
    representatives and sports
    information directors from the
    10 member institutions.
    The presidents are expected
    to consider several key matters
    including a proposal to increase
    the yearly maximum number of
    new football grant-in-aid
    scholarships beyond the current
    limit of 40. SEC schools now
    allocate 125 football grants on a
    continuing baas.
    Grapplers
    Pin Down
    A 2-2 Record
    The UF Wrestling Chib won
    its second straight match with a
    21-16 win over Florida A&M.
    The win evened up the grapplers
    mark at 2-2.
    The final outcome was not
    decided until the 177 pound
    bout when Wesley Royal took
    his opponent with a sensational
    pin.
    Steve Shomion and Jeff
    Shaffner maintained their
    undefeated status in the 123 and
    167 pound classes but John
    Gonzalez suffered his first defeat
    in the 130 lb. division.
    Bill Northup and Bill Baxter
    were two other Gator victors but
    Tony Foshee was defeated in a
    close one, 34.
    The wrestlers had defeated
    the University of Tampa Friday
    night by a score of 26-15. This
    was the first win for the UF
    team in three starts. The first
    two losses were by narrow
    margins to FSU.
    Shomion won the 123 pound
    match with a pin. Gonzalez, in
    the 130 lb. class also won by a
    pin. The Gators forfeited the
    137 lb. class and Northup took
    the 145 lb. division.
    Mike Magrino in the 152 lb.
    class was the first Gator to get
    beat as he lost by default.
    Foshee won the 160 lb. division
    with a pin, and Shaffner and
    Royal respectively won the 167
    and 177 lb. classes 84. 7-6,
    before Mike Hubbard was
    pinned in the unlimited.
    Ex- Coach Dies
    SWEETWATER, Tenn. (UPI)
    - Bowden Wyatt, 54, former
    head football coach at
    Tennessee, Arkansas and
    Wyoming, and winner of
    conference titles at all three
    schools, died Tuesday of a virus
    infection.

    Other discussion will cover
    admission policies, minimum
    grade averages for competition
    and a recommendation from
    basketball coaches to allow
    league teams to participate in
    the National Invitation
    Tournament. The SEC winner
    traditionally goes to the NCAA
    sectional playoffs but other
    schools have been barred from
    post-season activity.
    Discussion in the preliminary
    meetings pointed toward
    possible action, in the final
    business meeting will also
    include the following subjects:
    adjustment to the NCAAs 1.600
    rule, a round-robin schedule for
    baseball, and adopting wrestling
    as a conference sport.
    Commissioner Tonto Coleman
    prepares for the SEC meeting
    after participating in the NCAA
    meetings at Los Angeles, where
    the SEC plan of allowing
    freshmen to play on varsity
    teams other than football and
    basketball was solidly endorsed.

    H.
    Think selfishly about your Many have found career So talk to the Du Pont recruiter,
    own career before you decide enrichment at Du Pont. This comes If he offers you something, think
    on one with Du Pont. from being handed a ball and of it as a professional challenge, not
    being expected to run with it. From a proposal of marriage.
    working with top people, from
    growing in a company where the i
    opportunities are always wide open j £ ll t 6^ mpany
    and the projects are often way out. i wHmington, DE 19898
    Many have found professional i
    fulfillment and have built a very full, j M It te in nnr t lin ;
    varied and happy life as Du Ponters. j at Du Pont for graduates
    Others have found, after working i with degrees in __
    at Du Pont, that their professional
    Be selfish. But be honest. interest lay in teaching, in further j Name
    Youve put in a lot of tough years study or in an industry that i Un i vers j ty
    to get your degree. Your allegiance offered even wider scope in their j
    lies with a professional discipline. particular discipline. All of these | eree ~ J
    Why, then, must you decide now men left Du Pont far better qualified j Graduation Date j
    to plight your trust to a company professionally than when they came. i Address j
    for life? Dont. Join a j city i
    advance you within that /f*** v x P
    professional V. \| An Equ.l Oppof.uay Employe well, youre not \
    married to it. / 1 V vUiU rllllJ/
    |
    v-x |
    j m a
    . V
    .
    , " -

    He says: We anticipate an
    amicable meeting in which
    discussion of our mutual
    problems will help to crystallize
    the various considerations. If an
    existing rule is altered, or new
    one adopted, it will be done by
    agreement of the presidents for
    continued of the
    conference as a whole.
    Dean Fuller
    In 22nd Year
    Coach Dave Fuller begins his
    22 year as head baseball coach at
    UF.
    In Fullers 21 years at the
    Gator helm he has compiled a
    390-201 record, which is
    considered one of the finest in
    the country.
    Known as the dean of college
    baseball coaches in the South,
    Fuller has been at the helm of
    three SEC championship teams
    and has been runner-up twice.
    Every season the Gators are
    ranked high in national polls.

    SALESSERVICE-RENTALS
    ADD OFFICEEQUIPMENT
    formerly Hancock Office Equipment
    |l? AK it SHRKfI
    I wl a mmc I
    FEATURING QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE I
    DINING ROOM
    COUNTER
    I CARRY OUT I
    I Open Til 1 AM I
    I 1610 S.W. I3h S>. J
    NEED ZIPPY RESULTS? _ _
    GATOR
    CLASSIFIEDS

    Wadneaday, January 22,1969. Tht Florida Alligator,

    Page 15



    Page 16

    t, Th* Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 22,1969

    Gun Lap

    Dunns Prediction Psyches Nason

    Us grad student and former
    Olympian Jack Bacheler is
    apparently a little hesitant about
    accepting the 12:42 three-mile
    time given him by some
    reporters for his performance in
    last Saturdays track festival.
    Bacheler actually ran a 13:30
    which is probably the best time
    recorded in the country for the
    season, but nowhere near the
    world or American marks. By
    way of comparison, last years
    best three mile effort was run by
    Australias Ron Clarke. He ran a
    13:05.6 for three miles while
    competing in the slightly longer
    5000 meter event. The time is
    still official if clocked by
    bonafidei timers at the three mile
    point.
    ***
    Pole Vaulter Joel Sarrett
    sustained what head trainer
    Brady Greathouse calls a pretty
    good sprain while vaulting
    Saturday, but is getting
    daily treatment and may be
    vaulting again this week.
    Sarrett is a 15-foot plus vaulter
    who has figured heavily in Head
    Coach Jimmy Hawk Carnes
    plans for the season.
    Sixteen-foot vaulter Mike
    Flannagan has been sidelined for
    several months and is due for
    surgery soon. He was good
    enough to make the high
    altitude training squad last
    summer, getting as high as 16-6.
    Us freshman distance ace,

    Xnfwrftg iWjufi
    f^, l§ld b §m ACP0 J Bhlrtthat S \
    er ... a Bushcoat Comfortable. Spirited. Easy
    lways gets what it | live with. Fun. It has
    30 in. Bushcoat Cotton, wash & wear .. water Liw: )
    repellent ... in natural British tan and yellow. Sizes S,
    M, L, XL. $14.00 r
    II |#* A #I"P I VII THE PLA,D SH,RT CPO Shirt of
    W I f\ UEJI %# IJ 11 made-to-take-it wool, all revved up and raring
    W I AV IV I V t to go with vigorous plaids. Styled in the manner
    _ of a dress shirt with patch and flap pockets.
    Bell Bottoms, Flairs siz es s,M, l, x 1.512.00-$15.00
    & Peacoats
    Xmmvmtg Sfyop

    Jack Nason, is apparently a little
    perturbed by Gator assistant
    sports editor Bill Dunris
    prediction that he will break the
    four minute mile this year.
    Nasons best in high school was a
    4:13 last year in the state meet.
    Seems Dunn should know better
    than that. He was a miler at
    Bishop Moore High in Orlando
    in ms running days. His time was
    in the 5:00 flat area. Later he
    found out he was more suited
    for the quarter mile (he ran
    around 50 flat). Perhaps his
    predictions would be more
    suited for shorter distances, too.
    How about the time it would
    take a chubby sports writer to
    get from his typewriter to the
    cafeteria and back?
    ***
    Only five high jumpers in the
    world cleared higher than 7-2
    last year before the Olympic
    Games in Mexico. And that was
    at the end of a long competitive
    season. UFs Ron Jourdan has
    done it already and the indoor
    season is barely underway.
    Barring injury and the

    JOIN NOW
    WORK FOR 70 & 72
    YOUNG DEMOCRATS
    ORGANIZATION MEETING
    Wed 7:3opm Room 357 Reitz Union

    unforseen, there is no telling
    what Jourdan could do. Does
    7-4 sound a little cautious?
    ***
    The glamour running event, so
    far as UF is concerned, has
    traditionally been the two-mile
    relay. It seems The Hawk
    sould rather recruit half-milers
    than anyone. This years quartet
    of 880 men seems to be no
    exception to the rule. Bob Lang
    is the anchor man and the reason
    is a matter of simple
    mathematics. At the first time
    trial of the year a month ago,
    Lang broke his own school
    record of 1:49.9 by running
    1:49.8. Lead-off man John
    Parker did 1:53.5 in placing
    second to Lang, Ken Burnsed
    did 1:52.3 last year, Eammonn
    OKeefe, a freshman from
    Ireland has run better than 1:51
    and Dan Flynn, who is now
    injured has run sub 1:52.
    Also in Carnes half-mile
    stable are Steve Keller, a
    member of last years fearsome
    foursome with a 1:52 flat, and
    Steve Atkinson, a miler, who

    runs in the sub 1:53 range. Both
    are still getting into shape and
    should be ready by indoor
    conference time. The two-mile
    relay team and high jumper Ron

    m^KENSHAinmiN^I
    IPtI SHAMPOOING RAZOR CUTTING S
    LONG HAIR STYLING APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
    Wom SIMS BARBER SHOP H
    lir |g| 817 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. Jf
    Climb aboard C
    h r a*
    /The S.S. Winnjammer fi
    Luncheons served from 11.00A.M. wj
    J Dinners to 12:00 P.M. ji
    \ Bernie Sher at the Organ
    x
    Thursday, Friday & Saturday
    Oysters & Clams on the half shell dp
    M ichelob on draff IV
    Steaks and Seafoods our specialty {\A
    Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. (\*
    Reservations accepted
    i? Harry M. Lanton, Manager ''AjJ'/
    Closed Sundays

    By Caldwell Tumec

    Jourdan travel to Philadelphia
    Friday for the Enquirer Games.
    They will then meet the rest of
    the team Saturday for a dual
    meet at Ohio State.