Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Demonstrations Mar Inauaural Eve

WASHINGTON (UPI) Anti-war
demonstrators and police fought
outside a Smithsonian Institution
building late Sunday while formally
dressed guests arrived to attend a
champagne reception for Vice
President-elect Spiro T. Agnew.
Two officers were reported
hospitalized and about two dozen
demonstrators arrested in incidents
during the daylong protests.
Some 5,000 youths,
demonstrating on the eve of the
inauguration of President-elect
Richard M. Nixon, marched up
Pennsylvania Avenue opposite to the
direction Nixon will ride Monday.

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 64 University of Florida, Gainesville Monday, January 20, 1969

\Afc
m
*
OVER HIS HEAD
UF track star Ron Jourdan high-jumped T 2" in Saturday's Track
Festival at the university. See Page 10.
Alleged Flag-Burner
Stands Trial Thursday
John R. Claxton, accused of burning a small American flag
following a presidential election-night apolitical rally on campus Nov.
5, is scheduled to appear in circuit court Thursday.
Claxton, 2UC at the time of the incident, is currently not in
school. He was arrested by city policy while attending a Students for a
Democratic Society meeting Nov. 12.
The city charges were dropped in December when he was arrested a
second time by the Sheriffs Department under a state statute. His
SSOO cash appearance bond comes due Thursday.
Under state law the maximum penalty for desecrating a flag is a
S4OO fine and/or 60 days in jail.
Claxton is represented by Benjamin M. Tench, a local
court-appointed attorney. The local chapter of the American Civil
Liberties Union will file a brief under amicus curiae (friend of the
court). Tench was out of town Sunday and could not be reached for
comment.

The
Florida Alligator

VIOLENCE IN WASHINGTON, D.C

There were minor incidents along the
way.
Most violent were the fight
outside the gleaming white marble
science and technology building after
the march was over and a brief
flareup at the foot of Capitol Hill
about an hour earlier.
While invited guests in evening
cloths entered the Smithsonian
building, protestors battled officers
with bottles, rocks, sticks, mud and
oak slats torn from large litter
baskets.
Police said they could not
determine immediately how many
demonstrators were arrested, but

OPPOSES CHARTERING

New Regents Head
Blasts SDS, SSOC
w

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Board of Regents Chairman
D. Burke Kibler said Saturday he
would personally oppose
recognition of Students for a
Democratic Society (SDS) or
any similar organization at
any of Floridas state
universities.
It would be absolute
foolishness for anyone on any
campus to expect the chairman
of the Board of Regents to sit
idle and allow anyone to
recognize SDS, Kibler told the
Alligator.
But the newly-appointed
chairman emphasized the
Regents dont even
contemplate at this time
interfering with SDSs struggle
for recognition at Florida State
University.
I think the matter is being
handled properly on all
campuses at this point, he said.
A wave of controversy was
aroused at FSU last week when
the schools vice president for
student affairs turned down a
Faculty Senate recommendation
that SDS be chartered as a
student organization.
Kiblers statement apparently
will not affect the plans of the
UF Committee on Student
Organizations to consider
recognizing the Southern
Students Organizing
Committee (SSOC), k the Souths
counterpart to SDS.
SSOC leaders will present
their request to the committee
Wednesday at an open meeting
and a decision will be made in a
day or so, said committee
member William Cross.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will have final
jurisdiction over the
nine-member, student-faculty
committees decision. OConnell
could not be reached for
comment Sunday.
SDS has become a national
issue, Kibler said, symbolic

estimated the total at about two
dozen Park police said two officers
had been hospitalized, but no details
were available.
In the clash at the Smithsonian,
one mounted park policeman was
jerked off his horse, thrown to the
ground, kicked and beaten by the
demonstrators.
Four remaining mounted officers
charged into the group, their clubs
swinging.
Another youth, carrying a Viet
Cong flag, was also beaten by police
who were vastly outnumbered by the
demonstrators and who for the most
of the day appeared to go out of

Thousands Jam
' Rat Opening
By KAREN ENQ
Alligator Staff Writer
Gemutlichkeit, German for fellowship and good cheer, became
the Rathskellers password this weekend as more than 2,000 students
and faculty packed the converted east wing of the old main cafeteria.
Eric Williams, publicity director of the Rat, said Sunday more
than 2,000 membership cards were sold to a line of students and
faculty, which lasted until 3:30 Saturday morning.
From the time Rathskeller Committee Chairman Joe Hilliard and
Student Body President Clyde Taylor tapped the first keg at the
formal opening Thursday night, Williams estimates 320 gallons of beer
were served.
At the formal opening on Thursday night, UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said the Rat has had his approval and active assistance.
UF needs gathering places where other peoples company can be
enjoyed in an atmosphere outside the rush which is characteristic of
our lives. The Rathskeller satifies these needs, OConnell said.
The system for checking identification was put to use as everyone
who entered showed identification and had his hand stamped with a
flourescent stamp.
Frauleins equipped with special flashlights repeatedly checked to
see no minors were drinking.
Williams said there were only two incidents where minors were
caught drinking. These people were thrown out immediately, he
said.
In the future, minors caught drinking beer may have their
membership cards taken away, said Williams.
The Rathskellers imported Austrian chef prepared a buffet dinner
of German food Friday night. The food for the Rat is a special
Servomation project.
Students and faculty clapped and sang to the music of Your
Fathers Mustache, a sing-a-long banio band.
Two professional groups will entertain this week.
The Lee Shaw jazz trio from New York and Grace and Costello,
a comedy team from Miami Beach will perform Monday through
Saturday nights.

with violence and student
unrest.
I really have contempt for
that type of organizational
effort-SDS or SSOC or whatever
you want to call it, he said.
SDS is not important in
itself, Kibler said, but because
it stands as something in the
minds of the people: violence.
This is why I say individual
members of the Board of
Regents should properly speak
on this matter, he said.
Kibler said SDSs recognition

their way to avoid a conflict.
When the parade ended at the
foot of Capitol Hill, some of the
protest leaders urged the crowd to
move on but others linked arms and
refused to move. That brought on
the first confrontation of the day.
During the confrontation,
demonstrators threw rocks, mud and
sticks at the policemen who were
attempting to clear one side of the
street.
The group, shouting peace slogans
and waving placards, started the
march at the Washington Monument
and planned to walk to the Capitol.

is a mater of policy and
principle.
Its not denial of academic
freedom, he said. It is denial
to a group that would destroy
our campuses, as it has been
proven throughout the nation.
People would be horrified if
the Klu Klux Klan or the Nazi
party became a student
organization, Kibler said, but
Im just as horrified with SDS.
He said Regents policies
prohibit recognition of violent
organizations.

America's
Number I
College
- Daily



The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 20, 1969

Page 2

Off-Campus Authority
To Check Living Costs

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
The off campus housing
authority which has drawn up a
blacklist of landlords who have
overcharged students, as well as
of students who have refused to
pay rent, is now planning to
investigate the prices ol
commercial services in
Gainesville.
Michael Katz, secretary ol

MiW/ F V il J
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PROSIT!
A toast to the Rathskeller's opening is offered by the club's six
bartenders.

Regents May Get UF
Single Insurance Policy

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
The Board of Regents is
considering a proposal to place
UFs insurance policies under
one policy underwritten by the
state.
The policy will provide
coverage on stolen property for
less money than current
university policies with private
agents, said Leo J. Myer,
accountant in the finance and
accounting office.
The UFs present premiums
for insurance against theft
amount to more than $5,000
per fiscal year on property
valued at $863,621.
It offers limited coverage for
specific items of high value or
property likely to be stolen.
Such items include cameras,
paintings, science equipment, all
contents of the Campus
Bookstore, band instruments
and computers leased by the
university," Myer said.
Current UF policies are
subject to approval by the state
insurance commissioner in
Tallahassee.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville. Florida .12601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Iost Office at Gainesville,
Florida. 32601.
p Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical enors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (I) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

legal affairs, and Gavin l.ee,
under secretary of legal affairs,
said there is a tendency to treat
students as captive consumers
when it comes to prices.
'file report, which they hope
to have out by the end of the
quarter, will look into the
general cost of living for
students by comparing prices
and services.
They will also look into
discount stores to see if they

Myer said the Board of
Regents talked about the new
insurance coverage last year but
it didnt get done."
All policies now out would
have to be canceled and
rewritten under one policy,
Myer said.
This is difficult because they
all come due at different times.
Myer said the proposed
policy was feasible but would
require a great deal of work in
the according office.
A major handicap to the
proposal is finding a Florida
company willing to write it. All
policies taken out by the
university must be with a state
insurance agent.
The UF also carries insurance
against fire, wind damage, smoke
damage, lightning, vehicle
accidents, riots and civil
disorders, according to Mver.
The university has never
filed a claim against riot
insurance to my knowledge," he
said.
UF has been very fortunate"
in collecting claims, Myer said,
and it had no trouble finding

really offer discounts.
This will just be an
investigation, Katz stressed.
. Its quite posable nothing
will come up, he said.
He hinted at the possibility of
expanding the off-campus
housing authority to include
daily problems of living
encountered by students.
They have bandied a variety
of problems so far.
In one case, they dealt with
the predicament of students who
could not keep up with rent
after one of their roommates
had dropped out of school.
The authority located the
student to see if lie could pay
something, if he couldnt pay all
the rent he owed.
Often, the authority will refer
a case to another organization.
In an instance of faulty wiring
found by a student he was
referred to the Fire Marshal.
When one girl couldnt get
heat in her room, she was
referred to the Florida Hotel and
Restaurant Commission for
substandard housing.
Generally, the larger
landlords honestly try to give
students a fair deal, though, he
said.

insurance companies willing to
take a policy.
Myer said all university
buildings and inventoried
material valued at more than
$25 are insured against Fire
under the state Fire Insurance
fund.
This fund is written in
Florida law and covers all state
buildings. The legislature
appropriates half of the funds
and UF pays the other half.
Doctors at the Infirmary
and the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center can take out malpractice
insurance through the university
at their own expense, he said.
UF also carries a dishonesty
bond covering theft of money or
securities by a university
employee.
The university is compelled
to take out insurance on all
leased items, like the analog
computer in the Space Sciences
building, Myer said.

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First Mental Healtlr
Workshop Opens
The first of a series of mental health workshops to discuss
problems of transition from high school to college are being
held on campus today and Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 and 4:30.
Preventive action in college mental health, part of a student
mental health service project, is sponsoring the four workshops
for Florida high school counselors. Duval, Alachua and Volusia
counties will be represented today and Tuesday.
Counselors will talk to former students who are now
freshmen at UF and ask them about their transition period.
They will also be quizzed on what frustrating experiences they
have had during this time, whui aspects of the university are
most difficult and what recommendations they have for
improvement.
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Nixon Taking Oath
For Highest Office

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Richard M. Nixon takes the oath
of office of the American
presidency and assumes
leadership of the worlds most
enduring republic today in a
simple ceremony of national
renewal and peaceful transfer of
power.
At noon EST, with his hand
touching the Bible passage which
speaks of nations beating their
swords into plowshares, Nixon
will be sworn in as the 37th
president of the United States
and will declare:
I do solemnly swear or
affirm that I will faithfully
execute the office of President
of the United States and will, to
the best of my ability, preserve,
protect and defend the
Constitution of the United
States so help me God.
The nations 46th inaugural
ceremony will be held out of
doors, on the Capitol steps. The
weather forecast foresaw a 50
per cent chance of rain but mild
temperatures in the low 40s.
Through television, millions
of his countrymen will watch
the ceremony and hear the new
Presidents inaugural address,
setting the tone of his
administration. Nixon has said
his highest duty is to reunite a
nation divided by war and race.
v An estimated two million
persons are expected to line
Pennsylvania Avenue to watch
the traditional parade, led by
Nixon and his wife riding in
an armored bubbletop limousine
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew
and his wife and leaders of
Congress, the new cabinet and
the governors of all 50 states.
The parade was to be held to
two hours duration this time.
But first Nixon will make the
traditional visit to the White
House for coffee with his
retiring predecessor, Lyndon B.
Johnson and his wife. They will
be joined by Vice President and
Mrs. Hubert H. Humphrey and
Vice President-elect and Mrs.
Agnew.
Shortly after 11 ajn., Nixon
and Johnson will ride together
to the Capitol in the sometimes
painful, always poignant gesture
of peaceful transition in the
turnover of power from one man
to another. In this case, the men

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put aside their personal feelings
and maintained a remarkably
cooperative relationship since
Nixon defeated Humphrey for
the presidency with 43 per cent
of the vote last Nov. 5.

SSOC Celebrates
Nixon Inaugural

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
About 20 UF students have
gone to Washington to
demonstrate against the Nixon
inauguration, John Sugg, 3JM,
State Secretary of the Southern
Students Organizing Committee
(SSOC), said Sunday.
Sugg 1 stated they will be
protesting because the Nixon
administration doesnt represent
the people.
He is selling the nation
down the river to a police state,
he said.
The National Mobilization
committee, which coordinates
movements for radical and leftist
groups, has called for a massive
demonstration . to let Nixon
know that peace forces will not
relax until American forces
withdraw from Vietnam.
SSOC expects to have
10,000 people from the South at
the demonstration, Sugg said.
Our organization does not
want any violent participation,
he stressed, because a fantastic
number of military and cops
who are there are supposed to
shoot to kill, he said.
He urged SSOC members to
come back to the UF Sunday
night, because some groups have
already been harassed.
We dont want
hurt, he said.
A lot of people are going to
be hurt or killed, but the
networks will black out any
violence because Nixon doesnt
want another Chicago.
The flyer publicizing the
inauguration protest told SSOC
participants to bring helmets in
addition to confederate banners
and sleeping bags, if they
planned to stay on Monday.
On the agenda for Saturday
was a press conference to discuss
Yankee Imperialism, the

Nixon spent most of the day
in New York City before flying
here in time to attend an
inaugural concert. He planned to
spend the night with his family
at the Statler Hilton Hotel.

colonial status of the South, and
the concept of Total War as
founded by General Sherman.
SSOC members are expected
back here Tuesday.
A Counter Inauguration Ball
is scheduled Monday night with
the Fugs, among others,
appearing.
Another SSOC flyer on mass
mobilization has pointed out the
doubts held by some members as
to the effectiveness of mass
demonstrations.
We are beginning to feel that
a point has been reached where
mass demonstrations are not
only of no positive value, but
actually hurt our efforts to build
a broadly based radical
movement in this country.
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Monday, January 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 20. 1964

Strife-Torn Campuses
Quiet For Opening Today

By United Press International
Relative quiet awaited the
resumption of classes today
on strife-torn university
campuses around the nation
following a week climaxed with
violence and death in a
classroom at the University of
California at Los Angeles
Ford Hall, a classroom
building at Brandeis University
in Waltham, Mass., was available
for classes for the first time in
nearly two weeks after 64 Negro
students ended their occupation
of the building Saturday.
At Wilberforce University in
Ohio, a predominantly Negro
school, black students resolved
to continue their boycott of
classes in support of 45 demands

Czechs Mourn Death
Os 'Human Torch

PRAGUE (UPI) Jan Palach,
21, a student who set himself on
fire in a crusade for freedom,
died Sunday of his burns.
Thousands of students staged
a quiet funeral march and called
hunger strikes and classroom
boycotts as the nation mourned.
There was growing national
dissent sparked by his
martyrdom and warnings not to
turn Czechoslovakia into
another Hungary.
One leader warned of
unforeseen consequences unless
there is calm and said a force
could emerge to restore
order apparently meaning
Soviet troops.
Palach died with a plea to
other students not to carry out
threats to bum themselves to
death too in protest against the
Soviet occupation and the
government's failure to maintain
the liberal reforms halted with
the August invaion.
One warning came from
liberal writer Jiri Hochman who
told a meeting another human
torch will drive the' nation to
madness. Another came from
Cestmir Cisar, chairman of the
Czech National Council and a
popular figure among students.
It was .he who warned of
possible Soviet military action if
the present political leadership
cannot master its tasks.
On television a comedian,

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submitted to the admmistiaiion.
And in Tahlcqiiah. OJ b ft
president of Northeastern State
College disclosed that
undercover students'' acting as
informers will be used to keep
tabs on dissident students.
An all points bulletin was
issued by Los Angeles police for
the arrest of two brothers in
connection with the fatal
shooting on the UCLA campus
Friday of two leaders of the
militant Black Panthers during a
meeting in a classroom building.
The brothers were identified
as Phillip Steiner, 22, and Larry
Joseph Steiner, 21, both of Los
Angeles. Black Panther
spokesmen told newsmen they
tipped police to the identity of
the suspects and said the

Miroslva Hornicek, broke into
tears as he pleaded with young
people not to repeat Palachs
fiery act. He said, I speak to
you as a son of this country and
as the father of a boy who also is
21.
The Czechoslovak branch of
the human rights commission, a
United Nations organization,
said, The heroic deed of Jan
Palach shook not only our
people but also the conscience
of the world.
It said the world will not
allow that we should continue to
be denied the right to
independence and freedom.
As darkness and plummeting
temperatures thinned the crowds
on the streets a group of about
500 arrived in Hradcany Castle
and a delegation entered with a
statement asking the government
what was being done to meet
Palachs demands.
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Steiners were members of the
rival black militant organization.
US.
Quiet continued at
California's San Jose State arid
San Francisco State colleges.
The black students who had
occupied Ford Hall at Brandeis
for 11 days walked out of the
three-story brick building late
Saturday afternoon in return for
a grant of amnesty. The
students, many of the men
unshaven and the girls in bright
African turbans, vowed to
continue their struggle in new
forms but did not elaborate.
The students had seized Ford
Hall, which houses classrooms,
the universitys telephone
switchboard and a $200,000
computer, in an effort to get the
administration to meet their 10
demands to combat alleged
racism. The principal demand is
for an autonomous department
of Afro-American Studies.

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PAINTING FOR FUN
Lessons in water color
using Oriental Technique
Beginning Jan. 21st
7:3opm 9:3opm
$6.00 Per Person
Reitz Union Room C-4
INST. Mrs. Sung Cont. Projects Comm.
COLLEGE MEN
Looking for a Summer
job that is interesting
and pays well?
the Southwestern Co.
will be holding interviews
MONDAY JAN.2Oth
Details and sign-up sheets
are posted in the Placement
Planning Center Room 6-22
. i. rTvos- ~
Reitz Union



DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST

AGATrtA r You're -x ~ Z I- K .,i 7 \ zrTvr^l
u~br' QWfm tj^M\
. .Mm X'w
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Prof. To Advise In Saiaon

A UF professor in entomology and three other
faculty members left Jan. 17 to work on the UF
agricultural mission to South Vietnam.
Dr. William G. Eden, party chief, and the rest of
the team are on their way to Saigon to begin
working on a $750,000 educational assistance
contract with South Vietnam.
On the UF team with Eden are Dr. James W.
Carpenter, associate professor of animal science,
William R. Llewellyn, soils specialist, and Diego
Giminez, research assistant.
Funds for the mission come from the U.S.

Call Africa, f
Anywhere I
I From UF I
Phone calls and messages to
anywhere in the world are
possible from the UF campus,
Dr. A.D. Sutherland, Gator
Amateur Radio Club advisor,
said Thursday.
By utilizing a Ham radio
network, it is possible for UF
students to speak to friends and
relatives in foreign countries.
A call is placed from the
radio shack on campus to a
similar station in the country
being called. The responding
ham operator refers the call to
a phone patch network and the
conversation begins.
In the absence of a phone
patch, the person being called
speaks to the caller while
remaining in their local radio
shack.
All conversations must be in
English so monitoring may be
carried on. This is to eliminate
anything illegal from going over
the airwaves, Sutherland said.
A special service for students
with relatives serving in Vietnam
is rendered by the Radio Chib.
Messages may be delivered to
servicemen through an amateur
radio net. Birthday and
anniversary greetings should be
sent a week in advance.
Interested students should
contact Sutherland in the
Electrical Engineering Building,
room 223, betwen 8 and 9 a.m,
for an appointment.

TpEROSA
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 90c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378>3320
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Coeds Conduct UF
Marijuana Survey

According to a survey
conducted by two UF freshmen,
one third of UF students have
smoked marijuana and less than
half of this group smoke often.
Julie Miller, lUC, and Bonnie
Boland, lUC, conducted a
survey on marijuana smoking at
UF for Miss Mae Smiths CLC
141 (Comprehensive Logic)
class.
What surprised us was the
large number of high grade-point
averages among those who have
smoked pot, Julie said.
Intellectual people as well as
socially active people seem to be
involved.
A recent confidential report
Alumni Drive
Yields Over
$200,000
UF Alumni contributions
totaled more than S2OO per
person in the 1968 UF Alumni
Association campaign for a total
of $200,125.
In a report Thursday, William
J. Watson, Jr., executive
secretary of the association, said
the contributions were from
10,118 alumni who gave
$190,125 to the drive.
An additional SIO,OOO was
contributed by A.D. and J.E.
Davis, Jacksonville businessmen,
after an early fund drive promise
of SIO,OOO if 10,000 persons
contributed this year.

Agency for International Development in
Washington.
The UF team will strengthen and upgrade in the
field of agricultural education in South Vietnam. It
will provide technical services to the College of
Agriculture in Saigon for the expansion of its
programs, Eden said.
These services will include planning, curriculum
revision, teaching and development of course
materials in the College of Agriculture.
Eden will serve in Saigon for three months, when
he is replaced as chief of party. Until then he will
develop an operational plan or work program to get
the activities started.

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given to the United Nations
Narcotics Commission stated
the use of illicit drugs, from
marijuana to LSD, is increasing
in the United States and all
around the world. The report
also suggested stricter penalties
for pushers.
Yet according to the girls
report, 92% of those who
smoked said friends were
responsible for introducing it to
them. The same number said
they have no regrets.
As for non-smokers, 58% had
no desire to smoke and nearly all
of these had had the
opportunity.
To the question, Should pot
be legalized? an overall 52%
said it should be.
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Breakfast served
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Monday, January 20, 1969. Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 20, 1969

EDITORIAL

Student Responsibility

The continuing dispute between the
administration and the Interfratemity
Council over open house restrictions for
frats threatens to mushroom into alienation
on the part of several student leaders.
Talk of possible defiance of the
universitys ruling not to allow greater
freedom to frats have rippled among the
leaders and the men they lead.
Although such an alternative should not
necessarily be completely ruled out, we
suggest the students involved use patience
for the time being.
The issue, of course, is much deeper than
a question of the hours fraternities allow
brothers to bring girls to the houses. The
central issue is student responsibility,
coupled with administrative trust.
A sidekick issue is the administrations
inconsistency. For instance, President
OConnell is a strong supporter of the
Rathskeller, designed by students and run by
students. The Rat is the epitome of
responsible student leadership in action. And

Staff Writings

A few comments heard
around the Alligator office:
Spiro Agnew will never be a
household word.
Here I am, surrounded by
incompetents.
How do I spell OConnell?
Is Vice-President Hales first
name Dean?
Does anyone know how to
change the ribbon on the UPI
machine?
Why cant I type?
Well fake it.
He said it really wasnt
important, so I didnt write it
down.
Hey, throw me a piece of
bubble gum.
Why dont we challenge SG
to a beer drinking contest.
Your deadline today is 5:30.
Do I file Jim Hollis under
V for veteran or S for
sk indiver?
Wow! Do you believe the
- on that new reporter.
I wonder when Aldrich will
ever wear his Blue Key.
God! Look at those pictures
Nick took of Pam.
Do you have a match?
Do you have a cigarette?
Hey! I hear Doucette is
selling out.
No one knows what theyre
doing here.
Wheres the party Saturday
night?
Throw me the glue.
Now whos going to clean
that up?
Dont give him a byline.
Lets call Beth Graves
column Petty Coat Jockson.
Or how about Daddy says.
Theyre throwing sicssors at
us, what are we going to do
about that.
We extend a welcome hand
to all students.
That includes the chick
down the hall.
Hey, theres Zinober Here
Comes De Judge.
Goodrich is tough.
I've got to settle down and
do some serious work.
Does anyone have a student
directory.
I got connections you jusi

Voices In The Air

stick with me, kid.
Frat Backs that sounds
like sour food.
This happens everytime I get
on the floor (honest folks!).
I just want you to pat me on
the back.
Lean forward.
The Dunn boys get the job
done. (Ugh) Is the Sun
coming 'out 1 this morning?
That depends in the clouds.
Hes so bad they kicked him

Editors Viewpoint

Americas Ills: Acne Or Cancer ?

The December issue of a little
publication called In The
Capitol, from the office of
Secretary of State Tom Adams,
has an interesting article by our
friend Tom.
Most of the article is devoted
to telling Americans how alive
and viable the American dream
is in America, how great things
really are. Some examples: the
output of industry has increased
50 per cent during the past seven
years, total employment is up 13
per cent, unemployment is down
34 per cent, corporate profits
are up 90 per cent, stock prices
are up 55 per cent.
Everything is on the rise.
Personal incomes are up 56 per
cent, consumer prices only 12
per cent. New construction is up
40 per cent. Retail sales are up
49 per cent.
And, Adams says, the future
of America is even brighter. By
1975 one of every four workers
will be a college graduate. Within
15 years,- the average family
income is expected to exceed
$14,000 per year; within 30
years, it should top $20,000 per
year.
An amazing new tool
developed by an American
promises to revolutionize
industry, communications and
medicine. It is called a laser.

OConnell recognizes it as such^
Yet hie wont recognize that responsible
students can also make open housing work
effectively.
Those students who believe themselves
responsible enough to direct their own lives
and determine their own destinies are
justifiably up-tight over the administrations
continued insistence on treating young
adults like children.
Their cause is right, and they should not
give up without giving it the old college try,
frustrating though that may be. Nor should
they jump to hasty, ill-considered action.
The middle path of further negotiation
appears to be the best choice. So we suggest
that IFC President Steve Zack seek another
session with the administration to sell
student responsibility.
We also suggest that Zack ask other
student leaders to go with him to show the
administration that responsibility is deeply
ingrained in the majority of UF students.

By Dave Reddick

out of the Pop Warner League.
Stupid fools.
Whats happening, Chafin?
Congratulations! How long
have you been engaged?
Since August.
Oh.
Wow! Aldrich is wearing a
suit today.
Is Raul Ramirez really
German?
Is it true Reddick always
wears a tie to cover his red neck?

Nine of every ten scientists ot
all time live today. Seven of
them are Americans.
These enlightenments lead
Mr. Adams to believe that
Americans have been duped by
the news media, that America is
not a sick society.
To be sure, the news media
have done a superb job of
showing us the infection, but
they have neglected to show us
the body of society as a whole
the healthy majority.
Americans, on the whole,
live together in reasonable
harmony and (work) out their
problems with pride and
dignity.
In truth, Mr. Adams says,
Americas sickness is closely akin
to acne, which is seldom fatal.
Much of Mr. Adams short
treatise on the general good

The Florlda All i gat or
Published by students of the University of Florida umfar **
mwpkn of the Board of Student Publications.
EdhorW. Businm, Advrtkiwg offcw in Boom 330, JUfa
3821681,392.1682 or 392-1683.
i
OpfaioM exprtsaed in the Florid* AU%tor are tkoae
tbs mHm of the article and not those of the Uaimritv of FtedZ*

The Florida Alligator j
*Th price of freedom 5
* *> * o# rv>oraifaNity.~
, Harold Aldrich
Dave Doucette
PlClfcuJw/ Managing Editor
y((!(l Raul Ramirez James Cook
Av*MM Executive Editor News. Editor
\ '* S: ..
Its
7m 77ze Afew Secretary of Offense

health of American society has
genuine merit. Truly, the
prowess of Yankee ingenuity has
created the greatest, richest
society ever devised by man.
Truly, the future of America
is bright, promising even greater
advancement of human worth
and dignity. Truly, there is much
that is good and wonderful
about American society; there is
much greatness in the courage,
stamina and brilliance of her
people.
And truly, the news media
often fail to adequately portray
the happy side of American life.
But the inescapable reality of
America today includes much
that is bad, much that is the
antithesis of the hallowed
American Dream. The news
media emphasize the filth, the
scum, the agony of the seamier

By Harold Aldrich

side of society for good reason.
If the unyielding degradation
of black ghetto life is diagnosed
as only a slight case of acne,
blemishes on the beauty that is
America, and dismissed as such,
then the infections could erupt
into run-away, malignant cancer
before any treatment was
administered to cure the blights.
The same goes for other
unpleasant facts the news media
wont let America forget:
rampant organized crime,
violence in the ghettos and on
the campuses, the tragic deaths
of thousands of American boys
in an unjust, unnecessary war in
Vietnam, graft and corruption in
government, etc. ad nauseum.
If the news media focuses
enough public attention on the
ills of our society, perhaps one
day the powerful, silent majority
the contented cows will be
moved by outrage and
conscience to demand
immediate medication and
treatment.
Maybe then the misery of
Americas oozing, bleeding
pimples can be stopped.
Because no matter how
healthy the rest of her body is,
America will face certain death
if the acne is allowed to fester
into cancer.



Speaking Out

'HELL: Open House Plan For UF

In this age of bold, new ideas, one
should read without shock of radical
plans and remarkable new designs so
rapidly appearing in the scope of human
civilization. With this in mind, let the
UF and universities throughout this land
be braced. A plan is about to be
presented which, if installed at UF,
would revolutionalize lovemaking and
throw schools everywhere into a state of
shocked admiration at such audacious
progressiveness in sexual relationships
on a university campus. Among other
things, this plan would mean 24-hour
open house everywhere!
The writer, creator of this daring new
scheme, conceived the notion after
noting a remark made by Vice-President
for Student Affairs, Fester Quail, about
those who take advantage of
unmonitored situations. All thinking
students will grant the sound depth of
perception behind this prudent attitude;
students at a university away from
home cannot be expected to maintain a
responsible attitude at so tender an age,
(some are yet under 20!) and of course,
must be guided in their searching for
love. Thus since the conception of
coeducational universities, this in loco
parentis guidance so necessary to
growing young men and women has
been a problem.
Administrations have sought to
control sexual meetings by restricting
hours in which girls might be out, (as

Parallel At UF
To FSU Inanity?

MR. EDITOR:
! Another case of
Administrative inanity has
recently occurred at FSU, where
refusal to recognize SDS has led
to a demonstration and two
arrests. My interest in the FSU
matter stems partially from the
fact that my good friend Radical
Jack Lieberman was a leader of
the demonstration, as evidenced
by the St. Pete Times story. But
of far greater importance is the
parallel between the situation on
the FSU campus and that of
University of Florida.
FSU President John
Champion, a pawn of the Board
of Regents, has followed the
same course he undertook last
year, when he temporarily
resigned. Refusal to recognize
Illegitimate
Methods Used
For Article
MR. EDITOR:
I believe other students
would be interested in reading
the following quote. It seems to
partly refute your past editorial
justifying the methods used on
the birth control article.
Few editors today
encourage deception on the part
of reporters in obtaining
interviews. Frankness and
fairness are recognized as the
best standards of conduct. The
reporter should let the person
know who he is and the nature
of his visit, and then should
attempt by any legitimate means
within his power . to obtain
the information that he desires.
The quote is from
Interpretative Reporting by
MacDougall (pg. 36).
DEL CAIN, 2UC

chastity is threatened only after
midnight,) by limiting areas that couples
might frequent, by ruling doors be left
open when people of the opposite sex
are together in a dormitory room in
short, by doing nearly everything
possible, shy of hiring escorts to watch
over the universities naive students as a
father would direct his dearest
offspring. Well, such problems are
absolved, forever! Parents and
administrative officials will suddenly
know peaceful slumber at night, free
from anxiety for their beloved younger
generation, when HELL, (Hundreds
of Eyes Looking at Lovers,) comes to
UF! Herewith is how HELL will work.
First off, all single students, (and
possibly those in their first year of
marriage,) under the age of 25 would be
compelled to live in a dorm, fraternity
or sorority house, but cry not at this
seemingly despicable thought, you
august Sin City clique! Read again the
final sentence of the first paragraph of
this memorable document and be
hushed in renewed fascination.
Now, a monstrous monitoring device
would be installed in Tigert Hall this
is the pith of the plan which would
connect to thousands of cameras about
the campus, as there would be a video
mini-camera in each and every room of
every dorm and Greek sanctuary, in
cafeterias, the library, in trees around
secluded campus grounds, in the new

groups that differ ideologically
with the Administration is a
prime cause of unrest and
protest on the part of
powerless students. Statements
by officials, such as history
professor Dr. Earl Beck, lead one
to believe that the members
were judged guilty of
anarchy-revolution-violence
before they had even made a
move. But here at UF we have a
President and an Administration
that dynamically guarantee
justice for dissenters. Just ask
Lavon Gentry, Steve. Hull, or
Marshall Jones.
I believe that a decision was
to have been made last
November 1 as to whether or
not SSOC was to be recognized
(shades of Red China!) by the
UF Power Structure. Statements
at that time by such leaders as
Colonel Hennessey (I know
you, Ed Freeman!) led one to
believe that such recognition
would be forever denied.
Perhaps SSOC will one day be
recognized on this campus, but
that remains to be seen.
It is tragic that these
Administrators close the
channels of procedure to
SDS-SSOC members, then whine
that the latter have not gone
through proper channels when
a protest is made. By adamantly
refusing to provide an outlet for
responsible self-expression, the
Administrators invite
insurrection and Revolution.
Perhaps the proper channels
will some day be open to
left-of-center students. For the
time being, however, we shall
have to be content with saluting
Colonel Hennessey and
attending Young Americans for
Freedom meetings. At least
these things are recognized.
DAVID MILLER

OPSN FORUM:

Ric Masten Told It Best

MR. EDITOR:
Tonight I attended the Ric
Mqsten concert expecting to see
and hear a man who was totally

Take Professionals
Off Campus Politics

MR. EDITOR:

I was surprised to find my
name being tossed around
politically in last Thursdays
Alligator (Hopeful Plans
Election Mockery). Although I
am considering, at the present
time I have not announced my
candidacy for Student Body
President.
The letter in question also
LITTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Rathskeller and in all lavatories, which
would be watching each room.
Meanwhile, back at Tigert would be an
adequate 24-hour staff of respectable,
(preferably Gay-ness-ville housewives,)
employees, to watch a
computer-controlled system of about 20
large screens. At intervals, a look at each
room would be briefly flashed on one of
the screens where the dedicated
watchers will be maintaining constant
vigil. Intervals would be determined; for
instance something like every ten
minutes, and then . no, that just
might be too long. Maybe every five
minutes, or .. no, no that wouldnt
do either. Then let the plan call for 50
large screens so each room might get
its turn no less than every two
minutes.
The watchers would also have access
to a small loudspeaker installed in each
room next to the video camera. Thus, if
as a room is flashed on and the watcher
sees something naughty occurring, she
can loudly instruct the naive couple as
to the social error they are committing,
or perhaps if a second offense, she could
punish them by making each stand in
opposite corners for an hour. She could
dismiss the visiting miscreant for the
night. A watcher may, of course, call
the noble Campus Police Force to
intervene, if need be.
A points-system could be utilized,
whereby various offences would

AJaiiuwl tylA&wt

"There is no hope for the complacent man."

hung-up in putting over a
hip-show. Instead, I was
greeted by a smiling man who
told me that he was plastic.
I sat through the whole

blasted your editorial, Were
Not Lackies. I feel that this
editorial was an excellent one
and showed an awareness of the
problems our students are
facing. In the past no one has
been elected Student President
exclusively on the basis of the
quality and realism of his partys
platform and his own personal
merits.
Instead he has had to have
vast political connections and
bloc-vote backing. We must take
the POLITICO out of Student
Politics.
Students at the University of
Florida are tired of having
professional politicians run
rough-shod on campus. It is time
for a real student to be elected
to a high office in student
government.
GEORGE A. CARSWELL, 4ED

Monday, January 20,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Doug Olander

accumulate different point values, such
as holding hands: 5 points, kissing: 10
points, and so on. (Rape would
disqualify the perpetrators from
privileges of being with the opposite sex
until such time as a standard S2O fine
would be awarded the university.)
Just think, people, of the wide
benefit under such a magnificently
fully-monitored life. No more will the
innocence of unprotected boys and
girls, (under 25 those over that age
will have to take care of their own
innocence, as many Womens Deans
know,) suffer the inevitably resultant
evils of granting college couples freedom
unmonitored freedom. No more
valuable, but troublesome curfews,
open-house regulations and so forth!
Concerned people like Fester Quail and
Petty Jawsfree will rest at ease, knowing
their helpless young are safely being
protected from themselves!
Surely youre not wondering where
the funds for such a system would be
obtained; thats too simple. Well just
use the money that UF now spends on
birth-control pills for the installation of
HELL! The administration will certainly
admire such a solution.
So hang loose rather, hang on
everyone, just until HELL arrives and
WELL ALL BE SAFE!
DOUG OLANDER, 2UC

concert only half-believing what
I was hearing. Here was a man
who in age was far beyond my
generation, but who was telling
it like it is better than anyone I
have heard.
Mr. Masten rapped of
protesting for the sake of
protesting, of preaching love
only to find himself hating, and
of being proud of his liberal
views only to find that he was so
liberal he could not even put a
Negro down as he would a white
man for trying to pick-up his
wife under his nose. He also told
of the civil rights revolution
which may be coming a
guerilla war of colors: Black
versus White.
In short, he got down to the
nitty-gritty of the matter and hit
us with the truth about
ourselves. The truth that we all
hide from.
After living in the
flower-hypocrisy of Los
Angeles for 1% years, it is
groovey to find someone who
can lay his soul before his
audience and end up baring its
soul too.
No, Ric Masten is not plastic.
Rather, he is very real simply
because he has broken his plastic
shell and found himself; and will
go on finding himself. Lets have
more Ric Mastens.
CARY MAGEE

Page 7



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 20, 1969

Page 8

'(
/* £a^V-~Atp
U#> Campus; Crier
\ Sponsored by Student Government.
J M ___

. ".' 1 i *B^SSg^^>e8 S Z^
fH -Jilr '-

*
Meeting of all those interested in volunteering for SAMPSON in rooms 121 and 122 of the
Reitz Union at 7:30 P.M. on Wednesday, January 22, 1969.
Work in any of these programs
Tutoring
* Field Trips
Day Care Centers
Friendship Program
;' Recreational 1
%
' \
Sampson helps people to help themselves. Why not start now to ban
apathyyours and somebody elses

'*l*
Destroy Neglect
Volunteer for work in
>
*
?' ;
SAMPSON



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JR OFFICE FURNITURE &
EQUIPMENT Co. 620% So. Main St.
Ph. 376-1146. (A-6t-56-p)
63 Galaxie 2dr., r&h std. trans. five
brand new wide oval tires. $550,
need money for school. Call Jack,
372-2027 or see 1111 SW 16th Ave.,
Apt. 93. (A-st-61-p)
STEREO COMPONENT AM-FM
multiplex radio. Brand new, was
$499.95 Sacrifice $250. Call
Sandy, 4 7 pm, 376-1536.
(A-st-62-p)
Muntz car stereo, 4 spkrs, excl cond.,
has balance, contour, volume and
track controls. $55, 378-0129 after 6
pm. (A-4t-62-p)
Fender super reverb amplifier with
case. Both are in excellent condition.
Call Fred Fey, South 304. Phone
392-7950 after 5. (A-3t-62-p)
Garrard SL-95 automatic turntable
with dickering low impendance
stereo cartridge. For SIOO.OO or will
settle for best offer. Call Irv,
378-0729 after 1 P.m. (A-st-61-p)
Quick sale! Honda 50 2 years old,
step threw frame, helmet included.
Price SIOO. Call 372-7550.
(A-st-54-p)
1967 Honda S9O only 2400 miles.
Excellent condition, best offer over
S2OO, 376-6983, 1128 NW 4 Ave. "
(A-3t-62-p)
Allstate motorscooter, very good
condition, excellent transportation.
SBO.OO 378-8496. (A-3t-62-p)
1964 Lambretta 125. Tools and rear
seat. Never been outside the city
limits. $125 or thereabouts. Phone
376-1853. (A-2t-63-p)
Camera: Pemtax Spotmatic SLR
Built in meter F 1.4 with case, just
used once, cost S2BO, yours just
$220. Call Daniel at 376-8694.
(A-3t-63-p)
KEEP carpet cleaning problems small
use Blue Lustre.wall to wall. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-64-c)
FOR RENT
One br. furnished apt. will sub-let
immediately SIOO. 378-2162.
(B-st-61-p)
Inexpensive, 2 man apt., 2 blocks
from campus 304 NW 15th St. Call
G. Joiner, 378-8122. ( -3t-62-p)
Must sublease 1 bdrm. apt.
immediately. Pool, air cond., deposit
and January paid. Call Terri
372-7343. (B-2t-63-p)
Immediate sublet upstairs poolside
2 bedroom Village Park Apartment.
January rent paid, will transfer
damage deposit, lease till June,
378-8382. (B-st-64-p)
Must sublet 1 bedroom apt. pool, ac,
near campus. Colonial Manor,
$115.00, 378-0531. (B-3t-64-p)
|T
Coed roommate wanted for French
Quarter apt. furnished one bdr. 67.50
per month, immediate occupancy.
Call Mary Jo 378-0359, Linda
378-9162. (C-st-62-p)
Female roommate for 2 bdrm. Fr.
Qtr. apt. for winter and spring and
possibly summer qtrs. Apt. no. 96,
Call 372-5246. (C-3t-62-p)
Roommates wanted, 1 or 2 to share 2
bdrm. apt. Gatortown, SW 16th Ave.
$42.50 mo. Call Ralph after 3 p.m.,
378-8525. (C-3t-64-p)
"8 ON THE LAM I
STARRING
BOB HOPE PHYLLIS DILLERI
I AT 7:07 IN COLOR @ if

ALSO I
1 "THE GOOD THE I
bad AND THE UGLY!
I STARRING IN COLOR ffl I
CLINT EASTWOOD

Monday, January 20,1969, The Florida Alligator,

sx*x<<.xv...%wxw WANTED
vx*x*x*:x*x*vwx-x*:*,* >smmsx;v;*wxsx £
Male roommate to share 3 bedroom
1% bath house with central air and
heat, separate bedrooms. Occupancy
Feb. $50.00/month plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 378-7041. (C-st-64-p)
Need two female roommates now!
Luxurious 2 bedroom, 2 bath &
dishwasher. $55 per month. Call
376-6870 preferably after four.
(C-3t-64-p)
I HELP WANTED j
Entertainers for Graham Area
Playboy club Feb. 1. Singers,
dancers, comedians, musicians, or
anyone who has talent. Call
392-8495. (E-st-61-p)
MEN AND WOMEN SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT CAMP
PINEWOOD for boys and girls,
Hendersonville, N.C. (June 17-Aug.
23) General Counselors needed to
live with and care for campers.
Specialty Counselors to teach
Boating, Canoeing, Sailing,
Swimming (WSI), Horseback Riding,
Skiing (be able to drive a boat), Arts
and Crafts, Archery, Riflery (NRA
Inst), Nature, Overnight Camping
(able to drive a truck), Tennis,
Dancing, Drama, Golf. Salary based
on age, education, abilities and
experience also includes room, board,
laundry and other extras. Apply for
applications to T.R. Robertson,
Camp Director, 1414 Felch Ave.,
Jax, Fla. 32207. (E-6t-59-c)
GRADUATING SENIOR WOMEN!
WANT IN WITH A GOING
CONCERN??? If you like people,
like to travel, and have a knowledge
of a foreign language, consider
becoming a stewardess with Pan
American World Airways. Stewardess
interviews will be held on campus on
Jan. 24, 69. For further information,
please contact your Placement
Office. Pan Am is an Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-lt-59-c)
COLLEGE MEN: Looking for
profitable summer job? Southwestern
Co. will hold interviews Monday, Jan.
20. Placement Planning Ctr. in Reitz
Union has details and sign-up sheets
for interviews. (E-2t-63-p)
Female subjects needed for speecn
experiment. Must be native English
speaking, free of voice defects and in
the age group 30-39 or 50-59. $2.00.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway
Comm. Science Lab. 392-2049.
(E-10t-54-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
Need office equipment Salesman in
Gainesville.i Call 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-c)
Student over 21, part-time work 3
nights a week, meal included. Apply
in person at Woodys 3458 W. Univ.
Ave. between 3 5 p.m. (E-3t-62-p)
, x-xx-x->w
| AUTOS |
xxx-XvX-x*x>x*x*x-X'X-x-vxnv:v:-x*x: v
Have 2 surplus cars, 1962 Plymouth
V/8 5325. 1964 Cadillac 51750.
Call 372-9607 or 372-3251.
(G-ts-60-c)
1959 Ford, radio, heater, good
condition, $225. Call 372-6455.
(G-st-61-p)
AH Sprite, 1967 convertible w/boot
& tonneau cover, meichelin x tires A
radio. See Steve, 472 Murphree D or
call 372-9289. (G-st-64-p)
!|
...HOPELESSLY FUNNY!*
INA MELA ISQELECTABLE!"
lOf WIT AND HUMOR, A SLY
JKa a style, and a barbed
VIEWPOINT! 1
fHFRESH,
S heady and
WMmaW r INVIGORATING?*
8 E jEr FUNNY AND
i E PROFOUND!

; ;vXsX-X^:<*X<^X-:<*XX-X-X-:'X<*XCX^;
| AUTOS |
1965 Sunbeam Alpine, tremendous
condition, new tires, only 39000
miles. Call 372-7971 after 5:30. Best
offer. (G-3t-63-p)
World respected Lotus Elan S-2 1600
1966. Loaded inverness green, black
interior. Call for appointment
376-4313. Private owner. (G-3t-63-p)
VW *62: radio, new speaker &
battery, 2 owners, 62,000 miles,
motor recently reconditioned, clean
interior, S6OO. 372-7215 before 5
P.m. (G-6t-63-p)
1965 Datsun 4 dr. sedan, very clean,
radio, heater, 4 speed, low mileage.
Top speed 90 m.p.h., 25 m.p. gallon.
Call 372-8246, Lot 133 Mobileer.
(G-st-61-p)
1961 Valiant 4 door radio, heater,
excellent condition, only 38000
actual miles, ww tires, please phone
376-9968 or see at 710-109 SW 16th
Ave. (G-st-61-p)
aocoe^s^wwwwwtfxxsxxwx'xw
I PERSONAL
V V
Double elf: Oh wow, if you only
knew what the yellow flowers have
done. Merci mucho doesnt begin to
say it. Luv, the down one gotten up.
(J-2t-63-p)
We hijacked Autumn help us deter
spring. Its a bigger job, requirements
a gentle mind and a big suitcase.
Contact Helene or Marla at
392-9290. (J-3t-64-p)
~-..v., s'v.v.*.VX':, : *x, X *X-XX > X'X-X.v.vX*Xv;.
LOST & FOUND |
Wx<*x-x*x<*x.>x*x<<-xiwx*x.w.rx*x*:l l
Purse stolen at research library
contained SIOO, identification,
glasses, etc. If found, at least return
glasses and identification. Call
Annette Morroni, 376-8514,
(L-st-63-p)
Ray Ban dark glasses prescription no
good to anyone. Please return.
Reward $lO. No questions. Charles
Wolff, 378-3372. (L-3t-59-p) \£
J
LOST: Navy blue trenchcoat with
keys in pocket. If found, contact
Hugh at 372-2749. No Questions
Asked. (L-3t-63-p)
#xvx*x*x*xx*rxxx*x*xx.x~;
| SERVICES
% -ft
Xx-:.x.:.;.v.v.vx*x i X'X*x*x*X-*v>YV"VX;Xtf
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST for
quality repairs, call 376-0710.
(M-7t-63-p)
Figures, graphs, etc. For theses,
dissertations, publications.
Professional graphic artist. Nancy
McClelland, 378-4260. (M-st-60-p)
KSEfll
I > ft jj fA
V IN THUNDERING COLOR l
The MINI-SKIRT MOB" 9:00
iBI HOW
I jasj i ;2 5 3;4 q 1
I 5:40 7:45 9:50
STEVE
IMCOJEEI\
| AS
Leulutt J
UMLI now
1:35 4:00 \
6:30 9:00 |
-

Page 9

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIED!]
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required-Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

t*j "A "A-CLASSIFICATION
CLASSIFICATION "A-CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
.0, s.l. (consecutive) STUDENT # PHONE
for rent CD 1 day
Q wanted * O help wanted D 3 day. dl% diecount)
Q autos CD 4 days (*lO% discount) CITY STATE ZIB
D personal Q 5 days and over
lost-found (*20% discount,
D r,,c WORDING
lIMIIIIIIIMMIMMimiIIIMMIIir
2l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M M I I 1 I I I I II I
an mil ii 11
4i 11 1 11 11 1 11 11 1 ii 11 11 11 ii 11 1 im iitt

I SERVICES I
a a 8 a amewflo l aesae?!
Watch repair very reasonable and
work guaranteed have new and
used men and ladies' watches. Andy,
372-1865 or 372-9415. (M-3t-62-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT you'll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,
prices from $250 round trip N.V. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-13t-61-c)
Now there's an Avon representative
on campus to bring you quality
products for men and women at low
prices. Contact Linda, 392-9357.
(M-st-62-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)

G Genaral Audiences
M Mature Audiences
(Parent's Discretion)
R Restricted (under 16 must be
accompanied by adult guardian or
parent)
X Under 16 notadmitted.
l in We IhhmHf 4-e J
METROOXOR ID
! nil W.IW It \1 /II
ierthl Pair
naTTii* f, vwyl
f the fixer
Based on the Pulitzer
Prize winning novel
by Bernard Malamud.
Mrtiocoloi M I



Page 10

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 20. IBb9

m
MH&fc
> H

UF trounced lire Furman Paladins Saturday night IIU-65, the
second time this season the century mark had been passed by the
Gators. x
The game was ail UF right from the start, as the Gators took an
early 10-2 lead. By halftime the margin was extended to 50-26.
Neal Walk had his high point night of the season, making 35 points.
Fd Lukco hit on 10 of 17 field goals and one of two free throws for
21 points. Andy Owens made 20 points. I I of those coming in the
first five minutes of the second half.
It was an all-around good effort for the Gators, pushing them
above the .500 mark. The record is now 7-6.
There were some interesting side notes:
Frank Selvy, the Furman coach, was an All-American at Furman in
the early 1050s. He still holds the record for the most points scored
in a single game, 100 points. Until last year Selvy also had the record
for the average points per game, but then along came Pete Maravich.
* *
It was surprising to see such an outstanding athlete as Selvy sitting
on the bench smoking one cigarette after another. Not only is it aginst
the rules in Florida Gym, it also isnt a very good example to set for
his players.
* *
Furmans No. 10, Charles Selvy, is the coachs brother.
* *
Steve McCammon, a 5-foot-l0 guard for Furman, made some good
outside shots, but otherwise poor play by the Paladins did them in.
* *
Richard Vasquez scored UFs 100th point.
* *
As usual the referees did an incomprehensibly poor job. It doesnt
seem to be ignorance or poor judgement but just a matter of
incompetence. I wonder how they sleep at night.
* *
UFs football game with Tulane next Oct.l 1 has been moved from
the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans to Tampa Stadium.
Both UFs Ray Graves and Tulanes Athletic Director Rix Yard
signed the agreement Saturday.

Jourdan Clears7-Foot-2

Ron Jourdan, a junior,
Saturday high jumped 7-feet-2,
best of the young season for a
collegian.
Jourdan, who is from
Pensacola, was competing in a
benefit track meet to raise
money to send a Gainesville prep
shot putter, Johnnie Lee
Samuels, to the Deaf Olympics
next summer in Yugoslavia.
Gator distanceman Jack
Bacheler ran a special three-mile
race against the clock and
finished with a time which
would have won the comparable
5,000-meter race in the 1968

(SEMINOLE!
SENIOR &GREEK]
pictures!
;! Because we were unable to take pictures [
;! of everyone Friday, the SEMINOLE |
j; photographers will be shooting again, ;!
j| MONDAY, 9:00-11:00 am, 1:00-5:00 pm, jj
!; and 6:00-9:00 pm. Appointments can be \\
! made in person only, at ROOM 346 of the !
1 REITZ UNION (next to the Seminole office), j!
Only those with appointments !j
will be photographed. !
mm mm am mmmm rnmmmmmmmmmmmrn

Walk Hits High Os 35

Olympics at Mexico City.
The lanky graduate student
covered the distance in 12:42,
better than Jerry Lindgrens
American record of 12:50 and
relatively better than Tunisias
Mohammed Gamudis winning
time in the Olympics.
Bachcler was unable to
compete in the Olympics as he
became ill the night before his
event was scheduled.
In a special fraternity
440-yard relay, Alpha Tan
Omega won with football star
Larry Smith running anchor.

It will be a home game lor lulane. Since the financial end of last
seasons UF-Air Force game in Tampa did not come out the way the
UF expected the Gators will not play their home games in Tampa.
In this case everyone is happy though. Tampa gets the Gators.
Tulane gets a bigger crowd than usual and the Gators get a bigger
payoff than in New Orleans.

McDonakfs
Hamburgers
The way you like em best!
...100% BEEF
... GROUND FRESH
... PREPARED WITH CARE
... HOT OFF THE GRILL
... ON TOASTED BUN
... UM-M-M-M GOOD!
Come in any time.
The service is fast
-our prices are right!
McDonalds*
is vour kind of place.
(PlMcDonuM* Corn IMA
201 N.W. 13th Sr.
NEED ZIPPY
E S U
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS
' 11^
l'i / \
tVV" JjL> :W
% CAPfN
Jtouie^
GALLEY
THE FINEST
SEAFOOD & CHICKEN
TAKE-OUT ORDERS
A SPECIALTY
1 N*l w V "r-r r ri : .vr.v r
StA'OOUA'.L. C. i.wAIN Kit' v
30? NW IJlh STREET 2Jt hW 10c, vtv.'£
37^6311 y.

BY MARC DUNN

CHARM CLASSES
Begin Jan. 23rd
8:00 pm 9:30 pm
$6.00 Per Person
Reitz Union Room 118
INST. Mrs. Foster & Mrs. M. Thompson
Continuing Projects Comm.
THIRSTY
feGATOR &
Taint A Fit Night Out For
Man or Beast Except At The TG
W.CHeU's b Alto At Tlm
THIRSTY GATOR
ch Monday Night 10 till 2 6 days a waak
I TODAY I
I Smothered I
I Salisbury W I
I a- 12* ss. 12* |
I TUESDAY I
I ssr*- AQO I
I Chicken w
Ml Crisp m I Bakers Pride Jk a H
Tossed |yv Peach ( I
Salad Imm Pudding Imm H
CHILD'S PLATE I
10 Years and under
Includes Beef Patties, M
Choice of Potatoes or Rice,
and Choice of One Vegetable. Kh
University Av,
Downtown
Gainesville
in rcab 1
.

The
Florida
Alligator



THE ISSUESfc^fc4?3{Ht?}T
jd Os Sauerkraut I
MB And Butterscotch f
SHJHH BY BETH GRAVES*
A. Welcome girls to the inside scoop on foods athletes crave A
jTmost. From home-made ice cream to hard-boiled eggs. IT
?participants from all sports have voiced their favorites in the ]T
T* field of nutrament.
& Kicking off into the world of football we find a bland,
4* practically unanimous vote for steak and baked potatoes. The &
only variation was that of medium-well or medium-rare for the
steak and an assortment of preparations for potatoes. 4Z
When asked how he would fix his potatoes, Guy Dennis a2
2 perfected a recipe for the mashed kind, with one exception, he XL
J forgot to peel them. Although haling from Miami, Wayne XT
* Griffith chose a Pennsylvania Dutch meal of sauerkraut and ]
pork, cooked only the way ones mother could, in the oven for jT
five hours at a slow simmer. Jim Yarbrough chose the
& all-southern Arcadia classic, fried chicken with sweet potatoes,
topped off with banana pudding. 4§*
Cooking in the basketball teams eyes was again steak or 4§
roast beef, with the favorite hang-out (when affordable) being 4$
,o, General Gaines. Scooter Houston differed on one account, that 42
2 being a love for sea-food, while Gary Waddell is known for his 2
2 strange desire for hard-boiled eggs.
The baseball team proposed a new meat into the menu and
voiced a liking for pork chops, as did the tennis team (although 3
theres a possibility of a loaded sample for this one). Sweet &
4t potatoes, corn, and steak took their usual place on the list, but
the southern dishes such as spoon bread, grits, and squash 4§*
with pot liquor, which was a new one to me) boiled
2 their way in.
tx Glenn Hoffman lengthened the list with tuna fish casserole, aL
f but it is doubtful that he could ever prepare it: ... put the 2
2 stuff in a Corning Ware Dish, put it in the oven, and take it out 2
2 w hen its ready. John Scafuti admitted that any meal he fixed 2
4* wouldnt be his favorite, for that sole reason, Interestingly
S enough though, he endorsed Gator Go as one of his favorite
drinks. Although successful iii the SEC title consistently as &
4f swimmers, these boys do not get the nod in the kitchen; thats 4y
as it should be. 4^
Cj The golf and track teams have been out-of-reach, setting new
2 records, but I did receive comment from golfer John Darr.
Broccoli enlarged the vegetable selection (little green trees, {T
2 according to John). But more to the humorous side, when 2
2 questioned where the golf team went to celebrate, he replied J
4F (with a roll of the eyes) that they didnt win very much, just Tr
4* the NCAA title. #
4t Topping off the menu was the dessert category. Strawberries 4j*
received the most votes, whether in ice-cream, pie, or shortcake.
2 Glenn Pickerin found home-made icecream to his liking,
2 typically though, freezing it was his only contribution to the *2,
T final product. Cheese cake worked its way in from the
t** connoisseurs list to this one with Mike Ovcas vote, whfle 2
various pies came in second, such as lemon meringue (John
Scafuti), butterscotch (Cliff Cox), and pecan (Jackie Eckdahl). J
When not at the training table in Yon Hall, these famous
athletes can be found at various Gainesville restaurants. Take
4f note of these girls, and the next time youre out on the town
the set-up. Cook books should be referred to. 4^
$ Remember: the way to a mans heart is through his stomach.

Justus Prevails
Bill Justus, Tennessee clutch
man, made 11 of 11 free throws
against Georgia to again take the
top in SEQ freethrow
percentage. For the season the
slender little guard has 52 of 57
for 91.2%.
Cage Tickets
Tickets will be available
Tuesday for the Mississippi State
and Mississippi basketball games.
Students may pick up their
seating assignments at Gate 13
of the stadium from 2:30 to 8
pm
The Mississippi State game
will be played Saturday and the
Gators will meet Mississippi on
Monday.
Good Sorvic# Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
m 1
BALES-SERVICE BALES-SERVICERE
RE BALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
sos b, obo. ai. yn-4arm

Bette's Hairstylist
1620 W. Univ. Ave.
University Plaza
Ph. 378-2244

1 I
I IT AI IA U Sauce Ladled on JinT
I IIA LI AN Tender ||||V I
SPAGHETTI r |
I mil MFD DININGROOM M 1
I I/IIWUI CURB CARRY OUT AfntflTflr 1
M 3 w 13 th St. & 1505 N.W. 13th St. %

I W Secretary Service |
I Now at KINGS FOOD HOST I
I Secretaries may reserve a meal. Just call either Kings I
I Food Host and give your order and the estimated time I
I of arrival and well be ready for you and bring your I
I order immediately! I
I Kings Food Host 1
I 1802 W. UNV. AVL 372-6820 f
1 1430 S.W. 13th ST. 378-1656 I
I HOUSE OF TRAVEL |
I complete travel services ml
I credit cards accepted I \ 11
specializing in cruises / I II
I representing all major J j\ II
| no service charge / ||
Has* H
I 1378-1601 1 :OF III
OPEN DAILY: 3415 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
I 8.30AM.-S=3OPAL GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA ||
I SATURDAY WESTSIDE It
I 9 AM.-NOON SHOPPING CENTER ||

Monday, January 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 20. 1969

UFs Last Ditch Team Effort
Dunks Arch Rival Seminoles

Coach Bill Harlans swimmers
averted a last minute tie with
arch-rival Florida State Saturday
by winning the 400-yard
freestyle relay in record time for
a 63 Vi 4 9VI victory.
With the Gators leading by a
slim seven point margin, and
with exactly that many points
riding on the final event,
swimmers Bruce Williams, Hank
Hough, Mark McKee and captain
Andy McPherson swept to the
team win with a pool and meet
record-setting time of 3:13.5,
breaking the old record, 3:14.4.
Sophomores McKee and
Williams each won a pair of
events and swam on the relay to
pace the Gators.
McKee set a meet record in.
the 200-yard individual medley
and set another record in the
200-yard breaststroke while
Williams won both the 200-yard
freestyle and the 500-yard
freestyle handily.
The Seminoles dominated the
diving and jumped out to an
early lead under the strength of
top tanker Dennis Shiels.
A large crowd of ardent
supporters turned out for the
meet and to counter a relatively
large FSU crowd.
The win left the Southeastern
Conference title-holding Gators
with a flawless 3-0 mark. It was
the Seminoles first setback in
four dual meets.
Harlans crew will have an
open week before facing North
Carolina State, the only team to
defeat them last season, on Jan.
31 at the UF pool.
- 50-freestyle lj>eek (F); 2, (tie)
Jerger (FS); and Hairston (F), :22.1
400-medley relay (tie) Florida
(Strate, Perkins, Murphy, McPherson)
and FSU (Shiels, Lodges, Rathman,
Esinger), 3:40.8
1,000-freestyle l,Thompson
(FS); 2,McNemey (FS); 3,Russo (F),
10:36.1
200-fTeestyle 1, Williams (F);
2,Hough (F); 3,Stafford (FS); 1:45.4
(meet record)
Walk Bounds
No. 6 In U.S.
Bob Lienhard and Neal Walk,
standout rebounders of the SEC,
latch onto the errant shot with
the class of the nation the top
ten, in fact. In last weeks NCAA
statistics Bob was No. 4 and
Neal No. 6. They can be
expected to rank very close to
the same positions this week.
Lienhards 12-game average, No.
1 in the SEC, is 17.2 while
Walks, No. 2 in the league, is
16.3.

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200-IM I,McKee (F); 2,Shiels
(FS); 3,Bridges (F); 2:01.3 (Meet and
pool record)
1-meter diving I,Boggs (FS);
2,Link (F); 3,Acosta (FS), 289.10
200-butterfly l,Russo (F);
2,Rathman (FS); 3, Vining (FS),
2:00.8
100-freestyle l, Jerger (FS);
2,McPherson (F); 3,Hairston (F),
:50.0
100-backstroke Shiels (FS);
2,Strate (F); 3,Bridges (F), 2:06.5
500-freestyle l, Williams (F);
2,Thompson (FS); 3,Page (F). 5:00.5
200-breaststroke I,McKee (F);
2,Lodges (FS); 3,Perkins (F), 2:16.8
(meet and pool record)
3-meter diving I,Boggs (FS);
2, Link (F); 3,Vonoenn (FS),
296.75
400-freestyle relay l,Florida
(Williams, Hough, McKee,
McPherson), 3:13.5 (meet and pool
record)
Maravich Hot,
Pushing 600
Pete Maravich, master point
producer of the LSU Tigers, has
eased past the 500-mark in the
first eleven games of the season
en route to his second straight
1,000-point year. Pete scored
1,138 points last year at a 43.8
rate, the highest average ever
recorded in major college
basketball, and apparently he
will exceed that total this year.
A continuance of the 45.5
average, with which he now
leads the SEC, and the nation,
will £ive him a total closer to
1,200 than to 1,00
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... as McKee surges on relay team.

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