Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
During this period of history when change so
often comes after violent protest it is becoming
increasingly difficult to find men who seek forward
movement through peaceful means.
Caught in the nation-wide backlash, many who
once sought change are today seeking the protective
security of the status-quo.
Not all men, however, are victims of the backlash.
Such men realize that constructive change is still
possible within the established institutions.
These men chart their own routes. And
frequently they find new and better courses.
Joe Hilliard is such a man.
Less than a year ago Hilliard had an idea -a
radical idea in the eyes of many Florida University
experts. Hilliard wanted to create a place on campus
where students could drink beer, and exchange
ideas, and relax.
The experts said the Board of Regents would
never allow it. They assumed the University could
never tolerate it. Most important of all, almost
everyone assumed a student facility could not
obtain a beer license.
But Joe-Hilliard had an idea.

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 63

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(L to R) CAROL KEMP, JO PADRON, AND KAREN KEMPF
... Rathskeller "Frauleins"
'Rat Guests Come Early
The Rathskeller opened its doors Thursday night to the tune of
free-flowing beer, a buffet dinner of authentic German food, and
entertainment and ceremonies for all.
UFs first nightclub saw some 350 persons pack the east wing of
the Main Cafeteria for formal opening ceremonies. Starting at 7:30
p.m., ceremonies included the drinking of the first beer, symbolic of a
year-long hassle with authorities over the serving of beer at the
Rathskeller.
The 20 UF coeds who serve as hostesses, or Frauleins, were
introduced to the guests, and were kept busy all evening serving food
and drinks. --. v -.- :
Entertainment was by Your Fathers Mustache, a Dixieland jazz
band, and The Seventh Chord, a folk and blues duo of UF students
Kitty and Rick Oliver.
Invitations to the formal opening went out to members of the
Board of Regents, UF administrators and deans, student leaders and
representatives of most campus organizations and some 30 members
*L -* -* .. - * -r-s- .... -.-
yen mv jiuw pivourr I ; r : T-*-. .; ;; ; r~. rr: tt~. ; r
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...5o Here s A Toast To Old Joe

The
Florida Alligator

AN ALLIGATOR EDITORIAI

So instead of wheel spuming, instead of talking
about the big and delivering only the small, he set
out to do the impossible.
Hilliard announced to the skeptics that he would
create a Rathskeller for the UF campus
complete with beer, atmosphere, entertainment,
pretty girls and flair.
Many continued to snicker; it could not be done.
That didnt stop Hilliard.
With the backing of the Clyde Taylor
Administration, he worked to find a place for his
Rathskeller. Efficiently he sought permission to
serve beer on campus. Effectively he endeavored to
obtain a beer license.
Unbelievably he succeeded in doing all he
planned and more.
In so doing Joe Hilliard unintentionally proved a
few points. He showed that Student Government,
when properly motivated and properly directed, can
get things done. He also showed that when Student
Government seeks out the students and puts out the
politicians, things can go a lot more smoothly.
Using this newspaper as a starting place, Hilliard
went outside of the traditional Student Government

University of Florida, Gainesville

IN RATHSKELLER OPENING

Beer On Campus,
Movies Til Dawn

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The red tape has become
unplugged and beer will flow out
of taps tonight when the
Rathskeller opens its doors to
the UF campus at 7:30.
Thirty-two continuous hours
of entertainment is planned
from opening Friday night to
closing at 2 a.m. Sunday
morning. The Dixieland jazz
group Your Fathers Mustache
will put on two complete shows,
at 9 and 11 each night.
Local entertainment folk
singers, blues, instrumental
groups and other acts will
perform between shows and
until midnight.
Old-time movies from the
silent films era including the
famed Great Train Robbery
will be shown from midnight to
7 a.m.
. Frauleins will run around in
flowered dimdl-waisted skirts,
peasant blouses and black vests,
serving food and drinks and
introducing the guests to each
other.
Breakfast will be served
Saturday morning from 7 a.m.
until noon when a jam session
like you never saw before will
start, Eric Williams, public
relations director, said.
Several local entertainers will
perform at the jam session
which is to last until early
Saturday night.
We are on the verge of the
greatest breakthrough in
communication this
campus maybe any
campus has ever seen, Clyde
Taylor, student body president,
said.
Tonights opening represents
*Lj* M/vn ll,> I rv f AL. a -* /*
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manpower pool. He sought out students qualified
for positions in the fine organization that created
our Rathskeller.
Hilliard relegated politics to the most minor
position possible.
The new approach worked well and now we have
our Rathskeller to prove it. We know that students
are willing to give their all in student projects when
given the opportunity. We know that the system
can be made to work with creative people in charge.
Having proved all this, Hilliard should be proud
and gratified.
He has delivered to this University a unique place.
He has given the UF something no other place in
Gainesville, nor for that matter in this part of the
state, can offer.
Those who worked with Hilliard on this project
also deserve commendation. For as Hilliard is proud
to say, he did not do this job alone.
Hence tonight, when the Rathskeller opens, we
will be lifting our glasses in a toast to Joe Hilliard,
his Rathskeller staff and constructive Student
Government action.
We hope you will do the same at the Rathskeller.
And we hope to see you there often.

man-hours of student, faculty
and administrative efforts and
over 18 months of planning.
The idea for a coffee-house
on campus was initiated during
Charles Shepherds
administration and became an
active issue in April, 1968, when

New UF Pill Policy
Given Approval
ByCAROL SANGER c
Alligator Assignments Editor
UF President Stephen C. OConnell Thursday approved the
controversial Infirmary policy on the dispensing of birth control pills
to unmarried coeds.
In a memorandum to Dr. W. J. Coggins, director of Student Health
and Dr. Samuel P. Martin, provost of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
OConnell said present University policy Is a sound policy and is
approved for continued use.
The policy states:
The issuance of such a prescription is a medical decision made
by the individual physician in full accord with the ethics of the
medical profession;
Such a prescription is issued only for sound medical reasons; and
Such a prescription is issued to a minor only with parental
consent, or in emergencies where consent cannot be obtained
immediately.
When asked to explain what constitutes an emergency as stated in
the OConnell memorandum, Coggins refused.
You make your own interpretation, he said, We cant discuss
the nuances of personal cases because they vary from person to
person. This is what Ive been saying all along.
Coggins said anything the Alligator wrote would be
misinterpreted by the students to the harm of the students.
If we spelled it out students would feel they could get the pill
under any circumstances, or they would feel they could never get
it neither is true, Coggins said.
As the policy now stands, a UF coed under the age of 21 can only
obtain the pill with the consent of her parents, unless her physician
feels the case is an emergency which cannot wait for parental consent.
oConneJj was unavailable for comment Thursday evening.
Illlltltllllllinilllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Friday, January 17, 1969

Hilliard, representing the
ne w1 y elected Taylor
administration, presented
preliminary plans to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
OConnell gave the go-ahead
and the Rathskeller started to
move.



Page 2

: The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17,1969

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POLITICAL DISTORTION
Equipped with a new fish-eye lens, Alligator photographer Brian
Goodheim snapped this picture of SG Vice President Gary Goodrich.
Now campus politicos can complain that not only their words, but
even their pictures are distorted by the Alligator.

Voluntary Attendance
One Os 3 Proposals

Voluntary class attendance is
one of three proposals to be
coniidtfed by the A cadence
Regulations Committee today
The three main points in the
proposal are:
Failure to attend class
should not result in course
failure unless the student has not
met bona-fide requirements of
the class.
0 A student should not be
(dropped by an instructor for any
reason other than interfering
with the academic progress of
the class.
0 If a course requires surprise
quizzes as a legitimate teaching
technique the teacher must
make it known at the beginning
of the term.
Surprise quizzes in general
were discouraged in the
proposal, Roy L. Lassiter said
last Fall.
I have no idea what the
outcome of the proposal will

Groups Entitled To Funds
Asked By SG For Requests

All organizations entitled to
receive funds from Student
Government are asked to turn in
their requests for this quarter as

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more ~
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.


be Ernest H. Cox, committee
chairman said.
If the proposal passes through
the committee it will be
submitted to UF president
Stephen C. OConnell.
The attendance proposal is a
slightly modified original
submitted by the Action
Conference last summer.
Two other proposals are on
the agenda.
One asking lowered minimum
requirements from 12 to 9 hours
for students who carry a major
extracurricular activity, was
made by the Student Affairs
Committee.
The other proposal concerns
probationary regulations
submitted by the University
College.
But this proposal is vague
and will have to be clarified by
the University College before it
can be discussed, Cox said.

soon as possible.
Requests should be filed on
the new Special Request form
and turned in to the treasurers
office.

IN IFC OPEN HOUSE PROPOSAL

Administration Attacked
For Seven-Month Delay

See Editorial, Page 8
by GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
Speaking the ... truth with
nothing left behind closed
doors, former Interfraternity
Council President Jim Devaney
Wednesday night attacked the
administrations delay on
approving an IFC resolution.
Devaney spoke of his
seven-month ordeal of trying to
secure open house hours to be
set by individual fraternities
before a packed crowd at the
IFC Installation Banquet for
new officers.
The proposal in question was
approved by the Fraternity
Action Conference and was then
sent to the Student Affairs
Committee at the suggestion of
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale. The
committee passed it on June 29.
Although the outgoing
president didnt name names and
used a truthful hypothetical
example to explain the dragged
out resolution, he released
names, dates and committees in
Wednesdays Alligator.
They said we are responsible
people, why cant we make
responsible rules? Devaney
asked IFC representatives

OConnell Plans Address
To Air Views On Gentry

UF President Stephen C.
- OConnell said late Thursday
afternoon he expects to release a
statement shortly on the Levon
Genry affair.
Gentry was acquitted on a
technicality Tuesday after
appearing before Gainesville
Municipal Court Judge Wade
Hampton on charges of defacing
university property.

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Wednesday night.
He quoted a letter of Dec. 2
from Hale which read,
... there are those who will try
to take advantage of
unmonitored situations.
Some fraternities have
already requested 24 hour open
house with IFC and the Dean of
Men, Hale said Thursday. I
havent seen the requests, but
Ive been told.
All we request is for respect
as a responsible group. We have
been called this, but have yet to
feel it, Devaney said.
is something basically
wrong in the way the
administration handled us, but it
was not the intent of every
person in the administration to
do it, he said.
From my point of view
there has been no understanding
shown on the part of the
administration.
Devaney was optimistic that
the resolution would be
accepted at the Fraternity
Action Conference meeting
following the banquet.
It is a good idea and is going
to be approved, he said at the
close of the banquet.
But Devaney said Thursday,
We didnt come to any
understanding at all. The total

I feel those who were
involved, including students who
signed the petition and the
faculty of the College of Arts
and Sciences, are entitled to a
reply and to know their views
were considered, OConnell
said.
The president said he had
hoped to have his statement
ready sooner. However, he said.

issue of the run around involved
with the resolution was
avoided.
The administration is trying
to make a comparison between
fraternities and independents.
They want us to have the same
open house rulings, he said.
We dont see this as' a
conflict with any independent
group, Devaney said. It is
more shifting responsibilities
than expansion of limits.
The administration fears such
responsibilities would be
misconstrued as discrimination,
he said.
I think the idea we
presented will be totally raped in
a sense, Devaney said. I am
totally drained of any faith in
the administration at all.
He said honesty is at a very
low ebb in the Student Affairs
Office.
Hale defended his office by
saying he is trying to get IFC to
take a more significant part in
governmental control.
In absence of any approved
plan for IFC, we selected the
same hours the dorms use, he
said. He suggested IFC follow
the same type of procedures as
Interhall.
Hale meets with the
Fraternity Action Council again
next week to try and reach a
settlement.

his first draft of the statement
had proved unsatisfactory to
him.
Apparently satisfied the
Gentry affair failed to turn into
an unhappy confrontation here,
OConnell said, I hope I have
the opportunity to meet Mr.
Gentry and learn what he was
seeking to prove if anything.
Maybe I can help him prove
it, OConnell added.



2 Jailed In FSU Fracas; UF Next?

Students scuffled with
campus security officers in a
hallway outside an auditorium
of the Florida State University
campus where former United
Nations Ambassador Arthur
Goldberg was speaking
Wednesday night.
Two students were arrested.
Goldberg entered the
auditorium by a rear entrance
and apparently did not see any
of the demonstrators, all
members of the Students for a
Democratic Society (SDS) which
officials at FSU have refused to
give official status.
SDS was denied recognition
by FSUs acting Vice President
for Student Affairs John Arnold.
He told the students he had
vetoed approval of the group by
the student senate because of its
relationship to the radical SDS
national organization.
They clearly and willingly

Swathmore President
Dies At Take-Over

Dr. Courtney Smith, president of Swarthmore College, died of a
heart attack in his office today as about 25 of the schools Negro
students occupied the admissions office for the eighth day.
A spokesman for the college said Smith, 52, had been under quite
a strain since members of the Swarthmore Afro-American Society
(SASS) took over the office last Thursday.
Smith suffered the heart attack seizure shortly before he was to
meet with a faculty committee which had been studying demands
made by the blacks, the spokesman said.
The SASS has been demanding greater participation for blacks in
the affairs of the 1,024-student Quaker school.
At the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis militant Negro and
white students relinquished control of the administration building
after an agreement with officials of the nations fourth largest school.

Toilets Will Flush
After Nixons Oath

When Richard Nixon finishes
his inaugural oath Monday,
thousands of toilets will be
simultaneously flushed across
the country.
This is all part of a massive
demonstration in protest of the
new administration by The
Students for Violent
Nonaction (SVNA) to have
every toilet in the country
flushed.
Frank Malbranche, SVNA
Jurors Need
Not Come
Jurors who have been called
to serve in the Honor Court
hearing Sunday will not be
expected to attend, Honor Court
Chancellor Pete Zinober said
Thursday.
Zinober said the jury trial
planned for Sunday was changed
to a bench hearing instead.

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accept disruption and violence
to accomplish their means, he
said.
SDS leaders said they
mtended to continue to hold a
vigil outside FSUs
administration building.
An open hearing to discuss a
charter at UF for Southern
Students Organizing Committee
(SSOC), formerly affiliated with
SDS, will be set today at 3:30
p.m. by the Student
Organizations Committee.
Bill Cross, assistant director
of Reitz Union Activities, said
the hearing will be set for
hopefully next week.
However, SSOC leader Steve
Fahrer, 3AS, said Wednesday
night that the hearing is set for
Jan. 24.
SDS withdrew its charter
request last quarter, and Cross
said SDS intended to submit a
new one. We havent heard

national chairman, called for a
high degree of organizational
effort as we hope to flush the
toilets not only of the dorms,
apartments, and lecture halls in
and around the campuses, but
also downtown hotels,
restaurants, railroad stations,
and high schools, private homes,
etc.
The toilets will be flushed as
Nixon says the last word of the
oath ... so help me God.
SKY DIVERS A
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SUN. JAN.l9th
GAINESVILLE
DRAGWAY

from them yet, he said.
Concerning the charter denial
at FSU Fahrer said, Any group
of students wishing to meet can
not be denied a charter at a
university because it is a denial
of freedom of speech. >
Cross said the organizations
committee has been studying its
procedures and chartering
criteria and has come up with
written guidelines to be followed
in granting charters to student
groups.
When the hearing takes place
the policy will be to let three
students from SSOC speak to
the committee, Cross said. The
decision was made to do it this
way because of the possible
confusion in letting everyone at
the hearing have a say, he added.
The organizations committee
is comprised of five faculty
members and four students. The
rules call for at least one student
to vote yes if a motion is
carried. At least two students
must agree with the majority
decision on a charter grant.
Student groups at UF need
only the approval of the
organizations committee.
The FSU Faculty Senate
overwhelmingly passed a
resolution prior to the SDS
meeting which recommended
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that it be university policy
neither to approve nor
disapprove student
organizations.
In effect, the faculty
resolution would leave the final
decision on recognition of
student organizations to the
student senate.

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Friday, January 17,1969, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17,1969

Hope Remains For Century Bells

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The chimes of Century
Tower, stopped from ringing for
nearly six months by a need for
repairs, may be ringing again by
the end of the quarter.
The Department of Music,
under whose supervision the care
and upkeep of the Century
Tower chimes falls, has
tentatively been given approval
to spend the money needed to
have the chime clock mechanism
repaired.
We had a telephone call from
the Office of Academic Affairs

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GAINBSVILLE MALL

and were told there would be
permission for us to spend the
money, said UF carilloneur
Willis Bodine. We assume there
will be a budget transfer to the
music account.
We expect the firm handling
the repairs to go ahead with
them. I would hope they will be
completed in about three weeks
to a month, or at least by the
end of February.
The chimes, which in past
years have chimed the quarter
hour and between classes, have
not operated since the end of
last summer, when the

seven-day, j4-hour clock
mechanism -a 15-year-old
mechanism broke down.
Apparently several pins in this
complex clock device-which is
the timing device controlling the
regulated playing of music--
jammed, Bodine said.
The repairman we called
took the entire mechanism back
to the factory, he said. We
waited until November for some
word from them, and they told
us then that it could not be
repaired but must be replaced.
The only reason its taken so
long to gpt started is that the
Department of Music doesnt
have the money needed for
replacement or repairs and we
had to go through channels to
get it. We are working as quickly
as we are allowed to.
In addition, new music
rolls-custom made rolls punched
for tunes much like rolls for
player pianos-were needed.
Delta Chi fraternity donated
SIOO for a new music roll last
COLLEGE TEACHING
A Cooperative College Registry
representative will interview
candidates January 20-21 for
faculty and administrative posts
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colleges throughout the United
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Ph.D. preferred. Master's
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Appointment through
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tnrougn xne continental Representative
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October and a new roll has been
ordered, though it has not yet
been received.
Bodine also said he had
received a letter from unofficial
in Student Government
expressing an interest in
financing periodic live carillon
concerts.

Winter Bowling Leagues
Are Organizing NOW!!
Mixed and mixed doubles leagues forming
for Tues. through Thurs. nites at 9:00 p.m.
and Fri. nite at 11:00.
Call 392-1637 or come by the GAMES
AREA and fill out an application.
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
UF Students
Are invited
to a spaghetti dinner
At First Baptist Church
425 W. University Avenue
Sunday, January 19th
following the 11:00 worship service.
No reservations necessary

SKY DIVERS &
Wheel-Standing
'CHEVY -Rebellion
SUN. JAN. 19th
GAINESVILLE
DRAQWAY



Fee Protestors
Seek Legal Aid
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
An attorney has been hired to represent an undetermined number
of UF Physical Plant Division employees in a dispute with the
administration over a parking fee.
Gainesville Attorney Richard T. Jones submitted a letter of protest
to UF Business Manager Tom N. Wells on Thursday.
The~mi are protesting the administrations parking plan which is
to go into effect March 21. Faculty and staff making more than
$4,500 must pay a basic fee of $lO with a $5 fee for those making less
than $4,500.
A few of the reasons of protest presented in the letter include:
The lot near SW 34th Street, has no relationship to the main
campus and generally serves only employees of Physical Plant.
The salary range in Physical Plants is such that many employees
cannot afford to pay to park but they must pay if they are bo*\ As
work.
In addition the letter said the employees on the main campus have
available parking off campus with no such facility for those on SW
34th Street.
A question of the legality in charging an employee to go to work is
not a part of the protest but is reserved for action later if the parking
plan actually becomes effective, the letter states.
Wells said the letter is being included with a group of
approximately 20 other letters that will be considered later by the UF
Transportation and Parking Committee.
A date has not been set for the committee meeting.
UF Gets Voice
In Personnel Area
State Personnel Director Jay McGlon Thursday assured UF
President Stephen C. OConnell and key administrators that UF will
be granted maximum delegation of authority within the next 30 days
to reclassify certain positions and provide greater efficiency of
operation and flexibility on personnel matters.
McGlon, Assistant Director Conley Kennison and Board of Regents
Personnel Director Steve McArthur spent most of the day meeting
with OConnell and members of his staff to discuss personnel
problems some of which have been pending for more than 18
months.
I recognize that reclassification of positions is one of the major
problems at the University of Florida, McGlon said. Your positions
are different from those at other institutions and this produces an
added burden of evaluating changes in title and responsibilities.
McGlon agreed to send members of his staff to the UF campus or
to work with Personnel Division officials who would come to
Tallahassee in an attempt to resolve critical decisions as soon as
possible.
Pointing out his office was launched less than 15 months ago,
McGlon was optimistic about the future.
Were going to be able to provide a great deal more assistance,
McGlon said. We want to work on the pressing difficulties that
require immediate attention, help with recruiting qualified personnel
and assist in other ways. Im encouraged by my visit to the Florida
campus and by the cooperative attitude displayed by staff members
here.
OConnell noted: The most difficult and pressing campus problem
we have today is the one of personnel policies. But it is one that were
going to lend every effort to solving through, by and with the aid of
Mr. McGlon and his staff.
Speaking for the Board of Regents, McArthur said, We also
recognize this as a critical problem and one that needs attention.
During the day-long meeting, it was made clear that the policy on
overtime and not paying employees for working it on the basis of
time-and-a-half is the result of a State Budget Commission decision
and can be changed only by that group.
The matter has been discussed with Chancellor Robert Maurz and
the Board of Regents will be urged to take early steps to permit the
University to observe the law, even if it requires leaving positions
vacant to fund the payment of overtime, OConnell said.
We require others to observe the law... I dont see how we can
justify our not doing so, he added.
McGlon said an essential ingredient in continuing to update UFs
personnel structure will be appropriation of S3O million during the
1969-70 Fiscal year to support a program establishing salary
adjustments for 1,850 different classifications held by 56,000 state
employees.
As a result of a thorough pay study recently completed by Frank
C. Brown and Co., a proposed classification and pay plan which would
set competitive salary levels for all state positions has been approved
by the State Personnel Board and is now before legislative
committees, McGlon said.
The adoption of this plan, which is subject to the appropriation of
necessary funds by the 1969 Legislature, will make possible complete
state fay comparability with private business, McGlon continued.
McGlon explained some positions will reflect monthly increases of
$25 to $250 because of their technical nature. These include
medicine, engineering, data processing, and a number of specialized
jobs in higher education.

W f. I
I stol
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2546 N. W. 13th Street I
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Savings for you. Fashion fabrics, \
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Friday, January 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17,1969

''^ww^^^M^wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwvwwwirf*
T<|* Campus; Crier
Sponsored Dy Student Government.
"T** rlnnmi nnnnfifinnnnnnnrtnnfMVWi ~nnn ~~i -innnn* ;
.. ..... c

.. : )
- 9
* - -- -
/"
ft v
- ' > 17 .
V .
.'. S
' \
Remember, RATHSKELLER opens
tonight at 7:30. Membership cards on
sale today all day. Be prepared to have a
,f ball. . and stay very late.
< if
-

m B mi
i ~ ssi
$ Hg I g B ig^
A
aa -, B s : '' t *. |H[ y -' II A ''; 5 /,', 5Ef
1 t(P <£, * \)*' 'V" I *~h!Jk *-** %
' ~ vtMifiL > ,y:-> / '; - .. ;'.:.-y{r^fe-^gy3i l^l .',-. ->
... ~ * ; r*" v m -



V.?.V,V.

Make-Up
Pictures
Set Today
Final make-up pictures for
seniors selected to Whos Who
will be taken today in the
Seminole office, third floor of
the Reitz Union.
Seminole Editor Jim Moody
said caps and gowns will be
provided for the pictures.. Hours
will be from 9-11 a.m., noon-5
and 6-9 pm.

UF Female Students
Seek 10 Sexiest Men

By LONNIE BROWN
Alligator Correspondent
Theres an independent study
to locate the 10 most sexiest
men on the UF campus.
How do you rate? Asked
the advertisement in
Wednesdays Alligator. There
was one way to find out.
I dialed the listed number at
the end of the ad. Its simple,
she murmered, You want to
make an appointment? How
about in five minutes?
I ran out behind my gray
sports car, started pushing it

Oden Guest Speaker
At Un ion Sunday

Contemporary Theology and
Psychotherapy will be the topic
of a talk Sunday by Dr. Thomas
C. Oden of Phillips University,
Enid, Oklahoma.
Oden, professor of ethics and
historical theology at the
Graduate Seminary of Phillips,
will speak in room 150-D of the
Reitz Union at 6:30 p.m. He will
also speak at University United
Methodist Church Sunday at
Frat Backs
United Fund
Delta Chi fraternity is
sponsoring a fun rally for the
general public Saturday at 7
pm. at the Commercial Bank of
Gainesville, with proceeds going
to the United Fund.
Entry fee is $2.50, and
contestants should bring a
pencil, flashlight and watch,
according to rallymaster Vince
Bailey. Registration is at 6 p.m.
Saturday, and a drivers meeting
is at 6:40.
Since the rally is not a speed
contest, any type of car may
compete. In each car will be a
driver and a navigator, who will
be required to follow a given set
of instructions and answer
questions at check-in points.
The rally will follow a scenic
route of Gainesville, according
to Bailey.
Trophies will go to drivers and
navigators of the first, second,
and third place cars.
SKY DIVERS R
Wheel-Standing
"CHEVY -Rebellion
SUN. JAN. 19th
GAINESVILLE
DRAGWAY

DROPOUTS

f ,*£/) La /
I SHELLS? y

down the hill, jumped in and
popped the clutch. It started
with a resounding putt. I twisted
the two loose wires under the
dash and the headlights blinked
on.
Success! I screamed in my
Paul Newman voice. Im in the
running.
You too can apply for the
now vacant position of the 10
most sexiest men on campus.
Call 378-9898. Sandy, Sharon,
or Marlyn will answer and make
your appointment.
Weve been interviewing
about four men at a time, said
Sandy, 22 and a senior from

9:45 and 11 a.m. on The
Celebration of Now.
Oden is the author of
Contemporary Theology and
Psychotherapy and several
other books dealing with current
ethical and theological problems.
He graduated from Perkins
School of Theology in 1956 and
received both M.A. and PhD.
degrees from Yale University in
1958 and 1960 respectively.
Oden received a Post-Doctoral
Cross-Disciplinary Fellowship in
1965 under which he studied at
Heidelberg University in
Germany. He also toured Jordan
and Israel, attended several
Vatican Council meetings, and
attended the World Conference
on Church and Society in
Geneva, Switzerland.

69 is the year of i
the CUBANA
I
Order Out or Visit
The number 1 sandwich shop in Gainesville I
Find out why more and more people are saying I
Alans Cubana
9 H
Has the best sandwiches (all kinds) I

378-1230 [FREE PELIV6IT| 378-1252 I

Tampa. The interview takes
about 15 minutes. They have
had almost 100 calls since the ad
appeared Wednesday.
The girls do not want their
full names revealed until
Thursday when the contest ends.
We did it because the Florida
man is ignored. The Alligator has
a Gator Girl, but what about the
Gator Guys? asked Sharon, also
from Tampa.
The three girls have a form
the contestant fills out. There
are seven questions, ranging
from How many girls did you
date in 1968? to What line
do you use most often?
While the form is being filled
out, the girls rate the male on his
voice, movement, manners,
build, appearance, and
interrelationships. The
questionaire and the rating cards
will be compared and the
winners announced Friday in the
Alligator.
Both single and married males
are eligible. So far, about one in
12 is married, explained
Marlyn, 1 UC, from New Jersey.
Sexiness is casual
confidence, said one of the
girls. Its being able to handle
yourself well in any situation,
added another.
The response has been more
than expected, but none regret
starting the quest. Some of their
friends might start a search for
the 10 sexiest girls later in the
quarter.
So sign up men. Show the
girls what the man who needs no
introduction looks like!

11969 BGT crane I
$3250 imports I
1969 I
SPEQALS
1969 SPRITE I
$2150
1969 MIDGET I
$2350 I
1969 MGB I
CRANE
f£ imports!!
506 E. UNIV. I

Friday, January 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

BY HOWARD POST

Page 7



Page 8

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17, 1969

Lead People Or Herd Sheep?.

After more than eight months of patient,
quiet work, a proposal for relaxation of
fraternity open housing restrictions
apparently went up in smoke Wednesday
night.
For the umpteenth time in recent months,
the administration vetoed the request from
the Fraternity Action Conference. The
excuse this time was that if frats were
allowed greater open house freedon, then
the administration would have to permit the
same for the independents living in dorms.
Such an aigument is both illogical and
absurd. Even if it were a good argument,
though, would there be any conceivable
harm in relaxing open house restrictions in
dorms? Dont students living off-campus
have complete open house freedom?
Dont young people who are not students
have complete freedom? Why should
students living in dorms and frat houses be
judged and ruled by different standards?
Speaking to the specific issue itself the
fraternity system had no intention of pitting
the frats against the dorms to see

wnu W§
IT if V j W/UE^gg^sUn
"Youll Need That To Bail With"

Staff Writings

Back in the Good Old Days of
the Reign of Stephen in the
country of Gain-less-ville there
was a Youth named Simpson of
the Graham ancestry.
Now Simpson, ,a Normal
Youth in the Reign of Stephen,
was a little Naughty. In fact, his
Mommy caught him in his
Chambers with a Girl (an
imported commodity from
Tail-a-has-he; and you know
about Girl in Chambers). Well,
Mommy and Daddy Graham
decided that Discipline was In
Order.
Now in the days of Stephen,
parents were Psychologically
Educated ana knew better than
to Hurt their children. So

Caught In His Chambers With 4 Girl

Mommy and Daddy Graham
said, Naughty, Naughty,
Simpson. No more Girls in
Chambers for And
Simpson, being a NormaTYmrtfc,
protested.
In fact, Simpson found his
Punishment so unbearable he
decided to forsake the Shelter of
Home Life and to Make It On
His Own.
After sneaking a Good-Bye
Letter to the Grahams maid and
town gossip. Alley Gator,
Simpson loaded his Traveling
Bag with Goodies and Strutted
out the Front Door.
Now the first person that
Simpson met in his Journey
through Life was the kindly

The Florida Alligator
t
#*Tha price of freedom
is die exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
PflCfltoflfeto/ Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez James Cook
Amthitffa Executive Editor News. Editor

which could get the greatest freedom. To
contend that the IFC was trying to beat the
independents is also an absurd position.
Fraternity men were simply trying to
increase their own rightful claim to
responsible freedom; they were not trying to
deprive independents of any freedoms.
If the administration of this university is
so blind, so stubborn, so resolute to avoid
unpopular decisions which might benefit and

Afreshman and sophomores who have not
reached the age of 21 shouldnt feel like one
of the UF crowd. Because they arent.
They have been singled out from the rest
of the students and have been denied a
privilege enjoyed by other students.
*
Under a current university regulation,
based on a state statute and approved by the
Board of Regents, most freshmen and
sophomores under 21 are denied the
privilege of driving in Alachua County
except from 3 p.m. Friday to 7 a.m.
Monday.
And only then in a car registered with the
University Police Department. They cannot
drive a borrowed car which is not registered
with the university. They cannot drive any
automobiles in the county during weekdays.
Exceptions are made for students who are
married or disabled and those who live
within commuting distance of the campus.
Neither Gainesville city police nor the
Highway Patrol ever enforces the regulation,
and University Police rarely concern

Senile Policeman who patrolled
Interhall Square.
Simpson was tripping down
the Yellow Brick Road when he
met King Stephen (who
happened to be going the Other

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business. Advertising offices in Room 330, Reite Union Phone
392-1681. 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florid. Alligator we those of the editor, or of
the writer of the article and not thoae of the Univerritv of FkLida"

Let Them Drive

Way).
Hi, my name .
Im running away from
Home, said Simpson.
. is King . .
I didnt Like It at Home.

enrich UF students RESPONSIBLE
students then they are not fit for their
jobs, nor are they worthy of the respect such
jobs should have in the eyes of the people
they lead.
Specifically, President Stephen C.
OConnell, Vice-President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale and Dean of Men Frank
Adams apparently cannot see that MAIN
issue here is their own constant, unending,
frustrating obstruction of student leadership
working for desirable and needed change
through accepted channels.
If they cannot see that fact, if they persist
in denying and undercutting responsible
student leadership, then the blame for
turning patient leaders into impatient,
threatening ones will rest squarely on their
shoulders.
Before such a travesty occurs, they should
admit their ineptness and abdicate their roles
as leaders of people at this university.
They should seek a vocation for which
they are better fit, such as herding sheep.

themselves with' oil-campus traffic
violations.
The regulation was intended to limit the
number of cars on campus. As presently
worded, it also denies many students the
privilege of using their Florida drivers
licenses during the week. It even dictates
what automobiles these sutdents may drive
on weekends.
True, the regulation is rarely enforced.
But it could be even though it amounts to
nothing more than discriminatory deadwood
amoung the traffic and safety regulations,
even though it smells of selective legislation
and bogs down the enforcement of necessary
university regulations.
A
The University Parking and
Transportation Committee has the power to
recommend a change. By suggesting that the
regulation be scratched, the committee
would not be increasing the number of cars
on campus. It would instead be granting
underclassmen a privilege they deserve but
are being denied.
Given the privilege, they too will be able
to feel like one of the UF crowd.

By Bryce Donovan

.. Stephen.
My parents were too Strict.
Im always glad to talk to
my Subjects ..
Im going to Make It On My
Own.
. . about their Problems.
Nice meeting you.
And they Parted.
A little further Down the
Road, Simpson met a Girl who
also wanted to Make It On Her
Own. But they couldnt
So Simpson gave up his Ideas
about Making It On His Own
and snuck back home.
Moral: It is not Easy to Make
It On Your Own (you know
about Girls without Chambers).



Staff Writings

Workers Charged With UF Parking Fee

There isnt a place of business
or an industrial complex in
Florida that charges its employes
to park, except the UF.
This is the gripe at Plants and
Grounds where the pay on the
average is less than $4,500 and
many workers have a family to
support.
The charge for parking o
campus beginning March 31, for

OWN FORUM:
jAdt/uiml ViA&Mt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."

THE WORD IS OUT
The sign posters were back to work Thursday, only one day after
Lavon Gentry left the courtroom. One of the first to try his luck
seemed to be paying a tribute to the man who made it all possible but
future poster pasters should take heed Gentry was released on the
wording of the charge against him. The next person to get caught may
not be so lucky.
Throw Them Love
Instead Os Hate
MR. EDITOR:
A New Word For Love? (Jan. 14) was garbage.
I mean, not totally, you see, but in the main.
The love generation prostituted no, murdered love? Nonsense.
Hell, man, it was not we who did it . no, not those who love.
Those who LOVE prostitute it ... no, my son.
It was those who hate ... they that have done it, to take it from we
who love.
Those who hate .. they that throw the excrement, they that shout
mother f-ker.
They who killed the Kennedy brothers and Mr. King did not love.
Nor were they on drugs.
No, we have not piostituted love.
Some have advocated hate and destruction, but they have not, for
gods sake, been a true part of the love generation.
In fact, love is the very thing with which to fight them.
So, brothers, pick up your love and throw it at your enemies its
better than beating the crap out of them.
Peace be with you, friend, love you neighbor ... as yourself.
DONALD CARTER, 2UC

this group will be $5.
This doesnt sound like much
to most people, but for a man
with a family earning less than
$5,000 a year, $5 is a pair of
shoes, groceries or gas to get to
church on Sundays.
Parking space off SW 34th St.
for plants and grounds personnel
is on the campus periphery away
from the congested center of

campus. The men want to know
whose parking space they will be
paying for.
The men are said to be fired
up about having to pay for a
parking policy in which they had
no voice in formulating.
A few are expected to quit
their jobs and find an employer
who does not charge for parking.
They arent speaking out to

Alphabetic Ages

MR. EDITOR:
I wish to chastise those
miscreants who would have
compulsory physical education
abolished by contending that the
program can only benefit
analphabetic apes, i.e. jocks.
I would like to remind these
academic charlatans that their
moribund bodies will not always
live in this cushioned ivory

I j
V/florrH-HOUSE Ls.
gUfrl E/

By Taking Only High IQs
UF Would Be Great Too

MR. EDITOR:
When students ask me why the University of
Florida is not a great school I can answer only one
way They say it has over 18,000 students and
covers many square miles and is situated in a great
metropolis.
Therefore they reason that it must be great.
However they also realize that it is far from being
equal to many small schools. An obvious example is

the press or taking the matter to
their superiors because they fear
reprisals from the
administration.
When they present their case
against the planned parking
system, they will have stood
alone unless other campus
groups support them.
They are fighting the
administrations parking plan by

No Student Jobs

MR. EDITOR:
Finding it necessary to
supplement our funds to assure

tower. To enable we privileged
few to make our full
contributions to humanity such
a compulsory program must
exist to enforce at least minimal
maintenance of the metabolism,
though the medicinal taste be
bitter. Thus I strongly endorse a
compulsory physical education
program at this university.
ALLEN R. FRYE, 2UC

the tiny college of Arghan College located in North
Smithton. It has only 347 students and a
student-teacher ratio of 2:3 and covers only 1.4
acres.
Arghan College is great because it accepts persons
with 185 IQs exclusively. I propose that the
University of Florida seriously consider this policy
if it is to ever become a great institution of learning.
ARTUR V. FREINER

Friday, January 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

By Don Yokel

hiring a lawyer. An anonomyous
spokesman at Plants and
Grounds Monday said they
passed the hat for donations to
hire legal counsel.
The administration may win
this one, but what happens to
the pair of shoes, the groceries
or gas to get to church on
Sundays.

an education we began looking
for part time jobs on campus.
First we went to the Financial
Aid office and filled out
applications for student
employment. Our names were
placed at the end of a very long
waiting list, for many other
students are in similar situations.
Our next idea was perhaps we
could obtain work at J. Hillis
Miller Health Center as nurses
aides, maids, or anything. So we
called Personal Employment
only to find that there was some
ruling that prohibits full-time
students from becoming
employees.
We understand there must be
a good and necessary reason for
this ruling. Could someone
please answer this question.
Also why arent more jobs
available for students on
campus? Many employees are
full-time workers and are not
students.
JANET HOWE, lUC
BETTY SZUTENBACH, lUC
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. Tiie editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 9



Page 10

l s The Florida Alligator. Friday. January. 17... 1969,

Fellowships
- Offered

i Jk> fl
. a company §!
107 years old? Ba
NO-NOT WHEN YOU'RE GROWING!
OUR FORMULA FOR SUCCESS IS QUITE SIMPLE-UTILIZATION OF
TALENTED YOUNG PEOPLE. T^^KFKvv3m
L#
Union Camp is one of the world's leading producers of paper and paper V^l
by-products. Were growing. And well continue to grow through the
thoughts and ideas of people like you. We encourage our people to I
think and act on their own because that way they do the best job job-1,1
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a Union Camp Career Counselor will visit
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
explore your career objectives.
Were looking forward to the opportunity
10007 Ej^^^KjEi^S|
Opportunity Employer
HB union camp corporation
HR HBcomomho*
WbH|MBM|H|

Students interested in careers in
public administration at the national,
state and local levels have been
offered an opportunity to apply for a
fellowship to study at the
Universities of Alabama, Kentucky,
and Tennessee.
Completion of the 12-month
r ... -...V.V*V

training period entitles them to a
certificate in Public Administration.
They can be awarded a Masters
Degree at any of the universities
attended upon completing a thesis
and passing aDDrooriate
examinations.
For information and applications,

- - -.-... ; ,y. |
students should write to Coleman B. |:
Ransone, Educational Director :
Southern Regional Training Program j
in Public Administration, Drawer I j
University, Alabama 35486. i
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The deadline for submitting;
applications is March 1.



Orange and

STATE TEACHERS AND
STATE NURSING
SCHOLARSHIP LOAN
HOLDERS: Your Loan Notes
must be signed by you and your
parents and approved in the
College of Education or College
of Nursing and returned to the
Student Depository by Jan. 20,
1969.
MORTAR BOARD:
Applications for Mortar Board
are now available at the Student
Activities Desk, 3rd floor, Reitz
Union. Women with a 3.0 grade
point average and a junior
classification presently or by
June, 1969, are_ eligible.
Deadline is Friday, Jan* 17, 5
p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
OPEN HOUSE: There will be
an open house at the Mormon
Student Center and Church,
1220 S.W. Fifth Ave., Saturday,
Jan. 18, from 4*lo p.m.
PI BETA PHI: An open house
will be held Friday, Jan. 17,
from 2-5 p.m., in rooms 121-123
of the Reitz Union. All
interested persons are invited to
attend.
S 3
JAN. 17: GENERAL
MOTORS CORP. AC Elec.
Div. EE, ME, Math, Physics,
Met E IE. GENERAL
DYNAMICS (Ft. Worth) CE,
IE, EE, ME. INSTITUTE OF
PAPER CHEMISTRY
Graduate work in full-time
program leading to M.S. and
PhD., Chem, or ChE. DUN &
BRADSTREET, INC. Bus.
Ad, Lib. Arts, Fin, Ed, Econ,
Acctg. CRUM & FORSTER
Production, claims, underwriting
and administration. WISCONSIN
STATE UNIVERSITY
Teaching and research. U.S.
PLYWOOD Mkt, Bus. Ad.

NEXT CAR LOAN...
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION % A

Administrative
Notices

BLUE BULLETIN

ELIGIBILITY FOR
PARTICIPATION IN
E XTRACU R RICU LAR
ACTIVITIES:
To hold any
elected or appointed office in
any extracurricular activity, a
student must be free of
scholarship,
academic or admissions
probation. He also must be
classified as a full-time student
enrolled n a minimum of 12
hours. In exceptional
circumstances, a student, not
eligible to hold an elected or
appointed office, may obtain
information on seeking a waiver
by contacting the Dean of Men
or the Dean of Women.
PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
JAN 20-21: MARTIN CO.
EE, ME, CE, Physics. RALSTON
PURINA CO. Bus. Ad, Ag,
Econ, Ind. Mgt, ME. U.S.
ATOMIC ENERGY
COMMISSION ChE, EE,
MetE, NE, ME, CE, IE, Acctg,
Bus. Ad, Econ, Pub. Ad.
ALLIED CHEMICAL Chem,
ChE, ME, CE, EE, IE, Acctg.
CARNATION CO. All majors.
JAN. 20: EASTERN
AIRLINES Controller, Cust.
Serv, Computer Serv, Flight
Oper, Mkt. Planning, Properties
and Facilities, Treasury.
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC
CORP. All engineering majors,
math, chem. GENERAL
DYNAMICS (Electronics
Division) EE, ME.
COOPERATIVE COLLEGE
REGISTRY Art, Bio, Chem,
Econ, Bus, Ed, Eng. US PUBLIC
HEALTH SERVICE COMM.
DISEASE CENTER All Lib.
Arts, Bus, Biology degrees.
TRUST CO. OF GEORGIA
Bus. Ad, Fin, Insur.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Friday, January 17
Seminole Portrait Photography,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Dept, of Engineering Science &
Mechanics, Dr. William E.
Miner, Activities in the
Flight Theory, etc.", McCarty
Hall Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Campus Games Tournament,
Tournaments in Bowling,
Billiards, Table Tennis, Chess
and Bridge, Games Area,
Union, Time varies.
Movie, "Casino Royale", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Student Government Rathskeller
Opening, "Your Father's
Mustache", Main Cafeteria,
8:00 p.m.
Saturday, January 18
Seminole Portrait Photography,
346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "The Bridge on
the River Kwai", Union Aud.,
3:00, 6:00 & 9:00 p.m.
Mormon Student Center Open
House, 1220 S.W. sth
Avenue, 4:00 to 10:00 p.m.
Basketball, Univ. of Fla. vs.
Furman, Fla. Gym, 7:45 p.m.
Student Government Rathskeller
Opening, "Your Father's
Mustache", Main Cafeteria,
8:00 p.m.
Sunday, January 19
University Films Series, Movie,
"Best of Laurel & Hardy",
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:15
p.m.
Religion in Life, "Father lan &
Caroline Mitchell", Union
Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
Civil Air Patrol Meeting, 122
Union, 8:00 p.m.
NOTICE- THE ARREDONDO
ROOM will be opened for
lunch Monday through
Friday, 11:30 to 2:00 p.m.
until further notice.

Campus Calendar

Friday, January 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Monday, January 20
Seminole Portrait Photography,
346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Student Government Book
Exchange, 206 Union, 3:00
p.m.
Chess Tournament, 243 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, Union
Ballroom, 7:00 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Self Defense Lessons for
Women, C-4 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club, 525
E & I Bldg., 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 21
Seminole Portrait Photography,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Student Government Book
Exchange, 206 Union, 3:00
p.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Bridge Tournament, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 356
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Tournament, 243 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Supper Club Meeting, Buffet
Supper, University Inn, 7:30
p.m.
Painting for Fun, Water Color,
C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Alpha Epsilon Delta Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Samson Meeting, 321 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Music Dept.: Florida Baroque
Ensemble, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Games Area, Bowling League
Organizing, 118 Union, 9:00
p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the
Audobon Wildlife Films
Series.
&

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
**' !**
Honda 50, good shape, plus two
helmets and book rack, $125. Call
Skip, 392-7495. (A-St-60-p)
1964 Pacemaker Mobile home
l?nnn' front dinett .
S3OOO, best offer. 376-8281
evenings. (A-4t-55-p)
JUST ARRIVED Hundreds of desk,
chairs, files, bookcases & much more.
New Used & refurnished. Save 50%
or more. Additional 10% off Jan.
10th to 18th to students with IDs.
JR OFFICE FURNITURE &
EQUIPMENT Co. 620*/z So. Main St.
Ph. 376-1146. (A-6t-56-p)
Kawasaki 350 cc 1968, perfect
condition. Low mileage. S7OO or best
offer. Call 376-7648 after 500
(A-3t-61-p)
63 Galaxie 2dr., r&h std. trans. five
brand new wide oval tires. $550,
need money for school. Call Jack,
372-2027 or see 1111 SW 16th Ave.,
Apt. 93. (A-st-61-p)
STEREO COMPONENT AM-FM
multiplex radio. Brand new, was
$499.95 Sacrifice $250. Call
f^ ndy \ ~ 7 P. 376-1536.
(A-st-62-p)
Muntz car stereo, 4 spkrs, excl cond.,
has balance, contour, volume and
track controJs. $55, 378-0129 after 6
pm. (A-4t-62-p)
Fender super reverb amplifier with
case. Both are in excellent condition.
Call Fred Fey, South 304. Phone
392-7950 after 5. (A-3t-62-p)
Garrard SL-95 automatic turntable
with pickering low impendance
stereo cartridge. For SIOO.OO or will
settle for best offer. Call Irv,
378-0729 after 1 p.m. (A-st-61-p)

ToUatf
ceps I
thCrCl I A SOLAR PRODUCTION HHE 1
are I I
then lil %||
, there'sl I I *. jjp if
I mmjm S
ROBERT VAUGH[\
JACQUELINE BISSET DON GORDON ROBERT DUVALL- SIMON OAKLAND NORMAN FELL
I
lor Ihr n hole Idmily! /

FOR SALE
**
3&B9W l liMftWW9WWftMWo6ft | flfl | MdflM4iai?.:*
Allstate motorscooter, very good
condition, excellent transportation.
SBO.OO 378-8496. (A-3t-62-p)
1967 Honda S9O only 2400 miles.
Excellent condition, best offer over
S2OO, 376-6983, 1128 NW 4 Ave.
(A-3t-62-p)
Wollensak tape recorder 2 and 4
track extra equipment, SBO or best
offer. Call Ted 376-3514. (A-2t-62-p)
Quick sale! Honda 50 2 years old,
step threw frame, helmet included.
Price SIOO. Call 372-7550
(A-st-54-p)
DONT merely brighten your carpets.
. Blue Lustre them . eliminate
rapid resoiling. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-63-lt-c)
1964 Lambretta 125. Tools and rear
seat. Never been outside the city
limits. $125 or thereabouts. Phone
376-1853. (A-2t-63-p)
Camera: Pemtax Spotmatic SLR
Built in meter F 1.4 with case, just
used once, cost S2BO, yours just
$220. Call Daniel at 376-8694
(A-3t-63-p)
FOR RENT
...............
Colonial Manor 1 bedroom corner
apt., furnished, panelled, air, pool,
next to campus. $l2O a month.
372-3003 after 5:30 or anytime
weekends. (B-3t-61-p)
One br. furnished apt. will sub-let
immediately SIOO. 378-216 2
(B-st-61-p)
Inexpensive, 2 man apt., 2 blocks
from campus 304 NW 15th St. Call
G. Joiner, 378-8122. ( -3t-62-p)

Page 12

\ The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17, 1969

| FOR RENT I
xx-xcccflw-x-xc'x-x-v.yxxx-x-xfrxvx*:-*
Must sublease 1 bdrm. apt.
immediately. Pool, air cond., deposit
and January paid. Call Terri
372-7343. (B-2t-63-p)
x-x-x-w: tressw-i x*xxvv:v.vx-fr
| WANTED 1
forasxs-xfrsww..vww i 1 ? 1 ? ? ww^siiwuw^
Coed needed for attractive apt. All
deposits paid. Contact Connie,
378-3184 or 376-7430. (C-3t-61-p)
to share large 3 bdr.
house with senior students. Fireplace
and cable tv. Quiet and very
comfortable. Call 378-1112 anytime.
(C-st-59-p)
Coed roommate wanted for French
Quarter apt. furnished one bdr. 67.50
per month, immediate occupancy.
Call Mary Jo 378-0359, Linda
378-9162. (C-st-62-p)
Female roommate for 2 bdrm. Fr.
Qtr. apt. for winter and spring and
possibly summer qtrs. Apt. no. 96,
Call 372-5246. (C-3t-62-p)
One sharp female roommate wanted.
Butler apts., Winter and Spring. Low
Rent. Prefer student over 21. Call
378-0609. (C-st-58-p)
Beautiful yr.-old cat desires home
until June. Friendly, litter-trained,
been spaded. Will pay for food &
litter if youll keep her! 378-8481
(C-lt-63-p)
HELP WANTED
Male student free after 6th period
need transportation. Drivers license
and English with little or no accent.
Drive elderly owner and his car in NE
section. Call 392-0353, 12 noon to
12:30 pm or 5:00 to 5:30 p.m.
(E-3t-61-p)

[ Downtown Gainesville |
FINAL 7 DAYS
| V 3 W- Unlvnlty Avr. |
' An adventure which spans the
whole history of the human race. A
voyage of discovery into the great
age of exploration opening for
i Ww v I
r w. 51 /]
fhl+ e h^!? ac^u y hlt is now a Hollywood howl
that bridges the generation gap with laughter!
m>*m r mt mgm PRESENTS
igp p ££l
W
Jp- 7ft m-A OZZIE NELSON CRISTINA FERRARE
| \ 3 RANAVISION "mbMETROCOiOR
77?/s /s one of the most powerful and
deeply moving motion pictures / have ever
Seen Harold Aldrich, Editor
the alligator
One of f/7e ten 6esf of f/7e /ear. /A
dramatic study of human courage.
Definitely worth seeing."
David Doucette, Managing Editor
TH E ALLIGATOR
. A stark portrayal of man's inhumanity to
man. Alan Bates' performance will make
, this an all-time classic." Norman Going, Editorial
Advisor THE ALLIGATOR
"The Fixer" Mkm/f
...based on theVAillfl
Pulitzer Prize-1fll 1
winning novel by
I Bernard Malamud^lg
MGM presents fp |
the John Franlcenheimer-1
Edward Lewis Production of J
thefixer A
.Alan Bates ll F** ] I : i
| Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman,
:wn Holm, David Warner, Carol White
|m] 5u.,.,a to, mature .d,.nc., I
L I (potntoi diK'tiion did, "JL-? r/et '.'/ A'/I MO f /



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I HELP WANTED j
Entertainers for Graham Area
Playboy club Feb. 1. Singers,
dancers, comedians, musicians, or
anyone who has talent. Call
392-8495. (E-st-61-p)
MEN AND WOMEN SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT CAMP
PINEWOOD for boys and girls,
Hendersonville, N.C. (June 17-Aug.
23) General Counselors needed to
live with and care for campers.
Specialty Counselors to teach
Boating, Canoeing, Sailing,
Swimming (WSI), Horseback Riding,
Skiing (be able to drive a boat), Arts
and Crafts, Archery, Riflery (NRA
Inst), Nature, Overnight Camping
(able to drive a truck), Tennis,
Dancing, Drama, Golf. Salary based
on age, education, abilities and
experience also includes room, board,
laundry and other extras. Apply for
applications to T.R. Robertson,
Camp Director, 1414 Felch Ave.,
Jax, Fla. 32207. (E-6t-59-c)
GRADUATING SENIOR WOMEN!
WANT IN WITH A GOING
CONCERN??? If you like people,
like to travel, and have a knowledge
of a foreign language, consider
becoming a stewardess with Pan
American World Airways. Stewardess
interviews will be held on campus on
Jan. 24, '69. For further information,
please contact your Placement
Office. Pan Am is an Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-lt-59-c)
COLLEGE MEN: Looking for
profitable summer job? Southwestern
Co. will hold interviews Monday, Jan.
20. Placement Planning Ctr. in Reitz
Union has details and sign-up sheets
for interviews. (E-2t-63-p)
Female subjects for speech
experiment. Must be native English
speaking, free of voice defects and in
the age group 30-39 or 50-59. $2.00.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway
Comm. Science Lab. 392-2049.
(E-10t-54-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session or $2.50 for IV2
hour session. Must be native English
speaking and have normal hearing.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway,
University 392-2049. (E-55-10t-c)
Need office equipment Salesman in
Gainesville. Call 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-c)
Cook wanted girl to cook lunch for
six law students 5 days a week. Must
have 4th and sth periods free. Salary
to be arranged. Call 80b,378-7748.
(E-2t-62-p)
Student over 21, part-time work 3
nights a week, meal included. Apply
in person at Woodys 3458 W. Univ.
Ave. between 3 5 p.m. (E-3t-62-p)
AUTOS |
Olds 98, 1962 Factory air, all power,
one owner, excellent! Light blue and
not a .scratch. Call Dr. Busby,
392-0724 or come see at 3812 SW 15
St. (G-st-59-p)
Have 2 surplus cars, 1962 Plymouth
V/8 5325. 1964 Cadillac 51750.
Call 372-9607 or 372-3251.
(G-ts-60-c)
1961 Valiant 4 door radio, heater,
excellent condition, only 38000
actual miles, ww tires, please phone
376-9968 or see at 710-109 SW 16th
Ave. (G-st-61-p)
1965 Datsun 4 dr. sedan, very clean,
radio, heater, 4 speed, low mileage.
Top speed 90 m.p.h., 25 m.p. gallon.
Call 372-8246, Lot 133 Mobileer.
(G-st-61-p)
"8 ON THE LAM I
I STARRING
BOB HOPE PHYLLIS DILLERI
| AT 7:07 IN COLOR B §
ALSO I
I "THE GOOD THE |
BAD AND THE UGLY!
I STARRING IN COLOR B I
CLINT EASTWOOD $

--- --- vn,-rTr.v.v.v.v.www>xw:; AUTOS |
1959 Ford, radio, heater, good
condition, $225. Call 372-6455
(G-st-61-p)
3 Sunbeam Alpine, tremendous
condition, new tires, only 39000
miles. Call 372-7971 after 5:30. Best
offer. (G-3t-63-p)
World respected Lotus Elan S-2 1600
1966. Loaded inverness green, black
o' 5 all for a PPOintment
3/6-4313. Private owner. (G-3t-63-p)
VW 62: radio, new speaker &
battery, 2 owners, 62,000 miles,
motor recently reconditioned, clean
interior, S6OO. 372-7215 before 5
P.m. (G-6t-63-p)
| PERSONAL I
$
Congratulations "Goody Two Shoes
Hope you have found the missing
shoe. Love 6/9/69. (J-lt-63-p)
Double elf: Oh wow, if you only
knew what the yellow flowers have
done. Merci mucho doesnt begin to
say it. Luv, the down one gotten up.
(J-2t-63-p)
Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs.
Jackson on the birth on their baby
birdlegs born Jan. 16, 1949. All my
love today, tomorrow and forever
Spacie. (J-lt-63-p)
Friday afternoon club for single
students, faculty & staff over 21.
Single's mixer Lampliter Lounge
private room. Cocktails doubles
45c, ladies drinks 2O c, no cover.
Action begins 4:30, Fri., Jan. 17,
drinks til 7:30. Bring friends. See
posters. (J-4t-60-p)
Independent study to find the 10
sexiest men on the UF campus. How
do you rate? Call 378-9898.
(J-3t-61-p)
I LOST & FOUND |
Lost Friday afternoon, a set of keys
in black plastic case near college
library Peabody Radio Road? If
found please call Sue, 376-9594.
(L-3t-61-p)
Purse stolen at research library
contained SIOO, identification,
glasses, etc. If found, at least return
glasses and identification. Call
Annette Morroni, 376-8514,
(L-st-63-p)
Ray Ban dark glasses prescription no
good to anyone. Please return.
Reward $lO. No questions. Charles
Wolff, 378-3372. (L-3t-59-p)
LOST: Navy blue trenchcoat with
keys in pocket. If found, contact
Hugh at 372-2749. No Questions
Asked. (L-3t-63-p)
LOST: BLACK LABRADOR
RETRIEVER NEAR VILLAGE
PARK APTS. CALL 378-8382.
REWARD. (L-2t-58-p)

REITZ UNION THEATRE
ffWffffl JLIIAM HUIDtN
PETER SELLERS UBSlll OWSJ
DAVID NIVEN WOODY ALLEN JJJIJ* ANO INTROOUCIMO I
FRIDAY JAN 17 JOANNA PETTET ORSON WELLES SESSUE HAYAKAWA JAMES DONALD AM DEARS GEOFFREY HORNE
rKIISMI >' OALIAH LAVI -1.- DEBORAH KERN n*Win T | cVll iv
A.nn p.qn 11.00 pm william holden Charles boyer DAVID LEAN pierre boulle mis novel TECHNICOLOR CINEMASCOPE I
6:00, 8:30, 11:00 IMVI. JEAN PAUL BELMONDO CATIIDHAV IAM lfl Qaa Ann OAAPM

I SERVICES
S s
tt:'X*xsx*v.v.v:>:>:-x-:*XX"X*x-x.x*:>v.v.*. , :*;v
Figures, graphs, etc. For theses,
dissertations, publications.
Professional graphic artist. Nancy
McClelland, 378-4260. (M-st-60-p)
T
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,
prices from $250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-13t-61-C)
German tutor needed? Call 372-4713
after 6:00 p.m. (M-2t-62-p)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST for
quality repairs, call 376-0710.
(M-7t-63-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
~ I
For A Happier
New Year 7^7
mvon £\\
BIRTH / 7/
D&Ecrs

PRESENTED BY
THE UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES
subscription program)
9 ADMISSION 50c
$5.00 for quarter
P \ 1 \ 11 &hi
Vbyaibscription
SUNDAY, JAN. 19 BSP
REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM

SERVICES
:Jx*:*::xxx.v.sv;s*>;:-i:4ex.vx-;*::x-:^sxS
GERMAN lessons and/or turoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-st-59-p)
Now theres an Avon representative
on campus to bring you qaulity
products for men and women at low
prices. Contact Linda, 392-9357.
(M-st-62-p)
ft
rS-1.4
* 1 HOPELESSLY FUNNY.'I
INA MELA IS DELECTABLE!"
'Jj&Ehi o STYLE, ANd'aRARBED
J9 EkL VIEWPOINT!'
fftPl'- FRESH,
M ; HEADY AND
HHjjiyr INVIGORATING!
JF FUNNY AND
1 flr PROFOUND!

Friday, January 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

S G General Audiences
| M Mature Audiences
I (Parent's Discretion) I
I R Restricted (under 16 must be I
I ccompanied by adult guardian or I
I parent) §
I Under 16 not admitted. I
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
MAIN FEATURE AT 7:00 8 10:25
"MINI- SKIRT MOB
STARRING JEREMY SLATE M
|

Page 13



Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17, 1969

| Greek |
[ Jjeios I
By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writer
KAPPA DELTA
It looks like another great
quarter for the Kappa Deltas.
KD Missy Jones was a finalist in
the Gator Bowl Queen Contest,
and Becki Hucks is the Billy
Mitchell Drill Team Sweetheart.
Pattie Merk is new president of
the Delt Little Sisters.
Two KDs have been chosen
for pledge class sweethearts:
Nancy .Wityak, Sigma Nu; and
Chris McDowell, Sigma Phi
Epsilon. Jean Dziadul is on the
Pi Kappa Alpha pledge class
sweetheart court.
New little sisters are Mary
McWhirter, Delta Sigma Phi; and
Mary Vickers and Missy Jones,
Kappa Sigma. Bonnie Campbell
and Kitty Koepka have been
chosen for Florida Cicerones.
Congratulations to Kirk
Brown, Sigma Chi, who is our
KD Man of the Year.
PHI KAPPA TAU
The Phi Tau formal pledging
banquet was held Sunday as 21
new pledges took the oath of
pledgeship. Brother Bill Ryals, a
prominent Gainesville attorney,
spoke on the benefits of
fraternity life.
Brother Keith Ryan has been
named Voice of the
Rathskeller.
PI KAPPA PHI
This past quarter the men of
Pi Kappa Phi dedicated their
fraternity house to Dr. James
Martine Pearce in recognition of
his 44 years of service to Alpha
Epsilon Chapter.
The Pi Kapps initiated 15
new Little Sisters of the Star and
Lamp.
The new officers for this
quarter are: Mike Hill, archon;
Dave Lottier, vice archon; Ron
DHaeseller, treasurer; Jim
Antista, secretary; Jim Harpel,
warden; Tom Mathews,
historian; and Bruce Pockey,
chaplain.
111 \ Xrj
rn Mm j jll
% RPTN
IfOUlE 8
GALLEY
THE FINEST
SEAFOOD & CHICKEN
TAKE-OUT ORDERS
A SPECIALTY
FXPERTS IN THE PREPARATION Os
SEAFOOD AND CHICKEN FOR OVER 10 N l ARC,
309 N.W. 13th STREET 231 N.W. 10th AVENUE
372-6311 372-3346
4 I

rWEEKENPOINGS I
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
FOLK-SINGING PRIEST: Father lan and Caroline, his wife,
appearing in Reitz Union Ballroom, Sunday 8 p.m., and at the Bent
Card Coffee House, Saturday, 10 pjn. to 11 p.m.
JOHN MARSHALL BAR ASSOCIATION LUNCHEON: Perry
Nichols, prominent Florida lawyer, speaker. Holiday Inn on 1-75,
today, 12:30 p.m.
MORMON STUDENT CENTER OPEN HOUSE: Mormon Student
Center and Church, 1220 SW sth Ave., Saturday, 4 p.m.
HILLEL FOUNDATION ONEGS: After services by Reform Rabbi
Stephen Jacobs of Temple Emanuel in Miami. Services on Friday
night at 7:30; Saturday 10 a.m. At Hillel Foundation.
CLUB MEETINGS
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST: Sigma Phi Epsilon House,
tonight, 9:15.
MENSA: Room 150 B of the Union, today, noon.
BADMINTON CLUB: Norman Gym, tonight, 7.
ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB: Room 150 C of the Union, today,
noon.
AFRO-AMERICAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Union room 347,
tonight, 7.
ATHENEAUM CLUB: Room M-504 of the Medical Center,
tonight, 8.
INDIA CLUB: Room 349 of the Union, Saturday, 7:30 p.m.

' l I
J? (S ** I

DANCING LESSONS
Begin Jan. 22nd
7:oopm 9:oopm
Union Ballrooms 245& 246
$8 Per Person
INST. Mrs. F. Kessler Cont. Proj. Comm.
|7!7T?TiTcm
m
McDonakfs is vour kind of place.
201 N.W. 13th St.
OMcOonMi Cerp



. y e.
BatfjsMler
Sr
Membership Information
_ 1
. I
There will be two categories that are eligible to
use the Rathskeller
- i
n
Category I This includes STUDENTS and non-instructional,
non-administration, non-research STAFF employees of the
University of Florida. A
This category will become associate members of the U.F. faculty
club for a membership fee of SI.OO per year (4 quarters). This
Associate membership in the faculty club entitles the holder to
use of the Rathskeller only.
Category II This is for FACULTY. Faculty become full members of the U.F.
faculty club and entitles them to all rights and privileges of the
faculty club, including the Rathskeller. Cost: $5.00 initiation fee
SIO.OO yearly dues.
**"-
- <
# ... -*

Student and staff membership cards go on sale at 8:00 a.m. this morning (Friday, January 17). Membership cards also on sale at
the door during grand opening weekend, starting tonight at 7:30 . Don't forget, first 200 people can get the preview dinner
and show reservations at the Rathskeller door this morning.
U. of F. Faculty Club. 100.

Friday, January 17, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17. 1969

FOR SUMMER ABROAD

Study-Tours Planned

By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
Explore the Roman ruins. Lose yourself in the
Louvre. Conquer the Alps. Swing on Carnaby
Street. Mingle with matadors in Madrid. Drink saki
in the Orient and receive three to six semester hours
of college credit.
American International Academy (AIA) has
opened a branch on the UF campus in conjunction
with the Union Board and is now accepting student
applications for summer studies in room 310 in the
Reitz Union.
The Union is offering nine combinations of tour
arrangements through Europe, the Middle East, Asia
and North Africa open to both students, teachers
and administrators.
The six week study programs cost between $720
and SBBO and include air transportation to and from
the desired tour area, reserved accomodations at
universities and hotels, meals, lectures, on site
studies and selected social events.
AIA and Union Board representatives are
sponsoring a meeting of interested travelers Jan. 30
at 7:30 p.m. in the Union auditorium, second floor.
A film of an AIA tour will be shown and questions
answered by AIA representatives.
The following tours are being offered:

jr Hr
g&
UNION BOARD OFFERS INTERNATIONAL SUMMER TOURS
. . applications are now being accepted for summer studies.

Center Offers
Free Computer
Instruction
Computer courses are being
held at the computing Center
beinning this week. These
non-credit courses are free and
open to the public.
Courses covering the
FORTRAN IV, COBOL, and
PL/1 computers are being
offered.
The FORTRAN IV course will
be held on Wednesday nights,
7-9 p.m., the COBOL course will
meet on Monday nights, 7-9
p.m. and the PL/1 course will
meet on Tuesday and Thursday
afternoons, 4-5 p.m.
All classes will be held in Bless
Auditorium, 133 Williamson
Hall. COBOL classes will be held
in Room 2, McCarty Hall.
For more information,
contact Frank Towers at
392-2061.
FIGHT BH7TH DEFECTS ...JOIN
the MARCH OF DIMES !!

Before or after the ball game
Make your first stop at McDonalds. Whether you have
a party of two, four, or twenty, we can serve you in a
few seconds each. McDonalds Hamburgers are made
of 100% beef, government inspected and ground fresh
daily. Theyre served piping hot and delicious on a
toasted bun. Come in today... youll get fast, cheerful
courteous service... plenty of parking and the tastiest
food in town at extra thrifty prices.
McDonakfs is vour kind of place.
o*>cOonM Cw 1i
201 N.W. 13th St

CLASSICAL EUROPE: S 800: includes Rome.
Florence, Venice. Montreux. Paris and London.
SOVIET STUDIES: S 880: includes Stockholm.
Helsinki, Leningrad, Novgorod. Kalinin. Moscow.
Minck, Warsaw, Cracow, Vienna, munich.
GOTHIC EUROPE: $800: includes Stockholm.
Copenhagen, Berlin. Prague, Vienna. Salsburg,
Munich.
§ BRITISH ISLES: $800; includes Shannon,
Galway, Dublin, Edinburgh, Liverpool,
Stratford-on-Avon, Oxford, London.
CASTILIAN: $800; includes Lisbon, Seville,
Tangier, Malaga, Granada, Valencia, Barcelona,
Madrid, Burgos, San Sebastion, Lourdes, Paris,
London,
t ARGONAUT: $880; Rome, Olympia, Sparta,
Tripolis, Corinth, Athens, Delphi, Nicosia, Tel Aviv,
Bersheba, Jerusalem, Nazareth, Haifa, Istanbul,
Munich, Paris, London.
i ORIENT: $880; Honolulu, Tokyo, Nagoya,
Kyoto, Osake, Nara, Honolulu (optional to Hong
Kong and Formosa).
FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CIVILIZATION
SEMINAR: $730; Paris, Tours, Lyon, Lausanne,
Munich.
GERMAN LANGUAGE AND CIVILIZATION
SEMINAR: $720; Rome, Vienna, Dresden, Berlin,
Salzburg, Munich.

_- T UTs representatives: I
1 Mel Ward J' m Bartlett I
c iCf Dan Sapp Bill Worsham
Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
George Corl Harold DeVane
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave. 1
I *NO WAR CLAUSE I
I PAYMENTS J
Climb aboard
/The S.S. Winnjammer
V- Luncheons served from 11 .00 AM. w\
'* Dinners to 12:00 P.M. if
f f|
* 41
\ Bernie Sher at the Organ .A
" \ ft
Thursday, Friday & Saturday '
Oysters & Clams on the half shell Jm
Michelob on draft w.
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty f \
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. (\*
Reservations accepted
| | '* r Harry M. Lanton, Manager Vm/
Sundays
*
| AS ADVERTISED ON TVT
INVENTORY
I RIOT
I SALE!
1 MUST MOVE PRESENT
I INVENTORY FOR NEW -MjMBWPR,
1 LINE NOW BEING
SHIPPED! T
a| EUROPEAN TEXTURED
1 HUMAN HAIII
WIGLETS
A CHOOSE FROM FLORIDA'S
LARGEST
1 HAIRGOODS DISPLAY
I FALLS *o
? Full C olor Range
!MS *l2"
? f'-AffS-WORLD
l CORNER W UNIVERSITY, 13th ST
( Acr oss ffomamadalnn)
1 GAINESVILLE c? *n 10-7
W ... Mlfn v.i;oc tairih i La/tcna t*
>js-- -- 'uipii



PFLIGION-IN-LIFE series

Folk Concert Planned
By Episcopal Priest

Father lan Mitchell and his
wife Carolyn will appear at UF
in a folk concert Sunday as
the First in a religion-in-life series
of functions scheduled during
the winter and spring quarters.
Father Mitchell is an
Episcopal priest and author of a
folk-rock mass he was
commissioned to rewrite to fit
the liturgy of the Roman
Catholic church. He and his wife
schedule appearances in
churches, schools and concert
halls to sing the music of faith in
the idiom of young people.
Their folk concert will take
place at 8 p.m. in the Reitz
Union Ballroom. Admission is
free to the concert sponsored by
the University Religious
Association.

UNION FILMS
COMMITTEE Fri.: Casino
Roy ale with Peter Seller,
Ursula Andress Andress & David
Niven at 6, 8:30 & 11. Sat.:
Bridge on the River Kwai with
William Holden & Jack Hawkins
at 3,6, &9.
CENTER I-Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: The Impossible Years
with David Niven & Ozzie
Nelson at 1, 2:40, 4:10, 6:06,
7:52 & 9:38.
CENTER 11-Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: The Fixer with Alan
Bates & Carol White at 2:18,
4:38, 6:58 & 9:18.
STATE Fri., & Sat.: The
Trial with Orson Wells &
Anthony Perkins at 3,5, 7:10 &
9:20. Sun.: The Crazy Quilt.
PLAZA I Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
Bullitt with Steve McQueen &
Robert Vaughn at 1:40, 3:40,
5:45, 7:45 & 9:50.
PLAZA II Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
Doctor Dolittle with Rex
Harrison as 1:35, 4, 6:30 &9.
FLORIDA -Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: 2001: A Space Odyssey
with Gary Lockwood at 2, 5 &
8.
GAINESVILLE
tjysver been sick
Vj a day in
fits life
That's the way it should be
Every child is entitled do a
healthy start in life, but there
are an estimated 250.000
American babies each year
who are deprived of that right
because of birth defects

FATHER IAN MITCHELL TO APPEAR SUNDAY
... with his wife Carolyn in Religion-in-Life series concert

at
the
flicks..

DRIVE-IN Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
8 on the Lam with Bob Hope
& Phyllis DillerW 7:07 & The
Good, the Bad arid the Ugly
with Clint Eastwood at 9:13.

i
OFF-DUTY ACTION
... brings Steve McQueen close to Jacqueline Bisset in "Bullitt"

"MED BARN ML MLWELCOMES
WELCOMES MLWELCOMES ALL U. OF FLA. JT
FIGHTING GAJORS AND
OFFERS this fine assortment of tasty food
to serve you n_
Big Barney4s< Chicn Fries-59<
Ha mburgers2o< Country Dinner 89C
Cheeseburgers2s< Barnfuil 9 pieces $2.09
Fish Filet Sandwich 3o< Bucket 15 pieces $3.59
French Fries-- 15< Barrel 21 pieces $4.89
Onion Rings-2s< Soft Drinks 10<-15<
Shakes 25<
STUDENTS IN PREVIOUS YEARS HAVE TRIED OUR FOOD AND LIKED IT ITWE
WE ITWE THINK YOU WILL TO. SOME OF OUR COMPETITION IS CLOSER
BUT- WE THINK YOULL BE MISSING OUT IF YOU DONT TRY US
N.W.l3th St. Across From Gainesville High School

SUBURBIA DRIVE-IN-
Fri., Sat. & Sun.: Fireball
Jungle at 7 & 10:25 &
Mini-Skirt Mob with Jeremy
Slate at 9.

Try-Outs Slated
At Little Theatre

The Gainesville Little Theater
will hold try-outs for its fourth
play of the season, "Absence of
a Cello, a situation comedy by
Ira Wallach, at 8 p.m., Sun. and
Mon.
Directed by Tom Godey, the
play will be presented on Feb.
27, 28, March 1, and March 6,7,
8. The cast calls for an elderly
woman, a middle-aged man and
wife, a slightly younger couple,
and a college student and his
gatoi^
ads
1 sell 1

TursNAi^mM^V
LONG HAIR STYLING I
APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
SIMS BARBER SHOP
L 817 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
CHARM CLASSES
Begin Jan. 23rd
8:06 pm 9:30 pm
$6.00 Per Person
Reitz Union Room 118
INST. Mrs. Foster & Mrs. M. Thompson
Continuing Projects Comm.
Pi Beta Phi Rush
OPEN HOUSE
2:00 to 5:00 pm
Room 121-3 Reitz Union
Friday January 17th
All interested Welcome

r- t --V 1069 The Florida Alligator,

girlfriend.
The last GLT production,
"The Little Foxes, was very
successful and contained UF
students in its cast.
The Little Theatre is located
at 403 1 ) NW lbth Boulevard.
BOWLING
SUNDAY
SPECIAL
35< per game
or 3 games SI.OO
ALL DAY
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17,1969

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Symphony
Orchestra is composed of
faculty, students and
townspeople performing
standard orchestral pieces in
concert both on-campus and off.
Spearheading this eighty
member organization is the
vibrand, personable conductor,
Mr. Edward Troupin.
A graduate of Harvard and the
University of Michigan, he
received his Bachelors degree in
THAT'S MOZART
... sounds like Sousa

&at!)gfeeUei*
32 Hour Endurance Contest Rules
BECAUSE OF THE TREMENDOUS RESPONSE TO THE ENDURANCE CONTEST
THE FOLLOWING RULES WILL BE IN EFFECT FOR THE CONTEST:
r v c :
1. The contest will be limited to 50 contestants, the first 50 that state a desire to enter.
2. Contestants will pick up contest application and rules as they enter the Rathskeller. The applications will be
numbered 1 to 50. This makes sure there is not a tie if more than one person stays the whole 32 hours. The lowest
numbered application wins in case of a tie. (Be the first if you are serious about this).
3. All who wish to enter the contest must bring an old sweatshirt, t-shirt, etc. to which a number can be stapled.
I
4. Contestants have to remain physically within the Rathskeller to be eligible. If you leave you are disqualified.
5. No sleeping, you must remain awake (not necessarily alert, but awake . and no pills, please). Sleep or pills
disqualify you.
6. The Rathskeller frauleins and MC will check contestants periodically to make sure you're who you say you are (no
team efforts, please).
7. Grand prize. A minimum of $25.00 plus bonus money for each hour over 25. I
8. Every new member is eligible to be one of the 50 contestants (we are an equal opportunity Rathskeller).
U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc. |
StatftfbeUer ~r(f

The Faces Os Music Troupin Style

EN GUARD
... prepare for battle
mathematics, but went into
music during graduate work
although music has always been
a part of his life.
A musician stays alive by
producing music himself, Mr.
Troupin says, so he manages to
practice on his bass fiddle a little
each day taking time out from
teaching violin, composition and
conducting for the music
department plus, of course, the
orchestra.
He took the reigns of the
orchestra in 1961 and, obviously

UF SYMPHONY CONDUCTOR

a man who enjoys his work, he is
full of talk about that
organization.
According to Mr. Troupin, the
orchestra needs to have more
student interest. Although it is
gratifying that the percentage of
students has increased from 35
per cent in 1960 to 60 per cent
in 1968, an all student orchestra
is still a goal.
The orchestra affords students
T
an opportunity to participate in
near-professional training and
performance. Also, an
Ol VAY
... one more time
4

TOUCHE

... I caught you
all-student organization would
make touring more feasible.
There is a new organization
now on campus called the
Sinfonietta -a chamber
orchestra of faculty members,
Mr. Troupin announced. They
j.ave already given one concert
and will be performing Feb. 2
and March 9. He will be
conducting the group.
Also, the third annual student
concerto program will be
sponsored this term. Students
will audition and the best of the

group play or sing solos with the
orchestra.
Reemphasizing always the
desire for more student
participation, Mr. Troupin is
obviously a man full of music. In
his own words: There just arent
enough hours in the day.
PHOTOS
BY
NICK
ARROYO
L
VHRSmBBBhmHHNhIIB^
MAZELTOV
... how sweet it is



LIKES SILENCE

Red Bearded Masten:
A 40-Year Old Hippie

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
A 40-year old hippie? With his
boots, cords, hells, beads,
gold-rimmed glasses, flowered
guitar case and wooly red beard,
Ric Masten definitely looked
like a middle-aged member of
the protest set. Bringing his
message in original folk-style
question songs, he sounded
like one too.
Masten performed for UF
students Tuesday night in a
nearly filled Reitz Union
Auditorium. His appearance was
sponsored by the Unitarian
Universalist Billings Lecture
Fund and the Unitarian
Fellowship of Gainesville.
Through songs and dialogue,
the thirst half of the program
explamed Mastens evolution
from a member of the
establishment to his present
status as a traveling folksinger.
Topics for his songs included
war, commercialism, hatred, civil
rights, and religious beliefs.
Dropping out was the theme

DAYS"
... says Ric Masten, middle-aged folksinger.
;~i
^i

HDOTRS I
j CAMERA SHOPS I
T for I
JOURNALISM |
& ART STUDENTS I
1232 W. UNIV. AVE. I
JL
376-7657 I

for one song, which advocated
Drop out, lay down your gun;
Drop out, turn on the sun; AH
you got to do is take a chance;
Drop out, release the dove: Drop
out, find peace and love; Theres
stiU time for you to do your
thing.
Doing his own thing, Masten
asked for silence during the
second half of the program,
encouraging the audience to
interpret his songs for itself. I
like silence, he said: and
quoted an African proverb, To
listen is to love.
Masten commented on a
number of cun-ent issues. White
is ugly these days, he said. He
condemned reverse racism and
said that it was wrong to be too
accomodating to a man just
because he is black. A
revolution, he claimed, is a
dangerous possibility, but it is
not inevitable.
Mans basic need is to be
noticed, according to Masten.
Put me in your human eye,
come taste the bitter tears that I

cry, were the words to one
song.
Communication was another
topic, with the lyrics If youre
hung in the words, in the nouns
and the verbs; then youve never
heard what he said.
Although Mastens voice
sounded somewhat strained due
to his strenuous schedule while
on tour, his message was
well-received by most of the
audience.
A number of students came to
the front of the auditorium to
question him following the
program. He was at UF
Wednesday to talk to students
and attended a luncheon in the
Union before leaving for
JacksonviUe to continue his
tour.
HO LY
TRI NITY
SUNDAYS
8*9:3011
ALL KINDS OF
PEOPLE APE
WELCOME
X 116 HE IST
EPISCOPAL
/Am\ church

|| SKY DIVING
ij So high up when they jump that they will y WM
[i light torches to help you spot them, \
| jumpers Bill Both, Harold Stewart, Jack jmL w /Q
J Kabot, and Bob Adkins will attempt to ai^£
i form the difficult "Four Man Star, while JUi ~
! falling almost two miles, at speeds in
| excess of 120 miles per hour. Their target
will be to land at the starting line just
i before Elimination Racing Begins.
'Chevy Rebellion
l "CHEVY REBELLION" will also be at
; SHSjgS GAINESVILLE DRAGWAY. "Chevy
I VyT Rebellion" is a Dodge pickup powered by
J/& a FUEL-NITRO-BURNING Chevy
Engine. It is the Southern Wheel Standing
H Champion, having beaten such
/JRf competition as the "Little Wagon,
/kT* the "L.A. Dart, and many others. Driver
/nA Richard Hutchins is one of nine wheel
standing drivers chosen by NHRA to be
\ issued and unlimited Funny Car license.
He will make two runs of a full
i quarter-mile each, on the rear wheels
! only, with TOP SPEED IN EXCESS OF
| 130 MILES PER HOUR.
I PLUS A FULL SCHEDULE OF DRAG RACING, INCLUDING RAILS.
GEN ADM $2.00
| PRACTICE & TRIALS 11:00 -1:30. ELIMINATIONS 2 P.M.
GAINESVILLE DRAGWAY P.O. 1646 Gainesville, Florida 32601
| Phone: 904 378-0046 Three and one-half miles north of the Municipal Airport
' on State Road 225.

PAINTING FOR FUN
Lessons in water color
using Oriental Technique
4 V
Beginning Jan. 21st
7:3opm 9:3opm
$6.00 Per Person
Reitz Union Room C-4
INST. Mrs. Sung Coni. Projects Comm.
Dont Miss:
The
Magnificent Men
and their
Flying Machinee
Sat. Jan. 18th
7:30 pm & 11:00 pm
Hume Area Re c. Room
Hume Area Cards FREE
UF Student & Faculty donations 50<

Friday, January 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17, 1969

Gators Offer Big Package

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Name your sport this
weekend in and around campus
and the Gator spectator will be
right in the thick of the national
spotlight.
Beginning Saturday morning
at 11, Track Coach Jimmy
Carnes performers, a handful ot
whom are currently rated No. 1
in their respective events, will
put on an hour-long show at
the UF track.
For Deaf Prepster
Proceeds from the event will
go towards sending Gainesvilles
Johnnie Lee Samuels to
Yugoslavia this summer to
participate in the Deaf
Olympics. Samuels represents
the United States in the shot
put.
It will also be Jack Bacheler
appreciation day. Bacheler,
Americas Olympic
representative, will run a special
three-mile race in an attempt for
the fastest time ever in the
South. He will have a special
pace man each lap of the way.
High jumper Ron Jourdan,
who has suffered from the
removal of an impacted wisdom
tooth all week, will definitely
jump seven foot or better, says
Cames.
Half miler Bob Lang will go
after the school record also.
Sorority and fraternity relays
will kick off the program with
an open Joggers Mile for all
amateurs other than track
members also slated.
Swimmers Go For Third
Coach Bill Harlans
highly-touted tankers will match
waves, splashes and muscles with
arch-rival Florida State at the
UF Pool at 2.
Trying to preserve a flawless
3o dual meet record this

HOUSE OF TRAVEL I
INC. I
I complete travel services I
I credit cards accepted ] \ I
specializing in cruises / 1 H
representing all major ) / / 5
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I no service charge //jA. / j
DIAL. I "Mm
I 1378-160) I wH E TRAVEL I I
I OPEN DAILY- 3415 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
I 8:30 A.M.- 5:30P.M. GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
I SATURDAY WESTSIDE I
I 9AJA.-NOON SHOPPING CENTER j I

The
Florida
Alligator
season, the Gator swimmers
should find formidable
opposition in the Seminoles,
who themselves beat Georgia last
week by nearly the same margin
the Gators did.
Nevertheless, the UFs meet
with Georgia was cut short by a
power failure at the Gators
antiquated swimming hole which
may have had something to do
with the comparable margins.
Sophomores Mark McKee and
Bruce Williams have led the team
early with strong performances
in their specialties. Since the UF
has dropped the Seminoles from
its basketball schedule, the swim
meet provides the main winter
revival of the heated rivalry
between the two schools.
BJC Ranks Nationally
The evenings entertainment
will open at 5:30 when the Baby
Gators basketballers, coached by
Jim McCachren and last years
varsity captain David Miller,
square off against the 15th
ranked junior college cage team
in the country Brevard Junior
College of Cocoa.
Sparked by a first team high
school All-America (Scholastic
Magazines), Brevard brings an
111 record into Gainesville.
Guard Harold Fox (22 points
per game) at 6-foot-l is a player
that state college recruiters say
could play for anybody.
Brevard will also revolve
around a 7-foot center,
Pembrooke Burrows (13 points

per game) who also is considered
a good college prospect.
The Baby Gators are sporting
a hot-cold 4-3 record and will
take their 6-10 center Gary
Waddell into the ring against
Pembrooke and company at
Florida Gym at 5:30.
Big Bad Furman
In four games with Furman
(of Greenville, S.C.), the Gator
varsity through the years has
won only one of four contests.
The last meeting vetween the
two schools (Furmans
enrollment is 1,950) was in 1931
when the Paladins nosed the
Gators 5121.
The two teams first played,
however, in 1921, with the UF
coming out on top 3725. But
that was the season the Gators
lost to the Macon YMCA
(correct me if Im wrong. So it
will be hard to predict the
outcome of tonights
rendezvous.
Furmans strongest point will
be the fact that all five starters
started last season. Their
weakness: lack of height. They
play a zone defense.
Dick Eslecek, a 6-1 guard
leads the club in scoring with a
20 point average.
The Gators are fresh from a
costly weekend road trip and
consecutive losses to Kentucky
and Tennessee who face each
other this Saturday in the big
SEC action.
Jets, Joe, and Jax
On Sunday, north Florida
football fans will be treated to a
look at World Champion New
York Jets quarterback Joe
Namath at Jacksonvilles
American Football League
All-Star game beginning at 2.
UF students will be admitted
for only $1 by presenting their
student identification cards at
the Gator Bowl ticket office.

H ADS SELL!! Q
tal o^ C hange\
Our Line? $
T C
o
BEGINNING BRIDGE
LESSONS
Begin Jan. 20th
7:3opm-9:oopm
Reitz Union Room 118
$7.50 Per Person
INST. Mr. Schonau Cont. Proj.Comm.
it
. WMMMMNHNMIIMMMMHBBMMMeMMBBMB
. i Efl
k 1 only
Youll like Jarmans
new interpretation of the 1
traditional saddle shoe. J
Notable for comfort and ftifMjml
longevity, with smart style w[§\
accents. We invite you to \ \/\
come saddle up, in comfort Vs j
and style. T \\
TflnTTlitcheM
1127 W. University Ave.
f
. ' . '' ' ... . '
4



SUGGESTS Rflrffr FOR GIPI <;
Girl Jockey Gives Up

MIAMI (UPI) Barbara Jo
Rubin, the teenager in pigtails
bumped off her horse by
Tropical Parks professional
jockeys, is giving up her efforts
to ride against men.
The 19-year-old brunette will
try instead to get Hialeah
Racetrack to put on occasional
races for girls.
Im not talking about a
powder puff derby where the
girls dont wear silks and there
are no weight conditions and no
betting, she said Thursday. I
mean a regular betting race. Im
sure there would be enough girls
qualified for it.
Barbara, a soft-spoken south
Florida girl, had her silks on and
was ready to ride in the fourth
race at Tropical Park Wednesday
when suddenly the male jockeys
balked. When they refused to
come out for the third race,
Barbaras boss trainer Bryan
Webb agreed to take her off
her mount.
The same sort of thing
happened to "Penny Ann Early at
Churchhill Downs last fall.
Georgia Grid?
ATLANTA (UPI) Speaking
to a meeting of football
rulemakers, Gov. Lester Maddox
last week compared the United
States to a giant gridiron where
American and Communist teams
battle for victory.
NEED ZIPPY
RESULTS?
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

PARK LANE'S SPECIALS
DINNER ONLY
Mon. . Grilled Liver & Sauteed Onions 62d
Toes. Fried Chicken & Potato Pancakes 62d
Wed. Roast Turkey over dressing 62d
Thurs. Veal Cutlet Parmigians 62d
Fri. Deep Ocean Fried Perch
Tangy Tartar Sauce with French
Fries 62d
SATURDAY NITE IS STEAK
NIGHT AT PARK LANE
Sizzling Charbroiled
Mammoth Size Juicy & Tender Club
Steak & French Fries SI.OO
U.S. Choice Roumanian Steak t
With a tint of garlic and French Fries. SI.OO
l' choice Half-Pound Chopped
Sirloin Steak 50 77T 77TSUNDAY
SUNDAY 77TSUNDAY Fresh Georgia Oven Baked
ALL Chicken & Yellow Rice 62d
DAY
eR 10%
'with I.D.
mpnm M£* THROUGHOUT
rERIAS FLORIDA
111:30 AM 2:00 Pld
1 4:30 PM 8:00 PM |
'
E SHOPPING CENTER
I. MAIN ST.

Angry officials of the Florida
State Racing Commission
immediately ordered an
investigation. Chairman L. B.
Walker instructed Tropical
Steward Eb Pons to question the
jockeys involved in the apparent
boycott and report back to the
commission.
While the stewards Thursday
were questioning about a dozen
jockeys, Barbara was back at her
old duties at Barn 11, exercising
horses and cleaning tack for
Webb.
Webb also had been forced to
take Barbara off Bold Point,
which was a 5-2 favorite in
Thursdays eighth race.
Barbara said she didnt think
the male jockeys would object
to the kind of girl races she is
proposing.
I think theyd be all for it,
she said.
Two other girls are also set to
try for a Florida jockeys license.
They are Iris Coppinger and
Diann Cmmp, who is under
contract to Don Devine.
Barbara said her thwarted
opportunity to become the
nations first female jockey was
awfully disappointing.
But Id be happy if theyd
put on some races just for girls,
she said. I just want a chance to
SKY DIVERS*
Wheel-Standing
'CHEVY-Rebellion'
SUN. JAN. 19th
GAINESVILLE
DRAGWAY

ride. I think if we girls get to
ride against each other, it will
pave the way for us getting
mounts against men.
He m
Your Gonorafor \
# OVERHAULED Soecial
ISASO f
INCLMOt
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
' SOS NW sti AVC. GAINESVILLE
MON. FKI. S AM-7EM SAT. TIL S Ml
371-4011

OF GAINESVILLE
Our Semi Annual
'
Stocktaking
Clearance
Starting Monday
JANUARY 20 AT 9..30 A.M.
Save 1/4 1/3 1/2 & More
This is a store wide clearance sale,
when Wilsons cleans house of odd
lots, broken sizes & color ranges and
manufacturer discontinued styles,
so shop early while selections are
good. /
SHOP
Wilsons
of Gainesville
. r~ e
- <'*. " .'*
MONDAY-SATURDAY 9:30 AM. 9 PM.

ALIBI LOUNGE |
FOR YOUR LISTENING 1
PLEASURE I
RICHARD PARKER |
and the 1
WITNESSES I
334 W. Univ. Ave. |

Friday, January 17,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

Th# Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17,1969

Skirting The Issues

Attention campus coeds! This is Beth Graves
your liason from the world of basketball to you, the
interested but possibly ignorant Gator girls. This is a
proposition, a tipoff into the goals of the basketball
world for you girls that are hard pressed for a fast
break. Why not turn over a new ball and astound
the male population with your widom of the game.
Basically you must understand that all physical
contact is kept off the floor and in the stands.
Generally speacking a round ball is used and the
object is to swish, insert, place and/or stuff it
through the wire rim on the backboard at your end
of the court.
Working our way through the terminology, one
should be aware that the tip-off puts the ball into
play at the beginning of each half. If by any chance
you notice that there is not an excess of walking
around with the ball, you have stumbled onto a
major violation, called traveling, which rewards the
ball to the opposite team.
Not only in the stands, but on the court you will
find good date material. To prevent a technical foul
from being called, the players must practice
sportsmanlike conduct. This could carry over from
the floor to a date, but, then again a Florida man
never did need an introduction. Speaking of fouls,
those committed intentionally, or in the act of
shooting, result in two shots, for the other team
that is. All others such as charging, tripping,
pushing, shoving, kicking, or slapping call for only
one shot.
Traveling on into the more technical aspects of
the game one finds terms such as one and one,
freeze, double-dribble, palming the ball,
zone, and catch-up ball. If the total team folds
reach seven in either half one and one goes into
.effect, meaning not that three is a crowd but that
the player is awarded two foul shots if the first is
good.
Towards the latter part of a close game, the
Gators may attempt to slow the pace down,
J
d*
|

Doug sanders Top Gator Pro

Although he won no major
tournaments in 1968, Doug
Sanders continues as the all-time
leading money winner among
University of Florida golfers on
the pro tour.
Gator graduates on the
golfing tour, the largest group in
the country with 10, have now
earned $2,059,322.09 through
the 1968 season, these figures
compiled by Bob Lynch,
Director of Division of
Information Services at Florida.
Sanders has won $618,626.20
in his 12 years on the tour. He is
followed by Dan Sikes with
$392,982.28, Frank Beard with
$376,805.60, Tommy Aaron
with $303,170.13, Dave Ragan
$201,797.97, Bob Murphy
$ 105,948.99, Laurie Hammer
$27,493.41, Pat Schwab

RfurnOverA New Ball

FAST BREAK

$ 19,524.60, A1 Kelley
$8,060.62 and Don Bisplinghoff
$4,912.29.
It is interesting to note that
Murphy, the Rookie of the Year
in professional golf in 1968 won
all his money this past year, a
record earning for a first-year
professional golfer.
Rozelle Hires
G-Man
Pete Rozelle, commissioner of
professional footballs National
Football League, has selected
John J. (Jack) Danahy as his
security officer for the coming
year. <
Danahy is a former special
agent with the Federal Bureau of
Investigation.

i
X
@
TIP OFF
working the ball down for the sure shot. With a
substantial lead, this action may result in a freeze of
the ball with the hope of entertaining fouls from the
opposition and controlling the game. <
Now if you look at the game as a whole, you may
observe various patterns, plays rotation cycles, or in
short, strategy. On defense you may recognize that
the Gators sometime organize underneath the
basket. Into greater detail, ther may be a 1-3-1
formation, with each man sagging in under the
basket (for off-side rebound), or going out after the
ball according to the position of the ball defending
his zone. If you notice that the opposing players
are checking each other out and following each
other around, calm down, it is only a man-to-man
defense.
Man-to-man defense has its place in catch-up
ball with little time left. The defense pressures the
opponent for the ball then wastes no time *n getting
the ball to its end of the court for a shot.
Now that your minds are oriented to this
fascinating sport you need only the strategy to get
in. Hearsay has it that tickets to the next home
game are still available on the first come- first serve
basis.
Those of you who are interested in ego-building,
Saturday night is your chance. Upon returning
rome from a frustrating road trip (basketball, not
ratemity), the Varsity and Frosh are out and ready
or a change. They displayed that ambition Monday
light against Tennessee but a home court should
everse the ending for the Furman chapter. The
reshmen take on Brevard Junior College at 5:30,
ind the varsity faces Furman at 7:45 Saturday
night.
To date, Dean Cosby has not issued a ruling that
girls must be accompanied by a male escort to these
events, and more than likely it will be a profitable
experience. In case you have never been to Frolics,
its a great way to see Florida Gym. Single males
have been sighted by the throngs (according to the
campus police). Translated: opportunity knocks.

?Beth Graves

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend I
10%
DISCOUNT I
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL I
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS) I
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs I
Jus. Show Your ID Card To Our Serv.ce Manager I
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET I
S*. Phone 376-7581 J

Baby Seminoles Hot
TALLAHASSEE-Florida States undefeated freshman team looks
for its seventh win of the year Saturday when the Baby Seminoles
meet a team from the Albany Navy base in a preliminary to the Tribe
varsity clash with Tulane.
The freshmen are paced by 6-6 forward Rowland Garrett who is
averaging 22.2 points a game and rebounding at a 19.2 grabs per
contest clip.
The Canton, Miss, native is one of four Seminoles in double figures.
Behind him are Roy Glover (14.5), Don Bowles (12.2), and Ron
Harris (12.0).
/ SALESSERVICERENTALS
"Authorized
' Y Smith Corina
Dealer"
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Office Equipment
LIST DAY
FRIDAY, JAN. 17th
for SENIOR & GREEKS to have
pictures taken for the SEMINOLE...
1:00 to 5:00 &00 pm to MO pm
ROOM 346 REITZ UNION
A NEW TASTE TREAT
hlot soft
PRETZELS
sold only at the
Dipper Dans at
Westgate Shopping Center
Fri. 7-10 p.m.SAT. & SUN. 2-10p.m.



Bowling Swings Into Action

The rich get richer and the
poor get poorer; and so it went
in Orange League bowling
Wednesday afternoon.
Beta Theta Hi and TEP,
already leading the rest of the
league by 80 points, expanded
that lead to 100 points with
victories over third place Phi
Delt and Delta Tau Delta
respectively.
t The TEPs rolled the days
highest ten game set in a
1718-1603 roll over the Delts.
The Betas edged Phi Delt by
1558-1505.
Pi Lam, led by the 224 point
performance of Mike Segal
registered the highest 5 game set
with a 932 and the second
highest 10 game set in a
1710-1653 win over ATO. Mike
Maloney of the ATOs bowled

JBI a..

The San Francisco State Student Senate controls
funds for many student activities, among them
football. Well, believe it or not the Senate voted not
to fund the 1968-69 football team.
State had the No. 1 small college team in the
country two years before.
As it is with all good administrations they
reversed the no-funds policy of the student s.
Amazingly enough there wasnt any student
rebellion that time.
* *
UFs department of Dairy Science, supplier of all
dairy products used in Food Service on campus, has
dedicated its milk packages to Neal Walk.
Last quarter the milk packages were dedicated to
Larry Smith, honoring him for his outstanding
football career.
The department plans to honor new athletic
heroes as they develop on campus.
** s
The Tennessee Vols have won the last five
Southeastern Conference Indoor track titles, the last
five outdoor titles and the last four cross country
titles. You might say that the Vols have created a
dynasty.
The Gators will challenge this supremacy with
track stars like John Morton, Ron Coleman, Ron
Jourdan, Bob Lang, Mike Flanagan and Jack Nason.
* *
The SEC doesnt put any limit on the length of
football spring practice. Tennessee, it seems, is
putting a little too much emphasis on this sport,
their spring practice is scheduled for five weeks.
The Gators practice for 20 days, but then our
athletes are scholars, too.
* *
The Gator mermen have won the last 13 SEC
titles in a row. Consequently, everyone is after the
Gators.

n Tnimirm ifi 1
P^W' TCKFECTIQKI
PJI- it's trom I
I 35^0S^W. 13th street SBSXETS
Camesville, Florid* PIZZA PARLOR I
I 372-3389 anA PuMicfi^cJ
HMM| S

Football Funds Denied

BETAS, TEPS LEAD LEAGUE

MIKE SEGAL
... Pi Lam's high bowler

By Mark Dunn;

One of the SEC schools released the following:
The SEC race will be a dogfight this year with
UF having the edge due to experience in their
seniors.
All this with an outdoor pool.
* *
Letters in football went to 48 members of the
varsity team at UF this year. Included in the list
were 20 seniors, the largest group ever. Along with
them were 18 juniors and 10 sophomores.
1968 Gator football lettermen:
g: s ||
ft Ends George Dean (Sr.), Mike ft
ft: ft Healy (Sr.), Gene Peek (Sr.), Jim ft; ft
v ft Yarbrough (Sr.), Paul Maliska (Jr.), ft ft;
ft |v Britt Skrivanek (Jr.), Bob Coleman .ft ;ft
& : : : : (Soph.), Jack Youngblood (Soph.), .ft .ft
ft: : : : Tackles Bill Dorsey (Sr.), Ed fcj ft
ft # Foster (Sr.), Terry Morris (Sr.), ft ft
ft ft Lloyd Turman (Sr.), Skip Amelung ft ft
v (Jr.), Wayne Griffith (Jr.), Jim ft ft
a ft Hadley (Jr.), Robbie Rebol (Jr.), Jim ft ft
$ ft Kiley (Soph.). . ft ft
ft ft Guards Guy Dennis (Sr.), Gary ft
ft ft Duven (Sr.), Mac Steen (Jr.). ft ft
ft ft; Centers Linebackers David ;ft ft;
ft % Barnhart (Sr.), Bernie Byers (Sr.), ft ft
£ Steve Ely (Sr.), David Mann (Sr.),
ft ft Tom Abdelnour (Jr.), David V
ft ft Ghesquiere (Jr.), Kim Helton (Jr.), ft ft;
ft ft Mike Kelley (Soph.), Brad Powell.;. ft
ft ft; (Soph.), Donnie Williams (Soph.). ft. ft
:! ft; Quarterbacks Harold Peacock ft. ft;
ft ft (Sr.), Larry Rentz (Sr.), Jack Eckdahl ft ft:
ft $ Halfbacks Tom Christian (Sr.), ft ft
;ft ft Bill Gaisford (Sr.), Bill Mcride (Sr.), ft ft:
ft ft Don Gramling (Jr.), Guy McThenyft. ft
ft ft: (Jr.), Steve Tannen (Jr.), John Faixft. ft
ft ft (Soph.), Ted Hager (Soph.), Garry g j ; j;
$ ft Walker (Soph.). ft; ft
ft Safety -Skip Albury (Jr.), Mark.... ....
ft $ Ely (Jr.), Jack Bums (Soph.). ft
ft ft: Fullbacks Larry Smith (Sr.), ft. ft
ft ft Brian Hipp (Jr.), Jerry VinesettX
$ ft (Soph.). ft #
ft ft ft ft:

the days highest game, 266, and
the highest two game set with a
415.
Kappa Sigs Lane Spain
bowled a 215 to lead his kegglers
to a 1625-1581 win over SAE
despite a 204 game for the Es
Daryl McKinney.
In the big upset of the day,
last years champs Lambda Chi
Alpha took a beating from AEPi
1543-1409. The 1409 was the
lowest score of the day. In other
action Sigma Chi topped KA,
1649-1434, Pi Kappa Phi
squeaked by SPE 1512-1501,
and PiKA struck another blow
to Sigma Nus dwindling hope
for a repeat of the Presidents
Cup with a 1650-1498
trouncing.
Tuesday TEP will face SX, Pi
Lam is against Pi Kappa Phi,

Beta must duel the PIKES and
AEPi will face Kappa Sig. The
tournament is single elimination
with 40 points going to each
team that enters, 20 for each
victory and 120 points to the
victor.
jg|g3
vt&, v V.V
LARRY SMITH
... ATO bowler

APPLICATIONS FOR THE
"MISS SEMINOLE CONTEST
MAY BE PICKED UP
IN ROOM 337
OF REITZ UNION
MON. THRU FRI.
9f 'V
2 to 5 pm
I Utah is the Center of I
I MORMON CULTURE I
> r i 1 BH
I Accordingly, did you know that: I
I . .Utah has the highest percentage of males and females 8
I in school among all of the states? Why? I
I . .Utah ranks first in the nation in the number of I
I graduates from colleges and universities? Why? I
I . .Utah ranks first, percentagewise, in the nation as the ?
state most productive of scientists? Why?
I . .Os the 471 largest companies in the U.S. more,
percentagewise, of their presidents were born in Utah than
I in any other state? Why? I
HE 4 HE
o. gg|
- iiii
1 To learn more about the above facts and the I
I philosophy surrounding them, you don't have to fl
I go to Utah. Just attend our OPEN HOUSE, Sat., I
Jan. 18, anytime between 4 p.m. and 10 p.m., at I
fl the L.D.S. Institute of Religion (Mormon Hall) I
I across the street just north of Norman Hall, at 1
I 12205. W. sth Ave. 1

Friday, January 17, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

| JOIN thus. 1
iMARCHqfDIMBj
fl thank
_iV you:
@ DELICIOUS
STEAKS
FINE FOOD
student prices
Breakfast served
daily.
1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

Page 23



Page 24, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17, 1969 jjj Theres i
SWING OVER TO- I/j one c Sr
II I -F rW a
Arby s m |a
JP I "lirr fK)
. iHi'i IPLAYER of the WEEKI
, I Theres one in every crowd who didnt
I get his yearbook. Theres one in every
1 crowd who wants a yearbook. The
' "r t tfH I I Seminole has a limited number of 1968
I ? I Seminoles f ()r sa c n R orn 330 in the
1405 SW 13th Street I
___ I I The Florida Alligator extends a hearty
>A W 1< I I welcome to the Rathskeller on its
II 1/ \ IjMJ I D 4\% I grand opening tonight. This
* am. a I |\ 01l JOU UQ II I establishment is a fine addition to the
NATIONALLY KNOWN I I University community and we wish
you the best of luck.
All lA# PATH FR ATC I This wee^s Alligator Player of the Week resulted in a
111 tlx IW virtual dead-heat with high jumper Ron Jourdan edging past
.... | golfer Steve Melnyk for the honor.
iwith zip-out Liner;
Jourdan, the Pensacola junior, jumped 7-0 twice in indoor I
| meets last week to establish himself as perhaps the finest
Jj&X ~.. I collegiate high jumper in the nation this year.
I another to his list by capturing the Senior Bowl tourney while 4 Ti jxtl Al IA V
' I fading the NCAA champion Gators to the team crown by a Ss| |TI CL £ IIP!
:jr>M I whopping 35 strokes over their closest competition. ArV W j
£"411 | Jourdan won the honor due to the national importance of
I S e^orts He went 7-0 to take the Northeastern Louisiana
Ink* I Indoor, then repeated the effort against the finest high 1
ij I jumpers in the country to capture the Washington, D.C. I
; : ll % I A jump like that indoors and this early is a good sign," A
l\ a y. I says Gator track coach Jimmy Carnes. "It is a sign Ron might
Jf- s i I \ I be able to do 7-2 or 7-3 later this spring outdoors." w
/ | I I This sort of mark should make Jourdan a strong candidate / \
35.00 to 65.00 .. y
MDKH>l>i # j 207. j T_xy4-^
A Jf .GOLF JACKETS. .REDUCED 20% \ r Tjf /
Substantial Savings on | L -lIG |
W. Florida
# d mo " r J HU RY SAIE | AIH o.q ~
l open Friday Till 9:00 PM /:j il C>tL( ) I
225 W UNIV AVE FREE PARKING IN REAR \

Page 24

The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17, 1969