Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 62

Attorneys
To Debate
For Accent
Three nationally renowned
attorneys will air their views on
civil disobedience in a panel
discussion at the closing session
of the Accent Symposium week,
Feb. 3-8.
Attorneys Willaim Kunstler,
Melvin Belli and Tobias Simon
are to present the panel
discussion, Civil Disobedience
and Due Process, at the Reitz
Union Ballroom Feb. 8.
Kunstler, a civil rights
attorney, has counseled Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr., Rap
Brown, Jack Ruby, Adam
Clayton Powell, the Freedom
Riders and the Black Panthers.
He is a noted author and
contributor to the nations
leading periodicals. Since he
obtained his Law degree from
Columbia University in 1949,
Kunstler has been associate
professor of law at New York
Law School.
Belli was chief legal counsel
for Jack Ruby, assassin of Lee
Harvey Oswald. He is a senior
partner of Belli, Ashe and Gerry
law firm in San Francisco.
He has been conductor of
Belli Seminars in Law since 1951
and is president of Belli
Foundation Lectures since 1960.
Some of Bellis books include
Modern Trials and Modern
damages, Life and Law in
Russia, Ready for the
Plaintiff and Dallas Justice.
Tobias Simon, past general
counsel for the Florida Civil
Liberties Union, won the
landmark Supreme Court case,
Gideon v. Wainwright, which
extended the right to counsel to
state judicial prodedures.
Simon was past secretary and
member of the Florida Advisory
Committee to the United States
Commission on Civil Rights and
is currently a member of the
United States Supreme Court
Bar and Florida Bar.
Kunstler, Belli, and Simon
boost the total number of
Accent speakers to 10, said
General Chairman Larry Berrin.
Berrin said that the
announcement of the remaining
speakers wjjf assure the public
that the Symposium will be an
overwhelming success.
Speakers already announced
include U.S. Senators Strom
Thurmond and Wayne Morse;
Professor Jean Houston Director
of the Foundation for Mind
Research in New York City;
John Finalator, associate
director of the Federal Bureau
of Narcotics and Dangerous
Drugs; and Anson Mount, public
affairs manager of Playboy
Enterprises.
Julian Bond, leader of the
insurgent Georgia delegation to
the Democratic National
Convention; and Louis Harris,
one of Americas leading
analysts of public opinion, have
also accepted invitations to
speak in ACCENT 69.

The
Florida Alligator

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University of Florida, Gainesville

FIVE ALREADY IMPLEMENTED

Task Forces Finish
With 21 Proposals

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
The action taken on Action
Conference proposals and
probable upcoming
recommendations i* reviewed
by conference members
Wednesday.
Most of the 21 proposals have
been referred to university
committees either for study or
implemenatation. Five have been
put into effect.
They were:
The proposal that the
Alligator refuse advertising space
to apartment owners who do not
sign open housing statements.
The resolution on freedom
of student publications which
culminated in adoption of new
policies for the Board of Student
Publications.
The proposal for
publication of Directory of
Helping Services.
The proposal for study on
housing policies for black

Union May Try
Check Service

By ANNETTE VAN DAM
Alligator Staff Writer
A proposed year-round check
cashing service is under
investigation by the Reitz Union
Policy Committee.
At the Union Board of
Managers meeting Tuesday
afternoon, Union Director
William Rion proposed a seven
day 8 a.m. 11 p.m. cashing
system, with a $5 minimum and
S2O maximum on all checks
cashed.
Further provisions included
identification procedures and
limiting negotiability to first
party checks.
Due to the capital involved
between SIO,OOO and $15,000
an initial system of weekends
only was discussed.
Program Council President
Robert White, summing up the
main objection to the weekend
idea, said, This would eliminate
the purpose of serving the
students need.
Us Business Manager Tom
Wells pointed out, however, that
during the week the Hub,
Servomation, area banks and
food stores provide adequate
facilities.
Both channels are being
investigated.
In further discussion of union
facilities, it appeared evident
that prospects are dim for
utilization of the Reitz Union
rqof for recreational activities.
In answer to a letter from
Rion concerning the feasibility
of such a project, architect Jack
Moore noted that the union roof
was capable t of supporting a

students. The Director of
Housing, Harold Riker, reported
that the housing office does not
have a policy of placing Negro
students in single or double
rooms alone if not requested to
do so by the students.
The proposal asking for the
creation of the Office of
Coordinator of Minorities and
Disadvantaged Students. A
presidential Committee on
Disadvantaged Students has been
created and a faculty member
will be appointed to act as
coordinator on a part-time basis.
Other proposals are in various
stages of study and
implementation. One calling for
a pass-fail system of grading has
cleared the Council of Deans
with only minor revisions and is
slated to go before the Faculty
Senate at its next meeting.
A voluntary class attendance
proposal was approved by the
Council of Deans and sent to the
Committee on Academic

maximum load of 25 pounds per
square foot, thus minimizing any
large group activity.
(SEE CHECKS', PAGE 2)

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INTEGRATION
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Who says black and white can't get together? These flying ducks
roosting over the Reitz Union pond are colorblind or in love.

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Thursday, January 16, 1969

Regulations.
Several recommendations are
before the Council of Deans for
study. They include a statement
of the universitys proper goals,
possible revamping of the
quarter system, and annual
evaluation of all faculty
members.
Other proposals dealing with
advisement and counseling are
before the Board for
Development of Counseling and
Academic Advisement.
Changes in orientation
programs have been sent to Vice
President for Academic Affairs
Frederick Conner. An Ad Hoc
committee to coordinate
orientation programs has been
created.
Task Forces also reported
plans now under study, or which
will be considered in the future.
The Curriculum Task Force is
now studying a questionnaire for
students to get more data on
present reactions to the
curriculum.
A proposal to spread general
education out over a four year
span, and one to give credit for
Physical Education courses are
also being studied.
The Task Force for Minimum
Conduct Expectations has
prepared a plan for revised
judicial structure for students on
campus.



The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16, 1969

Page 2

Automobile Use Laws Not Enforced

Campus, City, County
Police Ignore Rules

By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
Campus, city and county
police are not enforcing a
University ruling limiting
automobile use by UF freshmen
and sophomores in Alachua
County, says UF Police Chief
A.I. Shuler.
The present ruling, based on a
state statute and authorized by
the Board of Regents, allows
lUC and 2UC students under 21
to drive a UF registered car in
Alachua County only from 3
p.m. Friday to 7 a.m. Monday.
They may not borrow an
automobile not registered on
campus and it is illegal for these
students to drive any automobile
in the county during weekdays.
Exceptions include those who
have reached their twenty-first
birthday, those who are
disabled, live within a
commuting distance from
campus or are married and those
living with their families in
Gainesville.
The only enforcement is by
University police, Shuler said in
an interview Wednesday.
My men enforce it on
campus, but not in the county.
To my knowledge the city and
county authorities dont enforce
it dither.
Both Gainesville Police and
the Highway Patrol verified
Shulers statement.
Gainesville Chief of Police
William Joiner has never been
approached by University police
to enforce 'the selective ruling
denying county driving privileges
to certain underclassmen and
wouldnt enforce it if he was.
It is not a violation of city
ordinance or state law, he said.
No, we dont enforce it.
We dont refer to anyone we
stop as a student (of any
classification) but as a driver,
said H.M. Cross of the Highway
Patrol. We dont enforce it
either.
All we require is someone
have the proper drivers license
and is obeying the law, he said.
Restrictions on who can
maintain and operate
automobiles on campus and in
Alachua County were first
passed in 1956 and have since
been revised.
In the beginning restrictions
were made because of lack of
parking space not only on
campus, but in the county on
land adjacent to the university,
said Chief Shuler.
It was also felt, Shuler said,
the lack of automobiles among
freshmen and sophomores would
decrease the number t>f
dropouts.
I dont think the academic
point has ever been proven, he
added.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
_times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Arnold Butt, chairman of the
parking and transportation
committee, was not familiar
with the ruling concerning
underclassmen driving
off-campus in the county.
He said Wednesday he didnt
believe the ruling was meant to
say these students couldnt drive
in the county.
Local Pregnant
Teacher's Fate
Sill Undecided
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The fate of Mrs. Barbara
Finlayson, Littlewood
Elementary School teacher who
was told she would have to
resign because she is two months
pregnant, is still a mystery.
Following an hour 'long
confrontation at a health center
auditorium Wednesday night
between a school board policy
committee and a concerned
group of parents and citizens,
officials said the decision would
be made Jan. 23, three days
after Mrs. Finlayson is due to ~
leave.
The policy committee
meeting was attended by a group
of three physicians, two lawyers,
a minister and a clinical
psychologist and was
coordinated by Robert E.
Furlong, a UF law professor
whose son, Ricky, is in Mrs.
Finlaysons second grade class.
At one point during the
meeting tensions almost
exploded when school board
administrative assistant Tommy
Tomlinson stood to give absence
figures for other pregnant
teachers in the school system.
Tomlinson listed the absences
for the 20 teachers saying Os
course we dont have
comparable figures for the other
950 teachers in the system.
As he sat down he was hissed
and booed by his listeners, but
the disturbance quickly died
down.
The highest number of
absences was 15 for one teacher.
Tomlinson said Mrs. Finlaysons
absences were not excessive.
Enneking noted that Mrs.
Finlayson, whose husband,
Gordon, is a fourth year UF
medical student, knew when she
signed her contract that a school
board policy set down last July
stated that teachers who become
pregnant during the year must
leave.
Enneking said the committee
will make its recommendations
to the school board at its
meeting Jan. 23.

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IN CONCERT
Ric Masten, a California poet and songwriter, pre nted a folk
concert of "question songs" Tuesday night at the J. Wayne Reitz
Union. He is on a tour sponsored by the Unitarian Universalist Billings
Lecture Fund and the Unitarian Fellowship of Gainesville.

Union Check Cashing

fl FROM PAGE ONE J
It had been hoped that the
roof could be used for dances,
minature golf, shuffleboard or
an area for sunbathing.
The Union Space Committee,
headed by Robert Buck, will
work in conjunction with Marvin
Sylvest, Charles Dorman and Jim
Absent
g ft
Senators
| These Sen-oes a. no, |
v answer roll call at Tuesday :j:
nights Student Senate
| meeting: Jeffery Bayman, j:
>: Donna Betts, Marshall j:
|:j Constantino, Jan Dyro, Mike
$ Hill, Sam Hudman, Kipp £
$ Johnson, Skip Kedney, Arch :
Maldonado, Kathy Wallman, :j:
Bob Marshall, Jim McGrady, ;j:
& Mike McNemey, Jim Moigan, £
jjj Wally OKon, Joe Still, Pat jji
Tuck, and Bemie Barton.
V V
v
W.V.WV.VAVAVAWWK*KWK.:<.;

r w J
The Members of Panhellenic Council
cordially invite you
to participate in
*
winter rush
which formally begins on
Saturday, January 18, 1969
-sv V V
Sign up in Room 315 JWRU
through Friday

Money, three SG representatives,
to further investigate the
project.
In other action, the board
decided to maintain the union
parking facility as an
unrestricted lot.
To eliminate students using
the lots all while they go to
classes, it was suggested that a
full time attendant be hired to
control possible abuse. The
budget committee will present a
possible solution at the next
meeting.
Whites recommendations for
this quarters Program Council
chairme nships was also
approved.
The appointments are Steve
Allen, dance committee; Chris
Horrigan, films; Ted Remley,
fine arts; Austin Forman,
forums; Cathy Corrigan, hostess;
Carolyn Cole, Gator Growl; Jim
Stanfield, public relations; Dan
Ponce, recreation; Sherri Cox,
special projects and Randy
Green, continuing projects.

Conduct Group!
Discussed At
Senate Meet
The groundwork for a special
all-student conduct committee
was laid at Tuesday nights
Student Senate meeting.
The resolution endorsed the
principal of an all-student
conduct committee, but the
main body of the resolution was
thrown back to committee in
order to revise the whole code of
membership in one fell
swoop, said Senator Clyde
Ellis.
In a move to hopefully
pressure UF President Stephen
C. O'Connell to accept the final
proposal, recommendation of 22
university committees were
tabled until the resolution is in
full form.
The committee
recommendations involve
nominations to committees such
as curriculum financial aid and
teacher evaluation which are
presently unrepresented by
students.
The recommendations were
also the subject of another bill
required, that committee
reccommendations be made with
i three weeks after vacancies
exist.
This act would prevent a long
delay in appointments and
student-represented committees.
Several other resolutions were
passed: The Rathskellar
committee was praised for its
outstanding work in
strengthening communications
between students, faculty and
administrators.
Arts and Sciences was
commended for its inspiring
efforts on behalf of the students
in initiating welcome changes.
It was praised for setting an
example for the entire
University by realizing the
necessity of these changes.
Petitioning of class changes
was also asked to be revised
allowing students to drop classes
within the fifth week of classes
without having to petition.
JACKIE ONASSIS
UKES
GREEKS



Lower Inflation Rate
Forseen By UF Profs

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
A lower rate of inflation is
seen for the new year by three
UF economic professors, Drs.
Richard E. French, David
Geithman, and Joseph M. Perry.
In consumer terms, this
means the cost of living will not
rise nearly as fast as in the past
year, French said.
All three believe continuation
of the surtax charge requested
by President Lyndon B.
Johnson, is the best policy to
follow at this time to curb
inflation.
Geithman, however, would
not approve of the surtax charge
if it is used only for inflation
and not to expand anti-poverty
programs.
He sees a reduction in
consumer spending as well as in
corporate profits, during the
first half of the year at least.
This is due to the decrease of
household savings because
families have not lowered their
expenditures in the face of the
highest interest rates in
history and the surtax. They
have reached into their savings
instead, he said.

Intercourse 9 Reborn
In New Rathskeller
**

By WILLIAM MARDEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Intercourse is back!
The program which brought
students and such figures as UF
President OConnell and
Representative Ralph Turlington
to the Plaza of the Americas has
been reborn in the Rathskeller.
According to program head
Mick Callahan, all students and
faculty and interested persons
are welcome to come and ask
questions or voice their opinions
to OConnel, Dean H. H. Sisler
of the College of Arts and
Sciences and Head Registrar
Richard H. Whitehead.
. Dean Sisler speaks at the
Rathskeller on Jan. 28. at noon,
with OConnell speaking Feb. 5.
Intercourse will meet at noon
on scheduled dates, with the
Miami Rabbi
Speaks Tonight
Rabbi Steven Jacobs will give
a sermon tonight at 7:30
entitled, The Heart Is A Lonely
Hunter at the Hillel
Foundation.
Jacobs, Assistant Rabbi from
Temple Israel of Greater Miami,
will have lunch with UF students
from Temple Israel Saturday at
the foundation.
Jacobs is a member of the
Committee of Clergy and
Laymen Concern for Vietnam
and Clergy Concern on Drugs.
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANI IMPORTS
SAL ES-SER VICE*
REPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Unlv. Aw. 372-4373

Once this cushion of savings
we are working on is used up, it
will reflect on expenditures.
What will happen in the latter
part of the year hinges on the
administrations appraisal of the
situation, Geithman said.
If the administration decides
to allow more government
spending and perhaps abolish the
surcharge, the rate of economic
growth will likely pick up
again, he said.
Dr. Joseph M. Perry said a
change in business attitudes
toward investment and a
slackening in parts of economy
were partly why the rate of
growth was not as high as
before.
We need newer measures to
fight inflation in its early stages
such as more discretionary and
selective authority to the
Federal Reserve Board and the
executive office, French said.
But I dont think we will get
them under Nixon. The
traditional Republican policies
of restriction of money supply,
government spending, and an
increase in interests rates, will
remain, he said.

Rathskeller open for
refreshments.
Callahan stressed that
students can talk about anything
with the administrators.
He plans to have most of the
Deans of the Colleges attend
Intercourse meetings within the
next two weeks. Whitehead has
agreed to discuss problems of
studnts registration and plans for
its improvement.
Plans call for the Rathskeller
to feature local and state
politicians.
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Examine themes such as "Protest
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Access to excellent library.
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Live in CUERNAVACA
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Request catalog from
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These policies will restrict
economic growth and help
stabilize the cost of living for the
middle class, but they will do so
at the expense of the lower
income group, he emphasized.
,
Both Geithman and French
sees a slight rise in
unemployment.
The possibility of an end to
the Vietnam comflict could
affect the economy by raising
optomism.
The defense budget is halting
progress of projects back home,
Perry said.
But Geithman contends that
even if the Vietnam conflict
ended tomorrow, defense
expenditures would not start
falling for a year or so at least.

(f G a t r Bait"
With a complete
JSSSk iHiSk Outfit from
// \ \ Harlow Pants! |
|| \\ Ruffle & Satin j
111710 S.W. 13th SIJ
| W Across from |
j University Inn |

Esalen Founder Opens
Personality Conference
By KATHY KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Michael Murphy, founder and director of Esalen Institute, Big Sur,
Calif., will be the first speaker for the opening of the ninth
annual Conference on Personality Theory and Counseling Practice
today.
The theme of the conference, sponsored through the College of
Educations department of personnel services, is The Growth
Groups: Encounter, Marathon, Sensitivity, and T.
Murphy speaks at 8:20 p.m. on The Growth Center
Phenomenon. He will address the conference again at 11 a.m. Friday.
Dr. Robert Carkhuff, director of human relations and community
affairs at the American International College, is another featured
speaker.
He will speak Friday night on The Influence of Leader Level of
Function on Group Processes and again Saturday morning on
Critical Perspectives on Group Processes.
All sessions of the conference were to be held in the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center Auditorium but were moved to the University
Aduitorium in order to handle the large turnout expected.
About 600 persons have already registered for the conference.

Thursday, January 16,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16, 1969

I YOUR TREASURE MAP 1
to
g| / .
fun and entertainment
H ' r v yl v,,
s
I I #
I ~
I RATHSKELLER GRAND OPENING tomorrow night h|
I 7:30 P.M.



Cave-Divers Find A Dream World

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
(Second In A Two Part Series)
Because the five county area
around Gainesville abounds with
underwater caverns, cave diving
is a popular sport.
Statistics show that of
Floridas more than 350
submerged cave, 80 per cent lie
in this area. Coincidentally 31 of
the 65 cave drownings in Florida
since 1960 have occured in
Alachua, Columbia, Gilchrist,
Levy and Suwannee counties.
Seven have been UF students.
But cave diving is not all dry
statistics about the seemingly
high proportion of drownings.
Most divers dont drown. Or
come anywhere close to. They
just dive-and they live to tell
about it.
But telling about the thrills is
just half the fun. The best part is
the diving.
Dave Desautels, inhalation
therapist at the health center
and a member of Alachua
County Sheriffs Department
Underwater Rescue Unit, is an
expert scuba diver and a veteran
cave specialist. He has recovered
about 11 drowned divers. Most
of the 50 drowning casulties the
unit since 1960 has recovered
have been cave divers.
Desautels knows the dangers.
But he knows the thrills also.
Almost any weekend will find
him out diving. His rationale? He
explains in a diving publication
article:
Far from the gustle and
bustle of the surface world, the
cave diver has his own intimate
world underwater. It is a world
of eternal darkness, where no
light has ever penetrated, except
for he divers light. Back in this
darkness are found unusual
animal life: the Typhlichtys
subterraneus, an eyeless, albino
cave fish; the Orconectes
pedducdus, an eyeless albino
crayfish with twice the life span
of sits surface cousin; and the
amazing Palaemonetes
summingi, a shrimp with a
completely taransparent shell
revealing his insides.
Beneath the surface of what
appears to be a small puddle
there may exist deep penetrating
tunnels, concealing prehistoric
discoveries. For a person with a
flare and an urge to see what is
beyond the next bend, these
caves hold a never ending
opportunity for exploration and
discovery.
-However, cave diving is for
only the experienced and
careful. Divers who drown
though they may have been
experienced, have usually been
careless. Investigation of a

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drowning usually reveals that a
diver has violated basis rules. He
probably has become
overconfident.
Desautels lists seven pieces of
gear a diver must carry along
with his normal scuba
equipment:
0 A sturdy safety line which
can easily reeled and unreeled
and tied to the caves entrance.
A dependable light of at
least 40,000 candle power.
0 An extra safety light.

El H
I

I m
I .jl

IN A WORLD OF HIS OWN
... a lone cave diver far from the hustle and bustle

A set of double air tanks of
at least 72 cubic feet each. Never
depend on your reserve in cave
diving.
A dependable, waterproof
watch. Time down in the cave is
highly important.
i An accurate, reliable depth
guage.
And a waterproof
decompression table in case dive
plans are altered underwater.
Most diving is done in excess of
80 feet.
In addition, Desautels, and
Jim Hollis, SEG, also a member
of the rescue unit-10 for the 12
members on the unit are UF
students, staff or faculty- stress
the importance of taking along a
buddy when cave diving. Diving
alone is asking for trouble, they
say.
Underwater caves
predominate in the Gainesville
areas sinkholes. But diving in
sinks means watching out for
heavy layers of silt covering their
bottoms. The diver must shy
away from the bottom in a

strange sink for fear of raising
this fine muck which can
obscure vision quickly. If this
happens a divers only road to
safety is his lifeline stretched
along his pathway in.
Although cave drownings take
the lead in the area, hunters and
fisherman run a close
second. Next come open water
diving deaths.
From 1960 through 1967
there have been 55 open water
drownings in the state. Os the
estimated 350 drownings each
year in the state most are

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swimmers, hunters and
fishermen. The last two usually
wear heavy gear and
cumbersome boots. When their
boats flounder or overturn they
usually, in their panic, forget to
take off their boots and heavy
gear. So, they drown in the
strong currents or choppy water.
Hollis cites a case where a
fisherman overturned his boat
tied up only a few feet from
shore. But because he was
hampered by heavy gear, he

Pi Beta Phi Rush
OPEN HOUSE
2:00 to 5:00 pm
Room 121-3 Reitz Union
Friday January 17th
All interested Welcome
QUESTION??!!
Why did over 100,000 people convert to the
Mormon Church in 1968?
Why did the membership of the Gainesville
L.D.S. Church triple in the last 10 years?
Why is the membership of the Mormon Church
increasing at almost three times the growth rate
of the population of the U.S.?
What is the reason for this
rv y -W*
astounding growth of one of
Americas own religions?
Find out by attending the
OPEN HOUSE at the L.D.S.
Student Center and Church,
1220 SW sth Ave., Saturday,
Jan. 18, anytime between 4
p.m. and 10 p.m.

Thursday, January 16,1969, The Florida Alligator,

wore out quickly and couldnt
make it.
It took only 15 minutes to
pull a victim from the Suwannee
River last Saturday night. The
scene was bleak, rainy and cold,
40 degrees. The man had been
cutting swamp cabbage. He
drowned 200 yards from
Fowlers bluff landing. Hollis
says the man might have made it
after his boat capsized on a
floating log. When Hossis pulled
him up, his hunting boots were
still on.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator. Thursday, January 16, 1969

WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN EXPANDING THE
DEFINITION OF
WELL-BUILT: Narciso G.
Menocal, instructor in the Dept,
of Architecture, does that
tonight at 8 in the Latin
American Colloquium Room of
the College Library when he
speaks on 17th Century
Architecture in the Carribean.
IN FILMS ON THOSE
UNWASHED HIPPIES WHO
WANT ALL THOSE THINGS
THE COMMUNISTS DO
LIKE PEACE: Tonight at 8 in
room 118 of the Reitz Union
the Young Americans for
Freedom will show a film about
anti-Vietnam War
demonstrations. The film is
entitled While Brave Men Die
(on both sides?),,
IN PETE ON TED: Professor
Peter Lisca speaks on The
Poetry of Theodore Roethke
today in rooms 122 and 123 of
the Union at 4:40 p.m.
IN WAR AND PEACE:
Scabbard and Blade has a rush
smoker in room 109 of the
ROTC Building tonight at 6:30.
Sarah Adams of the Peace
Corps will speak to the United
Nations Association in room
1038 of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts
tonight at 7:30 p.m.
AND SPEAKING OF
AFRICA: The African Study
Center meets in room 349 of
Union tonight at 7:30.
IN GREEK-LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Sigma Tau Sigma
meets in room 150 C of the
Union tonight at 8:30 p.m.
Profs Wife
Homemaker
Os The Year
Joann Carroll, wife of UF
associate professor of Nuclear
Engineering Science, Edward E.
Carroll, has been named
Homemaker of the Year by
Fifthly Circle magazine.
Mrs. Carroll, who told the
Alligator she entered the contest
because she feels homemaking
can be fun, said she was not one
of those sorry people who feel
like they are serving time until
their children grow up.
The Carrolls have three
children: Cindy, 9; Megan, 4;
and Ned,3. They have been
married 10 years.
On oui first anniversary we
had a bottle of chanpagne left
over from our honeymoon, the
top layer of our wedding cake
that had been frozen (she
admitted it was a little stale) and
a six-week-old baby, she
laughed.
Mrs. Carroll, who received her
B.A. in drama from Chestnut
Hills College in Pennsylvania,
works with the Gainesville
Childrens Little Theater and is a
Girl Scout troop leader. She also
numbers sailing, art, ceramics,
sewing, and partying among her
free-time hobbies.
Family Circle magazine, a
Coles publication, will carry a
story on UFs national
Homemaker of the Year in their
February issue which goes on
sale this week.

DROPOUTS t __ BY HQWA^ D POST
yJ(I I-' 4|i#

FLAG To Form
Alachua Chapter

A state-wide organization
committed to establishing
programs within the states
educational system for
intellectually and creatively
gifted children, is forming an
Alachua County Chapter.
Ethiopian Gets
First Negro Ph.D.
The first Negro student to
earn a PhD at the UF graduated
last quarter. Faye Bezuneh, from
Ethiopia, deceived his doctorate
in botany.
He has joined the faculty of
the Haile Sellassie University in
Ethiopia.
Bezuneh earned his masters
degree in horticulture at the
University of Hawaii in 1963,
under a grant from the Agency
of International Development.
While studying for his PhD at
UF, he was supported by the
Rockefeller Foundation.
'll.l 'v"'',
Wf k
FAYE BEZUNEH
first Negro PhD
ARISTOTLE WAS
A
GREEK

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Florida Association for the
Gifted, FLAG will hold an
informal luncheon get-together,
Saturday, Jan. 18, from noon
to 1 p.m. in the Reitz Union
cafeteria. An open meeting of
the state executive board will
follow in Room 357. All
interested parties are invited to
attend.
FLAG members include UFs
professor Dr. Myron
Cunningham professor of
education, parents, teachers,
professors, students, and other
educators.
The special session of the
Florida legislature allocated
funds for exceptional education.
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Dont Mess With Dirk

By LINDA MIKLOWITZ
Alligator Staff Writer
Dont pick any fights with
Dirk Mosig.
In fact, you better not get
into disagreements with his
pupils either, many of whom are
UF students and teachers.
Mosig, a graduate student in
psychology, who owns a third
degree black belt, has begun
courses at his karate school again
this quarter.
He teaches sparring, kata and
breaking to beginners Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday from 6
to 7:30 p.m. Sparring is
exchanging blows with a partner,
driving at full force but stopping
before hitting the opponent.
In kata one follows a pattern
of movements to fight six to
eight imaginary opponents. The
41 katas range in degrees of
complexity. A black belt holder
must know about 20 of them.
Breaking, Mosig explains, is
not an important part of karate.
It only builds the students self
confidence since he cannot hit
oTh-Crs without serious
consequences.
Mosig teaches his students to
use karate only when their lives
are endangered.
If someone slaps you across
the face, walk away, he
lectures. He asserts that karate
has cured many a bully. They
no longer feel it necessary to
prove themselves.
A beginner starts with a white
belt and spends about three
months working for his first
degree, the yellow belt.
Cost is S2O per month or SSO
for three months. Gradually the
student progresses to the blue,

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green, purple, brown, and ten
degrees of black belts. The tenth
black belt takes about 35 years
to earn. Mosig has studied for
eight years.
Many girls and women take
the course. Mosig speaks proudly
of many of his star pupils. One,
a 13-year-old girl, recently won
the International Womens
Karate Championship.
Mosig believes a karate course
is the best self-defense course a
woman can take since she gets to
practice on men.
Mosig teaches his students the
best of four styles of karate. In
this way they are prepared for
all types of opponents at
tournaments. The four schools
are Shorin from Okinawa, Shorei
also from Okinawa, Tang Soo
Do from Korea, and
Kyokushinkai.

APPLICATIONS FOR THE
"MISS SEMINOLE CONTEST
MAY BE PICKED UP
IN ROOM 337
OF REITZ UNION
MON. THRU FRI.
2 to 5 pm

Thursday, January 16, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Karate developed in China
and Buddhist priests taught it to
the Okinawans who modified it
and used it to resist the
Japanese.
Young men about to be
drafted have come to Mosig for
instruction since the Army does
not provide adequate training
and karate is not known bv the
Vietnamese.
Mosig explains there are
definite distinctions between
karate, judo, and jujitsu. Judo is
unbalancing the opponent or
throwing him and then pinning
him down. Karate is an exchange
of blows designed to kill or
paralyze and the art of blocking
those blows with all parts of the
body.
The judo chop,is a
misnomer, he says. It is actually
a karate chop.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16, 1969

The Florida Alligator
*Th price of freedom
* ** x rc * of rMponsibfirty."
r Dave Doucette
rftGftltfjlM/ Managing Editor
At Raul Ramirez James Cook
yiIKMICM Executive Editor News Editor

Thank You
I would like to become sentimental and try to
show my appreciation for what the people of the
UF have done concerning my municipal court trial
Tuesday. I am absolutely certain that the results
would have been quite different, if not for the
undampered courage of the persons at the
University to strive for justice.
To be specific, l would like to thank the student
body for signing petitions demanding the University
drop charges against me; to thank the College of
Arts and Sciences faculty for their condemnation of
the Administrations action; to thank the Alligator
editor and staff, most specifically Janie Gould,
David Osier, and Harold Aldrich for their many
articles and editorials in support of j istice, not
selective law enforcement, on this campus; to thank
the College of Business Administration for its
disapproval of the Administrations actions; to
thank immensely SSOC for its sundry petitions and
demonstrations in support of me; to thank the
many student leaders who stood up for justice in
the matter, including Clyde Ellis, Gary Goodrich,
and many others; to thank the University Report in
its strong stand in support of me; to thank the
ACLU and Bob Shetterly for backing my case
financially; and to thank the few hundred people
who came to the trial in support of me and sat
through all of the games with very good composure
(considering.)
Although nothing was resolved by the verdict due
to the situations causing the acquittal, it is a
consolation to know the UF faculty and students
will not allow injustice to run rampant on this
campus, even if they do not agree with the views of
the person or persons involved.
Thank you! LA VON GENTRY

Times Up

What Am I Doing Here?

Has anyone ever given any
thought as to when they first
thought of going to college and
why? Interesting thought, why
am I in college?
For me the main reason is
probably because I knew of
nothing else to do. My
experiences were limited, but
enough to know that I didnt
want to go into the Army. Since
I had been in diapers, family,
friends, and affluent society had
drilled into me that if you were
anything at all you went to
college and became a doctor,
lawyer, or any of assorted other
society-sustaining roles.
So off I went to college.
Maybe I still didnt know what I
wanted To be, but that was all
right because there I'd have
plenty of time to decide.

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices ir Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed m the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
tbe writer of the artu-lc <
After dropping out twice,
changing my major four times,
and mentally touching the
fringes of schizophrenia about
three times a week, I still havent
decided. Which leads me to
believe that a formal education
may not have been as important
to me as I thought. But then,
what is formal education
anyway?
First of all to me formal
education, as taught in most
colleges and universities, is
training, not really an education.
To be trained is to be taught a
skill, to learn techniques
necessary in carrying out a
specific job. Whereas an
education would be to
experience Hie variety of things
which make up the world, and
then analytically try to

EDITORIAL

Governor In Earnest

Somewhere along the line, to everyone s
amazement, Claude Kirk learned how to be
Floridas governor.
Flis secret: keeping his mouth shut most
of the time, speaking when he has to.
And for Claude Kirk, thats not been an
easy task.
However, ever since Kirk defeated the late
Robert King High in the 1966 election, he
insisted on putting his mouth where his
mind should have been.
All too often he answered complex
questions with simple and worn cliches. All
too often he acted only after the damage
had already been done.
Witness the statewide school crisis last
year. Witness the initial actions by state
government to really do something for the
pooractions which came after Gainesville
and other Florida cities became nightly
targets for firebombs and bullets.
But now there is a new Claude Kirk.
&
Slowly and imperceptably our governor
has changed his image. He is no longer the
freewheeling bassoon. Kirk has finally
become governor in earnest.
/
Its nice to know someone is now really in
charge.
All this, however, is not to say that Kirks
escapades of the past can simply be
dismissed. He has used state money for
personal political purpose. He has spent too
much time out of the state in an attempt to
make the national press while the state itself
continued to flounder.
We think he knows this, and we would
like to think he intends to make up for his
former sins.

By John Caven

understand them. This in turn
gives you a better understanding
of yourself.
Since my major concerns deal
with the problems of self
expression, communication of
thoughts, and human truths, I
may really not need a formal
education. So why am I here?
Because wc live, believe it or
not, in an intellect conscious
culture. If l want anyone to
listen to what l have to say, then
I need something to back it up
with. A college education gives
me that backup.
This generation seems, for the
better part, less concerned about
monetary values. We were born
to affluency and thus have
begun to turn to more important
things. It is good that we do this,
because the things we are
turning to arc ourselves and how
we fit into life.
To those who sincerely feel
their place in the world is
through being a doctor, lawyer,
or any other defined role in
society. I am all for you. You're
necessary in society and college
is where you belting.
Bui to Miosc wdio are
restrained, who yearn to find
new paths to creativeness, do
what vuii musi do.

//
With new budget requests from Florida's
institutions for higher education now in the
hands of the state budget commission. Kirk
has an excellent opportunity to porve there
is a real man behind the new image, a man
interested in the best welfare of Florida and
its citizens.
The University of Florida, like other state
universities, needs money. The UF has
requested $2lO million for the next two
years.
Ordinarily, Florida governors do not go to
bat for education. They do not make their
support of education known to the people.
But Kirk can change all that, and he should.
Kirk can lead education in this state to a
new height, as he has pledged to do, by
forcefully supporting big new budgets for all
Floridas educational insitutions.
In so doing, Kirk must have the courage
to tell this states people that new taxes are
urgently needed. y
Floridas sale tax must not be allowed to
rise. Instead industry in this state must be
asked to pay its fair share of the cost of
governing this fast growing state.
We suspect this is all only a dream. We
know Florida politics is a barrel of worms.
We know expediency dictates state policy.
Yet we think Claude Kirk has determined to
become a good governor.
To be great, all he need do is lead this
state fearlessly. And to make this a truly
great state, he must throw the full weight of
his office behind an investment in Floridas
tomorrows.
Claude Kirk must stand up for Florida. He
must stand up for education.

Osborne Can / 'ill My Shoes



Hopeful Plans
Election Mockery
Mr. Editor:
Your editorial, Were Not Lackies, was not deserved by our
present and future political leaders. Clyde Taylor and his
administration have done a superb job while in office.
It has come to my attention, however, that there is a
student-president hopeful who is planning to make a mockery of the
upcoming student elections I refer to Geroge Carswell who in his
campaign activities will perpetrate the most shameless farce this
student body has ever been subjected to. It is Mr. Carswell, and people
like him, who are threatening our student government and deserve the
rath of your paper.
With the referendum to abolish student government coming up in
the April election, the candidacy of Mr. Carswell should be of
particular concern to all of us.

Speaking Out

Respect For Flu-Maskers

Reading Linda Miklowitzs article entitled The
Struggles of Being A Flu-Mask Guinea Pig,
prompted me to write my experiences as a mask
wearer and a note to my fellow students. If the
mask is worn continuously, there is no doubt to its
efficiency in stopping disease via microscopic
droplets released upon ones talking, coughing, etc.
Even for short periods of time in crowded places,
the mask is an insurance asset considering Listers
principles on sterilization practices. But there are
inconveniences upon ones choice of mask wearing.
First of all, there is the adjustment factor of
consciously forgetting youre wearing it, that upon
talking your voice will be muffled, and if youre
wearing glasses, a never ending struggle against
fog-up.
There are also the added pschological factors that
Miss Miklowitz brought out.
However, I believe that this method will be of
great benefit to those individuals in our society,
where influenza means possible death, i.e. the
elderly, and heart patients.
I believe that this method will be successful
against the flu for those who failed to take
advantage of the vaccine.
I believe this method should be enforced within
the confines of the infirmary for all patients waiting

Maniacs Devise Parking Plans

MR. EDITOR:
As usual the maniacs who
devise parking plans for large
organizations have bitten the
collective person of the
University of Florida in the
neck. The current idiocy not
being confusing enough, or
profitable enough, the Master
Minds in Physical Plant have
invented a system whereby those
who MUST park on the
University Campus or on its
miscellaneous ground|,and areas
must pay exorbitant fees for the
dubious distinction of possessing
a few miserable square feet of
dirt for short periods of time.
One is told that to float a
bond issue to build a few parking
structures of the type possessed
by many universities is illegal.
This is possible, but I doubt that
it would be illegal to build one
by subscription rather than to
charge for unprotected dirt. One
is also told that such a simple
modernism as a parking
structure would impair the
pristine natural beauty of this
glorious campus. And if
anything on this campus is ugly,
perhaps we could throw a few
sprigs of ivy on it from the
growth. The numerous
alphabetic temporary structures
could certainly use a bit of

NAME WITHHELD

disguising.
It is only to be hoped that
those who have the unspeakable
gall to charge one for space on
this campus have to pay it, too.
Perhaps when they feel the
pinch on their wallets they will
stop putting band-aids on the

The Dutch Played
No Groovy Melodies

MR. EDITOR'
We went to the concert of the
Dutch orchestra.
We were shocked indeed that
the entire gymnasium was
appropiated for this thing. It
should have been in a place
made for such activities such as
Norman Hall.
The tunes they played; some
of them were nice, but most of
them didnt have very groovy
melodies. You couldnt whistle
them.
The players didnt have very
good costumes. They were black
and drab. We would like to see
dark blue blazers with an
emblem on the pocket, maybe a
tulip or a windmill.
Some of the players needed
haircuts and most of them
looked unfriendly.
The string players plucked

By William Wanamaker

for treatment, to cut down the flu being passed
from someone who has it to someone who is sick
with something else.
I believe this method should be encouraged on
campus at least for two weeks with everyone
participating either as a mask wearer or as a control
member to stop the flus spread.
If one reflects, for a second, tothe symptomsof
fever, nausea, chills, etc., anything seems better than
to do nothing, although I hope there are a few who
will take up the cause for other reasons.
For the jokers who think theres nothing better
than to poke fun at those participating in the study,
let me point out those people in the past who jeered
at the tetanus vaccine, smallpox vaccine, polio
vaccine, open heart surgery, X-ray treatment for
cancer, pasteurization, and the struggles of
dedicated men who not so long ago eradicted
yellow fever and malaria by posing as guinea pigs
themselves.
I sincerely, support the mask wearers and realize
their plight having been one.
I urge all students to reflect back on past medical
history and take up the cause, and if not through
volunteering, then at least showing respect and
encouragement to those who have.

OPEN FORUM:
Adtiuimi Vlmi£
"There is no hops for ths complacent man.

It Was People Who Hate
That Destroyed The Word

MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Alford seems to think
that this generation, the love
generation as he calls it,
destroyed the word love. You

dead lump that we currently
liave as a parking plan, and will
take radical steps to remove the
current and impending idiotic
schemes and transplant a vital
and rational system.
ILLEGIBLE

their instruments too much. The
Montovani Symphony didnt
pluck nearly as much.
In the Montavani Symphony,
the players slid their bows along
the string producing a sweet
tone which oozed from the bow
like honey.
Until small countries can
throw together a good group, we
should encourage our own fine
symphonies.
The students here are
clamoring for serious cultural
activity and this is what we give
them.
We r e -sure Student
Government in\the future will
not neglect the students cultural
needs.
VICTOR RAMEY
PAUL RICE

are wrong Mr. Alford. Its the
ignorant bigots who bum
churches and deny people their
rights. Its people who think that
the only way an economy can
survive is through war. They are
the people who have destroyed
the word, theyre the people
who hate.
Tell me Mr. Alford, were the
men who killed the Kennedy
brothers and Martin Luther King
on drugs, or were they of the
love generation? No, they
were men who hated, its men
like them who are turning this
country toward Facism. They
killed men of love.
You are right that love has
many meanings today but you

Whos 'Responsible*
For Gentrys Woes?

MR. EDITOR:
For those of us supporting
Gentry it is nice to win, but
before we celebrate winning let
us try and examine the victory.
We hear a good deal of talk
from the administration about
responsibility, and clearly,
Lavon Gentry was responsible.
He was held accountable for his
actions and did not make any
effort to shirk his responsibility
(whether he had any choice is
relevant for this discussion).
He was innocent of the charge
against him, but consider what it
has cost him in time, money and
mental anguish. Consider also
that for the rest of his life when
filling out those forms we all
must fill out on occasion, he
must now answer the question
have you ever been arrested
with yes, and will then be
asked to account .for that
answer.
Consider that if he applies for
a job here at the University, or
for entrance to the Law School
he will be required to answer
this question one can only
wonder what effect his answer
may have on the processing of
his application.
Now let us consider the police
and administration. They would
have you believe that they are
responsible people, but
apparently this is in some mystic
sense that is not grounded in the
reality of accountability. They
too acted, and their acts have
caused a good deal of harm to
Mr. Gentry.
In the eyes of many in this
community they were wrong in
their actions and this opinion
has been supported by the court.
To what extent are they
responsible?
It would be nice if someone
among those responsible would
at least say sorry about that,

Thursday, January 16,1969, Thu Florida Alligator,

grossly misinterpreted this
generation. To them love means
brotherhood, living with your
fellow man. It means peace, a
world without war.
From your editorial it
would seem this is a sick
generation. But youre wrong.
Its a sick society that survives
on 'War. and hate. You might
say we are sick, sick of it.
Your editorial only proves
your ignorance of what is going
on. You are blind to the facts.
The next time you have nothing
to say, dont say it. A wise man
once said, its better to be quiet
and seem a fool than to speak
and let everyone know it.
ALAN M. MYERS 2 UC

but it would be better if, in fact,
they were responsible, and
behaved as responsible people
who could be held accountable
for their behavior.
CHAIRMAN
GAINESVILLE CHAPTER
ACLU
Gator Pity
MR. EDITOR:
Sir, I pity you.
You see, I am just an average
student at this on-the-brink-of on-the-brink-of-greatness
-greatness on-the-brink-of-greatness institution.
I do not belong to SDS (or
SSOC-if you prefer) nor do I
participate in flagraising
activities with the Veterans
Club.
I dont even vote in student
government elections!
And thats why I pity you.
You see, sir, I dont lose any
sleep over who gets the pill or
who smokes pot or who bums
the flag or who posts posters or
what campus politicos are doing.
You do, sir. And a handful
like you also do.
And I pick up the paper in the
morning, read your stories, your
editorials and the letters from
others who also get involved.
And I laugh.
Because all of you are pitiful.
And becuase I am the one who
will eventually benefit from
your troubles.
BOLLIVER SHAGNASTY

LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just' cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 9



Page 10

. The Florido Allietor, TtmrKtay, January 16,1989

Alt STRAINED BEECHNUT
BABY FOOD 10*
FANCY RICE 3 a 39< S COFFEE
PEANUT BUTTER... 39* f MAXW J LL A US! m 1
DOG FOOD 10/89*
Coffee Your
purchase excluding
DEL MONTE Sliced or
f PEACHES 1 Pineapple 4/sl.
V f Ho.l'/. $1 y Tomato Juice4/sl.
Chili W/Beans3/sl.
oT Z/HlT£ ScU£ ARROW lim* I yous choice > 55.00 of more purchase excluding cigarettes
LUNCH MEAT 3/si. DETERGENT... 39*
TUNA F15H...3/89* ARROW BLEACH 10<
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOO THRU JAN. 18 W W WHi Hi Hi |
winh-oixk rroncs. inc.-ooptiht-im
Na 303 Con thrifty maid
Tomatoes...... 5/sl.
A COLD POWER A Green Beans 4/sl.
L ht 4y J Pork & Beans 5/sl.
Limit 1 Deteraent of Yonr or more
cigarette!.
brother W^ofo"
~_ PAPER SPECIAL s fw, *XS& SSSSSJSsaI
TOWELS 4/sl. v S"s|n 9s m'WsSl J
TISSUE S/Sl. V^r_ 17
2-oR Pig. KLEENEX BOUTIQUE
TISS U E 5/ $1 ir 0000 *! 1 mc^ ; NA y ..
m^, Crackers... 3/89* Listerine 68^
IWMB fiMlmr fti ffiTiit.il in in-1
-1 in-1 FREE KLEENEX j \\Ptii &£*** j
DflllTimiC : BBfc::&fr M,nc e Meat Pie BUi '& w.L" t,c a c "' Cli: ; out , OUTM >Hr9
2 -. DUUIIUUI 'fmjm #. B&'M h o l e Acre Peo Movonnoiie 3* o, .,
r =: r~\
2 / \ lUADIf IIUQ : :;:; ECBgg_ 7 ..>.._ :(§rJ| # ,,,mT2? :
J / \ % lJ l I-Lb Pkg (Qtrv) BLUE BONNET ''' l ,In, j\'r - ?
/ *> \ i k i Giant Sire COLD WATER 1 1 n *i
; L \ with this coupon i Margarine .... 4/1. Surf Deteraent R7t
2 r^==~ : ~ Redeem at Your j ILb parkay corn oil soft 3Lb fluffy O/
j Local Winn-Dixie j Margarine . 45 f All Deteraent 87#
t _ 45 "LowSuds' Detergent '2"
^^^^^^^^^^s^E^EEE2EH2Eosii



THE REFERENCE tN
CHOICE BEEP
WINN PIXIE ANP SEE. NSBP

USOA BRAND CORN FED BONELESS
N*Y* STRIP STEAK 1, 51099
U A A A r Steak 69* 5tew....3 99*
' *-?" 1 Steak... sl*l9 Steakettes $ 1 79
Or USDA CHOICE WD Brand Corn Fed Boneless Delmonico 2%1b. Pkg. WD Brand AM Meot Stew or
WHOLE M Steaks.. $1.49 Chuck $1.99
W D i A i* D BEEF SHORT W D BRAND LEAN GROUND
LB w m Ri(k Roof 7 <1 AT
PLUS 100 FREE STAMPS WITH COUPON "If VVvl 4#- G. 4p | H V#
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED
DAIRY SPECIALS POT ROAST -59*
i-oz. BORDENS SLICED PROCESSED M ##### JF
AMERICAN CHEESE 35' DAlliilk CTEAI# not
cheese'" 49* cheese tq< ROUND STEAK.. '.9B*

QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOD THRU JAN. 18 I I IKI 4P JP J \
JIKLIIIR A I Ell 1%
OTHER MEAT DEPT. SPECIALS H
TASTE O'SEA FISH CRACKIN GOOD ALL FLAVORS
CAKES.... 3/Sl. COOKIES 4/Sl.
BOLOGNA 59*SPREAD .39 T
SU. HAM... 59' SAUSAGE $1.99 F DALUN A
Tarnow PIZZA R0A5T...... $ 1" I A A A
SAUSAGE... 59* FILLETS. .. 69 i WX/
U. S. No. 1 REGULAR^^^^^.
DATATAEC frozen food specials
H UtA I LB beans & & CHEESE or & BEEF
w w Hlr a /a.
I %a TA J Eton. Dinners....3/sl.
ZU / # Orange Juice 5/sl.
Perch Fillet 39*
Quorts BIRDSEYE
HARVEST FRESH PRODUCE f Aft | lAfl* O/t 1
U.S. No. I RUSSET BAKING (5-Lb. VINE RIPE %WI WWII llf Ak M I B
Potatoes.... 10. 69* Tomatoes . 29*
Strawberries 2/79* Pole Beans 2* 49* 1!I' *
* 2-Lb. Pky. THUNDERBOLT Brand Breaded Chunkees JF
-KING OF ORANGES" FLA. TEMPLE ALL PURPOSE BAG j| I . A A >
Oranges 10/59' Apples 5.:. 69< Shrimp...T 9 8ar....2/51.
EXTRA FANCY WASH. STATE RED OR GOLDEN DELICIOUS U.S. No. I YELLOW (5-Lb. 8ag...39(1) OCOMA Apples 29'Onions 3 £33' Basket... Cake 2/sl.
P D.ruc mine DIXIANA Pol/ Bag Grew Peoi, Mix. V<-g.. Cut Com,
MILD SWEET SWEET JUICY FLA P.nl s RICH S COHEE Cut Gr.-n Bn, St.w Veg. ur Cut
Rutabagas....... 10* Grapefruit... 5_ a 49* Rich... 4/$ 1 Okra 2/$ 1.
i \[jll i |DII Jt! j T^;VALuTst?MM | H 1 J TOP
quart 14 oz <.o*. ~o >iirm.m o.
* JOHNSONS CHICKEN SLICED INTO 1 6 " C BR,T Jl VRSS REGULAR OR fl-L W D BRANO LEAN J HALE OR WHOLE
- Croquette* ; Pork Choos ts .'j Lemon Pledqe Ground Beef j "Smoked Horn"
PINK Regular Size ll&lf . Born iize DOVE 12-oz. 34* . 22-oz. 61* . 32-oz. 3 /4-Gallon COLD WATER
Phase 111 Soap . 2/47 ? Liquid Detergent . 83* All Detergent .... $ 2 35 chocolate
Regular Size 3/43* . Both Size LUX 12-oz. 34* 22-oz. 61* .. King Size Giont Size NEW Os COCONUT
Lifebouy Soap . 2/41* Liquid Detergent . 83* Rinso Detergent . 87* CAKE
ASSORTED Regular Size 3/35* . Both Size Pints 45* Quorts 83* Holt Gallon Large Size 41* . Giont Size
Lux boap .... 2/33* Wisk Cleaner .... T 7 Breeze Detergent . 87 85*

at your Top Value Store St

Thursday, January 16,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

/.....:->x-:-x:.Nv.%v.^.w;;';*w:\vM*>y
FOR SALE
y >
Honda 50, good shape, plus two
helmets and book rack, $125. Call
Skip, 392-7495. (A-st-60-p)
SB Austin Healey, 100-6, mint
cond., all extras, $995 or best offer.
Contact Fred Miller, 4248 Ortega
Place, Jax, Fla, 388-4158.
(A-6t-57-p)
1964 Pacemaker Mobile home.
10x56. central air, front dinette,
S3OOO, best offer. 376-8281,
evenings. (A-4t-55-p)
JUST ARRIVED Hundreds of desk,
chairs, files, bookcases & much more.
New Used & refurnished. Save 50%
or more. Additional 10% off Jan.
10th to 18th to students with IDS.
JR OFFICE FURNITURE &
EQUIPMENT Co. 620% So. Main St.
Ph. 376-1146. (A-6t-56-p)
Kawasaki 350 cc 1968, perfect
condition. Low mileage. S7OO or best
offer. Call 376-7648 after 5:00.
(A-3t-61-p)
63 Galaxie 2dr., r&h std. trans. five
brand new wide oval tires. $550,
need money for school. Call Jack,
372-2027 or see 1111 SW 16th Ave.,
Apt. 93. (A-st-61-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are requiredJMinimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior la shirting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
W M
I lI II li I r
~
mm?? §
jH ln
8 I 5
z
Q
>
< K < < < 3
> M M M 5
e* < 2
3 * 2
N Q - M C U
it i s I
a a a w 2
KRS £
§ i z
__ 3 3 3
-
TO
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"if
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_ N m
__ in ii.i mmmmm

FOR SALE |
v
V xv:-:vx-x-x-x-x.v.v;vx*;s£-x-x.x.v.vx-x&
Cushman motorscooter with spare
parts good transportation. Must
sell. $55 or best offer. Call 372-7530
after 3 p.m. (A-3t-61-p)
Buffet clarinet original value $475
in beautiful condition. For $175 or
best offer. Andy, 372-1865 or
372-9415. (A-2t-61-p)
Honda 50, excellent condition. See at
1227 W. University Ave. or call
Frank at 376-0612. $125.00.
(A-2t-61-p)
STEREO COMPONENT AM-FM
multiplex radio. Brand new, was
$499.95 Sacrifice $250. Call
Sandy, 4 7 pm, 376-1536.
(A-st-62-p)
Muntz car stereo, 4 spkrs, excl cond.,
has balance, contour, volume and
track controls. $55, 378-0129 after 6
pm. (A-4t-62-p)
Fender super reverb amplifier with
case. Both are in excellent condition.
Call Fred Fey, South 304. Phone
392-7950 after 5. (A-3t-62-p)
Allstate motorscooter, very good
condition, excellent transportation.
SBO.OO 378-8496. (A-3t-62-p)

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16, 1969

Page 12

vi-XXWXX-:-.- j £
ij FOR SALE |
1967 Honda S9O only 2400 miles.
Excellent condition, best offer over
S2OO, 376-6983, 1128 NW 4 Ave.
(A-3t-62-p)
Wollensak tape recorder 2 and 4
track extra equipment, SBO or best
offer. Call Ted 376-3514. (A-2t-62-p)
Quick sale! Honda 50 2 years old,
step threw frame, helmet included.
Price SIOO. Call 372-7550.
(A-st-54-p)
Garrard SL-95 automatic turntable
with pickering low impendance
stereo cartridge. For SIOO.OO or will
settle for best offer. Call Irv,
378-0729 after 1 p.m. (A-st-61-p)
FOR RENT
# t
Colonial Manor 1 bedroom corner
apt., furnished, panelled, air, pool,
next to campus. $l2O a month.
372-3003 after 5:30 or anytime
weekends. (B-3t-61-p)
One br. furnished apt. will sub-let
immediately SIOO. 378-2162.
(B-st-61-p)
Inexpensive, 2 man aft., 2 blocks
from campus 304 NW 15th St. Call
G. Joiner, 378-8122. ( -3t-62-p)
I rasrni
Coed needed for attractive apt. All
deposits paid. Contact Connie,
378-3184 or 376-7430. (C-3t-61-p)
Male roommate to share large 3 bdr.
house with senior students. Fireplace
and cable tv. Quiet and very
comfortable. Call 378-1112 anytime.
(C-st-59-p)
Wanted: upper division student for a
roommate to share 2 bedroom apt.
S4O/month & utilities. Call
376-7664. (C-4t-59-p)
Male roommate wanted to share
house with 2 law students S4O mo.
Call 376-9080. (C-4t-59-p)
Coed roommate wanted for French
Quarter apt. furnished one bdr. 67.50
per month, immediate occupancy.
Call Mary Jo 378-0359, Linda
378-9162. (C-st-62-p)
"8 ON THE LAM I
STARRING
808 HOPE PHYLLIS DILLERH
I AT 7:07 IN COLOR g J
I ALSO I
I "THE GOOD THE
BAD AND THE UGLY!
1 STARRING IN COLOR g I
I CLINT EASTWOOD |
BOX OFFICE OPENS~6:3O
MAIN FEATURE AT 7:00 & 10:25
MUk : m \'i w| 4J|p
J^^^^JUNDBRING
"MINI- SKIRT MOB
STARRING JEREMY SLATE M
- L

r^WANTED
Female roommate for 2 bdrm. Fij
Qtr. apt. for winter and spring and
possibly summer qtrs. Apt. no. 96,
Call 372-5246. (C-3t-62-p)
Housewife will iron in your home or
mine, free repairs, call before ten
p.m., 372-5269. (C-4t-60-p)
One sharp female roommate wanted.
Butler apts., Winter and Spring. Low
Rent. Prefer student over 21. Call
378-0609. (C-st-58-p)
Female roommate to share 2
bedroom apt. University Gardens.
Graduate student preferred.
376-7670. (C-3t-56-p)
HELP WANTED
Male student free after 6th period
need transportation. Drivers license
and English with little or no accent.
Drive elderly owner and his car in NE
section. Call 392-0353, 12 noon to
12:30 pm or 5:00 to 5:30 p.m.
(E-3t-61-p)
/ THRU SAt
/ FRANZ \
| KAFKAS |
M TRIAL i
\loo-5)00-7:10- 9:20,/
'SWTS'

RbkKHBB Fgjfc SKIDOO'
Ljfrtgjjhyt. 17-14I4 Lw l tr^* 1^
The word
all ever him- HJB3b|
something
more
puzzling
JK? ;
E NqgggapSi,
SnHHL -xiM
ii^B
STEVE VlcdjtEN
AS EULLITT'
[MjsussESTEDfonjtTuit aupiEMCESj TECHWICOLOR a FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS V/^
9V*""
(ortho whole family!
' \

Use our handy
mail In order
form.

rnr -rmnnnnnn
| HELP WANTED!
i
Entertainers for Graham Area
Playboy club Feb. 1. Singers
dancers, comedians, musicians, or
anyone who has talent. Call
392-8495. (E-st-61-p)
->
[ OowbMww Gainesyille ]
1 *I W. UilvtrtHy Avt,
METWOCOtOR @
rwtwN^^fo.
ftasrl
Msyjyyyi Oj r '
fthe fixer
v. Based on the Pulitzer
Prize winning novel
by Bernard Malamud.
Metiocokx S I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

n n
| HELP WANTEDj
Female subjects needed for speech
experiment. Must be native English
speaking, free of voice defects and in
the age group 30-39 or 50-59. $2.00.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway
Comm. Science Lab. 392-2049.
(E-10t-54-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session or $2.50 for IV2
hour session. Must be native English
speaking and have normal hearing.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway,
University 392-2049. (E-55-10t-c)
Need office equipment Salesman in
Gainesville. Call 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-C)
Cook wanted girl to cook lunch for
six law students 5 days a week. Must
have 4th and sth periods free. Salary
to be arranged. Call 80b,378-7748.
(E-2t-62-p)
Student over 21, part-time work 3
nights a week, meal included. Apply
in person at Woodys 3458 W. Univ.
Ave. between 3 5 p.m. (E-3t-62-p)
1 AUTOS I
M
Olds 98, 1962 Factory air, all power,
one owner, excellent! Light blue and
not a scratch. Call Dr. Busby,
392-0724 or come see at 3812 SW 15
St. (G-st-59-p)
1964 Ford 6, standard shift, r & h,
new seat covers, good w/w tires, one
owner, 47,000 miles, excellent
mechanical condition, 750.00, call
372-4793 after 5:30 weekdays or
anytime Sat. & Sun. (G-3t-60-p)
1960 Ford 2 door 6 cyl. standard no
rust, excellent running cond., radio,
heater, good tires. Must sell. $195,
call 378-4907. (G-3t-60-p)
Have 2 surplus cars, 1962 Plymouth
V/8 5325. 1964 Cadillac 51750.
Call 372-9607 or 372-3251.
(G-ts-60-c)
1961 Valiant 4 door radio, heater,
excellent condition, only 38000
actual miles, ww tires, please phone
376-9968 or see at 710-109 SW 16th
Ave. (G-st-61-p)
Dodge Polara 1963 Sedan automatic,
AC, power brakes and steering, S6OO.
By owner. See at Cashs Service
Station, 3936 Newberry Rd.
372-9456. (G-58-st-p)
1965 Datsun 4 dr. sedan, very clean,
radio, heater, 4 speed, low mileage.
Top speed 90 m.p.h., 25 m.p. gallon.
Call 372-8246, Lot 133 Mobileer.
(G-st-61-p)
1959 Ford, radio, heater, good
condition, $225. Call 372-6455.
(G-st-61-p)
*nn*x*x # x # x*x # x # x # x*x*x*x*x # x*x*x # x*x*.'
PERSONAL I
X ?
Friday afternoon club for single
students, faculty & staff over 21.
Singles mixer Lampliter Lounge
private room. Cocktails doubles
45c, ladies drinks 2O c, no cover.
Action begins 4:30, Fri., Jan. 17,
drinks til 7:30. Bring friends. See
posters. (J-4t-60-p)
Friends of Lewis Rothlein interested
in his new address or general info,
call Nancy, 392-7489. (J-2t-61-p)
Independent study to find the 10
sexiest men on the UF campus. How
do you rate? Call 378-9898..
(J-3t-61-p)
Hi gang, that was a great party Sat.
nite, next week at my place, bring all
your friends and enemies, remember
Oscart Pukt lives forever, RSVP.
(J-lt-62-p)
LOST & FOUND |
-xx-x-x-x-x-:-v.>x-xc-x-x-XiXx.v.v.-.vx-v
Lost Friday afternoon, a set of keys
in black plastic case near college
library Peabody Radio Road? If
found please call Sue, 376-9594.

LOST & FOUND f
<-xxxx*x*x-x-x-x-x-x.x*x.v.v.v.\v--<#
~ a r T 93 9 ld womans
watch vicinity of graduate library. Os
can 3 P 92 S q;i l I Va,Ue ls f und P'ease
4 00-filn n - 279 Br ward,
400 6:30 P.m. (L-3t-60-p)
| SERVICES
GERMAN lessons and/or turoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551
(M-st-59-p)
Figures, graphs, etc. For theses,
dissertations, publications.
Professional graphic artist. Nancy
McClelland, 378-4260. (M-st-60-p)
Interested in EUROPE this summer,
travel alone, on tour or for credit,
prices from $250 round trip N.Y. to
Milan, Italy 10 wks. Deadline Jan.
31, ask at 310 Union, ph. 392-1655.
(M-13t-61-c)
Now there's an Avon representative
on campus to bring you qaulity
products for men and women at low
prices. Contact Linda, 392-9357.
(M-st-62-p)
German tutor needed? Call 372-4713
after 6:00 p.m. (M-2t-62-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
Watch Repair very reasonable and
work guaranteed. Have new and used
men & ladies watches. Andy,
372-1865 or 372-9415. (M-3t-62-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-tf-54-cj

BIRTH DEFECTS!
MARCH OF DIMES
Published as a Public Service by The Florida Alligator
<3

I **ftlili 4ia Center Cut Ham Steak k I
I HAWAIIAN QQC |
I lift VV ft 11 ft 11 Tossed Salad and I
a mm French Fries.
I HAM REGULAR $155 J_ I
I niftlftlCD DININGROOM 1
/ UINNtK CURa : OUT kmMf \
I 2310 s w 13th St & 1505 N w 13th St m

SS
NEED ZIPPY
RESULTS?
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

Winter Bowling Leagues
Are Organizing NOW!!
Mixed and mixed doubles leagues forming
for Tues. through Thurs. nites at 9:00 p.m.
and Fri. nite at 11:00.
Call 392-1637 or come by the GAMES
AREA and fill out an application.
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
ALIBI LOUNGE j
FOR YOUR LISTENING I
PLEASURE |
RICHARD PARKER I
and the 1
WITNESSES I
334 W. Univ. Ave. |
LAST CHANCE
(or SENIOR & GREEKS to have
pictures taken for the SEMINOLE...
1:00 to 5:00
MO pm to 900 pm ROOM 346 REITZ UNION
THURSDAY JAN. 16th SENIORS
S Z GREEKS
DELTA PHI EPSILON PHI SIGMA SIGMA
KAPPA ALPHA THETA SIGMA KAPPA
KAPPA DELTA ZETA TAU ALPHA
PHI MU
FRIDAY, JAN. 17ft LAST DAY

Thursday, January 16, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

ZEUS WAS
A
GREEK

Page 13



), The Florida Alligator, Thursday. January 16,1969

Page 14

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V 6*A ox. six# 40 ct. < Lifeline Tooth Brush I 20 ox. bot. < | 9Vi ox. bot.
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Thursday, January 16,1969, The Florida Alligator,

luHaS fiesta del monte sale
Fruit Drink 4ST $V
.
Golden Corn 5 $1
oSSLT 1 '/ iic Lima Beans 3 cans 89*
\V, U Lwl\ W ,][ Cake Rolls 31 $1 e #* Cl
:^ s z3S*&v!kk\ iivyxi ftsstfss 5 ~ *!
dairy specials o ijpgZ HoneyGiXm'r V S 39* Green Beans * 31
Kraft's Parkay (2c off) \tk *Af->' ,WI Del Monte Delicious Cut
Margarine .. 3l *feU%#|P KATIES 1 39* Green Beans 5 tt? $1
Crescent Rolls .... 1 39* Laundry Rinse w- 69 Green Beans 4cm $1
Corn Meal Mush J ,i: 29*' o down produce latte C^sCT'l 49* *< *m--". *
Kraft, Cracker Barral l BT j OlTlGtoes cam f |
Sharp Cheddar ..'JT 75* u.s. #i i,.i Bokio, io-ib. *o< Chilfwith Beans 4 'll $1 d.i M.n.. sliiw.
47* & s i ";*L
Cheddarchees 65* Mdnfosh Apples *,49 Saran Wrap % 37* Tomato Catsup *29*
. deli specials 2 J£ 19*
Delicious Old-Fmhlon Style U.S. #1 All Purpose
Baked Beans lb. 3 Pftfnfoes bog 79* Bremner's Snackin' Good
Cole Slaw .£39* -AO* % DfftS H* dJ
RUnnT r r 79* Peaches 69 . fp'-i' nJE h>... *..-.
Swifts premium proten govt. / '? *,, Cake Mixes ... 3 P k 9'
WapW/ / \ f/pur ** 49*
premium Proten _ '^ v
Beef Roast >b Ja Bag Sausage 59*
Swift's Premium Proten Boneless English Cut 4*4% WjK Swift's Premium Braunschweiger or Sandwich
Fee/ Foes/ 99* a / Spread 2Sa 69*
Chutk Steaks . > 69* EHu. Beef'LivST.*"' . 59*
ft I p;t* *. 69* mmF / Wieners VI, 39*
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I 2 stonffws hQt D | ai- A TW Seafood Treat, Fresh Florida
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EXTRA Swanson's Froien German Style Prices are effective WOOKCCI WraWTlSil lb. I
Xh/QfQonQtjinin^tW 1 TV Dinner pkq. Thurs, Fri, Sat, Jan. Seafood Treat, Medium Sixe Florida
n Swans*.', Frozen Chinese Style 16 17 18> 1969 DJuL CLa.'mn *?f r QQt
with Thu W TV Dinner
| Freezer Queen Veal | '\L S on,iand Frozen whoi. K.mei mmm
I Parmagian w/Tomato Sauce | Corn 3 boqs $1 N W 1 3tll ST
1 two pound pkg. 1 Sothlond Frown AL O U IN of¥ 10111 010
44. (expire* sat, *. *,) FrenclvwiiT Beans pkq.
HH Cooked" Squash 2 'lS: 39* V/D||D|lV *>l 1014 N MAIN ST.
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Queen Crib Meat
6-OZ. pkg. C C a||oDS pkg.
45. (expire Sat, Jan. IM.) | EXTRA
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I Any Swifts Premium || Butt er-Bdd Bo~ie Turkey ;| Food Cake Mix | llVz-oz pkg.
I Proten Beef Roest S i| 'pkg. I , '- -
1.. J2XZTL ll'- uuuurll^e^ee^W ~xL ,

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16,1969

Lisca To Lead
Poetry Reading

The first of this quarters Poetry Readings will be held in the Reitz
Union, rooms 122-123 today during ninth period (4:40-5:30). These
readings are under the auspices of the Department of English.
The bi-weekly event was begun last term by Dr. George Harper,
chairman of the English Department. The fall terms activities
included presentations of backgrounds and works of poets such as
William Butler Yeats, Dylan Thomas, Wallace Stevens, W.C. Auden,
e.e. cummings and William Carlos Williams.
According to Dr. James Highsmith, coordinator of this terms
program, the primary purpose of the group meetings is to get students
interested in poetry in a non-academic setting.
This end will be accomplished by having presentations of a poets
work and experimenting by discussing more than one poet or a certain
theme in relation to more than one poet.
Hopefully by next quarter there will be presentations by local and
student poets.
Discussion and involvement through participation is encouraged
and students are invited to join in the planning. Suggestions are always
welcome. ft
The aim, says Dr. Highsmith, is to make poetry more
meaningful.
The reading group will meet every other Thursday beginning today
with a discussion of Theodore Roethke led by Dr. Peter lisca.
The poetry reading schedule is:
Jan. 16: Theodore Roethke by Professor Peter Lisca.
Jan. 30: Three Contemporary Poets by Professor Ed Ochester.
Feb. 13: Two More Contemporary Poets by Professor Don
Petesch.
Feb. 27: Translations of Latin Poetry by Contemporary Poets by
Professor Melvin New.
March 13: Poets I Have Known by Professor Bill Robinson.

Accent Contest
Deadline Extended

The deadline for all entries in
the ACCENT 69 Symposiums
Poster and Photography Contest
has been extended from January
17 to January 23, according to
Tom DeMarco, ACCENT
Technical Chairman.
So many students have
requested more time for these
contests, said DeMarco, that I
felt it necessary to make the
deadline alteration.
A color or black and white
picture, 8 in. x 10 in. or 5 in. x 7
in., is required in the
Photography contest. First prize
is an AGFA Siletto 35 mm
camera and case, and second and

M HDOTRS
| CAMERA SHOPS 1
T T for
JOURNALISM
& ART STUDENTS
1232 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-7657

81-WEEKLY EVENT

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Staff Writer

third prizes are sls and $5 gift
certificates, respectively.
All prizes for the photography
contest are being furnished by
Bruce Mozert of University
Photo Supply.
Entries for the poster contest
must have copy reading
ACCENT 69 Dimensions of
Freedom, Feb. 3-8, and must
be printable. Chestnuts is
donating $35 and sls gift
certificates for the poster
contests first and second place
winners.
All material must be turned
into the ACCENT office, room
313 of the Reitz Union by Jan.
23. Judging will be on the 24th.

Films Committee Established

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Cinema Society
has become inactive because of
financial problems, paving the
way for an ad hoc University
Films Committee to establish a
film series for persons interested
in cinema art.
The committee is now selling
subscriptions for a film series
program, consisting of 10 films
to be scheduled throughout the
winter and spring quarters.
The first film to be shown is a
4*.
FIGHT BIRTH DEFECTS ...JOIN
the MARCH OF DIMES / /

TAKE A COUNTRY TRIP
JwSSii Pvv
--Pm :
Buckowe ns ~~
1
''Vi'iTKw
Also available on Reel-to-Reel Tape, 8-Track Cartridge and Cassette

set of six short subjects featuring
Laurel and Hardy, Sunday, Jan.
29, at 7 and 9 p. m. in the Reitz
Union Auditorium.
At the present time the other
nine films in the series have not
yet been scheduled, because
committee members say they
cannot select the films until they
know how much money is
available from subscription sales.
If insufficient subscriptions
are sold, all money will be
returned and the series will be
cancelled.
The committee, consisting of
UF faculty, staff and students, is
selling its subscriptions at $2.50
each for students and $5 for

fetgma {&au &igma
Student Tutor Society
requests the attendance
of all membership candidates
tonight at 8:30 p m in
room 150 C of the Union

faculty and staff.
The subscriptions are now on
sale at the Union Box Office and
will also be sold at Sundays
Laurel and Hardy showing.
The subscription campaign
will continue through the
showing of Sundays film, the
only film in the series at which
there will be door sales.
Admission to future films will
be subscription only.

HELEN OF TROY
WENT
GREEK



ItetijsSeUeF
Membership Cards
I go on sale at 8:00 A.M. tomorrow I
I morning. January 17 at the front doorl
I of the Rathskeller. I
|Price:sl.oo for the year(four quarters )|
I Get yours (membership card that is) I
I and avoid delay at the door I
I tomorrow night at 7:30 when the I
I 32-hour grand opening starts. I
ADDED ATTRACTION
--
I ADDED ATTRACTION I
H * .. * t Ijp
I As a special one-time-only introductory offer, the Rathskeller is I
I offering a SPECIAL sneak preview dinner and show at 6:00 pm I

I The first 200 people to buy membership cards may make I
I reservations and get a complete Rathskeller buffet dinner and I
I a special show for only $2 .00. Beat the mob scene and get your I
I private preview dinner and performance. 200 seats are all we I
I have available for one-time-only offer. I
I t I
I Come early(Remember membership cards go on sale at 8:00 AM I
I Friday) and be the FIRST on campus to enjoy I
I the Rathskeller. /N I
I Eattrsfoeller |

Thursday, January 16,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16, 1969

Wedding Bells Ring
For Spanky And Charley

By RICK BENSON
Alligator Special Writer
It turned out to be more of a
happening than a wedding when
Spanky and Medicine Charley
said I do, in a coffee house
ceremony in Miami during the
Christmas Holidays.
Friends such as Tiny Tim,
Richie Havens, and the Turtles,
wiete among the more than 200
guests who began arriving at the
dimly-lit coffee house across
from the University of Miami in
the early morning hours on the
last day of 1968.
Close friends and guests were
notified only five hours before
the wedding.
The ring was placed on
Spankys finger at 3:32 a.m.,
and after she received a kiss
from her husband and applause
from her friends, the party
began.
Walking from the stage, a
guest with shoulder-length hair
remarked it was the best
wedding he had been to all day.
A cameraman with a feather
stuck on his camera recorded the
entire event on video tape for
Spankys group.
Although Spanky wanted
strawberry shortcake, white
wedding cake and champagne
were served to the guests who
came dressed in T-shirts,
dungarees and beads, as well as
suits and evening gowns.
Spanky, leader of Spanky and
Our Gang, was bom Elaine
McFarland 25 years ago in
Peoria, 111. She has lived and
performed in the Coconut Grove
section of Miami, and it was
there she formed her group.
Medicine Charley, 26, of Los
Angeles, is business manager of
the Turtles and is otherwise
known as Charles Galvin.
The couple, who had met a
few years back at a club in
Chicago, were secretly married

a,'.*"--
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|
Q .|| I

|w im
mb M.
Hjk. sHHf M m
I§F i J W ::: -0§&
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THE HAPPY COUPLE
.. only five hours after wedding announcement.

last August and wanted the
public ceremony to make it
known to friends.
As a special wedding present,
the guests were treated to the
soulful stylings of Negro singer
Richie Havens who gave an
hour-long performance.
Sitting at a comer table in the
back with friends, Tiny Tim
listened attentively to the soul
sounds and even seemed to
groove on them as he clapped
along with one number.
Tiny Tim grooving on soul. It
could only have happened at
Spankys wedding.

> 4 J
*| V
"I have walked S'*
* a hundred highways, w J
* Cried to see l
' fl t the things men do; 4
i jm If you wonder who / am,
* ,j[ I'm just a loner 1
passing through''
Here's the real Rod McKuen captured in words, music and
photos as he passes through all our lives. Helen Miljakovich's
superb photographs, never before published, of McKuen in
concert, at rehearsals, in recording sessions, and at home
counterpoint the words and music of 22 McKuen songs never
previously recorded.
THE WQIRIP IF Kp McKUIIM
Other books bv Rod McKuen du < ,
y Photographs by Helen Miljakovich
Stanyan Street, Listen to the Warm, / \ $4.95, now at your bookstore
and Lonesome Cities RANDOM HOUSE

V/UFT To Screen
UF f Town Meeting f
UF will hold a giant town meeting through the medium of
television tonight at nine oclock over WUFI-TV (Channel 5).
Subject for discussion is the new campus traffic and parking plan
scheduled to go into effect March 31.
Architecture Department Chairman Arnold Butt, campus
coordinator for traffic and planning, will use slides and film to present
details of the plan. During the program, the viewing audience may ask
questions by calling special numbers 392-0461, 392-0462 or
392-0426.
WUFT-TV officials scheduled the program at the end of the
broadcast day so that it may run open-ended in order to give faculty,
staff, students and other affected by the proposed regulations an
opportunity to become fully aware of the total concept of the parking
changes.
The plan is a result of long study by professional and campus
planners toward solving transportation problems on the campus.
WUFT-TV is the universitys educational television station.
UF Students
Are invited
to a spaghetti dinner
At First Baptist Church
Cr
425 W. University Avenue
Sunday, January 19th
following the 11:00 worship service.
No reservations necessary



| impressions |
bo* By ALLEN PIERLEONOOtf
Alligator Features Editor
Just a few observations about
some highly c usual things
happening in todays happening
country, a country devoted to
all sorts of things that it wasnt
devoted to before now, know
what I mean?
It came to the attention of
this columnist that Mark Twain
was a racist, according to our
black brethren at Miami-Dade
Junior College. It seems that
black students at that institute
have finally succeeded in
swinging the ax of minority
justice by getting officials to
remove Mark Twains
Huckleberry Finn from the
required reading list.
The black minority there
contend that Twain depicted a
black slave as being an ignorant
illiterate person, and labeled this
as an emotional block to black
readers. So, quite naturally for
logical people not at all afraid of
being labeled racist, officials
dropped the book.
Jack Kofoed, columnist for
the Miami Herald, comments
rather nicely on the situation in
the Jan. 15 issue of the
Herald. He suggests that since
this step has been taken why not
drop the Merchant of Venice
(by a racist named Shakespeare)
because the portrayal of the
money-lending Jew, Shylock, is
offensive to Jewish readers.
He concludes: There were
books that annoyed Hitler and
the Nazi party, and they were
burned. Will Americans, in the
process of collegiate change, set
up a program of book burning
too?
So come on, you all lets
get the black mammy off those
Aunt Jemima products!
Another gem of interest:
United Press International
reports that police in
Washington, D.C. have just been
given the word to keep their
guns holstered unless they plan
to shoot to kill. Simply, the
police are now not allowed to
draw their guns unless they plan
to kill somebody no warning
shots in the air, no shooting near
the victim or aiming at legs or
arms.
Isnt that nice? As usual, the
nations capital is setting a
superb example for the rest of
the country. I mean, why just
shoot in the air to stop a victim
or wound a man to keep him
from escaping? Why bother with
that nonsense when you can
have the fun of killing
somebody.
It must be a case of logical
Washington thinking: that is, in
order to curb the population
explosion kill off the
population. Vietnam is one way
and now theyve come up with
another. Its really going to be
fun when black leaders protest
the new ruling D.C. is
predominantly black, you know.
Wont it be sane and really
nice if Sirhan gets off for the
murder of Kennedy on a legal
technicality of not knowing the
difference between right and
wrong? And isnt it fun
knowing that Morton Sobell, the
spy who helped give Russia the
secret of the American atomic
bomb, is out of jail?
America is a nice place to
visit, but I wouldnt want to ...

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608 N. Main Ph* 376-7171

Thursday, January 16,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

>, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16,1969

What do Greeks really do?
'
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*
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just party...

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' ~- -A. ~ ' ' :
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they care



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WITH CREW INTACT
... Cheri (center) and friends board plane

PHOTO
STORY
BY
SUSAN
WHALEY

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When your life has become a constant high then you have to be
careful.
Cheri McConnell, lUC from Fort Myers, likes to take trips and
likes to get high but not under the usual definition.
She is a sky diver.
I have a red, white and blue chute, says the blonde resident of
Hume Hall.
I dont know what I like most about it but its a nice way to spend
a Sunday afternoon.
Cheri got started in sky jumping when her father introduced her to
an old Air Force comrade who was an expert jumper and instructor.
Cheri said she always wanted to sky dive but never really believed
she could until the day she jumped out the airplane window.
She now dives with the University City Sport Parachute Club here
in Gainesville, a group which meets at Stengel Field Sunday mornings
and jumps from a rented plane.
Cheri has made 13 jumps to date. j
The thirteenth jump was the worst, says the slightly superstitious
coed.

0!
-v. v !% _. M s x : r '' M&&is&sko
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NICE WAY TO SPEND SUNDAYS?
... Cheri's 13th sore fanny
Up, Up And Down

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CHECK THAT RIPCORD
... pert coed gets pointers

Thursday, January 16,1*19, The Florida Alligator,

St
Newsweek said of them: The
entertainment is contagious...
Time titled its article about
them: That happy feeling.
U. of F. Rathskeller says: Be
at the grand opening of the
new Rathskeller tomorrow
night to enjoy one of the
hottest sounds in the
country ...Your Fathers
Mustache.
Statfrefeeller

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16, 1969

Diamond Village is no place for bachelors.
But it is the home of a pair of Bachelers ... Mr.
and Mrs. Jack.
Bacheler, the U.S. Olympic distanceman who
acquired a bad case of dysentery the night before he
was to run in Mexico City this summer, now wants
to send another trackman to the Olympics.
He is Johnnie Lee Samuels, a deaf shot-putter
from Gainesville, who won the State Class C shotput
last year for his school Florida Deaf and Blind, St.
Augustine.
Gator track Coach Jimmy Carnes is planning to
put on the best one hour of track and field Gator
fans have ever witnessed Saturday morning at 11
with the proceeds going towards Samuels
expenditures to Yugoslavia this August for the
world Olympic games for the deaf.
Bacheler will run a specially-paced three mile
run. Currently the nations top high jumper Ron

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'*.* / '/-~-v:4, .aHTH.' 'j f aflPHy i £ll I*' <
/
GAINESVILLE, FLA. Fred Everlast, local endurance champ, pictured in his secret training camp as he prepares for the 32-hour endurance
contest to be held during the grand opening weekend of the Rathskeller. Fred, awake over 27 hours at the time of the picture easily
outlasted his sparring partner, Nora Nodoze, who dropped off at just under 26 hours. 7 y
'._ .. i '
%*
e
"' 4:.. 1 I § ... : ; ;f
Not since the days of the dance marathon or the era of the flag pole sitters has there been / /^ a v \
such a spectacle offered. The Rathskeller is sponsoring an ENDURANCE CONTEST. Who f 'y
can stay for the most consecutive hours in the Rathskeller during the 32 hours of opening * /f\
weekend? A fantastic prize awaits the stout-heart that accepts the challenge. A few simple \l^iSvi 1
rules: You must stay in the Rathskeller, you must declare your intent to compete when > A14W14 V f J
you enter, no sleeping and no pills (pills are a no-no, Remember Bruno). For more j\ /I | llt^li rII P I
information, ask at the door. Opening night 17 January that's tomorrow. ** ** V 1 %% V % (

Married Bacheler Heads Track Fund

4 Hfe
"* *' > J h} f% t t/VyX
/VyX t/VyX
T %&m - lb
HERE WE GO AGAIN
... Tom Brown aids Pam Pemberton, Lynn Cameron
Jourdan will shoot for seven-foot plus in the high
jump. And Bob Lang will try to break the school

half mile mark.
Amateurs will get to participate in the festival
with a special Joggers Mile planned at 10:50 a.m.
The fraternity and sorority groups will get to
compete for trophies in two 440-yard relays.
Coaching will be provided by track team members.
Persons or teams interested in running should
contact Carnes office before Thursday at 3:30.
Samuels needs SI,BOO to make the trip to
Yugoslavia. Many countries finance their youths
trips to the games but in the United States, the top
deaf competitors have traditionally left it up to
their communities to finance them.
This is also a perfect time for all UF students to
show their appreciation to Jack Bacheler for
representing his country and this university at the
Olympics, despite his misfortune, said Carnes.
Bacheler is a graduate student and member of the
Florida Track Club.



m
v
X ilv
; k.. *l :#
*ih iiMnr
*.* II

The Joe Namath phenomena,
easily the young years top
sports story, has received curious
treatment by the press. Writers
either love Joe or hate him.
The college sports editors are
even getting involved in their
own brand of name-calling.
The University of Miamis
student newspaper, The
Hurricane, bannered this
headline two days before the

Spurrier Returns,
As Offensive Coach

Steve Spurrier has joined the
UF athletic staff as an assistant
football coach during his
off-season from the NFLs San
Francisco 49ers, Gator Director
of Athletics Ray Graves
announced Tuesday.
Suprrier, the 1966 Heisman
Trophy winner who was recently
Equipment Areas
The Intramural Department
maintains four check-out areas
for the students convenience.
Equipment can be checked out
overnight or over the weekend at
no charge except for lost or
overdue items.
An I.D. card is needed.
Florida Gymnasium
M-F 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 pjn.
Sat. 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
noon
Broward Hall
M-F 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sat. 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
Graham Hall
M-F 12:00 noon to 5:00 pjn.
Norman Gymnasium
M-F 4:00 pjn. to 10:00 pjn.
Sat. 9:00 ajn. to 5:00 pjn.
Sun. 1:00 pjn. to 5:00 pjn.

I&tag Hragl
I ladies I
CfcoMuice
I DRESSES 2 PIKE SUITS I
I wool SHUTS SWEATERS I
I NOW 1/2 PRICE I
I MENS DEPARTMENT I
I SALE CONTINUES | I
I 13 W. Univ. And Gainesville

THE CLIPBOARD

Who The Heck Is Dave Issacs?

Super Bowl ...... Super Big
Mouths Play Colts On Sunday.
Hurricane Assistant Sprots
Editor Dave Issacs ran off at the
pen to chastise the Jets Namath
and Johnny Sample for their
pre-game optimism, theatrics
and general playboyishness.
Issacs, of course, had to eat
his typewriter.
But the point is this: Just who
the hell is Dave Issacs to slander

voted quarterback on the
all-time Southeastern
Conference team, assumes his
new duties immediately.
Im pleased to have Steve on
the staff and Jbelieve he will
make a valuable contribution in
recruiting* scouting of
opponents and ourselves through
films and in spring practice,
said Graves. During the spring
he will work under our offensive
coach, Fred Pancoast, and will
also work with our punters.
Spurrier has been the 49ers
regular punter the past two
seasons and is regarded as one of
the finest kickers UF has
produced, ranking right up with
Don Chandler and Bobby Joe
Green, both of whom also went
on to the NFL.
This is a wonderful
opportunity for me, Spurrier
said. This staff of coaches
meant a great deal to me and its
a pleasure to be able to work
with them. Coaching is the
profession I want to eventually
take up and Florida is where Id
like to be situated.
Spurrier, his wife Jerri and
daughter Lisa, live in Gainesville
where they built a home
following his senior year in
1966.

- and malign people who hes
never even spoken to? Just
because any writer has attained a
position that he knows will give
him a considerable audience, it
doesnt give him the right to
spout off so rashly.
Joe Namath told it like it was.
Issacs didnt.
***
QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Joe
Namath: I recently attended an
affair where all the wives of the
Jet players were thanked for
their contributions toward the
success of the team. Id like
personally to thank all the single
girls in New York for their
contribution.
***
"V ;
Florida States All-America
end Ron Sellers found himself
Karate Classes
The UF Karate Club is now
conducting free classes for male
beginners.
Those interested should meet
in the basement of the Florida
Gym today at 4:30.
Today is also the last day for
teams in the Engineering League
to sign up for volleyball. Teams
must sign up in the Intramural
Office, room 229 Florida Gym
by 5.
TINY TIM
MIGHT BE

By the time
youre in line
with 600 other
guys in their
undershorts,
it will be
too late to
read this book.
Like all steps in the draft, the pre-induc pre-induction
tion pre-induction physical isnt so forbidding once the
mystery is removed. THE DRAFT AND
YOU makes clear the entire Selective
Service process local boards, regis registration,
tration, registration, personal and written appeals,
deferments even conscientious objec- ;
tion and draft resistance. It goes into the
legal history of conscription and some
proposed alternatives to the system we
have now. If you still wind up in that line,
at least you wont be wondering why
youre there. An Anchor Original, $1.45

at your college store I DOUBLEDAY

with a strange bedfellow in
Mobile last weekend before the
Senior Bowl game.
His roomie was UFs Guy
Dennis.
Neither player talked much
about the game they played
against each other, however.
Sellers knew it was going to be a
bad day for the South when he
came onto the field and saw that
the head field judge was Doug
Moseley, the person same who
called a controversial pass
reception out of bounds in the
1966 FSU-UF clash. Moseley
ruled Seminole flanker Lane
Fenne* out of the endzone in

Bich >"<>" |
LOCAT.ONS f
715 NW 13th St. |

Thursday, January 16,1969, The Florida Alligator,

By the time
you've gone
from experi experimentation
mentation experimentation
to being a
Head, it will
be too late to
read this book.
;\
No subject is surrounded with as much
misinformation today as that of drugs,
v particularly as they relate to college stu students.
dents. students. DRUGS ON THE COLLEGE CAM CAMPUS
PUS CAMPUS is something else. Its the most
lucid, reasonable presentation of the
facts, problems, and issues that sur surround
round surround the taking of various drugs (bar (barbiturates,
biturates, (barbiturates, amphetamines, marijuana,
LSD, alcohol, even aspirin) that you can
find. Without a single sermonizing word.
An Anchor Original, 95*

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor

the closing minutes of that still
disputed affair.
***
At the University of
Kentucky annual football
banquet this winter, linebacker
Gary Shahid was presented the
One Hundred and Ten Percent
Award for putting out on the
football field.
Shahid, a junior Wildcat from
Fort Walton Beach, Florida,
told this reporter that he had
wanted to come to the UF but
that Gator recruiters told him he
was too small at 5-foot-10, 185.

Page 23



Page 24

. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 16,1969

I WS-1967...1M Yl ARS YOUNS 9 l|L uP Jj
Isr s c rr£. 1 ~ 0H ML nO LB Avy I
~ ||I3QN.E. 16 Ay. 0 n _||
A O p WILSON SLICED #A A
VEGETABLE & FRUIT BACON '"""'
PORK 2 to 3 lb. avg.
ffSIIUP QUARTER LOINS 59$
#303 CANS FRANKS -- 59<
crelm style corn canned ham > $3.49
WHOLE KERNEL I'^ A "JsSi7" A o7i
corn 4/ IMAYONAISSE 01 49( |
beets /69< * s~sr
APPLESAUCE fjA Po\CK^
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SMALL PEAS 4/ !9ffe:=:=:;^!S
MIXED PEAS /79< s,a,lt Antiseptic
TOMATO SAUCE CELERY 35< LISTERINE
^i.^^ Groan M#l OQx
FRUIT COCKTAIL CABBAGE .08 lb
WHOLE GREEN 3/ Rom* Ahoy Liquid
BEANS / APPLES 59< DETERGENT
GREEN LIMAS 79<| whta 3/1.00
FREESTONE PEACHES Jane Park,r
- GRAPE DkINK APPLE PIES
ORANGE DRINK ONIONS 29< 2^79<
TROPICAL PUNCH /9<
Whit. ,b Nabisco Premium ib.
ORANGE-PINEAPPLE POTATOES 49< SALTINES33{