Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The ?
V
Florida Alligator

Vol 61, No. 60

GENTRY TRIAL TODAY

7 00 Ask O'Connell
,
To 'Drop Charges'

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AC To Hear Status Report

UFs six-month-old Action
Conference Wednesday will
attempt to determine how many
recommendations must be acted
upon before the conferences
projected spring closing.
Action Conference, created
last June by UF President

Pregnant Problem Studied
(See Editorial, Page 6)
The policy committee of the Alachua County Schpol Board meets
tonight at 7:30 to reexamine and reevaluate board policy of replacing
teachers at mid-semester who become pregnant.
The meeting will be held in the Shands Teaching Hospital, Room
H-611.
Barbara Finlayson, a second grade teacher at Littlewood
Elementary School may lose her job because she is two-months
pregnant. Mrs. Finlayson is the wife of a UF medical student.
Among those who will testify at the board meeting tonight are
Robert Furlong, UF professor of law; Dr. Henry Blank, a local
physician; and Rev. Thaxton Springfield, pastor of the University
Methodist Church. v

America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Stephen C. OConnell, will hear
reports from its chairman, Dr.
Hal Lewis, on the status of the
recommendations already
passed.
Task force chairmen have
been asked to submit reports on
recommendations which they

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
Petitions calling for the
dropping of charges against
Lavon Gentry, containing the
names of more than 700 UF
students and faculty, were
presented to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell Monday
afternoon.
Gentry goes on trial today in
Gainesville Municipal court on
charges of defacing public
property. He was arrested last
summer after reportedly
attaching Bust the Draft Rally
posters on Little Hall and
surrounding signs and trees.
John Sugg, state secretary for
Southern Student Organizing
Committee (SSOC) presented
the petitions to OConnell.
Sugg said he Was presenting
the names as a scholar at the
University of Florida.
We, students and faculty of
the University of Florida
condemn the administrations
practice of selective law
enforcement in the arrest of
Lavon Gentry, the petition
said. '"s'
Furthermore, it said, we
demand charges against Lavon
Gentry be dropped and the case
be brought before the proper
University authorities.
I will consider these,
OConnell said.
Sugg said SSOC plans to hold
a rally at the Plaza of the
Americas at 2:30 p.m. today.
After several speeches, Sugg said,
the group will go to the
courtroom at the Gainesville
Police Station in time for the
3:30 p.m. trial.
We feel that this (selective
enforcement) is the type of
behavior which precipitated
democratic student rebellions
at campuses such as
Berkeley, Columbia and San
Francisco State, Sugg said.

are preparing for delivery to the
conference.
Nck terminal date was set for
the conterence upon its creation,
but it was hoped at the time that
it would not last longer than a
year.
Dr. Franklin A. Doty,
chairman of ACs steering
committee, said a terminal date
should be set in fairness to the
members of AC.
I think this is a particularly
important meeting of the
conference because it will
provide an opportunity for some
stock-taking on the status of the
recommendations thus far
made, Doty said.
The meeting will be at 2:30
p.m. Wednesday in room 1038
of the Architecture and Fine
Arts building. j

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LAVON GENTRY
... revolution of ideas
Gentry: Rebel
With A Cause?
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Lavon Louis Gentry is a revolutionary.
But his revolution is one of ideas, not violent upheaval.
Gentry, 2UC, is to appear before Judge Wade Hampton today in
Gainesville Municipal Court to answer charges of defacing public
property. He was arrested last August for posting a Bust the Draft
Rally" sign on a campus building.
A member of the Southern Students Organizing Committee
(SSOC), pronounced sock, he readily admits that most campus
radicals are misfits in society.
In fact, Im misfit, he says.
SSOC was formerly affiliated with Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS) but dropped its attachment last quarter.
SDS is currently going through an identity crisis nationwide, he
notes.
On one hand are those members who want violent disruption of
government and society. On the other side of the split, members
foresee gradual revolution with radical liberalism being a catalyst for
change.
SDS and SSOC will have to step out of society and attack it from
Y
(SEE 'GENTRY' PAGE 2)
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_. ._ RANDY BASSETT
THE STRIPPER
Babs Bower, 3AS and a member of Delta Gamma sorority strips
the finish from a paint peeling cabin at Lake Wauburg. Babs was part
of a SGGreek liason that volunteered to help renovate the lake's
facilities.



Page 2

!. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 14,1969

Employes Fight Over
Parking Fee Underway

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
A confrontation between UF
Plants and Grounds employes
and the administration over a
parking fee is nearing a head, an
unidentified spokesman for the
dissatisfied workers said
: Mbnday.
The necessary funds to hire a
lawyer to represent the men has
been collected and legal action
will begin soon, he said.
Future consideration for
promotions are in jeopardy if
those who are leading this
movement are discovered, he
said. They may not fire you
but they could do things that
would hurt your chance for the
future.
Faculty and staff making
more than $4,500 must pay a
basic fee of $lO with a $5 fee
for those making less than
$4,500, according to the
proposed plan which received
approval at a Board of Regents
meeting in Boca Raton last
month.
The new parking and traffic
plan for UF has been delayed
until Mar. 21, the beginning of
the spring quarter.
Parking is provided near SW
34th Street for plants and
grounds personnel with
transportation provided for
those working on campus.
A hat was passed by the men
to raise the money needed to
hire a lawyer to begin
proceedings.
Only a few of the men are
expected to quit if they are
asked to pay the fee.
Director of UF Physical Plant
Calvin C. Greene said, We cant
have things like everyone would
like to have it. It takes money to
run this program.
The man that benefits has to
pay for it, said Greene and

Transportation Dept, 5G
Give Campus Bus Rides
Students can ride the bus to class at no cost.
Two busses, supported by Student Government and operated by
the Department of Transportation, shuttle to classes every weekday.
Bus A leaves Hume Hall at 7:25 a.m. for 8 ajn. class. It continues
along Radio Rd. for stops at Jennings Hall, the Towers, Sorority Row,
Tigert, Walker Hall, Floyd Hall, the Main Cafeteria, the Campus
Bookstore and the stadium. It returns to Hume Hall to repeat the run
for 9:05 class.
Bus B, which leaves Fraternity Row at 7:20 a.m. for 8 a.m. classes,
stops at Hume Hall then turns onto North-South Rd. and stops at
Graham Hall, the Campus Bookstore, and the stadium.
It returns to Fraternity Row for 9:05 a.m. class.
Bus A does not stop at Fraternity Row or Norman Hall and skips
the stadium on the last two runs.
Bus B does not stop at Jennings Hall or the Towers on any run.
Booster Shots Given
Boosters for students who participated in the Hong Kong flu study
last quarter will be given today at Hume Hall between 4 p.m. and 6
p.m.
THE. FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

added this is the idea he is in
sympathy with.
He feels the Board of Regents
has to consider many of our
requests for funds and cannot
give us money for our parking
problem too.
The first formal protest to
the administrations parking plan

Faculty Senate Asks
Lower Grad Credits
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Senate tonight plans to prod UF colleges to follow the
progressive lead of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Arts and Sciences faculty earlier this month overwhelmingly
passed requirements changes, including lowering required college
credit hours from 96 to 90 and the new drop and add procedure
allowing students to drop courses to minimum load through the
fourth week of classes without having to petition.
The resolution calls for other colleges to take notice of this action
and hopefully follow its lead.
Another bill calls for judiciary changes in the hall, area and campus
judiciary system.
Twenty-two committees will be given nominees for appointments.
Along with these appointments go a proposed act requiring that
nomination to UF committees be presented for approval within three
weeks, rather than waiting all quarter like last time, said Charles
Harris, senate majority leader.
Other business on tonights agenda includes a resolution
commending the Rathskeller committee for their hard work and one
thanking the Arts and Sciences college for its progressive academic
steps.
The meeting will begin at 7:30 pjn. Senators will meet in room
349 of the Reitz Union.

Student Board Probes
Possible SSOC Status

The Committee on Student
Organizations begins proceedings
today to decide whether or not
to recommend the Southern
Student Organizing Committee
be granted official recognition.
According to Professor R.E.

came last month from members
of the Department of Zoology.
This will not solve any
parking problems the present
permit system is unable to
handle, said the petition, we
urge that all faculty of all
departments on campus join
with us in refusing to pay this
unwarranted assessment.

Choate, the committee, which
meets at 3 p.m. in room 357 of
the Reitz Union, will determine
what criterion will be used in
granting recognition.
SSOC, which has asked for a
public hearing, will be unable to
use university facilities if refused
recognition.
Choate said this was the first
time any organization has ever
asked for a public hearing before
the committee.

A NEW TASTE TREAT
hot soft
PRETZELS
sold only at the
Dipper Dans at the"
S'
Westgate Shopping Center
Sold only Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 7pm-10pm


Gentry-' Rebel
With A Cause?
FROH PA6t
there, the Lakeland youth explains.
Total revolution is out of the question now, he says. It will
probably not come in our lifetime we must wait.
So Gentry is an advocate of a gradual change to radical liberal
ideals, not quickly attained by overthrow.
But he holds, There is no such thing as democracy. Like
anything else democracy is an ideal that probably may never be
completely attained, he says. The radicals such as those in SDS who
take Gentrys view want to make society as democratic as possible.
Gentry sees prejudice as the snagging force in society preventing it
from achieving true democracy. It seems to stagnate society, he
says. The nation is devolving.
Even though there are statutes to erase technical prejudice in
housing, jobs and education real prejudice still exists among the
people, he charges.
There are too many laws that seem inane, he says. They
confuse issues.
Gentry got involved with the radical students on campus when he
became disoriented politically and socially.
He joined SSOC following a disappointing experience with a
fraternity when he was a freshman in 1967.
I asked myself, ls this my place? he says, when made to
conform to a set pattern of social and political views.
For all his outspokenness on the inequities of society he is not a
non-nationalist.
This is my country, no matter how much may be wrong with it,
he says. I just want to change it I still love my country.
Although he identifies himself as a rebel, he says he feels probably
more nationalistic than some people who pay -only lip service to
national goals.
In his analysis there are three reasons for radicalism in America.
The first stimulus has been the immoral war in Vietnam and the
inequities involved in fighting it.
The second inducement has been a personal persecution complex.
When people are put down, they strike back, he says.
He agrees the radicals misunderstand others, but its because so
many people have misunderstood them.
The third issue has been the argument over drugs and restrictive
laws on their use and possession. This has been only a minor reason
for getting involved, however, he says.
Referring to his arrest and todays trial he says, Publicity will just
make the administration smarter next time. It only worsens things
since the affair is so mickeymouse.

Scabbard & Blade Plans
Rush Smoker Tonight

Scabbard and Blade, best
known for their big boom at
Gator football games, will hold
rush smokers for all interested
Air Force and Army ROTC
cadets in the advanced program
tonight and Thursday night from
6:30 to 8:30.
The smokers will be held in
room 107 of the ROTC

headquarters and dress is either
khakis or dress greens.
[
In addition to firing the Civil
War cannon, Scabbard and Blade
i works on the cadet blood drive,
i has adopted a unit in Vietnam,
and undertakes each year a high
school military service
orientation program.



Rathskeller Opens Friday

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Fo o t stomping,
hand-clapping, rousing
Dixieland renditions and lots
and lots of banjos thats the
sound of New Yorks Your
Fathers Mustache, appearing in
two shows nightly at the
Rathskellers grand opening this
weekend.
The group smacks of Rudy
Vallee, the Perils of Pauline, the
lunchtime beer pail, vaudeville
and hundreds of other memories
from Americas past.
Your Fathers Mustache is
the Gay 90s, Prohibition, and
the Roaring 20s all played on
trombones, pianos, tubas,
washboards with kitchen knives,
and banjos and banjos and more
banjos.
Audience participation is
crucial to the group which was
organized in 1963 by Joel
Sciavone, a 30-year-old Harvard
Business School Graduate.
Your Fathers Mustache is
actually a night club chain with
emporiums in Boston, New
Pizza I
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. freshly prepared from a 1
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baked to perfection with |
your choice of: cheese, I
olives, mushrooms, I
pepperoni, hamburger, I
sausage or anchovies. J
Special I
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Reg. $1.65 I
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Good Jan. 14, 15, 16 I
Jan. 21, 22, 23 I
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Bring this ad j
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York, New Orleans, St. Louis,
and other major cities and resort
areas.
Comedians and performers
direct from the Bitter End
Coffeehouse in Greenwich
Village, New York, and from the
Boom-Boom-Room of the
Fountainbleu Hotel on Miami
Beach kick off the first few
weekends of entertainment at
the Rathskeller.
Grace and Costello, a
comedy team now appearing at
the Fountainbleu will be on tap
Jan. 20-25. The Lee Shaw Jazz
Trio, from New York will be
featured along with *:he comedy
team.
From the Flick Coffee
House, in Miami comes the
folk-rock Ewing Street Times,
set' to play Feb. 3-8.
Erica, Eros and Young, a

t
The next time
some guy tells you
a used car
is "just like new"
ask for the
guarantee.
P/ 1
4 MBk
jms bie m.
When all the smooth talk is done, a guarantee is or 1000 miles, whichever comes first, free,
about the only thing this kind of guy- is guaranteed The engine, transmission, front axle assemblies,
not togiveyou. rear axle, electrical system, brake system are all
Which might explain why so many people find it cove red,
rough going with a used car they got f rom a smooth- We can cover them because we fix what needs
talking salesman. flying beforehand. When we inspect our trade-ins.
\/ oks a g us edcard ea Ie r s aren t smooth If they dont pass inspection, of course, they j
talkers. In fact, we arent talkers at a!!. don't get the guarantee.
Our guarantee says it all. But if they do, anything we have to say about
Well repair or replace any of the major work- hem we say in writing,
ing parts of our guaranteed used cars, r or 30 days K.s.cH the conversation you need.
MillerBrown Motors ||§
4222 N.W. 13th Street 376-4552
' \

folk-rock gfoup, performing at
the Bitter End is scheduled
for the end of February.
Student and faculty talent
has been tapped for weeknight
performances and to fill
in-between professional acts.
Happenings are being
planned by Dr. A.D. Graeffe of
the Comprehensive Humanities
Department and the Florida
Players may put on one-act plays
in the Rat.
Were looking for variety
acts, comedians, one-act
plays all kinds of acts, Fran
Belous, local entertainment
chairman said.
Bette's Hairstylist
1620 W. Univ. Ave.
University Pla/a
Pb. 378-2244

| SG to Publish I
Book Sale List
: The Student Government book exchange will publish in the v
: Alligator a list of receipt numbers of students whose books have ?
i been sold, according to Pete Fryefield, head of the exchange. y
: Students whose books were sold can then expect a check in *l*
£ the mail. If their books were not sold, they may pick them upTy
; with their receipt, in room 2Oo> of the Reit/ Union, on Jan. 21. £
23,27,29, or 31. £
$ Students who lost their receipt may claim their unsold books y
on Jan. 31. :
According to Secretary of the Interior Ric Katz, about 1.000 y
§ books were taken in on consignment, and about half were sold. :
RECONDITIONED TYPEWRITERS
36 Manuals from S4O. to $95.
18 Electrics from $l5O to $225.
Terms, too.
*
Kiser Office Equipment
604 North Main Street

Tuesday, January 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Towers Lot Underway

Another campus dust bowl began bowing out
this week with the start of construction on the new
Towers parking lot.
Calvin Greene, Director of UFs Physical Plant
Division, explained that the new lot will be ready
within a few months.
There has been no schedule announced as to the
lots completion date, Greene said. Construction,
however, is well under way, and should be finished
sometime during next quarter.

UF Profs Seek
'Center Os Man

By SUSAN WHALEY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Center of Man, an
experiment to develop mans
unlimited potential for love,
caring, achievement,
compassion, creativity and
personal growth, was formed
this month by three UF
psychologists.
Drs. Ted Landsman, Sidney
Jourard and Vincent OConnell
will direct the center. The
headquarters is in Micanopy.
The three will provide a
setting of leadership for those
who wish to: renew
themselves, theiF marriages, their
relationships with their children,
their co-workers and their
neighbors. The center also
hopes to help participants
re-invent new roles for
themselves, new personal,
religious and professional
commitments, and aid them in
their search for their best selves.
In addition to the professors,
23 persons will be staff

Check-Cashing, Golf
Discussed For Union
The possibility of establishing a check-cashing service at the Reitz
Union will be one of the topics of discussion at todays meeting of the
Reitz Union Board of Managers at 3:30 p.m.
Main problems of the service are finding methods of identification,
procedure for cashing checks, and the upper limit for amount cashed.
A report on the feasibility of putting a miniature golf course and
other activities on the roof of the Union will be read. The report
discusses whether the roof is strong enough to hold the weight, if cost
of strengthening the roof is practical, and if enough students will use
the activities.
Bob White, president of Union Program Council, will also mis4^M s
recommendations for committee appointments for the boards vo{e.
Whats NEW at the
V BOOKSTORE*?
WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR
REFERENCE SECTION.
WE KEEP IN STOCK
SEVERAL THOUSAND TITLES
ON ALL SUBJECTS,
IN BOTH HARD AND PAPER BACK EDITIONS,
WE ALSO HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK
OF HANDBOOKS,
MATHMETICAL TABLES
AND THE BEST KNOWN OUTLINE SERIES.
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
\
Campus Shop & Bookstore
I

members. Operating costs of the
Center will be shared by the
members.
It seems like a much needed
kind of setting for the times.
Jourard said. It will serve as an
opportunity for people to
explore their life situations in
the company of other people
and possibly enable them to
invent new ways for living to
keep more alive and growing.
The first encounter group
will begin the weekend of Jan.
18 in Daytona Beach. About 20
people will be participating in
the free atmosphere to explore
their feelings.
The object of these meetings
will be to free the group from
constricted forces and structures
which have inhibited new forms
of inter-personal relationships,
according to the directors.
The directors of the center
hope to eventually form another
group for teenagers with the
same basic goals and principles
set for the adult group.

Two separate lots are under construction. The
first, a student lot, will contain four lanes of
parking. It will be located between the south side of
the Towers and Diamond Village.
A second lot will serve the new housing offices
located adjacent to the towers, and will be built on
the east side of the Towers'between the housing
office and S.W. 13th Street.
The north side of the Towers, presently used for
student parking, will be landscaped at a later date,
according to Greene.

If your car needs repair
call
A-1 AUTOMOTIVE
. Brakes repaired
. Tune-ups
. Over-hauls
. Muffler & Tailpipes
. Automotive parts
. Major repairs
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
.ON ALL
Parts & Labor
1417 N.W. 2nd St.
378-9838

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WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
IN INSPECTING
ISRAELITES: The controversial
Rabbi Rudolf Adler conducts a
seminar on Judaic Studies today
from 3 till 5 pjn. at the Hillel
Foundation. Rabbi Adler will be
available for informal discussions
with interested persons from 11
a.m. till 3 p.m. at the Hillel
House.
IN THOSE WITH THE
GREYEST MATTER: MENSA
meets tonight at 8 in room 362
of the Reitz Union. Nominations
for new officers will be made at
this time.
IN THE SIR FROM SUR:
Rick Masters, who hails from
around the Big Sur in way out
west, will appear in the Union
auditorium tonight at 7. His
performance is sponsored by the
Unitarian Student Forum.
IN ABLE TO LEAP TALL
AISLE DISPLAYS IN A
SINGLE BOUND, FASTER
THAN A SPEEDING
BAGBOY : Yes, its
Super(market)man, and he will
be talking to the Agriculture
Science Dames tonight at 7:30.
The talk will be at the University
Womens Club.
Our own local Superman is
Charles Wood of Publix.
IN GREEK LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Delta Sigma Pi
meets tonight at 7 in room 122
of the Union.
UF Debaters
Place Third
At Vanderbilt
The UF varsity debaters
placed third this weekend at
Vanderbilt Universitys Debate
Tournament in Nashville, Tenn.
Steve Rosin and Ralph
Glatfelter led the undefeated
team to a unanimous decision
against Kentucky in the
quarterfinals.
UF lost to Emory University
in the semifinals.
Glatfelter won fourth place
foj individual speakers in a field
of 40 participants.
At the University of Georgia
Novice Debate Tournament the
team of Gloria Mikula and David
Rouse represented UF.
Mortar Board
Applications
Available
Applications for Mortar
Board, womens honorary
leadership organization, are
available at the student activities
desk, third floor of the Reitz
Union.
To he eligible, a woman must
have a 3.0 grade point average
and be a junior by June 1069.
Deadline for turning in
applications is 5 p.m. Friday.
at
CRANE IMPORTS
Htwumph]
SAL ES-SER VICE VICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS VICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
SO6 E. duly. Ave. 372-4373

DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST

I HEREBY CLAIM TrflS ISLAND ~X YOU CAN'T PO \ ( MoMARCHY/J [ btVVHTP a
asasaggj li" ?d /X
IssSjTtfTgS. l f

Audubon Film Series
On Union Schedule

The seventh season for the
Audubon Wildlife Films in
Alachua County starts at 8 p.m.
Jan. 23 in the Reitz Union
auditorium.
The National Audubon
Society series is a selection of
speakers and color movies
Fruit Thieves
Never Caught
No one stealing money from
honor fruit boxes has ever been
caught, according to Campus
Policeman Gene Watson.
The difficulty in
apprehending thieves is caused in
part by the reluctance of
students to tell on their
classmates.
When an honor fruit box is
broken into, the campus police
investigate, dust for fingerprints
and take pictures at the scene of
the crime. If any suspects are
located, fingerprints can be
compared; otherwise, the case
reaches a dead end.
e DELICIOUS I
CTCAIZC S
FINE FOOD I
< I
student prices
Breakfast served I
daily. I
1614 N. W. 13th ST. I
378-0955 I

GemutLichKeit, f. good-natured, sanguine, easy-going
disposition; good natured; kindliness; geniality;
pleasantness; cordiality; sentiment, tenderness of
feeling; freedom from pecuniary cares; comfortableness.
M
1 k
77?/s /'s f/?e philosophy on which the Rathskeller was planned, built and will operate. i
Friendliness is contagious, today the \
Rathskeller, tomorrow the world. \J

designed to promote
appreciation and understanding
of the world of nature.
Karl Maslowski,
%
photographer-naturalist, presents
the first program, A Naturalist
Afield.
UF student season tickets for
the five film series are $3;
general admission is $5. Tickets
may be purchased at the Reitz
Union Box Office, the Florida
State Museum in the George
Seagle Building, or at the door.

WELCOME BACK TO SCHOOL
I TO ACQUAINT OUR GAINESVILLE NEIGHBORS
WITH THIS NEWEST & MOST ADVANCED METHOD
OF FABRIC CARE
I* WPRE HOLDING THIS SALE FOR 2 WEEKS FOR THE
V STUDENTS' Ist GARMENT REG PRICE
BENEFIT 2nd LIKE GARMENT lA
"4-DAY SERVICE"
makes dry fetjzlngl
OBSOLETE FIUMUn
1120 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. k JV37B-3119

I ROBBIE'S I
S Best In Steak s^^
QfSandwiche.
rCOLOR TV & BILLIARDS
p. 718 W. University Ave.
I OnThe Gold Coast"

Tuesday, January 14, 1969/The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 14, 1969

The Florida Alligator
o
"The price of freedom
** exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
NJHSS.X Editor-In-Chief
P&CI/kaJtt/V Dave Doucette
... Managing Editor
j\a
. Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor

Staff Writings

Union Hosts Crowd

What was the event? What could possibly gather the usual busy
union into clusters of humans around a mechanical object?
The television sets in the Union sat back gloating at the attention
they received on special occasions such as this.
Such was the demand to see the picture, the television in the Union
TV lounge was lifted on a platform.
Ah ha! Now Ive got them eating out of my tubes it said with a self
satisfied smile on its face. The edges of the picture seemed to pick up
at the corners.
If the television had been a mean and petty machine, it would have
decided to blink out just to spite the humans who now clamored for
its sight.
However, remembering that such an appealing little brat as Heidi
who wasnt even a machine was almost lynched in another game on
television when she came tripping across the fifty yard line, the
television thought better of it.
The event was the Super Bowl. All the television rooms were
crowed at least an hour before the game started.
There was a crowd in the cafeteria. The food grew cold, no one
talked during the game. No one swallowed without saying excuse me.
The sounds could only be described as group sounds.
OHHHHHHHHHHHHH! and AHHHHHHHHHH! Or everyone
would come out with their own choice remarks at the appropriate
times, but only all at once.
In the T.V. lounge of the Union the gathering extended into the
clearing outside the area. Men came up, peered over shoulders or
between heads in an effort to catch a glimpse of the game on the color
set.
Hypnotized, an earthquake could have split the union in two, and
the crowd, en masse, would have shaken their fists at the interference
and huddled closer to the television.
It was dangerous to walk in front of the set even for an instant, for
dedicated football fans probably sharpened their umbrellas into
spears, just waiting for a moving target foolhardy enough to approach
the screen. (These targets might have included females who wanted a
better view of Broadway Joe.)
In spite of the desertion in offices, fraternity housed, and dorms
for the nearest television set, the afternoon dragged on for those, who,
like this reporter do not appreciate the finer things in life such as
superbowls.
Fans may point out the struggles of heroes, both real and fictional
who have undergone the same suffering and have drawn a large
following.
But it wasnt a game for them, the stakes were higher.

Watching:

A New Word For Love?

I hate love. I hate it because
its trite, banal, hackneyed,
overworked, abused, and almost
worthless. Well, I dont actually
hate love, the act-emotion-feel act-emotion-feeling,
ing, act-emotion-feeling, but just the word.
Love has become a nothing
word that is used to describe so
many things that it has lost the
real power it once had. The
power to explain to someone
special that they were special.
Now love is used to describe
what a girl thinks about a new
dress her friend is wearing
Ohhh, 1 just love that dress.
Or it can be used
interchangably with like, admire,
respect, desire. Its a nothing
word because we have taken
advantage of it. One could
almost say that love has been
raped.
The word love has taken a
place of prominence with other
nothing words such as cute,

By Chris Schauseil

tough, neat, cool, and jazz. Now
love, a word that should have
remained sacred, must be
included with a list of terms that
can, and often do, mean
anything and everything all at
the same time.
Do you know who is
responsible for the prostitution
of love? This generation our
generation the love
generation. We are the culprits.
You know about the love
generation dont you? They are
the ones who scream pig and
facist and mother f-ker at
police in countless cities across
the country.
The serious advocates of the
power of love are usually the
same people who profess a
respect for the rights of others
and demand respect in turn. But
how can we be expected to love
the same people who lob bags of

EDITORIAL

Mrs. Barbara Finlayson, the wife of a UF
medical student who may lose her job at
Littlewood Elementary School, takes her
case before the policy committee of the
Alachua County School Board tonight.
She wont be alone either. Scores of
parents, many of them UF professors, have
signed a petition addressed to the policy
committee asking that Mrs. Finlayson be
permitted to continue teaching.
Despite the fact that she is pregnant.
Unlike the committee which created the
policy, the parents are convinced that
gestation is unlikely to interfere with the
pursuit of quality education.
The policy itself, passed quietly in
September, has many interesting angles. In
the first place, no one except members of
the school board were aware of the new
policy, which prohibits a teacher from
continuing in her job during the next
semester after she becomes pregnant.
Apparently, the board was trying to
reduce the number of interruptions school
children often face during the middle of a
term.
By itself, the goal is desirable. But the
new policy may in the long run only cause
unnecessary disruptions. The previous
policy, under which a pregnant teachers
continued employment was decided by her
principal, seems far superior. It considers the
human element, the individual
circumstances.
Another aspect of the new policy is its
rigidity. It makes no allowances for date of
conception, expected date of delivery, the
individual teachers capacity to teach while
pregnant, the effect of a possibly
unnecessary change in teachers on the pupils
involved or the effect on the career of the
teacher herself.
All those considerations, and many
others, must be brought into play before a
fair and intelligent decision can be made.
Rigid, fixed criteria is not the answer.
The new policy does not consider the
medical differences between expectant
mothers, either. For some, immediate
termination of employment may be
necessary. For others probably the
majority active employment is desirable.

By Jeff Alford

human excrement and urine at
their opponents. How can we be
expected to love the people who
take drugs that can cause them
to sit on a hill with a rifle and
take pot-shots at passing
motorists.
Jt
If this is what love has come
to mean then I was wrong. Love
has not been prostituted it has
been murdered and buried in
hypocrisy. All we can do is look
for a new word to substitute for
it.
I wish it hadnt died this way wayit
it wayit was such a nice word that
seemed so easy to say when one
finally began to feel it. Love was
reserved for one person at a time
and certainly only a few during a
lifetime. Our generation put love
to the ax and it is up to our
generation to find the right word
to replace it.
Got any suggestions?

Let Her Teach

%p l 'j '. rvyjT vV. ;
What Frightens Me Is Theres Nobody Living Up There
To Defend Ourselves Against"

The mother-to-be is too busy to sit home
eating chocolates or worrying about the
fetus in her womb.
From a legalistic standpoint, the policy is
of doubtful validity. It appears on the
surface to be discriminatory and unjustly
harsh. Extension of the policy to an extreme
would require that every teacher, whether
married or single, be required to submit to a
pregnancy test prior to every term.
Only then can parents and the school
board be assured that pregnancy will not be
a cause of disruption of classes.
The new policy also overlooks the
children involved. Can it be disputed that a
pregnant teacher might excite healthy
curiosity in the youngsters and provide an
ideal situation for meaningful education
about love, sex, family relations, etc.? Such
an opportunity should not be passed up
without good cause.
It would appear, then, that the policy
committee made an honest error in
judgment. Tonight, they will re-examine the
policy. We suggest that the new policy be
scrapped and the former one reinstituted.
Parents who want their children to avoid
unnecessary interruptions in their
educational development should attend the
policy committee meeting and urge repeal of
the new policy.
Room H-611, Shands Teaching Hospital.
Tonight.
Job Well Done
The recently concluded Student
Government book exchange must be noted
as one of the best projects ever devised by
our Student Government.
The program offered students an
opportunity to save money at a time of the
quarter when money disappears quickly.
Hopefully, this program will be continued
every quarter, and will soon be large enough
to offer strong enough competition to the
local book merchants to lower the high
prices of these educational tools.
To the members who worked hard on
this bookexchange goes a hearty Job well
done.



Veterans Invited

To Take Part

MR. EDITOR:
With all due respect regarding the address
delivered by President to the #Bferans Club, I would like to
clarify some points made.
President O Connell gave us no mandate. In his acceptance of a
plaque presented to him by the Veterans Club, he invited those
present to participate, both as a group and as individuals, in the
current affairs of the university. He encouraged us to voice our
opinions in those matters which interest us. He did not advise us to
strike out, blindly or otherwise, on all campus issues.
President OConnell cares about this university. Perhaps that
sounds trite but he cares as much as anyone could. And in his
response to our small token of appreciation for what he has done for
our university, and our country, he has greatly reinforced our respect
and admiration for him. He gave us no mandate; he simply spoke to us
as a man appreciative of the honor bestowed on him by those present,
and invited us, as he would any student on this campus, to take an
active part in our university,.
JOHN B. BRETT, JR.
. ' >
~
'/iif \ hi

LETTERS
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters to the editor must
be typed and signed and should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers' names may be withheld from publication for just cause.
The editor reserves the right to edit all letters in the interest of
snace.

Speaking Out

Dont ever go to Tigert Hall."
While Jeff Alford was drafting his witless piece of
destructive; criticism, did it ever occur to him that
people live and work within those seeming deserted
walls. People who must meet deadlines and periods
of duress; people who sometimes get frustrated and
angry hut nevertheless continue providing services.
People who apologize for their mistakes and try
harder to meet the many demands with which they
open each day. People aren't perfect and neither
is Jeff Alford.
. Oh, how easy it is to find fault especially when
the student tradition of bucking the sxstem and
complaining about everything we encountei dictates
that this is the wav of all bona fide student
objectors! Win is it so difficult to compliment
what s eood in this world or is this taboo to the

No Rigor Mortis In Tigert Tomb

OPEN FORUM:
J[djowimi ViAAMt
There is no hope for the complacent man

Social Frat
Organizing
On UFCampus
MR. EDITOR:
A new social fraternity, Phi
Kappa Theta International, with
over 65 chapters in the United
States and Canada, is now
colonizing at the U F.
Phi Kappa Theta Colony has
been given 30 days by the
Committee on Student
Organizations in which to build
its membership and fulfill other
requirements. There are
currently eight men in the
colonizing group. President of
the colony is Les Brown. I am
Rush Chairman.
The colony here is being
sponsored by the University of
Georgias Delta Rho chapter of
Phi Kappa Theta. The eight
members of UFs colonizing
group visited Delta Rho last
quarter and another visit is
expected this quarter.
Phi Kappa Theta includes
many prominent alumni in its
bonds such as the late President
John F. Kennedy, Senator
Eugene J. McCarthy, Georgias
head football coach Vince
Dooley, Ed McMahon of The
Tonight Show and comedian
Bob Hope.
The UF colony will have a
series of smokers in the Union
plus other activities and
interested men are urged to
attend one of these smokers,
which will be announced in the
Alligator.
TOM RATICAN, 2UC
RUSH CHAIRMAN
PHI KAPPA THETA COLONY

creed of we who delight in emerging from our own
irreproachable inner Sanctum" to poke the sticky
finger at other human beings?
Yes. it would be extremely easy (and I must
confess, almost an irresistible temptation) to
respond in such away to your prejudiced attack,
Mr. Alford. I am replete with contradictory
arguments.
However. I will assume that you are one of the
unfortunate individuals who for one reason or
another never took the opportunity to avail yourself
to the positive aspects of the administration.
And there are. I submit, more positive attiibutes
Ilian you have allowed your editorial to reflect.
President O'Connell, indeed, has endeavored to
establish a lepulation Ipi friendliness and genuine

f/.V.V.VAV.'.V.V/.V.V.V.'.V.V.V. Poetry K'KmWftWW^ftWMMWKWJ
{ Distant Stars (
1 In Wintertime I
% ;?
||: To Seek the Stars
ji |:
:: (to those with worlds yet to conquer, $
:: who are dedicated to LOVE and Beauty) jj:
:: I cant touch but your mind ft
:: this very last time. :
:: Please dont leave, your once-bright eyes £
§ clouded with hate. But end it with a sad smile :
$ and warm life. ft
:|j I offer still my life, ft
ft but that may never be . ft
I*l J %
$ the Stars, Love, seem now ;j
S too distant for me. ft
$ I wish, shining bodies, £
to behold within my sight . }
$ once more your beautiful,
' Vanishing Light. £
ft Too Soon. ft;
i 5:
ft ROBERT WISNIEWSKI ft

Tuesday, January 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

warmth. But many, many others in that tomb
you describe are willing and able to help you and
me through our sundry crises.
Please give them credit for that. It shouldn't be
too taxing to acquaint yourself with the other side
of the human coin.
Incidentally, Mr. Alford, I too am a student who
often is reduced to helpless frustration over
someone's inefficiency and lack of concern for the
problems I face from day to day. But when you sit
on two sides of the fence your perspective
thankfully improves.
Drop by the Tigert Information Desk any day
from 1:30 to 3:30 and I will be glad to exchange
views with you at greater length. You see. I work in
this so-called tomb and I don't feel rigor mortis
setting in!

By Sally English

Page 7



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Page 8

Orange and

Administrative
Notices

CAMPUS TRAFFIC AND
PARKING: Faculty, staff and
students are urged to view the
presentation of the University's
new traffic and parking plan
which will be shown over
WUFT-TV pm Thursday, Jan.
16, at 9 on Arnold Butt,
coordinator for traffic and
planning on the campus, will use
slides and film to explain details
of the plan. Questions on the
plan may be telephoned prior to
the program by calling 392-0471
or 392-0475 during the day or
392-0426 in the evening,
Monday through Wednesday.
-4
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA:
Scholarships for $2,000 graduate
study for Alpha Lambda Delta
graduates of 1966, 1967, 1968
and June, 1969. Apply at 123
Tigert, Dean of Women's Office,
or call 392-9436 for further
information. Deadline for
application is Jan. 15.
FOREIGN STUDENTS AND
FACULTY: Aliens in the United
States should fill-out an Address
Report Card Form I-53 during
the month of January. The card
may be obtained at and returned
to any U.S. Post Office.
P c T R Y READING:
Professor Peter Lisca will present
readings on Theodore Roethke
Thursday, Jan. 16, from 4:40 to
5:30 p.m. in Lounges 122 and
123 of the Reitz Union.
PRE-MEDICAL 8t
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS:
Students must register with the
Pre-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 105 Anderson
Hall, starting Monday, Jan. 13
through Jan. 24. Be sure to bring
with you the full names of all
your instructors and the course
and section numbers.

FOR YOUR NEXT CAR LOAN.., at. g- ~~
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours:B:ooa.m. 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday

UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the
Audobon Wildlife Films
Series.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
on Thursday, January 16, at
1:30 p.m. in Room 235 Tigert
Hall.
ELIGIBILITY FOR
PA R TICIPATION IN
EXTRACURRICULAR
ACTIVITIES: To hold any
elected or appointed office in
any extracurricular activity, a
student must be free of
disciplinary, scholarship,
academic or admissions
probation. He also must be
classified as a full-time student
enrolled n a minimum of 12
hours. In exceptional
circumstances, a student, not
eligible to hold an elected or
appointed office, may obtain
information on seeking a waiver
by contacting the Dean of Men
or the Dean of Women.
NOTICE- The ARREDONDO
ROOM will be opened for
lunch Monday through
Friday, 11:30 to 2:00 p.m.
until further notice.

-
PEACE CORPS: A Peace
Corps recruiting team will visit
the campus the week of Jan.
13-17. Interested students may
interview with representatives in
the Game Lobby of the Reitz
Union.
COSTA RICA TEACHING
POSITION: There is a vacancy
for a single female elementary
school teacher in the American
High School in San Jose, Costa
Rica. Knowledge of Spanish is
not necessary. Employment is to
begin February, 1969. For
further information, contact
Enrique Segovia, 378-8904, after
5 p.m.

BLUE BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 14
Seminole Portrait Photography,
346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi, 122 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Unitarian Student Forum, Folk
Singer, Rick Masten, Union
Aud., 7:00 p.m.
Supper Club Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Student Physical Therapy
Association Meeting, A-91
Teaching Hospital, 7:30 p.m.
Agriculture Science Dames
Meeting, Speaker, Mr. Charles
Wood, University Women's
Club, Newberry Road, 7:30
p.m.
Mensa Meeting, 362 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Wednesday, January 15
Seminole Portrait Photography,
346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Campus Games Tournament,
Tournaments in Bowling,
Billiards, Table Tennis, Chess
and Bridge, Games Area,
Union, Time Varies.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, Slides, 349 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Experimental College
Registration & Meeting, 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 362 Union,
7:30 p.m.
K

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

*
Thursday, January 16
Seminole Portrait Photography,
346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
Poetry Reading and Discussion,
Prof. Peter Lisca, 'Theodore
Roethke", 121 Union, 4:40
p.m.
Campus Games Tournament,
Tournaments in Bowling,
Billiards, Table Tennis, Chess
and Bridge, Games Area,
Union, Time Varies.
Christian Science Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Student Contractors and
Builders Assoc. Meeting, 347
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Student Government Rathskeller
Opening, "Your Father's
Mustache", Main Cafeteria,
8:00 p.m.
United Nations Assoc. Meeting,
103-B AFA, 7:30 p.m..
Speaker: Sarah Adams, Univ.
of Liberia.
Friday, January 17
Seminole Portrait Photography,
346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Dept, of Engineering Science &
Mechanics, Dr. William E.
Miner, "Activities in the
Flight Theory, etc.", McCarty
Hall Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Campus Games Tournament,
Tournaments in Bowling,
Billiards, Table Tennis, Chess
and Bridge, Games Area,
Union, Time Varies.
Union Movie, 'The Happening",
Union Aud., 6:00, 8:30 and
p.m.
Student Government Rathskeller
Opening, "Your Father's
Mustache", Main Cafeteria,
8:00 p.m.

PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
JAN. 14-15: ALLSTATE
INSURANCE CO. Bus. Ad,
Lib. Arts. ARMSTRONG CORK
CO. ChE, CE, Bus. Ad, Acctg.
JAN. 14-15-16: THE BELL
SYSTEM group meeting Jan.
13; all eng, math, sci. degrees.

JAN. 15: CARRIER AIR
CONDITIONING CO.
VANDERBILT MEDICAL
CENTER. FEDERAL
RESERVE BANK OF
ATLANTA Acctg, Econ, Mgt,
Bus. Ad, Finan. TENNESSEE
CORP. CE, ME, ChE, EE.
BURROUGHS WELLCOME &
CO. trainee program; any
major. UNION PLANTER'S
NATIONAL BANK Bus. Ad,
Acctg. t
JAN. 16: U.S. ARMY
ENGINEER WATERWAYS
EXPERIMENT STATION CE,
ME, EE, Math, Phy. WESTERN
UNION TELEGRAPH CO.
EE, ME, IE, Physics, Math,
Comp. Sci, Acctg, Mkt, Bus. Ad,
Econ, Stat, Ind. Mgt.
NATIONAL CASH REGISTER
CO. EE, ME, IE, Chem,
Physics. SANGAMO ELECTRIC
CO. EE, ME, IE, Physics.
JAN. 16-17: GENERAL
MOTORS CORP. EE, ME.
Math, Physics, MetE, IE.
GENERAL DYNAMICS (Ft.
Worth) CE, IE, EE, ME.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
£
1966 Honda S9O, 7000 miles,
overhead cam, with book strap, runs
out good and good shape. Must sell.
ONLY $l5O (a steal) Call Rick,
392-8806. (A-lt-60-p)
Honda 50, good shape, plus two
helmets and book rack, $125. Call
Skip, 392-7495. (A-st-60-p)
LOST bright carpet colors . restore
them with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-60-p)
Honda 1967 305 Scrambler. Knobby
tires, new chain and sprockets. 7000
miles. $450. Call 378-9352.
(A-st-56-p)
TV 19 inch Motorola portable. Also,
one year old post versitrig slide rule
with plastic case. Make offer. Call
378-4135 after 6 p.m. (A-st-56-p)
8x36 AC 2 br mobile home, $995.
Nothing down, no payments or
interest till 10 mo. after you
graduate. Live in free or rent for
profit. 376-1436. (A-st-56-p)
68 Yamaha 100 Trailmaster, tool kit
elec, start, mirrow, book rack,
helmet, inspected. $325 call
378-4855 after 5 or come by 368
Union. Runs great! (A-st-57-p)
Gibson 5-string Banjo with case,
excellent condition. $125. Call
378-1949 after 5 p.m. (A-58-3t-p)
1964 Pacemaker Mobile home.
10x56. central air, front dinette,
S3OOO, best offer. 376-8281,
evenings. (A-4t-55-p)
66 Honda S9O excellent condition.
440 actual miles. Bell helmet thrown
in. Call 378-5490. (A-st-56-p)
2 Fender showman cabinets with
2-15s and 2-12s. Vox amp head
with reverb, tremelo, etc. All for only
$250! Call 372-7711 after 5.
(A-4t-57-p)
Set of weights. 110 lbs. sls. 1020
SW 3rd Ave. 5* pm to 6 pm.
(A-2t-59-p)
SB Austin Healey, 100-6, mint
cond., all extras, $995 or best offer.
Contact Fred Miller, 4248 Ortega
Place, Jax, Fla, 388-4158.
(A-6t-57-p)
JUST ARRIVED Hundreds of desk,
chairs, files, bookcases & much more.
New Used & refurnished. Save 50%
or more. Additional 10% off Jan.
10th to 18th to students with IDs.
JR OFFICE FURNITURE &
EQUIPMENT Co. 620/a So. Main St.
Ph. 376-1146. (A-6t-56-p)
FOR RENT
YOUVE GOT TO SEE IT TO
BELIEVE IT. On the beautiful JR
Ranchette, A-l bedroom, air
conditioned. Furnished apartment.
Utilities, Garbage & exterminating
furnished. Swimming pool available
Jan. 1. $125 monthly. Lease
required. Sorry, no children or pets.
3 2-10 miles beyond 1-75 on
Newberry Road. Look for signs.
376-3900 or 376-1146. (B-st-56-p)
Must sublet desirable apartment, in
the heart of Sin City. One bedroom,
married couple only. Call 378-0652
after 5 p.m. SIOO a month.
(B-st-57-p)
Wanted: male roommate,* Jr. or
above 4 bedroom CBS house, own
room. 5 min. from campus by car.
$37.50/mo. plus l U utilities. Call
3/6-0703. (B-st-56-p)
Female roommate to share apt. one
block from campus. Own room, share
kitchen and bath. S4O plus utilities.
Call Michelle 376-3184.(C-3t-58-p)
One sharp female roommate wanted.
Butler apts., Winter and Spring. Low
Rent. Prefer student over 21. Call
378-0609. (C-st-58-p)
- p
I BON THE LAM 1
1 STARRING 1
808 HOPE PHYLLIS DILLERI
I AT 7:07 IN COLOR 0 j
1 ALSO I
1 "THE GOOD THE t
bad AND THE UGLY ,, |
I STARRING IN COLOR 0 I
* CLINT EASTWOOD E

WANTED |
Female roommate for 1 bedroom
pool Fr. QTR apt or info on available
apt. for one Can. pay up to SBO.OO
mo. Call Patti at 378-7039 or
376-1583. (C-st-56-p)
Male roommate to share one
bedroom lux. Landmark apt. all the
amenities of sin city living S6O/mo. &
elec. Call 378-7751 after., 6 pm.
(C-st-56-p)
Coed to share modern 2 br trailer
with senior til June. Private room
close to campus. $57.95 mo. for
more information call 378-5850.
(C-st-56-p)
Roommate wanted for two bedroom
apt. SBO per month plus utilities.
Contact Ward at 372-7538.
(C-3t-58-p)
Two male roommates needed for
spacious two bedroom apt. Rent
37.50/mo. & gas. Contact Jim at 732
NE 3 Ave. upstairs on 8 st. off 3 Ave.
(C-3t-58-p)
Male roommate to share 2 bdr. apt. 2
blocks from campus. $33/mo. plus
1/3 util. Contact Walter Fitzwater,
1813 NW 2nd Ave. (C-4t-58-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apt. behind Norman Hall.
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call 378-7540
(C-st-56-p)
One roommate for this term or
longer two-bedroom house, air and
heat, one block from campus, $33.75
a month & utilities. 1316 N.W. Ist
Ave. 378-8895. (C-4t-56-p)
1 roommate wanted Colonial Manor
near Tigert Hall. 60/mo. plus utilities.
Call Richard 378-9817. (C-st-56-p)
Need one male roommate to share
three bedroom house. Call 376-0529.
(B-st-56-p)
Female roommate wanted for Village
Park or French Quarter; call
378-4034 after 5:00. (C-3t-59-p)
Female roommate to share large one
bedroom apartment in Gatortown.
Call 378-8434. (C-2t-60-p)
Female roommate to share 2
bedroom apt. University Gardens.
Graduate student preferred.
376-7670. (C-3t-56-p)
Male roommate to share large 3 bdr.
house with senior students. Fireplace
and cable tv. Quiet and very
comfortable. Call 378-1112 anytime.
(C-st-59-p)
Female roommate for 2 bdrm. apt.
only 3 blocks from campus. Cent, air
& heating, fully carpeted. $55 mo.
plus util. 378-4455 or 372-8066 aft.
5. (C-2t-59-p)
Wanted: upper division student for a
roommate to share 2 bedroom apt.
S4O/month & utilities. Call
376-7664. (C-4t-59-p)
Male roommate wanted to share
house with 2 law students S4O mo.
Call 376-9080. (C 4t-59-p)
Two female roommates needed for
two bedroom 2 bath & dishwasher.
$55 per month. Call 376-6870,
preferably after four. (C-3t-59-p)
KffiMi NOW.
| r.JXiA't.tr 15:40 7:35 9:30
@ atg
I skidoo
mMA- NOW NOW-1:35
-1:35 NOW-1:35 4:00 L
6:30 9:00 I
J
" """
4 *
\ '--'Liin

Tuesday, January 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

vv>T^VON>v.%vv.vX%v.vX # X*!!*!<*!*Vi # ~ X *Xw
HELP WANTED
MALE STUDENTS without first
period class needed to help distribute
/the Florida Alligator each morning.
Good pay for just a couple of hours
each day. Will consider applicants
who are able to work only part of the
week. Call Frank at 392-7527 or
392-1619. (E-ts-57-p)
Need office equipment Salesman in
Gainesville. Call 372-9607 or
372-3251. (E-ts-60-c)
r
Female subjects needed for speecn
experiment. Must be native English
speaking, free of voice defects and in
the age group 30-39 or 50-59. $2.00.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway
Comm. Science Lab. 392-2049.
(E-10t-54-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session or $2.50 for IV2
hour session. Must be native English
speaking and have normal hearing.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway,
University 392-2049. (E-55-10t-c)
Male roommate, call 376-5151.
(C-3t-58-p)
[, Downtown Golutivillt |
j mW. I/*.; "rslfr
METROCOLOR B 1
fir;T
j Jlh'Jjjjfjjf* PAV'D NIVEN
551 i ici f
fthe fixer
v Based on the Pulitzer
Prize w nning novel
by Bernard Malamud.
Metrocoloi @ I
Fh.w. I*HT, jilaal
LAST DAY! "NIGHT OF THE
LIVING DEAD" AND
DR. WHO AND THE DALEKS
STARTSWEDNESDAY!
weve reserved a seat 1
I to meet "CATEYE, I
I the Savage Brute, I
1 Barracuda Babes at I
I rgeAu I

Page 9

%<*!yWwWXw.w%V*%%vvVt*.wy*v*v.
AUTOS i 1
.vr-x.x.r.vAvxxx-X'X'X-x-x-x^x-x-vxv-v.-v
Dodge Polara 1963 Sedan automatic,
AC, power brakes and steering, S6OO.
By owner. See at Cashs Service
Station, 3936 Newberry Rd.
372-9456. (G-58-st-p)
1967 Triumph Spitfire MK2, well
cared for, WSW R&H convertible top.
Tonneau cover, front bumper guard.
Robert Palmer, 376-0911.
(G-st-56-p)
Olds 98, 1962 Factory air, all power,
one owner, excellent! Light tjlue and
not a scratch. Call Dr. Busby,
392-0724 or come see at 3812 SW 15
St. (G-st-59-p)
1962 Chev II conv. 6 cyl, radio,
heater, st. trans. $250 or best offer.
Call 378-4079 between 4 and 6 pm.
(G-3t-59-p)
1965 Falcon Futura, 2 door hardtop,
6 cyl automatic, radio, whitewalls,
excellent condition. Only 38000
miles. 372-5703, 392-1473.
(G-st-56-p)
1964 Ford 6, standard shift, r & h,
new seat covers, good w/w tires, one
owner, 47,000 miles, excellent
mechanical condition, 750.00, call
372-4793 after 5:30 weekdays or
anytime Sat. & Sun. (G-3t-60-p)
1960 Ford 2 door 6 cyl. standard no
rust, excellent running cond., radio,
heater, good tires. Must sell. $195,
call 378-4907. (G-3t-60-p)
-
Have 2 surplus cars, 1962 Plymouth
V/8 5325. 1964 Cadillac 51750.
Call 372-9607 or 372-3251.
(G-ff-60-c)
1961 Comet station wagon. Needs
work. Price SIOO. Call 376-9505.
(G-3t-57-p)
64 MGB excellent cond. New top,
tires, paint. Ph. 372-6175 call
anytime. (G-st-57-p)
PERSONAL |
MAID: don't ever leave me, I love
you now and always will. PUDGY.
(J-lt-60-p)

for SENIOR & GREEKS to have
pictures taken for the SEMINOLE...
Jan. 13th through 17th 1:00 to 5:00 ~ 9:00 to 11
600 pm to 900 pm ROOM 346 REITZ UNION
TUESDAY, JAN. 14th SENIORS
H 41 GREEKS
PHI DELTA THETA PI KAPPA PHI
PHI EPSILON PI PI LAMBDA PHI
? PHI GAMMA DELTA SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON
PHI KAPPA PSI SIGMA CHI
PHI KAPPA TAU SIGMA NU
PI KAPPA ALPHA SIGMA PHI EPSILON
WEDNESDAY, JAN. IStk SENIORS
N 4 GREEKS
TAU EPSILON PHI ALPHA EPSILON PHI
TAU KAPPA EPSILON ALPHA OMICRON PI
v- THETA CHI CHI OMEGA
ALPHA CHI OMEGA DELTA DELTA DELTA
s ALPHA DELTA PI DELTA GAMMA
THURSDAY JAN. 16th SENIORS
S-Z GREEKS
DELTA PHI EPSILON- PHI SIGMA SIGMA
KAPPA ALPHA THETA SIGMA KAPPA
KAPPA DELTA ZfeTA TAU ALPHA
PHI MU
FRIDAY, JAN. 17th LAST DAY

PERSONAL 1
£x<*x*xx-v;vx-x*x*x*x-x*>x-vaw.s?-h£*£
To my Bear Just 2 years since that
eventful meeting; its been
wonderful! I love you more than ever
Happy Anniversary, Moo.
(J-lt-60-p)
To the score-teller who is never
believed, I love you ... I think. The
new you is great. Ravish, that too.
H.B. From Bananas and Cream.
(J-lt-60-p)
Happy Birthday to the greatest
photographer (N.A.) in the world and
in outer space. Flash, Click, Click.
Don and Sues friend. (J-lt-60-p)
Friday afternoon club for single
students, faculty & staff over 21.
Single's mixer Lampliter Lounge
private room. Cocktails doubles
45c, ladies' drinks 2O c, no cover.
Action begins 4:30, Fri., Jan. 17,
drinks til 7:30. Bring friends. See
posters. (J-4t-60-p)
vX\-X-XX*X-X*V"V.vX*X*i;.
LOST & FOUND I
l
<>>X*X*X*X*X*X*X*X*XC-X*w.?y.%v.vX-W
LOST an omega gold womans
watch vicinity of graduate library. Os
great personal value. If found, please
call 392-9741, no. 279 Broward,
4:00 6:30 p.m. (L-3t-60-p)
LOST gold bell necklace with
diamond. Has great sentimental
value. If found, please call Jackie
Erney at 392-8587. Reward.
(L-lt-60-p)
v:vXx-x..v-:sv. - x*xx*x*x-x-:-: v~;
I SERVICES
8 ?>
:vX>X*X-V.v.v;xX*X\X*X*X>V*V.v.v.VX*;v
GERMAN lessons and/or turoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-st-59-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Figures, graphs, etc. For theses,
dissertations, publications.
Professional graphic artist. Nancy
McClelland, 378-4260. (M-st-60-p)



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 14,1969

'Fixer Hard To Criticize!

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Reviewer
It is hard to be a critic when
there is little to criticize. So it is
that MGMs The Fixer,
playing at the Center, presents a
multitude of' problems to
anyone wishing to comment on
the films merits or demerits.
If one were to sit back,
totally detach himself from the
precedings on the screen, and
view it all with absolute
objectivity it is doubtful that he
will come away having witnessed
any more than a very familiar
melodrama. For the films story
line that of a suffering
innocent who triumphs over his
oppressors via courage is
echoed innumerable times in the
annals of motion pictures and
literature, this time providing
little that is new in the way of
plot and setting.
And yet, in this age of
message movies it seems
unlikely that Hollywood would
spend the mount they so
clearly spent here to repeat
themselves unless they also had
something else to say.
First of all, several of the
characters distinguish themselves
as being somewhat extraordinary
simply through their dialogue.
The film carries a certain air of
profundity throughout its
length, one that boosts the
nature of the plot to a plateau it
otherwise couldnt have
attained.
Further, like the fine novel it
was taken from, The Fixer
manages to remain lean enough
to retain its impact and clarity
and yet simultaneously provoke
thought and emotion to make it
extremely uncommon by
American standards. As evidence
of this its characters are shown
only to the extent that they
affect the central character
Yakov. Bok, a handyman or
fixer but most are shown
with either considerable detail or
a very purposeful lack of it.
In addition, in several
instances such as the
seduction scene with Zinaida
(Elizabeth Hartman)
ENROLL FOR YOUR
STUDENT INSURANCE
NOWS!
Don't be left without
insurance this quarter.
Protect yourself from
expensive doctor bills due
to sickness or injury. Enroll
now in Student Health and
Accident Insurance. You
may enroll for this
insurance from Jan. 2 thru
Jan. 24.
Worried about protection for
your family as well as yourself?
Then enroll in our Dependent
Coverage Plan. With this
coverage your wife, children, as
well as yourself will be
protected.
Vou May Pick Up Brochures And
Enrollment Forms From The Places
Listed Below Or Mail Them To
McGriff-Scarborough & Assoc.
INFIRMARY STUDENT
GOVERNMENT OFFICE
McGRIFF-SCARBOROUGH
& ASSOC.
376-8393 537 N.E. Ist ST.
Sponsored by Student Government

MOVIE REVIEW

j||M
YAKOV (ALAN BATES) ESCAPES FROM PRISON
... in 'The Fixer now playing at the Center Theatre.

situations and characters are
presented which have little
bearing on the films final
outcome but which offer the
chance to reflect on entirely
different yet complimentary
points of interest.
For viewing the film is a
definite experience. Its hard to
imagine anyone with the ability
to view the story with the cold
objectivity necessary to make its
familiarity matter for criticism.

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Elaine Pharr Kathi Horne
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Selling at the library Selling at the Service booth from the Hub
'" MondayFriday 10am pm
*
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**L. __ -- : ' -- : - >-'--- : : : .-'.

And no matter how much the
cynic in ones mind insists that
messages like the triumph of
courage and the little man
becomes hero are much too
hackneyed and cornball to be
taken seriously, it will be
difficult for even the most
insensitive not to take them
seriously.
The Fixers every element
demands attention and rewards
that attention with an impact as
hard to forget as it is to explain.

Winter Bowling Leagues
Are Organizing NOW!!
Mixed and mixed doubles leagues forming
for Tues. through Thurs. nites at 9:00 p.m.
and Fri. nite at 11:00.
Call 392-1637 or come by the GAMES
AREA and fill out an application. %
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
mr* Discussion
HHIJ Wrjm
8:00pm Following
Jan. 14,1969 NO ADMISSION
JWRFU Aud.
UH RHr
m -11 iB \
! i Brafe X-^eoc'i ..r i \f & < jKs|&;JMt>t
* Wmm
*-Wk- \\ §||g|
..Jilt. 1 ImRMI
* wH|r: : .jssri 1 Mmwmmmm I
J sllls|4 !jH v *% I 1 iH .r i
" iiiir iWf hi HmMli WB&sJi
Vaw Jfi HI .H
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" :



Carnes Maps Out Festive Track r Hour 3

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Gator students will get to see
this Saturday the race that
Mexico City Olympic spectators
never saw on the UF Track at 11
a.m.
Olympic distance man Jack
Bachelor, UF grad student and
member of the UF Track Club,
will be shooting for a school
record in either the two or three
mile run in a benefit one hour
track and field extravaganza
planned by Track Coach Jimmy
Carnes.
Proceeds from the show will
go towards sending Johnnie Lee
Samuels, the deaf son of Mrs.
Mamie Lee Hill, of Gainesville,
to the 11th International Games

WjWKrmm:

Left on this desk have been several suggestions
for possible picker uppers for Coach Tommy
Bartletts basketball Gator, who, to put it mildly,
have been playing rather coldly.
With several of the team members under the
weather with the flu, one fan suggests the entire
team take part in the health centers influenza
masquerade. Wearing the masks might also have a
psychological effect on the opposition.
A fellow writer remembers a coach out west
whose team was winless in a half dozen games
before the Christmas break. The coach made every
player carry a basketball with him 24 hours a
day to class, to chow and to bed. The team won
five or six straight after vacation ended.
Yet another suggestion comes from the Penn
State campus where basketball Coach John Bach
believes that music relaxes his players during daily
workouts and puts them in the proper mood. Bach
makes it a habit to pipe music into the gymnasium
via a tape recorder.
So far, nobodys found an NCAA or conference
rule against it, which, in itself is surprising.
.. .just trying to help. Coach.
* *
Southeastern Conference statistics after the first
week and a half of action find the Gators on top as
the leading rebounding team in the conference.
The UF rates the lead by grabbing down 54
missed shots per game.

I Secretary Service I
I Now at KINGS FOOD HOST I
1 Secretaries may reserve a meal. Just call either Kings I
1 Food Host and give your order and the estimated time I
m of arrival and well be ready for you and bring your m
I order immediately! t
I WNto/ Kings Food Host 1
I 1802 W. UMV. AVE. 372-6820 1
1 /Sr 1430 S.W. 13th ST. 378-1656 1

The Clipboard

Backcourt Bounces

_ m luesaav. Jan
TO HONOR BACHELOR. DEAF PREPSTER*

for the Deaf (the Deaf
Olympics) to be held in early
August in Yugoslavia.
Samuels, who will be
shooting for a worlds record in
the 16-pound shot, needs SI,BOO
for the trip.
The program has also been
tagged Jack Bachelor
Appreciation Day.
Jack is a tredemendous
tribute to track at the UF, says
Carnes. This is a chance for the
student body to show their
appreciation for his making the
Olympic squad.
Though Bachelor travelled to
Mexico City and trained
intensively for his event, he
acquired dysentery the eve of his
run and did not run.
The Carnes' produced track

Alligator Assistant Sports Editor*:

Perhaps this can be attributed to another
statistic the number of missed shots per game, in
which the Gators also hold a commanding lead (44
per game in 10 games).
* *
With this years cage season in full swing, Gator
basketball recruiters are already out looking over
the top prep prospects for 196970. At this point,
it looks like Clearwaters Gene Bodden, a
230-pounder, averaging around 24 points per game
for the states top Class AA high school, is the No. 1
blue chipper. St. Petersburg Gibbs 6-foot-2 guard
Norman Stevenson has to be considered highly too.
* *
Last year, the Gator basketball recruiters passed
up Miami-Dade Norths John Napier, a forward,
who led his team to the state junior college
championship. Napier reportedly was more than
interested in attending the UF.
He presently is University of Tampas high scorer
averaging 25 points per game with a peak
performance last week against Valdosta State in
which he poured in 56 points. Napier scored 20
points against Tennessee when the Tampans lost to
the Vols 5351.
* *
One state sports writer, interviewing a towering
college basketball player after a game, said to the
tall center: Mac, I hear you are ambidextrous.
To which the player replied: Yes, Dick, 1 am a
pretty hard worker.

The
Florida
Alligator
and field hour, will not only
feature Bachelors record
attempt but a high jump
performance by the currently
ranked No. 1 U.S. high jumper,
the Gators Ron Jourdan.
Jourdan will definitely jump

By BILL DUNN

7-foot for the crowd Saturday.
He will shoot for 7-2 or 7-3 if
conditions are right. i
Record-holding half miler
Bob Lang will run a specially
paced half mile in an effort to
break the present school
standard which he holds
(1:49.8).
But thats not all.
Inaugurating the program will be
a special joggers mile.
Anyone can enter. Each entrant
will name a clocking he thinks
he can run and winner and
trophies will be determined on

ANNOUNCEMENT I
McDavids Barber Shop I
has movad to
the Village Square I
2409 S.W. 13th Ave. I
next to the Red Lion I

American Youth:
Its Outlook Is
Chanoino the World
The subject of ibis month's
issue ol Fortune eneaw

Much has been said, and much has been pub published,
lished, published, about todays alienated youth and
society. But to some extent, two important ques questions
tions questions remain unanswered: Is this, indeed, a special
kind of younger generation? If so, what will be its
impact on U.S. life over the next decade?
To find the answers to these questions, Fortune
has devoted most of its January issue to Youth and
Its View of America. Here, in a single issue of
Fortune, is perhaps the most thorough and search searching
ing searching analysis of the topic ever presented by a
magazine. Some of the areas on which this special
study focuses:
Why student activists demand reforms
The revolution on the square campus
' -
Youth and the pop culture Suit
Parents of the Forties
What blue-collar youth thinks
A new style of campus living
How youth is reforming business
Dont miss this special, single-subject January
issue of Fortune. Its on sale now!
FORTUNE

Tuesday. January 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

how closely times are matched.
Special fraternity and
sorority 440-yard relays will also
be run off with winning teams
awarded trophies. All teams
wishing to enter should contact
Carnes* office before Thursday
at 3:30 p.m.
Coeds or fraternity men
desiring coaching in baton
exchanges should report to the
track any afternoon this week
after 3 oclock and track team
members will provide free
technical advice, Carnes said.

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Page 12

Vols Squeak By,
UF Loses 64-63

Tennessees Bill Justus scored
his only goal of the game last
night with two seconds left in
the contest to give the Vols a
6463 Southeastern Conference
win over UF.
The Gators had held Justus,
* **********
Sport Trivia;
1) Who was the most
valuable player in the American
Basketball Association last year?
2) Who holds the single game
scoring record in the Florida
Gym?
3) Who were the starting
members of the New York Jet
defensive backfield in Sundays
game?
4) Who led the American
League in batting last year, and
what was his average?
5) What colleges did these
major league present and former
baseball players play football
for? (Matching)
Bob Allison Florida
Don Buford Kansas
Carroll Hardy Ohio State
Joe Sparma Kansas
Haywood Sullivan Southern Cal.
Answers to Thursdays quiz:
1) a) Bailey HowellMiss. State
b) Bob Pettit-LSU
c) Clyde LeeVanderbilt
d) Donnie KessingerMississippi
e) Roger KaiserGeorgia Tech
2) Chicago Bulls
3) Arizona; 3410
4) The Titans
5) Johnny Unitas; Lenny Moore; Alan
The Horse Ameche; L.G. Long
Gone Dupre.
Intramural

Signup Closes
Today is the last day for
dormitories and independents to
sign up their teams for
basketball and volleyball.
Referees are still needed for
the two sports and people
desiring to earn some money as
referees should come by the
intramural office, room 229,
Fla. Gym.

1 = 1
I TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY (
\ 5-8:30 PM 1
1 SOUP OR SALAD C
1 SMALL K. C. STRIP $ I
I BAKED POTATO I l
I HOT ROLLS I
I WONDER I
I HOUSE I
I 14 S.W. Ist. St. (
i SOUP OR SALAD 4 __ 1
I VEAL CUTLET | Ok|
I PARMACCANNO l*W JI
J w/ ITALIAN SPAGHETTI |
I HQT ROLLS j

who had a 20.4 point average
going into the game, scoreless
until that last shot. UF led most
of the game on a tough I3l
zone defense and their best
shooting of the season, about a
65 percent clip. 4-;-
With 1:07 left in the game
the Gators led 6362. UF was
playing ball control looking for
one good shot, in the process Ed
Lukco was fouled, playing on an
injured foot he scored 14 points.
Going on a one-and-one basis,
Lukco missed the first shot.
Tennessee got the ball and called
time-out. With 12 seconds left
the Vols set up for a shot, Justus
got the ball from 12 feet out and
put it in. Time ran out.
Neal Walk led the Gators with
19 points and Andy Owens got
16.
The Baby Gators also lost in
the closing seconds of their
game. The Vol freshmen won
57-56.
UFs next game is at home in
Florida Gym against Furman
University on Jan. 18. Tickets
may be picked up at Gate 13
today from 2:30-8 p.m. J
All-Star Tickets
Student tickets are available
for $1 to the AFL All-Star game
in Jacksonville Sunday at 2 p.m.
UF students are eligible.
The tickets can be picked up
at the Gator Bowl ticket office
or at the gates before the game.
Students must show their I.D.
card. The available seats are in
the north and south end zones.
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
Cars, Trucks, 4-wheel I
I drive. B
1 No. 1 in Japan (
8 Godding tr Clark I
I Motors I
I 1012 SOUTH Main St. 1
8 Open 8 A.M. 8 P.M. 8

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