Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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By United Press International
WASHINGTON Rep.
Richard H. Ichord, a
tough-minded Missourian who
will become chairman of the
House Committee on
Un-American Activities, said
Sunday his first order of
business would be to investigate
the Students for a Democratic
Society.
Ichord, who will also seek
new laws governing behavior in
the committees hearing room,
said in an interview the student
organization will be investigated
in view of the information that
has been made public of the
increasingly militant nature of
the SDS its conducting classes
in sabotage, how to make
molotov cocktails and its
teaching violent guerrilla
tactics.
At 42, Ichord will become
the youngest committee
chairman in the House. He made
the unusual jump from
Kerr On Dissent
Former Berkeley
President Clark Kerr will
head the list of speakers
for UFs annual
Religion-in-Life program
under the theme of
student dissent. See
story, page 3.

The
Florida Alligator

fourth-ranking Democrat on the
committee when chairman
Edwin Willis, D-La., was
defeated for re-election last
November; Rep. William M.
Tuck, D-Va., second ranking,
retired, and third-ranking Joe
Pool, D-Tex., died last July.
1 intend to use all the body
of the law that is available to
maintain the proper atmosphere
of a hearing, Ichord said. In
addition, I will introduce a bill
to clarify the present law that
permits me as chairman to
maintain order in the hearing
room.
Ichord will be the eighth
chairman of the controversial
committee, first organized
under chairman Martin Dies in
1938. Its hearings have been
among the mosfctumultuous on
Capitol Hill. **
Ichord also plans to improve
the investigative techniques of,
the committee and said there
would be fewer summons for
hostile witnesses intending to
refuse to testify under the sth
amendment.
I wont hesitate to call a
hostile witness, he said, but
there is no purpose in bringing a
Commie before the committee
and asking him questions on
which we know he is going to
take the sth.

University of Florida, Gainesville

BEVERAGE CLEARANCE SLOW

Red Tape Caught
In 'Rat' Beer Taps

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
V
Official red tape is still
plugging the beer taps set to
flow into steins pf UF
students, faculty and
administrators 21-years and
older during the
Rathskellers official
opening this weekend.
Assistant Director of the
State B everage Department,
Gene Andrews, told the
Alligator Sunday he had no
way of telling whether his
supervisors would approve the
application by Thursday.
Each application is handled
as quickly as we possibly can,
he said.
Fingerprints of officers of the
Faculty Club and managers of
the Rathskeller had to be cleared
in Washington, D.C. before the
license could be granted, Joe
Hilliard, Rathskeller chairman
said Sunday. Clearance of the
fingerprints is expected Monday,
he said.
Any UF-affiliated student,
regardless of age, will be
admitted to the Rathskeller, but
only those over 21 will be
served.
IDs will be closely checked
at the door and two different
types of tickets will be issued to
students above and below 21.
Every student, faculty and
administrator, must become a
member of the UF Faculty
Club Rathskeller, as it is
officially named. Membership
cards go on sale Friday morning.

v&iv mHI Hr
H ' n- IT
NICK ARROYO
SUPER SUPER BOWL
t
The Reitz Union TV lounge hosted a huge the Baltimore Colts and millions of spectators with
audience Sunday for the-third annual NFLAFL a 167 win. See story, page 16.
Super Bowl in Miami. The New York Jets surprised
_,> . -i : * * u ' ** & # .. '

. X
Jan. 17 at 8 a.m. in the
Rathskeller office and cost one
dollar per year or 25 cents per
quarter. They may be purchased
at the door Friday and Saturday
nights.
In order to obtain a beer
license, the Rathskeller had to
become a private club. Further,

'Over Expectant
Teacher Canned
(See Editorial Page 8)
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Strff Writer
W '
A UF student wife, who is teaching school to put her husband
through medical school, has been fired because she is two-months
pregnant.
A ruling passed by the Alachua County School Board last summer
prohibits women from teaching school the semester after they beCbme
pregnant. The decision previously had been left to the individual
teacher and her principal.
The teacher in question, Barbara Finlayson, teaches second grade
at Littlewood Elementary School.
She is highly qualified and would be difficult to replace, said
Mrs. Jan McGee, member of the Littlewood PTA.
The school board is to meet Tuesday night to review the policy.
According to Mrs. McGee, several people are to testify, among them
Robert Furlong, professor of law; Dr. Henry Blank, a lotal physician
and Rev. Thaxton Springfield, pastor of the University Methodist
Church.
Mrs. Finlayson could not be reached for comment.
A committee of five parents of children in Mrs. Finlaysons class
also will testify.
We polled a third of the parents, said Mrs. McGee, and found
no negative feelings about their children being taught by a pregnant
woman.
Mrs. Finlayson holds a B.A. degree in elementary education and
early childhood education from Carroll College in Wisconsin.
Her husband is due to graduate from the College of Medicine in
June.

Americas
Number I
College
Daily

Monday, January 13, 1969


as a private club, it was
necessary for the Rathskeller to
be in existence for two years to
receive the beer license. The UF
Faculty Club agreed to take the
Rathskeller under its wing and
the UF Faculty Club Rathskeller
resulted.
(SEE 'RAT' PAGE 5)



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 13,1969

Page 2

Rifle Association Claims Nixon And JFK

By United Press International
r
WASHINGTON The National Rifle
Association is proudly pointing out this
month that President-elect Richard M.
Nixon is and the late President John F.
Kennedy was an NRA member.
In the lead editorial of its official
journal, The American Rifleman, the
NRA noted that when Nixon assumes
the highest office in the nation and the
most important post in the world, He
will become the sixth U.S. President to
hold membership in the association.
The others were Dwight D.
Eisenhower, William Howard Taft,
Theodore Rossevelt and Ulysses S.
Grant.

PILLARS OF THE SOUTH

The pillars of one of the South's oldest fraternity
houses have fallen temporarily as the Kappa Alphas
seek residence elsewhere. The more than
100-year-old national fraternity got its start here in

Playboy Bunny Invasion
Set For Feb. 1- Graham Area

A dorm area is about to be
overrun with bunnies Playboy
bunnies that is.
Although they wont be Hugh
Hefners own, UF coeds are
planning to turn Graham Area
into one of the hottest
nightspots in town.
February 1 is the date of the
annual Playboy party to be given
by the Graham Area Council and
bunnies galore will be there to
serve the customers every need.

Accident Early Sunday AM.
Results In $1,850 Damages
A UF students car crashed into a parked car early Sunday morning
on SW 13th Ave. The driver and his date were taken to the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center for treatment.
The accident occurred at 12:10 a.m. Sunday.
Rebecca Lynn Gordon, 3ED, of Tolbert area, was officially
admitted to the Health Center for facial lacerations at 8 a.m. Sunday.
She is in good condition, said David R. Beard, Health Center
spokesman.
Kenpeth Alan Bodwell, 2UC, driver of the car, was treated and
released, a Gainesville police spokesman said. He said Bodwell had no
visible injuries but complained of some pain.
The accident involved two parked cars and the car driven by
Bodwell, a 1962 Comet sedan. Gainesville police said Bodwells car
struck a properly parked, unoccupied car and shoved it into a third
car, a 1965 Plymouth sedan.
Police estimate $1,850 total damage to the vehicles: SBOO to
Bodwells Comet, S7OO to the second car, a Corvair and $350 to the
Plymouth.
Bodwell was charged with careless driving and causing a major
accident.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of aU advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) on,e day after
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one in correct insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Nixon has been urged to resign from
the NRA by Rep. Richard McCarthy,
an upstate New York Democrat who
calls the organization the principal
spokesman of the powerful gun lobby.
McCarthy claims Nixon cannot fulfill
his campaign promise to reunite the
country if he belongs to an organization
which has been in the center of the
often bitter gun control controversy.
Nixon received his membership card
on July 29, 1957, as he was starting his
second term as vice president. Kennedy
joined the NRA on April 19, 1961,
three months after he was inaugurated.
McCarthy added that the weapon
reportedly used to assassinate Kennedy

Modeled after the famed
Chicago Playboy Club, the
Graham Club will furnish
entertainment and bunnies
typical of the Playboy
nightclubs scattered around the
world.
As in the past, there will be a
band, The Nation-Rocking
Shadows, scheduled floor shows,
dinner and dancing.
Grahams bunnies will be
dressed in black leotards, fish

1904 and moved into the house that featured these
columns in 1920. The KA's have not yet decided on
their new location.

net stockings, satin aprons and
the trademarks of the Playboy
Bunnies: white cuffs and collar,
bunny ears, and a fluffy
bunnytail.
The bunnies will serve as
hostesses for the 7 p.m.-l a.m.
continuous party. Most of the
girls are Graham girls, although
Mary Moore, social chairman,
said, Wed like to have girls
from other areas apply also.
Playboy keys will cost about
$5.00 per couple. This will
include the catered buffet
dinner, the dance and the floor
shows.
Graham will be decorated
with pinups and favors from the
Chicago Playboy Club.
The Playboy Party is not
restricted to just Graham
residents. The entire campus is
invited to attend this event of
cotton tails and bunny ears.

.... .... J JUNIVERSITY
UNIVERSITY JUNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend
10%
discount
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Jus, Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manage,
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET

was an Italian-made Carcano rifle
purchased by Lee Harvey Oswald from a
mail order house with a coupon clipped
out of the American Rifleman.
President Johnson, whose
administration fought pitched battles
witlj the NRA, is not a member. John
R. Hess Jr., NRA public relations
director, said Johnson too was offered a
membership, through aides, but that
nothing ever developed.
Hess went on to say, however, that
about three years ago the Association
presented Johnson with a traditional
Kentucky rifle.
McCarthy wrote Nixon on Dec.3o
asking that the president-elect quit the

Recruit Problems
Due To Finances
Although quotas have been met, UF deans and department
chairman agree they have problems attracting the desired standard of
instructor for vacant positions.
Weve never had any trouble on that score, said University
College Dean Franklin A. Doty referring to the quotas, but we have
had trouble getting the level of professor we would like.
These problems arise mostly from the gap between industrial
salaries and college salaries offered qualified people, Doty said.
Dotys statement was reinforced by Architecture and Fine Arts
Chairman Robert S. Bolles.
At this time, we cannot offer the money that industry and private
business can, said Bolles.
This problem is most apparent in recruiting of instructors for
architectural and engineering structure classes, he said.
Chairman Thomas L. Hanna of the philosophy department said he
had encountered no problems in the least. He made no mention of
financial matters affecting recruitment.
Dr. John K. Mahon, chairman of the history department, said his
departments quota was filled a couple of months ago for the 1969
fall quarter.
Mahon said salaries could be higher, but posed no great problem
at this time.
These financial problems may be partially solved if the legislature
approves a $2lO million budget request made last week by the Board
of Regents. Doty said the budget would cover a two year period.
Doty predicted a 7B per cent merit increase for salaries if the
budget is approved. Doty also predicted that starting salaries would
increase by at least this percentage.
Its nothing tremendous, but we can live with it, Doty said of
the pending increase.
SPECIAL]
2 Pants cleaned & pressedOO^i
CUANma CBMTW
COUNTRY CLUB QUALITY AT NEIGHBORHOOD PRICES :
1518 N.W. 13th St.

NRA be tore taking office. The
congressman said he has not yet
received a reply. A reporter who
inquired on Friday what Nixon would
do was told by a Nixon aide that the
matter would be looked into.
Last year Congress enacted curbs on
the sale of firearms, marking the first
time in more than 30 years that the
federal government had moved in this
field.
During his campaign, Nixon took a
middle ground position on gun controls.
He endorsed the bills passed by Congress
- which for the most part barred
interstate traffic but opposed efforts in
Congress to pass federal registration and
licensing laws.



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FATHER IAN MITCHELL
... sings with wife Caroline
Folk-Singing Priest
Featured For R-ln-L

Father lan Mitchell, who will
be on campus Jan. 19, is an
innovator.
The folk-singing
Episcopal-priests American Folk
Mass, written in 1960, has been
a breakthrough in church music,
the 41-year-old clergyman says.
Mitchell is accompanied by
his wife, Caroline, in concert
which is flavored with folk and
religious music.
The father of four, the
singing priest has appeared in
churches, schools, colleges,
concert halls, coffee houses and
nightclubs to present his message
through the medium of music.
A recent composition is a
folk-rock mass he was
commissioned to write for
Jacksonvilles Episcopal High
School. It is to be sung by all
students, accompanied by
electric guitars, drums, brass and
organ.
He was commissioned by the
late Joseph Cardinal Ritter of St.
Louis to adapt the Roman
Catholic English language mass
into folk idiom.
The Episcopal Churchs
Liturgical Commission is
considering using the American
folk Mass as one of four official

FEATURING: IN THE MALL From Our Italian Kitchen
Spaghetti with meat ball* 1.50
Italian Foods Spaghetti with meat sauce 1.50
Specialty Sandwiches (on,y abov two in child's portion) 1.00
Sk f% W Spaghetti with mushrooms 1.75
Delicious Salads with meat balls 2.25
Domestic and A \ Spaghetti oven baked in casserole
Imported 3 with meat sauce and cheese 2.25
r .. W Or with Shredded chicken and cheese
Wine and Beer A 2.50
Qn*dcn of gating \ll Spaghetti orders served with
UUNukIMIAL Italian Tossed Salad, roll and butter
CONTINENTAL home baked lasagne rio
ATMOSPHERE 51 AJ. B with meat balls 2.00
Serving Continuously Ct£ HOME STYLE CHEESE RAV,OU
. o.on with meat balls 2.00
am o pm . J Above served with Italian Salad,
CLOSED SUNDAYS tPlgr RoH

accompaniments for the new
liturgy.
Father Mitchell says he
intends to stay a priest. This
music is only the medium to
amplify his message.
After working a while at a
Utah Navajo Indian reservation
he was given permission by the
state's Episcopal bishop to
become a roving minister of
music. f
Father Mitchell and Caroline
are being brought to UF by a
Religion in Life series climaxing
in Religion in Life Week, April
20 to 23.
He will appear at a 5:15 p.m.
mass at ihe St. Augustine
Chapel, Catholic Student Center.
Following the mass he will be in
the Reitz Union ballroom at 8
p.m.

Winter Bowling Leagues
Are Organizing NOW!!
Mixed and mixed doubles leagues forming
for Tues. through Thurs. nites at 9:00 p.m.
and Fri. nite at 11:00.
Call 392-1637 or come by the GAMES
AREA and fill out an application^
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA

Dissent Is R-ln-L Topic

Student dissent, probably the
most cussed and discussed topic
on campus, will be the theme of
Religion-in-Life Week this year.
But Religion-in-Life wont be
the same as in the past, says
Chairman David Holbrook, 3AS.
Its changing in both format and
content.
For years R-in-L had
concentrated its series of
lectures, discussions and
seminars into a single week
during the winter term. Now the
series will be spread over three
months climaxing in
Religion-in-Life Week spring
quarter.
Emphasis will be on
entertainment rather than on
dry, dull talks on sometimes
boring subjects, Holbrook said.
Were looking not only for
interesting people in religion,
Holbrook notes, but also ones
who can entertain.
R-in-L is trying to present
one program each month until
the third quarter.
The projects inducement to
reorganize was its conflict with
Accent, and because it had been
systematically de-emphasized
in favor of Accent, Holbrook
says.
Since Accent is programmed
for the winter quarter, R-in-L
had to switch its format so that
it would not become
overshadowed by the similar
program.
R-in-L Week, April 20 to 23,
plans to center its program in
dorms, fraternities, sororities
and married villages.
In line with the student
dissent theme, R-in-L has
enlisted Clark Kerr, ousted
president of the University of
California, Berkeley campus, as
NEED ZIPPY
RESULTS?
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

its first speaker during spring
quarter convocation.
Leading the R-in-L series on
Jan. 19 will be guitar-playing,
folk-singing Father lan Mitchell
and his wife, Caroline. Father
Mitchell is an Episcopal priest
who uses music to put across his
message. He comes to UF via the
nightclub, college, coffee house
and church circuit.
Feb. 3, R-in-L brings Father
Clarence Rivers, a Negro
Catholic priest, to campus.,He
lectures and sings on racial
disorder, violence and civil
disobedience.
Coming Feb. 17, will be Peg

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1150 N.E. 16th Avenue

Monday. January 13, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Rig, a Florida Presbyterian art
professor, whose lecture on the
Images of Man will be
backdropped by psychedelic
lights while she paints.
DELICIOUS
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KHCUSeJj
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Breakfast served
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378-0955

Page 3



Page 4

> The Florida AUiaator, Monday, January 13, 1969

Photo-Poster
Entry Date
Is Extended

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The deadline for all entries in the Accent 69 Symposiums
Poster and Photography Contest has been extended from Jan.
17 to Jan. 23, Tom DeMarco, Accent technical chairman, said
Sunday.
So many students have requested more time for these
contests, DeMarco said, that I felt it necessary to make the
deadline alteration.
A color or black and white picture, 8 in. x 10 in. or 5 in. x 7
mm mm mm mm mmjmm mm mm mmm m mm mm mm mm 1

, f
V
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is it a drag
to work for
a company
107 years old?
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NO-NOT WHEN YOURE GROWING!
OUR FORMULA FOR SUCCESS IS QUITE SIMPLE-UTILIZATION OF
TALENTED YOUNG PEOPLE.
Union Camp is one of the worlds leading producers of paper and paper
by-products. Were growing. And well continue to grow through the
thoughts and ideas of people like you. We encourage our people to
think and act on their own because that way they do the best job jobfor
for jobfor us and for themselves.
/
On
JANUARY 21, 22
a Union Camp Career Counselor will visit
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
to explore your career objectives.
Were looking forward to the opportunity
of meeting you.
* Corporate Coordinator of College Relations
UNION CAMP CORPORATION
233 BROADWAY, N. Y., N. Y. 10007
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An Equal Opportunity Employer
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in., is required in the photograpny coniesi.
The prizes will be furnished by Bruce Mozert of University
Photo Supply.
All entries for the poster contest must have copy reading
Accent 69 Dimensions of Freedom Feb. 3 -8, and must be
printable.
All material must be turned into the Accent otfice, room 313
of the Reitz Union by Jan. 23, DeMarco said.

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Grass Growing Under Government Feet?

WASHINGTON (UPI) The government said
Sunday it. would grow its own marijuana for
laboratory use. The quality of confiscated supplies
varies so much they are useless for the research
necessitated by the ever increasing consumption of
the weed, it said.
The National Institute of Mental Health said the
government-produced marijuana would be used by
it and by private researchers to determine the
effects on humans.
The lack of a standardized product is a primary
reason for the relative lack of real knowledge about

Credit Hours To Be Lower
For A&S Graduates?

Proposed changes in
graduation requirements for the
College of Arts and Sciences
went through the Curriculums
Committee without a hitch
Thursday.
The proposals go to the
University Senate for approval
Jan. 30.
Lowering required credit
hours from 96 to 90 in upper
division was included in the
eleven changes.
Comments on the proposed
changes were all favorable, Dr.
Roy L. Lassiter, associate dean

A&S Dean Sets
Gripe Sessions
Got a beef?
If youre an arts and sciences major youre in luck.
Two hours each week are open for students with complaints or
problems, says Dr. Harry Sisler, College of Arts and Sciences dean.
Sisler will listen to any student who drops in to his Anderson
Hall office, Room 103, between 1:30 and 3:30 p.m., Thursdays.
He decided to reserve an open period in his schedule for students in
November. So far, it has been a success.
Individual needs will be dealt with, he said. Sincere students,
faculty with leadership and administrators must have good
communication.
Students can talk either on or off the record, he added.
Sisler cited two cases where problems have been solved.
In one instance an undergraduate student was allowed to fenter
graduate school before graduation. In another, an unfairly assigned
grade on an exam was thrown out.
The complaint-problem session has had relatively good
participation considering its lack of publicity, Sisler said.
Sometimes theres even a waiting line.
Dimes March Yields
$$ For Med Center

The $37,500 collected by
March of Dimes last year in
Alachua County has been
returned to the UF Shands
Teaching Hospital in the form of
$200,000.
March of Dimes sponsored
research has accomplished some
results in curing birth defects
and polio, but others have yet to
be found.
One of these accomplish accomplishments
ments accomplishments is a German measles
vaccine given to expectant
mothers to immunize them from
the dangers of contracting
German measles during
pregnancy. Great strides have
also been made in the area of
RH factor problems.
January is the month for the
March of Dimes fund-raising
drive. Several Florida graduates
are heading the drive.
William D. Olinger is
chairman of the Alachua County
Chapter while William Ryals is
campaign director. Also calling
signals will be Steve Spurrier

and professor of academic
affairs, said.
I think other colleges might
give it serious consideration, he
said.
Wholeheartedly
enthusiastic about cutting
degree requirements, Lassiter
feels that a study of the greater
institutions around the country
shows an inverse proportion in
the quality of an institution to
the number of courses
required.
Other changes proposed
include the assigning of a

who will direct the Teens
Activities. The drive will end
Jan. 28 with the Mothers March
led by Sandra Olinger, wife of
the chapter chairman.
Sanibel Isle
Hosts Science
Symposium
The Winter Institute in
Quantum Chemistry, Solid-State
Physics and Quantum Biology
which has been held at UF since
December will wind up its
program at Sanibel Island with a
week-long international
symposium.
The symposium will center
on the innermost structure of
matter.
Dr. Per-Olov Lowdin,
graduate research professor of
chemistry and physics at UF,
and professor of quantum
chemistry at Uppsala, Sweden, is
director of the institute and
seminar.

tjje long-term psychological and physical effects of
marijuana usage, said Dr. Stanley F. Yolles,
institute director.
Supplies of confiscated marijuana, heretofore
used in research, vary in accordance with methods
of harvesting, storage and climatic conditions during
growth, the institute said. These variables, it said,
control the potency of the weed.
The announcement also said the institute would
also supply pure synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol
(THC), believed to be the most active ingredient of
marijuana, for use by government and private

student to a specific advisor who
will remain y with him unless the
student requests otherwise.
The 48-hour \ceiling of
courses a student may take in his
major would be lifted.
He would be allowed to drop
courses to a minimum 12-hour
load until the fifth week without
having to petition.
A student would also be
allowed to take up to 10 credit
hours outside the college
without approval of the Dean, i
'Rat Beerless
pT WOM PA6t OMt
Members can bring
non-student guests but only
members may make purchases of
food or drinks.
We dont want to promote
this as just a student club, Eric
Williams, public relations
chairman said.
We want to get everybody
together to talk, loosen up and
know each other faculty,
student and administrator
alike, Williams said.

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researchers.
The institute said the recent upsurge in marijuana
use all illegal had created new social and
medical problems and that an accelerated research
program Was needed to provide objective data.
It said all the research materials would be
carefully watched to determine their potency and
toxicity so that reliable results of the effects of
marijuana usage can be obtained.
When adequate quantities of marijuana and THC
are available, the institute said, independent
researchers may apply for supplies.

Chaucer Exposed
As Satirist Prof Says
A UF English professor, Dr. Paul T. Thurston, believes he has
exploded a 300-year-old myth about Chaucers The Knights
Tale by proposing that this work was a satire on the age of
chivalry rather than a realistic account.
In his new book to be published by the UF Press, Artistic
Ambivalence in Chaucers Knights Tale, Thurston describes
Chaucers accounts of that age as, imaginative and lovely, but
just not human.
It is a humorous satire, not of the high ideals of that era,
but rather of the unrealistic attitudes of the people towards
x chivalry, Thurston said.
Chivalry has always been thought of in the past, but during
that period, courtly, romantic love tried to imitate literature. It
was this unsuccessful attempt at imitation that Chaucer was
satirizing.
The book is an expansion of Thurstons doctoral dissertation
which he presented in 1961.
Thurston said the book was entirely an independent project
done on his own time and he would receive the royalties.
However, it is essentially a scholarly book which would be
found mostly in college libraries, he said, so there really isnt
any profit in it.
Hi first book was a documentary on Hitlers concentration
camps during WW 11, and is entitled, The First 8800 Deaths at
Maulhausen, 1941 1945.
It was compiled after the war in an effort to trace the
inmates of these camps.
Another forthcoming book from the UF Press is a detailed
study of the work and life of German expressionist poet Georg
Heym.
Krispyn is a UF professor of Germanic languages.

Monday, January 13, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, January 13,1969

SG, Greeks
Fix Wauburg
A joint effort by Student'
Government and Theta Chi
fraternity and Delta Gamma
sorority brightened the fixtures
at Camp Wauberg Saturday.
The two houses, with SG
funds, painted all the tables,
chairs and benches, at the UF
lakeside resort. They are also
working on scraping down the
main recreation building.

Ex-Managing Editor Returns

Harvey Alper, ILW, a former Alligator managing
editor, rejoins the Alligator staff today in the new
post of special editor. Alpers primary
responsibilities in the position will be editorial
writing and depth reporting.
The first year law student, winner of a 1969
Hearst Foundation award for investigative reporting
and a 1967 Newspaper Fund Inc. scholarship for
summer newspaper internship, has been working in
the daily newspaper field in Savannah, Ga., and
Morristown, N.J. He was selected as the outstanding
male graduate of the UF College of Journalism and
Communications for the 1967-68 academic year.
During his term as Alligator managing editor,
Alper was one of five editors on the newspaper staff

Coggins: Mask
Could Fool Flu

Dr. W.J. Coggins, director of
student health services, urged
UF students to take part in both
masked and unmasked test
groups for the flu prevention
study.
Coggins asked students
interested in volunteering for
either of the test groups to come
to the infirmary today or
Tuesday.
One group of volunteers will
wear the surgical masks to class,
lectures and other public
gatherings for two weeks. A
control group will not, Coggins
said.
Both groups will be asked to
give a blood sample and turn in a
weekly medical record of any flu
symptoms felt.
Students who have had flu
shots this fall or winter should
not participate unless they want
double protection against the
flu, Coggins said. Only students
who have definitely been told by
a doctor that they have had the
Hong Kong flu, cannot
participate.
Many students who think
they had the flu really had other
virus infections, Coggins said.
Students who wish to
participate, without wearing
masks, may join the control
group of students who will give
blood samples and fill out
weekly illness reports.
Coggins said masks will be

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| UF Flu |
I Overdue I
I I
£ Director of Student Health J
J Wilmer Coggins is surprised
and grateful that there has £*
b been no increase of flu on the £
£ UF campus. £
j; The post-Christmas £
| outbreak hasnt occured on |
j: campus yet, he said Sunday. §
It will take 10 days to two
:j weeks to run necessary tests ji
S to determine whether campus jSj
| cases of influenza are the J
:jj expected Hong Kong variety, jjj
Ww^%V.w.'.'.'.w.w.*AV.w.v.;.vj
available for all student
volunteers Monday and Tuesday.
At the present time Coggins
said there are only 60 medical
students, and 40 Jennings
residents participating.
The program will determine
whether masks could serve as an
effective protection against
Hong Kong flu. Doctors
estimated more than 30% of the
UF student body would be
victims.
The present number of
participants, simply would not
provide erlbugh information to
make any definite conclusions as
to the effectiveness of the
masks, Coggins said.

who resigned in protest over an editorial policy
squabble with then-editor Steve Hull.
Cambridge, Gap Cancel
The scheduled stars of Winter Frolics, Gary
Puckett and the Union Gap and Godfrey Cambridge
will not perform for the IFC in the Florida Gym.
The latest word from Steve Zack, President of
IFC is that there is still hope.
We had booking problems with Gary Puckett,
but we are trying to sign Spanky and Our Gang with
David Fry, Zack said. We should know by Sunday
who will perform.

Tables from the KINGS tables...
.
V
The the c Pitcher'*
A thirsty crow once found a pitcher with a little water
in it, but try as he might he was unable to reach far
enough down to get at it. Until he picked up a pebble
and dropped it into the pitcher, then another and an another
other another until the water mounted to the brim.
KINGS Moral: Be resourceful. When you cant enjoy
KINGS delicious food in our attractive dining room,
take KINGS good food HOME with you or back to
WORK with you. Order To-Go. Every item on our
menu is available for convenient carry-out service.
Just call us and your order will be packaged and
ready to go when you stop by for it. £
* condensed, from Aesop's Fables
KINGS Food Host U.S.A.
1802 W. Univ. 372-6820
1430 S. W. 13th St. 378-1656

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NEED CASH? $ $
BABY SIT IN $
YOUR SPARE
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CALL STUDENT GOVT. OFRCE
OR COME BY THE UNION



Book Exchange Project
May Become Permanent

btuaent Government s book
exchange, an attempt to
eliminate the middlemen in
the sale of used books, may well
be about to take on the air of a
permanent project.
Secretary of the Interior Ric
Katz, coordinator of the project,
said plans are underway to make
Union Trying
To Schedule
More Shows
Union movies may be shown
three, times per night instead of
two, Bob White, president of the
Union Program Council, (UPC)
said Tuesday.
The third showing would run
from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
probably on the weekends, he
said.
More showings on weekdays
are also possible, he added.
Tentative appointments for
the UPC are:
Administrative vice president:
John Kesler; Chairmen of eight
of the 10 standing committees:
Forums, Austin Foreman; Films,
Chris Horrigan; Dance, Steve
Allen; Fine Arts, Ted
Special Projects, Sherry Joe Cox;
Continuing Projects, Randy
Greene; Recreation, Dan Ponce
and Public Relations, Jim
Stanfield.
The two appointments not
filled yet are chairmen of the
Hostess Committee and assistant
chairman of Gator Gras, White
said.
New Sorority
Rush Begins
Next Friday
Pi Beta Phi, UFs newest
sorority, will begin rush Friday,
with an open house at the Reitz
Union in rooms 121-123 from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m.
Pi Phi rush will continue
Saturday morning with an
invitational coffee party
followed by interviews in the
afternoon. Bids will be given out
Sunday.
Students interested in signing
up for Pi Phi rush may do so at
the Panhellenic office by
indicating it on their formal rush
applications.
National Pi Phi President Mrs.
Dorothy Weaver Morgan, along
with many other national
officers, will be on hand for the
signing of charter pledges to the
Florida Delta chapter of Pi Beta
Phi.

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the exchange a year-round
operation.
Right now, were just
looking for space, Katz said.
This years exchange was
successful, Katz said.
We took in about 1,000
books on consignment, said
Katz.
Os these, we have sold about
half. This was our biggest effort
ever, and business was great.
The exchange will remain
closed this week, while
inventory is taken on all unsold
books.
Students whose books were
sold can expect a check in the
mail. If the book wasnt sold,
gator
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sell
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they will have until the end of
the month to claim it, he said.
Plans for a permanent
student-operated used book
exchange hinge on the
availability of space, Katz said.
We will know more about
this within the next week or so,
said Katz.
Chances right now look very
good. We would like to run this
three quarters per year on a
daily basis.

Semi-Annual
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Monday, January 13,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 13, 1969

EDITORIAL
Were Not Lackies

Somewhere in the trash heap of student
politicos the next student body president
lives.
Today he is a mere mortal, undoubtedly
working hard at coking out his grades,
maintaining his political prowess and
fostering new and more powerful
friendships.
Come April he will be a sort of God.
Newspaper advertisements will picture him
as super-student. He will stand tall. He will
speak out on the issues. He will have a
program for today. tomorrow and eternity.
And lie will probably make deals that will
take more than his single year in office to
pay in full.
But come April the masters of student
politics here at the Ul will project him as
the new savior. They will give us to believe
that he really can solve our problems, let
alone understand them.
In truth they will probablv give us
nothing but hollow words and a choice
between the lesser of two or three evils.
Are we too cynical?
Winston Churchill once said It is my
earnest hope that pondering upon the past
may give guidance in days to come, enable a
new generation to repair some of the errors
of former vears and thus govern, in
accordance with the needs and glory of man,
the awful unfolding scene of the future."
We have lollowcd that great man's words.
We have looked upon the history of
student polities. We have pondered the awful
messonlv to see a more awful future.

Times Up
My Time To Accomplish 'lt Has Come
\ 'V
By John Craven

Through Iho years of my
existence I find that I have
moved swiftly through the
lighted domains of time without
examining those things which fill
the nooks along the way.
At last I must slow down. For
it I am to have meaning I can
only go where I have been. And
now. through the contemplation
of mv past. I have something to
say.
You may laugh, for at times I
am humorous. You may cry for
at times I do despair; but you
must listen. For as did the
ancient mariner, I am now
compelled to relate through
written words that which is my
own reality.
At times the words 1 write
will have but one redeeming
quality. They are the things I
have experienced, my own.
These things I write are not

Tlie Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Buswmw, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681,392-1682 or 392-1683.
&
Opinions expressed in the Florida Al%etar ere those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the Uaivcrdtv of Florida.**
J

above contradiction, even ot my
self. For as there are words on
the other side of the page, so are
there varied sides to me.
In these uncertain times I hear
too often, Yea, well what can I
do about it? It is the total
importance of that question that
has led me to paper and ink.
First I define it as all that is
significant to my existence, and
then 1 communicate to those
around me what I am, in relation
to it. Not what I want them
to think I am, and most
certainly not what they want me
to be. What I think, what I feel,
what 1 am.
It will not be easy to
accomplish. I may need a little
faith in my fellow man. Whats
that you say? Thats dangerous.
You are right, because 1 may
have to give some of what I am.
I may have to think of someone
elses happiness before my own.

There have been flickers of light but
only flickers.
Too often we have seen the game of
fraternity house jumping, of blue Key
dangling, of political post promising. Too
often we have seen the springtime political
Gods melt into puddles of empty promises
under the pressures of office.
If present indications mean anything we
will probably have more of the same this
year. We will probably see more deals, more
back-stabbing, more key danglingHjiore post
promising and more paper-Gods.
All this need not be.
The politicos can have their pfcwer and
still give us a competent, qualifiea and aware
student body president. Certainly, if there is
a grain of truth to the old cliche that the
best man wins." the student politicians
would be well advised to give us a good man
this vear.
* 0
Do we ask too ntuch? Are not the
students of this University entitled to
leadership that lives up to the image? Cant
we have a president who knows how to
wield his power not just for his friends but
for all the students?
Contrary to the belief of our current
student body president, the average student
is not iLlMackev
*And th>.politicians had better wake up
and realize tliat Clyde Taylor has promised
to give his lac,kies" (i.e. his constituents), a
chance to abolish Student Government
entirely this spring.
All the vested interests just might lose
that election.

s=Staff Writings=^=^=^^
Angry Crowds Can Riot;
UF Campus Was Ready
By Dave Reddick

r
l just cant understand why we didnt have a real,
No. 1 student-administratidn-police riot on campus
last week.
The way I figure it, the main ingredient in a riot
is people, big angry crowds of them.
And what, I ask you, has been roaming this
campus for the past week?
Big angry crowds. \
Big crowds at the registrars office, big crowds at
the Student Depository and big crowds at the local
pubs.
Just think how easy it would be for one person to
scream, This University is authoritarian,
unhumanistic and furthermore, not a very nice place
to visit and incite a riot.
At that the crowd would do a few seconds of soul
searching, looking deeply inside themselves and

I may even have to do
something. Now I can even tell
you what I wont do. I wont
have to prostitute my soul, my
very being, to a society that
feeds on hypocrisy, violence,
and fear.
Ive found my bag. Im
looking up, because now I can

Th Florida Alligator
Harold Aldrich
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez James Cook
Ammm Executive Editor News Editor
Good To Be Back. .

do something about it. There
are many things wrong with this
world, and I refuse to be one of
them any longer.
We are all made of the same
clay. It is only the shape,
texture, countenance and color
that differ. No man has ever
coveted his virtues or suffered

decide the university was truly authoritarian,
unhumanistic and furthermore, not a very nice place
to visit.
They would begin crying for the takeover of
Tigert Hall, the liberation of the depository, and the
opening of the pubs on Sundays.
The students wouldnt have to worry about
getting in the administration building, they would
already be there.
They wouldnt have to worry about money, they
would already have entrance to the depository.
And they wouldnt have to worry about the
brew, cause they would have free access to it by the
gallons.
Once the mass hysteria reached its peak,
university officials and police wouldnt have a
nravpr

his faults more than I. No man
could, because no man is more
than just a man. My greatest
connection with my fellow man
is that I too aspire to be
different.
The moving finger writes, it
is said, and, having written
moves on. And so shall it be.



Speaking Out

My voice will be just one of many praising Bill
Baggs, editor of the Miami News who died Tuesday,
but I would like to pay tribute to both a fine man
and emminent journalist. I will miss him.
I worked for Mr. Baggs this summer as an intern
at the News. 1 don't think any one could have
wanted a better boss. He made a point of spending
time in the city room conversing with his staff, even
the copy boys. I spent a four-week stint as religion
editor while the regular one was on vacation. Several
times Mr. Baggs slided up to my desk to ask me how
God was that day. I'll remember him with a
Tiparillo-type cigar stuck in the corner of his
mouth. He seemed to be as dependent upon them as
much as his typewriter.
I was surprised to learn he was 48. His tousled
hair gave him a much younger appearance. His ideas
were definitely under 30 in their idealism. He
seemed to be extremely sensitive to human suffering
target of hate mail for his stands on civil rights, Viet

OPEN FORUM:
Adoiaml ViMMt

There is no hope for the complacent man.

' Good To Be Back In The Saddle, Folks
Its Good To See
The Alligator There

MR. EDITOR:
It is for me to now, after long
silence, to speak out in exterior
of the Alligator. Where else but
in this newspaper would people
and things read both sides
concerning the issues that are
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers' names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

A Student Tribute To Bill Baggs

plaguing your university system
and our society as a whole
today.
The Alligator prints more
useful news and other things
than any other college with so
many journalistic awards. It is
truly a marvelous rendition of
the modern action tabloid style.
For the student to start his
day by concentrating on the
events and trivialities of tl/e day
it is good to see you there.
In summary and conclusion I
end by finally saying, Continue
Alligator so we of this proud
heritage may forever feel our
way through the denseness of
the world.
ARTUR V. FREINER
GAINESVILLE, FLA.

and social injustice. He became on many occasions a
Nam, etc.
Even more responsible critics assailed him for his
views. The president of a local television station
suggested he had Communist leanings because of his
conciliatory stand toward North Viet Nam. Mr.
Baggs answered him in what I felt was an
extraordinarily well-written letter.
He was one of the few American newsmen to
travel to North Viet Nam and interview Ho Chi
Minh not once but twice. He served as a courier
for the State Department in delivering peace feelers
to the Communists.
Because he became i disillusioned with what he
felt was our governments duplicity, he and his
traveling companion, Pulitzer-prize winner Harry
Ashmore, wrote a book which was released this
summer: Mission to Hanoi: Or a Chronicle of
Double-Dealing in High Places.
Mr. Baggs was fond of telling anecdotes. I heard t

Article Inaccurate
MR. EDITOR:
Although I appreciate your newspaper interviewing me as a newly
appointed member of the Attorney Generals Commission on Drug
Abuse, I feel that I must respond to the article, Myths Irritate Drug
Problems (January 7, 1969). In that article you linked my name to
many erroneous thoughts and statements.
First of all, it is my contention that the myths centering around
drug usage should be investigated along with the often misquoted
research evidence on drug usage, so that when we talk about drugs, we
know what it is we are talking about.
Secondly, the research I cited ms part of a sub-committee hearing,
but not at the state level, as stated by your article. The sub-committee
hearings were part of the 90th Congresss investigation regarding H.R.
14096 and H.R. 15355 (Increased Controls over Hallucinogens and
Other Dangerous Drugs). The research was not accomplished for this
committee, as stated by your article, but it was presented as evidence
by doctors and researchers before the sub-committee.
Further, I most certainly do not object to the experiments as stated
by your article, but I do object to the irresponsible use of inconclusive
data which leads people to believe that chromosone damage occurs,
when in fact, evidence cannot substantiate or negate that fact at this
time. Their earlier findings were not confirmed in later research by
Drs. Hungerford (Cancer Research Institute, Philadelphia) and
Kurland (Spring Grove State Hospital). It is therefore my contention
that we cannot begin to educate effectively regarding drugs until we
know what to educate about!
Your journalism, as represented by this poorly-written article, is
one example of how the public can be misinformed by the press.
Whether you like it or not, accurate reporting is basic to your
responsibility as educators on this campus.
M. GENE ALDRIDGE, INSTRUCTOR
COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS

I think it must be your eyes.
They can warm me with a glance
that crosses the length of a
crowded room. They gaze into
the distance watching thoughts
dancing in your head. They see.
And they question.
Look at them now. How I
wish you could see them! They
are merry in the saddest way.
Like they carried all the worlds
problems in those two brown
spheres. Their darkness mists
over and the problems drop
away like dew falling off a blade

Whyline ibbbbbbbbhbbbhhbbbbobhbbb BBHPHnnnn
Blazing Eyes Light The Dark
maDjan-nnnDnnnnaaonnnnn **Y Ann Hartecso

>y/.v By Linda Miklowitz KPMUVMM
him tell many of well-known people he knew
personally.
He knew Lyndon Johnson as a senator and was a
friend of the Kennedys. He even served as pall
bearer at Robert Kennedys funeral. He met them
through Adlai Stevenson for whom he worked
dedicatedly in the presidential campaigns.
A month or two after the assassination, he told
me a recollection of Bobby as attorney general. He
had trouble finishing. His voice strained and tears
welled up in his eyes.
Many yet unwritten books, one a political satire
he described to me this summer, as well as a fertile
mind died along with William Baggs.
I am reminded of these lines by George Bernard
Shaw:
You see things; and you say Why?
But I dream things that never were;
and I say Why not?
LINDA MIKLOWITZ, 2UC

Dum-DumLeaders

MR. EDITOR:
I was greatly impressed by
Lewis Livingstons excellent
Speaking Out column of
January 8. Mr. Livingston is
quite correct in criticizing the
thousands of sheep, of which I
am certainly one, that practice
apathy at this racist haven.
There is a terrible dearth of

of grass. They etch a story on
your countenance while they
cleanse your heart.
After the tears comes
laughter, lighting up your whole
face with its beguiling
innocence. That boyish grin
wrinkles your nose while your
eyes dance.
How can there be so much
emotion in those eyes? They are
so dark that they blaze when
you are angered. Like when you
try to comprehend the reasons
and you cant. When nothing

Monday, January 13,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

leadership here that manifests
itself in a shroud of silence
whenever an issue has the
audacity to arise. This
encompasses far more than the
President (sic) of the University,
for his cohorts are obviously
hard at work when one finds a
Gentry or a Claxton prosecuted
to the hilt while brawling
fratmen escape with a
naughty-naughty.
Reactionary heads of colleges,
such as Arts & Sciences and
Law, penalize anyone who
spends time trying to tear
down the Establishment, in the
words of Maxwell Wallace.
Kow-towing to the Board of
Regents causes Administrations
to successfully postpone the
long-awaited entry of UF into
the 15th Century.
The know-nothing
atmosphere that infects the
Gothic halls and vice-clad walls
of UF is repulsive and
inexcusable at a place
supposedly devoted to education
and maturation. / >
The anti-think climate Lewis
Livingston so graphically
described will exist when he and
I and the dum-dum power
structure or this sheep farm are
dead and buried.
The truth of the Kemer
C ommissions statement that
white racism is the ugly cause of
racial strife is evidenced here, as
it is throughout the nation. UF
students and Administrators
have amply shown that one
doesnt have to be a Chicago cop
in order to be a pig.
DAVID MILLER

makes sense anymore.
After a while your eyes look
almost weary, and so tired and
perplexed. Like theyre looking
for inner peace. Your eyes close,
' but I can still see them burning
in front of me, like two candles
illuminating my dreams. Their
memory warms me in the
coldest winter wind and shows
me the path to your door.
Without the feeling blazing
behind those eyes lighting my
life, I would still be in darkness.

Page 9



I, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, January 13,1969

Page 10

Ask A Pro
0
Worktop on a college newspaper is one of the best ways for a
student to quickly learn the practical aspects of the newspaper
business.
Several of our top editors worked on the Alligator, and some
of these have now moved on to larger newspapers such as the
Washington Post.
JACK NEASE
City Editor
' St. Petersburg Timur
NEWS-EDITORIAL ADVERTISING PUBLIC RELATIONS BUSINESS
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
ROOM 330 J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

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BP (BPf ..,!i!^S^^^^^k* s > ?i *^ !!P^^^^B^^;:; : ::: ~ ,'.*i!>>,''\'w

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£;, 4ot *eWsd^S ;^?^', !>WEr' "$

# Moss Alligator staff writers
work about 20 hours a week
_. __- __ : k 7
$ They write an average of 2,000
words a week
# They are responsible for cover coverage
age coverage of all local, state, national,
and international news of in interest
terest interest to UF students

gH m ~.'4

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j*|
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4 i 1



*GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE I
1964 Pacemaker Mobile home.
10x56. central air, front dinette,
S3OOO, best offer. 376*8281,
evenings. (A*4t-55-p)
Honda 1967 305 Scrambler. Knobby
tires, new chain and sprockets. 7000
miles. $450. Call 378-9352.
(A-st-56-p)
TV 19 inch Motorola portable. Also,
one year old post versitrig slide rule
with plastic case. Make offer. Call
378-4135 after 6 p.m. (A-st-56-p)
8x36 AC 2 br mobile home, $995.
Nothing down, no payments or
interest till 10 mo. after you
graduate. Live in free or rent for
profit. 376-1436. (A-st-56-p)
Allstate motorscooter 1966 like new.
Saddlebags, helmet box & helmet,
$165. Call 376-3888 or see at 4002
Newberry Blvd. (A-3t-57-p)
68 Yamaha 100 Trailmaster, toot kit
elec, start, mirrow, book rack,
helmet, inspected. $325 call
378-4855 after 5 or come by 368
Union. Runs great! (A-st-57-p)
SB Austin Healey, 100-6, mint
cond., all extras, $995 or best offer.
Contact Fred Miller, 4248 Ortega
Place, Jax, Fla, 388-4158.
(A-6t-57-p)
66 Honda S9O excellent condition.
440 actual miles. Bell helmet thrown
in. Call 378-5490. (A-st-56-p)
2 Fender shoWman cabinets with
2-15s and 2-12s. Vox amp head
with reverb, tremelo, etc. All for only
$250! Call 372-7711 after 5.
(A-4t-57-p)
JUST ARRIVED Hundreds of desk,
chairs, files, bookcases & much more.
New Used & refurnished. Save 50%
or more. Additional 10% off Jan.
10th to 18th to students with ID's.
JR OFFICE FURNITURE &
EQUIPMENT Co. 620 V? So. Main St.
Ph. 376-1146. (A-6t-56-p)
65 Red Vespa 90 good
transportation $85.00 or best offer.
See at Streit's Honda or call S. Evans
372-3867. (A-3t-58-p)
1965 Vespa 150 cc in good condition
and low mileage, includes helmet and
spare tire. $125.00 Gary Vickers,
376-9420. (A-2t-58-p)
Gibson 5-string Banjo with case,
excellent condition. $125. Call
378-1949 after 5 p.m. (A-58-3t-p)
The Happy Hangup! Mini-hammock
weighs 5 oz. holds 250 lbs. 7 feet
long, only 6.99. Call 378-9144 after
4:00. (A-2t-57-p)
Set of weights. 110 lbs. sls. 1020
SW 3rd Ave. 5 pm to 6 pm.
(A-2t-59-p)
SPOTS before your eyes on your
new carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer.
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-59-c)
FOR RENT
£\-.V.y .V.*.VX*:*X*X*X*X-*
Single room 3 blocks from library
$55 mo. includes heat, a.c., utilities.
Must sublease thru May. See room 1
304 NW 15th St. or call 378-9485.
(B-2t-58-p)
YOU'VE GOT TO SEE IT TO
BELIEVE IT. On the beautiful JR
Ranchette, A-l bedroom, air
conditioned. Furnished apartment.
Utilities, Garbage & exterminating
furnished. Swimming pool available
Jan 1. $125 monthly. Lease
required. Sorry, no children or pets.
3 2-10. miles beyond 1-75 on
Newberry Road. Look for signs.
376-3900 or 376-1146. (B-st-56-p)
Must sublet desirableCapartment, in
the heart of Sin City. Qne bedroom,
married couple only.
after 5 p.m. SIOO a month.
(B-st-57-p)
Clean downstairs furnished apt. Hot,
cold water, furnished, also electricity.
Boys only. SBO.OO per month. 1614
NW 3rd Place. Call 372-2946 for
appoint. (B-lt-59-p)
One bedroom University Gardens
sublet sllO unfurnished $125
furnished. Available immediately.
Call 378-0312 or 372-8646 after 5.
(B-3t-57*p)

lJf'*'** v ***** "****** **'*X M*!W*;*x;.xy.v.v;*;*v^.-
| FOR RENT |
"'x x*xx.vx ?x x i x*x-x. .v.v .....*
Wanted: male roommate, Jr. or
above. 4 bedroom CBS house, own
min- from cam Pus by car.
$37.50/mo. plus v. utilities. Call
376-0703. (B-st-56-p)
Inexpensive, 2-man apt., 2 blocks
from campus 304 NW 15th St. Call
G. Joiner, 378-8122. (B-3t-57-p)
Need one male roommate to share
three bedroom house. Call 376-0529.
(B-st-56-p)
Modern trailer 10x50 2 bedrooms
modern kitchen $75 per month no
lease required. Water included. Call
Mrs. Joan Poteet after 5 p.m.
376-5856. (B-3t-57-p)
WANTED
I* '
Female roommate for 1 bedroom
pool Fr. QTR apt or info on available
apt. for one Can pay up to SBO.OO
mo. Call Patti at 378-7039 or
376-1583. (C-st-56-p)
Male roommate to share one
bedroom lux. Landmark apt. all the
amenities of sin city living S6O/mo. &
elec. CaH 378-7751 after 6 p.m.
(C-st-56-pl
Coed to share modern 2 br trailer
with senior til June. Private room
close to campus. $57.95 mo. for
more information call 378-5850.
(C-st-56-p)
Roommate wanted tor two bedroom
apt. SBO per month plus utilities.
Contact Ward at 372-7538.
(C-3t-58-p)
Two male roommates needed for
spacious two bedroom apt. Rent
37.50/mo. & gas. Contact Jim at 732
NE 3 Ave. upstairs on 8 st. off 3 Ave.
(C-3t-58-p)
Male roommate to share 2 bdr. apt. 2
blocks from campus. $33/mo. plus
1/3 util. Contact Walter Fitzwater,
1813 NW 2nd Ave. (C-4t-58-p)
1 or 2 female roommates over 21.
Share 2 bedroom apt. / 41.50 mo.
Village Park no. 112. Home day and
evenings. (C-2t-58-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apt. behind Norman Hall.
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call 378-7540.
(C-st-56-p)
Part-time or full time. Be your own
boss. Have your own hours. For
appointment phone 376-9947.
(C-3t-57-p)
One roommate for this term or
longer two-bedroom house, air and
heat, one block from campus, $33.75
a month & utilities. 1316 N.W. Ist
Ave. 378-8895. (C-4t-56-p)
1 roommate wanted Colonial Manor
near Tigert Hall. 60/mo. plus utilities.
Call Richard 378-9817. (C-st-56-p)
Reliable couple wanted to manage 24
unit apt. bldg, for at least 2 years.
Non-working wife, no children or
pets. Repairing ability desirable.
Reply to Box X, City. (C-st-55-p)
Female roommate to share apt. one
block from campus. Own room, share
kitchen and bath. S4O plus utilities.
Call Michelle 376-3184.(C-3t-58-p)
One sharp female roommate wanted.
Butler apts., Winter and Spring. Low
Rent. Prefer student over 21. Call
378-0609. (C-st-58-p)
One or two female roommates to
share two-bedroom lux apt. in
Gatortown. Call Linda at 378-9974.
(C-2t-58-p)
Female roommate wanted for Village
Park or French Quarter; call
378-4034 after 5:00. (C-3t-59-p)
Woodward tScmmooumJ

Monday, January 13,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

| WANTED
y.VXWAVAWWiW/jAWMV.V.*/
1 male roommate wanted to share
two bedroom furnished apt. 3 blocks
from Univ. Pool, central air & heat,
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call 376-9540.
(C-3t-57-pt
Male roommate, call 376-5151.
(C-3t-58-p)
1961 Comet station wagon. Needs
work. Price SIOO. Call 376-9505.
(C-10t-58-p)
2 female roommates for Williamsburg
2 bedroom townhouse apt. Fool,
dishwasher, laundry facilities. 52.50
mo. Prefer graduate student or over
21. Call after 6. 378-3345.
(A-2t-57-p)
Male roommate to share large 3 bdr.
house with senior students. Fireplace
and cable tv. Quiet and very
comfortable. Call 378-1112 anytime.
(C-st-59-p)
Female roommate for 2 bdrm. apt.
only 3 blocks from campus. Cent, air
& heating, fully carpeted. $55 mo.
plus util. 378-4455 or 372-8066 aft.
5. (C-2t-59-p)
Wanted: upper division student for a
roommate to share 2 bedroom apt.
S4O/month & utilities. Call
376-7664. (C-4t-59-p)
1
Male roommate wanted to share
house with 2 law students S4O mo.
Call 376-9080. (C-4t-59-p)
Two female roommates needed for
two bedroom 2 bath & dishwasher.
$55 per month. Call 376-6870,
preferably after four. (C-3t-5S p)
ftw.N:...rAVx x*x*;*x*x*x*x*x*x*x-x*x; x*x\*i^
HELP WANTED
K 1 s
Female subjects needed for speecn
experiment. Must be native English
speaking, free of voice defects and ir,
the age group 30-39 or 50-59. $2.00.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway
Comm. Science Lab. 392-2049.
(E-10t-54-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
GRADUATING SENIOR WOMEN!
WANT IN WITH A GOING
CONCERN??? If you like people,
like to travel, and have a knowledge
of a foreign language, consider
becoming a stewardess with Pan
American World Airways. Stewardess
interviews will be held on campus
Jan. 24, '69. For further information,
please contact your Placement
Office. Pan Am is an Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-59-lt-c)
MEN AND WOMEN SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT CAMP
PINEWOpD for boys and girls,
Hendersonville, N.C. (June 17 Aug.
23) General Counselors needed to
live with and care for campers.
Specialty Counselors to teach
Boating, 1 Canoeing SAiling,
Swimming (WSI), Horseback Riding,
Skiing (be able to drive a boat), Arts
and Crafts, Archery, Riflery (NRA
Inst), Nature, Overnight Camping
(able to drive a truck), Tennis,
Dancing, Drama, Golf. Salary based
on age, education, abilities and
experience also includes room, board,
laundry, and other extras. Apply for
applications to T.R. Robertson,
Camp Director, 1414 Felch Ave.,
Jax, Fla. 32207. (E-6t-59-c)
mngmarbergmmtcl

Page 11

w;waw.%ww,v.v.wav.vkw>:o>t.v.v.%*,
HELP WANTED
v V
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session or $2.50 for lto
hour session. Must be native English
speaking and have normal hearing.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway,
University 392-2049. (E-55-10t-c)
MALE STUDENTS without first
period class needed to help distribute
the Florida Alligator each morning.
Good pay for just a couple of hours
each day. Will consider applicants
who are able to work only part of the
week. Call Frank at 392-7527 or
392-1619. (E-ts-57-p)
fWCWW.W.VWWVAV.VANVjV.V.V,.
| AUTOS |
Jaguar 1963 3.8 Mark 2 with
automatic transmission and other
accessories. Student leaving country,
best offer accepted. 378-8496.
(G-3t-57-p)
Ooage Polara 1963 Sedan automatic,
AC, power brakes and steering, S6OO.
By owner. See at Cash's Service
Station, 3936 Newberry Rd.
372-9456. (G-58-st-p)
1967 Triumph Spitfire MK2, well
cared for, WSW R&H convertible top.
Tonneau cover, front bumper guard.
Robert Palmer, 376-0911.
(G-st-56-p)
1965 Falcon Futura, 2 door hardtop,
6 cyl automatic, radio, whitewalls,
excellent condition. Only 38000
miles. 372-5703, 392-1473.
(G-st-56-p0
/
64 MGB excellent cond. New top,
tires, paint. Ph. 372-6175 call
anytime. (G-st-57-p)
Olds 98, 1962 Factory air, all power,
ui,c o*nir. excellent! Light blue and
not a scratch. Call Dr. Busbv Busbv-392-0.24
-392-0.24 Busbv-392-0.24 or come see at 3812 SW 5
St. (G-st-59-p)
1962 Chev II conv. 6 cyl, radio,
heater, st. trans. $250 or best offer.
Call 378-4079 between 4 and 6 pm.
(G-3t-59-p)
SSXX*X*X X J X'XX X*X X*X*X' | XX*X*X>.'
PERSONAL i
ix,x;xxYX*x*X"Xxx*x XXX*x-x*xx*x*x ow
Confidential to Alfurd: I love you
more than I can tell and am so lonely
every minute we're apart. And that
ain't no dog mess. Your Dummy.
(J-lt-59-p)
mn now
R=pP431 1;50 3:50V
15:40 7:35 9:30
I
[ SKidooJ
now
1:35 4:00 \
6:30 9:00 I
I <* 11

KiljyijyyH BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
show starts 7 : oo
BLOOD CHILUNG HORROR SHOWS Ik
"NIGHT OF DCAD "j|j||
' olot to \,.T.
.-

iV..v.* V-SSV-'oVWWVVWVWWWO*
r^V^VAM:*T>VV%V*V%%V#%ViV.V.Mi*?WS(
I PERSONAL $
.
v
r fyuv.v.v.v.v. s%v.w n
Shelly B.: I still love you very much
and now realize all my mistakes.
Please give me one more chance. All
my love, R. (J-3t-56-p)
^>MsNSr.w.?.%w.v.Vbv.v vwi'Avwm.wwvvv
| LOST & FOUND j
Lost after basketball game Jn. 6
p.m. One yellow-navy striped tie and
one Harley-Davidson black glove, if
found call Dave Swords, 376-9198.~t
(L-lt-58-p)
Class ring & watch during finals in
Matherly. Ring has sentimental value.
Reward, no questions. Call 376-6280
after 5. (L-3t-57-p)
SERVICES 1
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
Experienced babysitter will care for
child in her home. Good facilities,
reasonable pay. Call 372-2739.
(M-lt-59-p)
Housewife desires day work, clean
and iron, $6.00. Call before 10:00
pm. 372-5269. (M-st-59-p)
GERMAN lessons and/or turoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam tor
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-st-59-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
Satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-18t-59-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Downtown GmUmrlHt j
| 2)1 W. Uulnnltt 4v. |
METROCOtOW B 1
BCTiocoloa l^
o j
ffc, the fixer
Based on the Pulitzer
Wajf Prize winning novel
niy by Bernard Malamud.
Metiocolot H



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 13,1969

j myisanns |

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Features Editor
Compliments about
Gay-ness-ville coming from
students are rather scarce. Most
students, it is found, do not hold
this bee hive of industry and
open-mindedness in very high
esteem.'
Very few people realize that
Gay-ness-ville is a. friendly
hamlet nestled snugly in the rich
warm orange sands of Alachua
County, and that it has many
fine attractions, such as its warm
receptive citizens (who welcome
college students with open
arms), its fine culinary centers
specializing in national and
international quisine (one
restaurant even boasts of this
countrys finest chef, Caspar of
Gainesville), and of course its
local merchants, always more
than willing to give a guy an
even break.
These things are rather
apparent, however. One thing
that Hogtown boasts which is
relatively unknown is its rich
heritage and colorful history. So,
appearing in this column from
time to time will be factual
accounts of Hogtown history,
incidents that helped shape the
character and build the future of
the South, such as the great ice
debate which took place many
years ago when Hogtown was
yet to win its fame.
It seems that Gay-ness-ville
citizens depended on ice being
shipped down from the North in
huge chunks via clipper ships.
The ice, naturally, was used in
ice boxes in private homes and
also for commercial

Board Changes Name

The annual awards and
installations banquet of the
Reitz Union Board for Student
Activities was held Thursday
night in the Union Ballroom.
The Union Man of the
Year award was given to Roger
Brown, past president.
Dr. Robert B. Gaither,
chairman of the UF mechanical
engineering department, was the
guest speaker.
As the new officers took
office, the Reitz Union Board
for Student Activites ceased to
be and the new name of Reitz

Interviewing business & liberal arts seniors
for
Management Training Program
in
Atlanta
CRUM & FOSTER
January 17
1.
Positions in the Southeast
- f
'
-
2. /
See Placement Office for Details
' b : \

refrigeration. Which was a neat
arrangement and everybody
grooved along together with real
live ice from up North.
And then one day a guy
named Mr. McArthur (of dairy
fame) announced his invention
of artificial ice, and he actually
had the nerve to claim that his
artificial ice was colder and
would last longer than real ice.
The citizens were appalled. Here
was this hippie communist Jew
trying to upset the applecart,
and the talk of the town was
which ice was the best: good old
natural ice from up north or this
new-fangled ice invented by a
hippie communist Jew.
It was decided that the only
way to find out once and for all
whose ice was the best was to
have a contest. So, quite sanely
and logically for Hogtown, a
huge chunk of real ice and one
of equal size of McArthurs ice
were set side by side on a
downtown street. Then several
policemen were given the task of
guarding the ice from
scalywags. It was agreed on
that whichever piece of ice
melted last would be the winner.
The town settled down for
several tense days of waiting.
They waited and waited. Wait.
Wait. Wow. Finally the piece of
real ice melted first and
McArthurs ice was acclaimed as
the official winner and he wasnt
a hippie communist Jew any
longer.
So that is why today you may
find artificial ice in
Gay-ness-ville instead of ice from
up North. Other enlightening
highlights of Hogtown history
will, from time to time, appear
in this column. Their purpose is

Union Program Council became
effective.
If your car needs repair
call
A-l AUTOMOTIVE
. Brakes repaired
. Tune-ups
. Over-hauls
. Muffler & Tailpipes
. Automotive parts
. Major repairs
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
ON ALL
Parts & Labor
1417 N.W. 2nd St.
378-9838

to create an understanding of
Gainesville history and to stir a
feeling of pride for founding
fathers within students and
residents alike.

FREE FRENCH FRIES
with each BIG SHEF
OFFER GOOD 5 PM till CLOSING
JAN. 13 JAN. 14 JAN. 15
MON. TUES. WED.
Lets All
Go To \l^i=SSH!
Burger Chef \ / //
715 1412 N. Main St.
NW 13th St. Next to Gville Shopping Center
s
a perfect size 7
It has nothing to do with
calories. Its a special
female weight gain... 0 1
caused by temporary m
water-weight build-up. Jm I |jjl \|| f
Oh, you know...that : fl| : l jj x \ JE|f jjM
uncomfortable full im < I
feeling that sneaks up jJml It Wty
on you the week before jlm \ M iii
your menstrual period. IS B j I
This fluid retention not I|B If ydfl
only plays havoc with If H j f§ m
your looks but how |lff j S j >
you feel as well. J |JHh B j | fell jfc
(It puts pressure on j I jfL JB| fjgj lJSj| mSS
delicate nerves and I'lK 1 |B| Jw
tissues, which can lead S4%|
to pre-menstrual H
cramps and headaches,
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ANNOUNCEMENT I
McDavids Barber Shop I
has moved so
the Village Square I
2409 S.W. 13th Aye. I



I Ric Masten To Perform 'Question Sorias

Ric Masten, a California poet
and songwriter, will present a
folk program tomorrow night in
I t he Reitz Union Auditorium.
Mr. Masten will accompany
himself on the guitar, singing his
own songs.
This performer has dropped
out of five northern California
colleges, studied art in Europe
for two years in the early 50s
| and has written and seen
produced five musical comedies
a t the famed Carmel Forest
Theatre in California.
Ric Mastens songs deal with
most of our contemporary
problems. Question Songs, he
calls them. Questions about war,
civil rights, youth, sex ethics,
religious beliefs, conservation,

New Philosophy Prof
To Credit Department
John Daniel Wild, one of the most eminent philosophers in the
United States today will teach at UF next Fall, Dr. Thomas Hanna,
chairman of the philosophy department, said Friday.
His coming will project the department into national prominence
as a graduate philosophy center, Hanna said.
The opening of the departments doctorate program, a result of
three years preparation coincides with his arrival.
Presently a professor of philosophy at Yale University, Wild is
coming to UF because he considers this a growing department,
Hanna stated.
.
He is very student-oriented and noted for his lectures, he said.
Hanna said most of Wilds work at UF would be connected with
the graduate program.
Wild is founder of the Society of Phenomenology, and primarily
known as an existential philosopher.
He has published eight books on topics ranging from Plato and
Idealism to Social Philosophy and Existentialism.

linifSEsamw)
_ ffl| Rathskeller P
ENTERTAINMENT? You ain't heard nothing yet. We've got it all . blues to ballads, soul to
* saxophones. Guitar pickers, strummers and plunkers; jazz groups and piano players ... and that
mgm ~ just covers part of the local talent. Not to mention the full services of the New York-Miami
circuit and the coffee house circuit. ENTERTAINMENT? You name it, we've got it. THE
\ RATHSKELLER ... great entertainment six (count 'em folks) nights a week.
If you or your group would like to entertain Rathskeller-ites apply at the student T7 f
activities desk. 3rd floor Reitz Union (no jugglers or dog acts please) I
6'..lV? '

etc.
His work has often been
published in Broadside
magazine, a well-known topical
song publication. In the June,
67 issue, Mr. Masten said this of
himself: Im part of the silent
generation than
Seeger, older than Dylan).
I blew my teens on panty
raids and phone booth stuffing,
spent my twenties lost in the
violence on the boob-tube and
was three years into my money
grubbin thirties before I asked
my first question. I guess Im a
late bloomer.
Masten has been described as
a preacher engaged in singing
sermons. There is some of the
existentialist in him. His songs

TOMORROW night

reflect committment, joy,
despair and grief. Only the
insensitive can fail to be
affected.

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Ric Mastens tour is sponsored
by the Unitarian Universalist
Billings Lecture Fund and the
Unitarian Fellowship of

Monday, January 13,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Gainesville. The program will be
tomorrow night at 8 p.m. in the
Union Auditorium and
admission is free.

Page 13



Page 14

Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, January 13,1969

UF Tracksters Star
In National Meets

By CHUCK PARfUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
UF Gator tracksters more
than lived up to Coach Jim
Carnes expectations over the
weekend by establishing
themselves as the top college
team in two national indoor
meets.
Ron Jourdan continued to
show that track is on the move
at Florida by capturing first
place in both the National
Invitational held in Washington,
D.C. on Friday and the
Cats Defeat UF,
Vols Next Foe
By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UF, off a humiliating 88-67
defeat at the hands of Kentucky,
takes on the Tennessee
Volunteers tonight at eight.
Tennessee downed Georgia
Saturday night 82-67.
Tennessee has a 2-1
Southeastern Conference record,
the Gators are 2-3.
Bill Justus and Bobby Croft,
a 6-foot-10 junior, supply the
Vols with their big guns. The
other starters measure 6-foot-l,
6-foot-3 and 6-foot-4. But
heighth is not one of the Gators
big points, next to Neal Walk,
6-foot-10, the biggest man is
6-foot-5 Andy Owens.
The Gators played Kentucky
without another starter Boyd
Welsch, due to a virus, and
during the game Ed Lucko
sprained his ankle and will be
unable to play against Tennessee.
The Gators shot a dismal 40.6
percent from the floor,
compared with the Cats 47.4
percent.
Walk won the statistics battle
against Dan Issel of Kentucky.
Walk scored his usual 22 points
and grabbed 14 rebounds. Issel
had 20 points and 11 rebounds.
Owens scored 13 points and
came away with 10 rebounds.
Tennessee must continue its
hot shooting and fast play to
come out ahead of the Gators.
But they will not even need this
if the Gators continue the poor
shooting that has plagued them
this season.
WRUF will broadcast the
game starting at 7:55 p.m.
tonight.

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w
y;
Iv
RON JOURDAN
... nations no.l high juniper
Chesterfield Invitational in
Richmond on Saturday. Jourdan
won the Washington meet with a
leap of seven feet and the
Richmond meet with a
6-foot-l OV* high jump to prove
that he is the top high jumper in
the nation today.
Jack Bachelor, 1968 U.S.
Olympic Team qualifier and top
5,000 meter man, won the
3-mile in 13:45 Friday and took
the 2-mile invitational Saturday
running for the Florida Track
Club.
Bob Lang captured the
880-run Saturday and placed
second Friday to Villanovas ace
Frank Murpry.
John Parker brought home a
first in the college 2-mile event.
Steve Atkinson was third in the
invitational mile and Ijamonn
OKeefe second in
880-run.
After the 2-mile relay team of
OKeefe, Ken Burnsed, Parker
and Lang broke the meet record,
Coach Carnes said this is what
we need, this will help us let
others know about our track
program.
W
The Gators will compete in
six national indoor meets this
year, among them the big
Millrose Games in New York
City on January 31.
The Gators next meet will be 1
a dual affair against Ohio State 1
of the Big Ten in St. Johns i
Arena at Columbus on the 25th
of January.
Calif. Education 1
The average adult citizen of J
California has had 12.1 years of |
school. J

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Golfers Take Senior Bowl,
Melnyk Individual Winner'

UF golf team whipped the
Dauphin Island Golf Course, as
well as the cold weather and
strong winds to place first in the
Senior Bowl Golf Tournament,
33 strokes ahead of the nearest
competitor.
Steve Melnyk took the
individual honors with a
one-over-par 217. Freshmen
Andy North and David Barnes
had fourth and sixth place
finishes.
It was a very good
tournament, Coach Buster
Bishop said. We have gotten off
to a good start, especially with
such fine performances from the
freshmen.
The course, situated on an
island, southwest of Mobile,
Ala., had very tight fairways.
Three Wes were bordered by
the Giitf of Mexico, with the
other by trees
and only 3040 yards wide.
Barnes, in his first
intercollegiate tournament, is a
' V&iA
KBbIBH Bra Hw M
iS JB
Wmm:
STEVEMELtJVE
... Cops Senior Bowl
Letters To Editor
The Alligator Sports
Department will accept letters to
the Editor for a new weekly
feature.
The letters can be a comment
on the sports scene or questions
about whats happening in the
world of sports. We will attempt
replies to all letters received.
The Alligator reserves the
right to edit all material in the
interest of space.
Address all correspondence to
Sports Editor, Rm. 330. Reitz
Union.
fjVDIAcI
| STUDY CLASSES \
I BEGIN TUES. f
J JAN. 14th \
| 3:00 pm
Lecture on v
Judaism
\ 4:00 pm
1 Great Jewish
A Personalities
| 7:00 pm a
v Advanced Hebrew A
| 8:30 pm A
v Conversational A
A Hebrew \
\ HIILEL |
\ FOUNDATION S
b 16 N.W. 18th St. \
372-2900 0

5- 11, 150 pound native of
Avondale Estates, Ga. He is the
winner of the 1966 International
Jaycee, placed third in 1967
Future Masters and second in
the 1968 Atlanta Amateur.
North, also in his first
intercollegiate play, a recruit
from Madison, Wisconsin, is
6- 190 pounds. He was
the runner-up in the U.S.GA.
Junior in 1967, 1966-67

Martin
Marietta
Engineers=
Aeronautical
Electrical
Electronic
Mechanical
Civil
Interviews at campus placement
office on MON. TUE. JAN. 20, 21
Martin Marietta Corporation is interviewing
for career positions in major, long-term Research,
Development and Production Programs.
Opportunities exist in the technologies
associated with Space Exploration, Advanced
Electronics and Communications Systems,
Missile Systems, and High Strength Materials.
Martin Marietta has major facilities in:
Baltimore, Maryland; Denver, Colorado; Orlando,
Florida; Wheeling, Illinois.
If you are unable to schedule an interview,
please send your resume to.
director college relations
aerospace group dept. 155
MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION
FRIENDSHIP INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
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Wisconsin State High School
Championship, and runner-up in
the 1966-67 Orange Bowl
Tournament.
Florida U., j 129
Middle Tenn. 1162
Tennessee U. 1164
Miss. State 1185
So. Alabama 1200
Auburn U. 1202
Miss. So. 1224
Tenn. Tech ~ 1231
Tulane U. 1245
Tulsa U. 1255

DQSftHM!
1969 Radios
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Instant warm-up and cooler operation
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FM/AM TABLE RADIO
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Monday, January 13,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 13,1969

COLTS LEAVE SUPER IN STUPOR
Jets, Joe, Do It!

MIAMI (UPI) Broadway
Joe Namath put the money,
$15,000 of it, right where his
mouth was by pitching the New
York Jets to a 16-7 Super Bowl
victory over the Baltimore Colts
Sunday in a stupendous upset.
A capacity crowd of 75,377
watched in amazement as the
Jets, 18-point underdogs in a
supposed mismatch,
out-played and outfought the
Colts to give the American
Football League its first victory
ever in the post-season series.
And quarterback Namath, the
sideburned swinger who riled the
Colts before the game by
guaranteeing a Jets victory
worth $15,000 to each player,
was the man who did it.
Namath, who boasted before
the game, If the line gives me
enough protection to pass, well
win, got his protection and
made good by firing 17
completed passes in 28 attempts
for 206 yards.
The New York scores came
on a four-yard touchdown sprint
by Matt Snell and three field
goals by Jim Turner of 32, 30

Butcher McKee Axes
13 Seconds Off Mark

The UFs highly touted SEC
Champion swimming team
splashed its way to a resounding
65-40 win over the Georgia
Bulldogs at the UF pool Friday.
In the Gators second victory
in as many duel meets, soph.
Mark McKee butchered 13.3
seconds off the school 500-yard
freestyle record held by Bruce
Page in 1967.
The UF won 10 of 12 events
in the chilly outdoor meet that
was terminated early due to a
power failure.
McKee, who in one way or
another, is involved in a
dozen school records for his
efforts, also swam in the winning
400-yard medley relay that
finished with a 3:45.6 clocking.
Richard Ahrens, Jaime
Murphy and Bill Strate also
swam with McKees relay.
The win left the Gators with
a flawless 2-0 duel meet record,
having posted wins against
University of South Florida and
the Bulldogs.
The Gators meet Florida
State Saturday, Jan. 18 here.
Florida State beat the same
Georgia squad Thursday
afternoon.
Results:
400-medley relay Florida
(Strate, McKee, Ahrens, Murphy),
3:45.6
1,000-freestyle -1, Appleget (F);
2,Klein (G),l 1:11.2
200-freestyle -1, Hough (F); 2,
Martin (G); 3, Kirk (G), 1:51.3
50-freestyle l, McPherson (F);
2, Voyes (F); 3, Stokes (G), :22-2.
200-IM -1, Bridges (F); 2, Miller
(G); 3, Watson (G), 2:08.2
Good Strvict Start*
at
CRANE IMPORTS
e
SAL ES-SERVICE ES-SERVICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS ES-SERVICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
90S K. Ob*. Av*. m-Wlt

Yardstick
NY Bit
First Downs 21 18
Rushing Yardage 142 143
Passing Yardage 206 181
Return Yardage 34 139
Passes 17-29-0 17-41-4
Punts 4-38.8 3-44.3
Fumbles Lost 11
Yards Penalized 28 23
and nine yards.
Not until all those points
were on the board for a 16-0
Jets lead did aging, aching
Johnny Unitas save the
embarassed NFL champion Colts
from a shutout by
quarterbacking an 80-yard drive
capped by Jerry Hills one-yard
touchdown plunge.
The alert Jets defense, best
in the AFL, picked off four Colt
passes to blunt Baltimores air
attack. Randy Beverly
intercepted two in the end zone,
while vociferous Johnny Sample
grabbed one near the goal line
and Jim Hudson stole another.
Ohe NFL coach even cracked
before the game, Namath plays
his first pro football game

1-meter diving l, Link (F); 2,
Montgomery (F); 3, Dimling (G),
247.40 points
200-butterfly l, Williams (F); 2,
Hozen (G); 3, Sheehe (G), 2:05.2 Q
100-freestyle l, Stokes (G); 2,
French (F); 3, Timberlake (G), :51.8
200-backstroke -1, Strate (F); 2,
Magarham (G); 3, Harrison (G),
2:06.7
500-freestyle -1, McKee (F); 2,
Martin (G); 3, Calendar (G), 4:59.6
(meet record, old record 5:12.9 set
by Bruce Page in 1967)
200-breaststroke l, Perkins (F);
2, \Vyatt (G); 3, Strong (G), 2:24.3
3-meter diving -1, Wolfson (G);
2, Smith (F); 3, Dimling (G), 220.05
points
i
There was no 400-yard freestyle
relay run because of light failure at
the tJF Pool.
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today.
But Broadway Joe and Snell,
who gained 114 yards, re-wrote
that script.
Namath, calling plays with
the same efficiency with which
he passed, completely
overshadowed his rival
quarterback, Earl Morrall, who
was the NFLs most valuable
player. And Joe was rewarded
by being voted a new car as this
games most valuable.
Namath, mixing the
inside-outside running of Snell
with flare and screen passes, led
the Jets to a 7-0 lead at halftime
and then Turners three field
goals in the second half wrapped
it up.
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CHILDRENS DANCING LESSONS
4 YEARS OLD & UP
Tap Lessons Ballet Lessons
Thursdays Tuesdays i
January: 16, 23, 30 January: 14, 21, 28,
February: 6, 13, February: 4, 11,
20, 27, 18, 25
March: 6, 13, March: 4, 11
$10.50 per child $10.50 per child
3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30 4:30p.m.
C-4 C 4
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For pre-registration, come to the
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
room 310 or > Phone 392-1655