Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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t:>; - ifup?
Jf J 9
STEVE HULL
... writing again

Pacemaker
. "**
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 51

No Gatorade Settlement In Sight

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*' 'V "Vx* <, j* r V ,-.,-.,... 0 ASP t % | tf.J'z. xY>v
'£ tfhf ? v ;
*** Is
OUT OF THE SHADOWS
The sun has returned to the UF campus after a brief winter hibernation to the delight of students
and a multitude of trees.

Experimental College
To 'Stimulate Creativity

By SUSAN WHALEY
Alligator Staff Writer
A new experimental college has been formed
under the direction of Douglas Tedards, English
graduate student, and Dan Beardsley, campus
chaplain.
The college wont cost a thing, and its main
objective will be to give students a new learning
environment with reliance on the curiosity and
creativity of the individual students, according to
Beardsley.
Registration for the Florida Experimental College
will begin Jan. 15, at 7:30 p.m. in rooms 122 and
123 of the Reitz Student Union.
According to the winter catalogue prepared by
members of the Executive Committee, classes will
meet in an eight-week term and meetings will be
held at a time decided on by the coordinator and
the students. Meeting places will be in coordinators
homes, at one of the campus religious centers, or
possibly on campus.
Members of the Executive committee in charge of
the college are: Tedards, chairman; Beardsley,
vice-chairman; John Talmadge, chaplain at
Presbyterian Student Union and Hank Gooch,
sociology graduate student.

HULL JOINS STAFF
University Report Changing Format

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
Former Alligator Editor Steve Hull has
joined the staff of UFs off-campus
newspaper, the University Report,
executive editor, Scott DeGarmo, said
Tuesday.
Hull and myself will be doing most of
the work this quarter, DeGarmo said.
Richard Martin, editor of the Report and a
medical student, is busy delivering babies
this term, according to his wife.
Hull said Wednesday he plans to write a
weekly column for the Report. The

The
Florida Alligator

Some of the courses to be offered include: The
City and Urban Change, The Creative Artist Today,
Trends in Contemporary American Fiction, A
Reappraisal of Christian Faith, Radical Change and
An Investigation into Sex and Sexuality. Other
courses can be added if students request them,
according to the catalogue.
A coordinator will be in charge of the discussion
groups said Beardsley. He will act not as a teacher
but as a convener of the group and a liaison with the
executive committee. He need only have enough
background and experience to prepare an interesting
syllabus and a relevant reading list.
This is an attempt to draw together students and
faculty and give the student a situation where he
can feel free to discuss what he finds relevant and is
interested in, said Beardsley.
' 1 1
Florida Experimental College wants to bring
together self-motivating and creative students. The
student will fertilize his own mind by his own
creative interest, according to Beardsley.
The college hopes to make use of such techniques
as films, photography, tapes, field trips, sound and
light and person-to-person encounters, according to
the executive committee.

column will analyze and predict what is
going to happen on campus.
In addition, Hull plans to aid DeGarmo
in re-organizing the Report. The
production and advertising staffs are going
to be expanded, allowing the editorial staff
more time for writing, according to
DeGarmo.
Howell Ferguson, former executive
editor, is no longer working for the paper.
I needed the time to keep up with my law
studies, he said.
DeGarmo said he will be more
selective toward contributed columns in

University of Florida Gainesville

BY KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The dispute over who will
receive royalties from Gatorade,
thirst quencher invented by UF
professor Dr. Robert Cade,
appears far from settlement.
Fred Parker, Board of Regents
member authorized to negotiate
with Cade, said Wednesday there
are two requests in Cades initial
offer which the board can
obviously not accept. These
are:
t Cade would give up
royalties from Gatorade;
Hop-N-Gator, a special kind
of beer and hydraulic football
helmet if the board would
renounce patent rights to his
other inventions.
The board would agree not
to bring suit after settlement had
been reached.
Parker said that several points
in Cades offer were acceptable
to him, including Cades request
that royalties should go to the J.
Hillis Miller Health Centers
Department of Renal Medicine
for research.
Cade insists that he made the
board a very generous offer to
give up all his shares providing
they agreed to a few things.
The doctors, in effect, said
to us, this is our product. It is
just a matter of who we would
be dealing with.
The Federal Government
contends that the formula for
Gatorade is in the public domain
and should be made available to
anyone.
Stokely-Van Camp has the
trademark for the name
Gatorade.
;<.ywywy/AsvyA%v.v.v.v. .w .*j
5 9
SG Insurant
I 1
Students interested in g
obtaining low-cost Student
if Government insurance will be
if: able to purchase premiums if:
jf only through Jan. 24. §
A sl4 blanket coverage |f;
:f: packet will insure one student
through Sept. 17. For a
:f: student and wife, the cost is fi;
$29.60, and for a student and :
I family, $45. ~ j:
Information is available by fi|
calling 376-8393, or writing f:
Box 1407, Gainesville. $
.y.%v.%v.;.y.y.y.y.v.x.v.v.y.y,v.y.:.yv

the future and take a more definite
editorial direction.
There was a lot of creative
wool-gathering last quarter. We need more
articles that have an element of reporting,
he said.
Stories in the future are going to be
somewhat different. They will be more
timely and focused on news events.
DeGarmo considers the Report
somewhat above the crush of daily events.
We do not get swept up in daily crises, but
comment from the vantage point of a more
considered judgement.

Thursday, January 9, 1969

m VT'
.-.v
J|
LAVON GENTRY
... supported
A&S Faculty
Gives Support
To Gentry
By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
A condemnation of the
administrations refusal to
withdraw civil charges against
Lavon Gentry was passed in a
resolution by the Arts and
Science faculty and presented to
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell during finals week last
term.
Gentry, who was arrested for
placing Bust the Draft signs
on campus buildings after being
warned by campus police, has
been scheduled to appear before
Municipal Court Jan. 14. His
case was postponed Tuesday
when no court reporter was
available. f
The resolution, proposed by
Assistant Professor of
Mathematics Edward Ferguson
and Assistant Professor of
Biology John Kaufmann, states
the case sets a dangerous
precedent.
It urges the administration to
withdraw immediately the
civil charges against Gentry and
to return his case to campus for
action by the Student Conduct
Committee, in accordance with
the Student Code of Conduct.
(SEE 'GENTRY', PAGE 2)

Americas
Number I
College
Daily



Page 2

'> The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9.1969

Frauleins Brighten
Rathskeller Look

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs newest entertainment
medium, the Rathskeller, began
final preparations for its official
Jan. 17 opening by hosting
about 60 coeds Tuesday night at
an informal tea.
The girls are all prospective
Frauleins, a cross between
waitresses and hostesses, for the
new nightclub social center.
Joe Hilliard, who has spent
more than a year making the
Rathskeller a reality, told the
girls that Frauleins would be
more than just waitresses,
because they will help make the
atmosphere of the Rathskeller.
Equally important to serving
meals, sandwiches and drinks,
Hilliard stressed, is the Frauleins
job of getting the customers to
talk to each other.
Rathskeller
Needs Talent
The Rathskeller is holding
auditions for guality talent,
and for an emcee, The Voice of
the Rathskeller, tonight and
Friday from 7-10 pjn. and
Sunday afternoon. The
Rathskeller is located in the east
wing of the main cafeteria,
across from Murphree
area. Three emcees and 12 acts
will be viewed each night.
All individuals and groups
must sign up at the student
activities desk of the third floor
of the Reitz Union before they
may audition.
We need variety acts,
comedians, one-act plays as well
as instrumental and vocal
performers, Fran Belous, local
entertainment chairman said.
I Gentry... I
f FROM PAH ONE
...Gentry was** arrested and
charged in city court for an act
committed by others with
impunity countless times before
and after his arrest, said the
resolution, concluding that the
offender was singled out for
punishment because of the
political views expressed on this
poster.

Seminole Proofs Available
Picture proofs for Seminole yearbook photos of 11 students have
been returned to the Seminole office, Room 337, Reitz Union.
According to editor Jim Moody, the students may pick up these
proofs between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m.
The students are Lane Prior, Kenneth Hartsaw, Bruce Laval, M.
Marcy, Katherine Mathews, Cindy Miller, Michael Schalleen, Paul G.
Paulsson, Jody Tumipseed, Robert Cato, and Michael Leclercq.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Bolding, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as Sfoond class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
3he Florida Alligator reserves the ngnt to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

The campus grew too fast,
dividing into colleges,
fraternities, sororities,
independents and other groups
as it grew. There was nothing
developed to bring these groups
back together-thats why the
Rathskeller was created.
Hilliard said.
Three representatives from the
Association of Women Students
will conduct five minute
interviews Sunday night from 6
oclock to 11 oclock. Any coed,
21-years-old and older may
apply. Interested students may
call the AWS office in the Reitz;
~ Union.
Frauleins must be at least 21
because all employees of the
Rathskeller must be cleared by
the State Beverage Department,
Hilliard explained.
Each Fraulein will work about
12 hours per week, in several
flexible shifts. Base salary is
tentatively set at $1.40 per hour
plus tips.
Forty Frauleins will be hired
The frauleins will recieive a
two hour training course by a
professional beauty school
director Jan. 13 and Jan. 14. An
etiquette book for waitresses is
. also being prepared for the
Frauleins.
A draw-string peasant-style
blouse, tucked into a flowered
dirndl skirt, complete with a
short, black velvet vest and tiny
white apron will outfit the
Frauleins, said Rathskeller
secretary Dianne Barron.
You can have your skirt as
short as you want it-you can be
as modest or immodest as you
like just so long as nothing
shows that shouldnt, Miss
Barron told the audience.
Scholar Athlete
To Speak
Mac Crenshaw, national field
coordinator for Atheletes in
Action, a division of Campus
Crusade for Christ, will be
speaking at the College Life
meeting at the Sigma Alpha
Epsilon fraternity house Sunday,
Jan. 12.
Crenshaw is a 1966 graduate
of the University of Georgia
where he played varsity
basketball and tennis. He was
awarded the NCAA scholarship
for graduate work in history in
1968.

9 I
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The Law Center Will Be Dedicated By Earl Warren Feb. 1
Earl Warren To Dedicate
New UF Law Complex

The nations highest judicial
official Chief Justice Earl
Warren of the U.S. Supreme
Court will make the principal
address at dedication ceremonies

Burnett Denies Cut
In Debate Budget
By EILEEN FEINBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body Treasurer Phil Burnett Wednesday denied the
statement in Wednesdays Alligator that the budget for UFs debate
squad was cut.
John Wittig, director of forensics, had reported a cut in the budget
from SII,OOO to $7,125.
Actually, said Burnett, the debate team is now receiving almost
S3OO more than last year. What was cut was their requested budget of
SII,OOO, he said.
Burnett elaborated that each year, every campus organization is
required to submit a budget request to Student Government. The
request is then evaluated by the Student Senate for approval.
The reason the debate squad did not receive their desired budget,
Burnett said, is simply because there are not enough funds.
Not only the debate squad is suffering, but also every other
noA n + u n Cai T S ls the debators were § iven full request
ot SII,OOO, then other organizations would have to accept a decrease
to accommodate this, he said.
All organizations are entitled to special requests for funds, with the
approval of the Senate, and perhaps this will help the debate squad in
obtaining extra funds for special events this year, Burnett said
As for scholarships Burnett explained, several organizations have
made such requests, but prospects for this now or in the future are
not optimistic.

1 e SffClSt
I Thurs. Thru Saturday I
I W Jan. 9 Jan. 11, '69 I
I ANY COMBINATION of 3 LIKE PRICED ITEMS. I
I 2at Regular Price... I
I The 3rd Item Only 1( I
I Sample : When You Bring In 2 Mens Suits and 1 Plain Dress I
I r 2 Plain Dresses A 1 Suit or 3 of a Kind... I
I I
I I
I CLEANING CENTER I
I Country Club Quality at Neighborhood Prices I
J

for the UF Law Center on Feb.
1.
The 77-year-old Warren
agreed to President-elect Richard
Nixons request to preside over

the Supreme Court through the
end of its current term next
June. He had submitted his
retirement to President Lyndon
Johnson some six months ago,
effective when a successor was
approved by the Senate.
Chief Justice Warrens address
comes during the formal
dedication of the Law Centers
academic building, scheduled for
2:3 0 p.m. Deans and
representatives of over 100 law
schools throughout the nation
have been invited to join leaders
of the bench and bar from the
state attending the dedication
program.
Other events planned in
conjunction with the dedication
include a noon luncheon and a
seminar on The New Biology
and the Law in the morning.
The annual law reunion program
has been merged with the
dedication along with a meeting
of the Law Center Association.
Activities begin Jan. 31 with
registration at the Law Center. A
dedication reception and
banquet will be held at the
Ramada Inn that evening.
The $2,536,263 academic
building is the first of three units
planned for the new Law Center^



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Thursday, January 9,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

l Tht Florida Alligator. Thursday. January 9.1969

Ordered Your Seminoles?

Ordered your *69 Seminole
yet?
If not, you have until the
end of January to reserve
your copy of the UF
yearbook.
The Seminole is presently
being sold from 10 a.m. 2
pan. at the Student service
Center across from the
Depository (Hub) and at the
College Library, according to
Pam Pemberton, Seminole
sales manager.
Cost for the Seminole is $5
a copy.
Sorority members, who are
competing against each other
in a traditional sales contest,
are selling Seminoles at the
two sites.

Carter To Direct
Studies Center

Dr. William Earl Carter was
appointed permanent director of
the Latin American Studies
Center by UF President Stephen
C. OConnell Monday.
Carter, acting director since
last April, was selected by the
Board of Regents during a
monthly meeting at Pennsacola.
Carter replaced the first
director of the center Dr. Lyle
McAllister, who resigned in July,
1967, to return to full-time
teaching in the UF Department
of History.
The Latin American Studies
Center was established in 1963
to provide a directive and
coordinating agency for a
rapidly expanding number of
Latin American-related activities
and programs on the campus.
Carter has degrees in English
and theology along with a
masters and Ph.D. in
anthropology. He is the author
Savant-UF Will
Select Members
l
Savant-UF, honorary womens
leadership organization, is
selecting members for the fall
quarter.
Woman are chosen for
excelling in one or more fields of
leadership on the UF campus.
All women must maintain a
minimum 2.0 overall and are
eligible in thgif sophomore year.
We are in the process of
sending out letters to eligible
women to interview them
January 16, said Historian Jan
Dickens.
Other officers are Sue Ellen
-Winkle, president; Debbie Fein,
vice-president; Linda Tarler,
secretary; and Barbara Nunn,
treasurer.
DE LICIOUS I
W:rJ
I ffHOBSF/J at
I I student prices If
1 Break fast, served 1
I daily, 1
11614 N. W. 13th ST. I
|__37B-0955 I

Sales for this term began
Monday and are under the
charge of Pam Pemberton,
sales manager.
Final deadlines for
readying pages for the printer
are in February, about the
same time the printer must be
told the number of books to
be printed, which accounts
for the early sales drives.
By scheduling the sales
during the fall and early part
of the winter quarter, the
staff hopes to get an idea of
the expected student demand
in time to make a decision of
the number of Seminoles to
___ order.
The yearbook is expected
halfway during the Spring
Quarter.

of 18 books, monographs,
articles and book reviews and
served four years on separate
assignments as a minister,
administrator and educator in
Uruguay and Bolivia.
o
Youth Critical;
Friend Held
In Shooting
By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
Fifteen-year-old Willie Darby,
of Gainesville, and his
12-year-old friend played hooky
from school Wednesday. They
decided to play cowboys and
indians with real guns.
Willie armed himself with a
shotgun and his friend stalked
him with a 22-caliber rifle. The
boys thought the guns were not
loaded.
Willie was shot in the center
of the forehead by the other
youth, who police refused to
identify, and was rushed to the
UF Medical Center where he was
in extremely critical condition
Wednesday night following
surgery. He is in the Intensive
Care Unit.
The other youth was taken
into custody and turned over to
juvenile authorities after the
shooting shortly before noon.

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... sales manager 1
XV

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Mg.
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STYROPHOAM SOUL IS BACK FOR WINTER
WITH BRASS
and the sounds that have made them one of the most popular
' bands in the Gainesville area
after a most successful Ist quarter, Styrophoam Soule is now
preparing their winter schedule for playing. Contact Roy Morris
376-1270, contact after 6 p.m.
The Styrophoam Soule is a group working towards greatness. In their short
seven months existence, Styrophoan Soule has shown their ability to many
different audiences in and around the Gainesville area. They have played for
dances at fraternity houses, in the Reitz Union, and for teen dances. Not only
do they cater to the coltege crowd, but also to older audiences at such places as
With the addition of the brass section the Sytrophoam Soule plans to expand
their variety of Hendrix, Cream, Vanilla Fudge music P
announced" &."£ the c e | tz Union The date for this dance will be
ootendal and ,h h S U e plays t 0 be 9 ood They have the
P l X l and the deslre to be 9reat. Look for them to be one of the areas
outstanding bands for this quarter's many dances.
0

Reagan Threatens
Striking Teachers
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) Striking teachers spread their San
Francisco State College walkout Wednesday to another school as Gov
Ronald Reagan moved to cut off their salaries.
A militant picket assuaited a student en route to class at San
Francisco, and a professor was hit with a cherry bomb as picketing
began at San Jose 60 miles away. 8
The governor, reiterating his vow to keep the colleges open, warned
the American Federation of Teachers there will be no pay for
unauthorized absences. When asked by newsmen if he foresaw a
solution to the crisis, Reagan replied, The only solution you have... is
either fight or surrender and when you surrender they have taken over
This is the day of the ultimatum. The militants have delivered the
ultimatum at knifepoint, at firebomb point.
As AFT members picketed for the third day at- the 18,000 student
San Francisco campus, similar action was started at San Jose, which has
23,000 students. The union represents about 300 of the 1,300 faculty
members at each campus
The AFT hks demanded meaningful negotiations with trustees on
the student crisis at San Francisco and improved salary and working
conditions for the faculty.



tired 'Gator Editor Succeeds In Washington

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Washington The Washington Post
has a new assistant national news editor
who learned newspaper business the
hard way as an Alligator editor.
Robert Benny Cason was editor of
the UF student publication from
January to March of 1966 when he was
fired at a special meeting of the Board
of Student Publications. He now holds a
prestige position with a newspaper of
over half million daily circulation.
The setting of the Cason incident was
the 1966 gubernatorial race in which
Haydon Bums, the late Robert King
High and Scott Kelly vied for the
Democratic Party nomination.
High, then mayor ot Miami, won in
the democratic primary only to be
defeated later in the regular election by

From
Florida
To Alligator
l)c toasjjittgton

the Republicans Claude Kirk.
Cason had planned an election special
to be mailed throughout Florida
endorsing Robert King High and
blasting Governor Burns.
This special issue never materialized.
Casons bold but sometimes foolhardy
crusades aroused the ire of campus
leaders, faculty and administrators,
said Eddie Sears, former Alligator editor
who wrote a four part series on the
dismissal.
His supposedly foolhardy crusades
included: a proposal to cut publication
of the Alligator to three days a week, a
revealing series on the infirmary, a series
on academic freedom, coverage of the
resignation of several history
department professors and his

Changes At A Glance
-*N
§ Students be assigned to a specific adviser and remain with
that adviser unless student requests change. Presently adviser
who happens to be on duty signs course enrollment card, leaving
no record in fold of courses approved.
0 Make more specific the wording in the present catalog
which pertains to student's entire program of studies.
0 Deletion of present elective requirement which requires
18 quarter hours of work in courses unrelated to area of
specialization. Also elimination of 48-hour ceiling a student may
take in his major.
0 Each department set its own minimum hours for the
major, providing this minimum be set at not less than 36, nor
more than 60 hours.
0 Deletion of the section which equates one year high school
language with one quarter of language training.
0 Deletion of the catalog requirement which refers to a
facility in oral and written use of English language. This has not
been observed in recent years.
0 Students be allowed to take up to 10 hours of credit
outside the college without approval of the dean.
0 Students be permitted to take one course each quarter in
which the student is graded on a satisfactory-unsatisfactory
basis.
0 Students be allowed to drop courses to minimum load
until the fifth week without having to peition.
0 Creation of a nine-member advisement committee to be
composed of six faculty and three students.

unsanctioned listening to a secret Blue
Key tapping meeting.
When Cason was fired, 80 percent of
the Alligator staff walked out in protest.
It was reported that hundreds of
students demonstrated in favor of Cason
at the Plaza of The Americas. Robert
High even made a statement on behalf
of Cason.
On New Years Eve, this reporter had
the opportunity to talk to Cason while
he was on duty at the newsroom of the
Washington Post.
I found him sipping a cup of coffee
while on his 10 p.m. dinner break in an
unusually static newsroom.
He had little to reminisce about or
add to his being fired and the
circumstances that surrounded that
event. He seemed happy working for the
Post.
Being fired did not hurt me

although I feel that some people were
hurt deeply by events at that time,
Cason said.
He characterized his editorship as,
Using the Alligator as a vehicle of
communication for persons and groups
who previously had no means for mass
circulation of their ideas.
We were small-time compared to the
type of protest that you see on campus
today. The abolition of involuntary
ROTC was one of the aspects of our
period.
He mentioned that one of his
adversaries then is now working in the
U.S. Department of Agriculture in the
District of Columbia J. Wayne Reitz,
former president of UF.

Arts And Sciences Faculty
Approves Major Changes

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Sweeping changes in graduation requirements
were overwhelmingly passed by the College of
Arts and Sciences faculty. Dean Harry H. Sisler said
Wednesday.
The changes, which include the lowering of the
required credit hours from 96 to 90 will be
presented to the Curriculums Committee todays
If passed, the changes will go to the Faculty
Senate as the next step.
In addition to lowering credit hours, ten changes
were recommended by the Undergraduate Program
Committee.
In assigning each student visor, the
committee hopes to abandon the advisors role as
clerk and cxplicator .. .that he may return to the
role of representative of the college who has close
personal contact with the students.
In the past, advisors who saw students were often
ones who happened to be on duty at the time" the
committee report said.
Students are allowed to take one

Andy Moor who replaced Cason after
his dismissal was also fired for his
loyalty to Cason and is now planning a
round-the-world free lance writing tour,
according to Cason.
There are people who find it
remarkable that Cason should be the
assistant news editor at the
Washington Post with only two years of

Wmk mm
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Cason At Work On The Post News Desk

satisfactory-unsatisfactory course per quarter in
order to encourage the student who desires to
expand his intellectual horizons the report stated.
In keeping with its premise that students are
responsible for setting up their own pregram of
courses, and should be allowed to do so, the
committee recommended a student need no
approval to take courses outside his college.
This means that a student may take
basketweaving if he so chooses without approval
Dean Sisler said.
The creation of a nine member advisement panel
which was considered too large a group to perform
this function effectively.
Dean Sisler did not see the changes as a lowering
ot standards, but as an effort to make the
curriculum truly liberal and more flexible.
These changes have been studied for more than
five months by the committee, he said.
The .committee strove to provide a set of rules
which are both simple and unambiguous.
f R( P orts >>...graduate requirements will be heard

* Thursday, January 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

full-time newspaper experience since
graduating from UF.
Cason served as wire editor at the St.
Petersburg Times before going to the
Washington Post.
Casons time with the Alligator,
though turbulent, apparently was a
good stepping stone to work on the
national level.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday. January 9, 1969

Dr. Bradshaw Appointed
Assistant Nursing Dean

Appointment of Mrs. Carol
Bradshaw as assistant professor
and assistant dean for nursing
practice has been announced by
Dean Dorothy M. Smith of the
UF College of Nursing.
A graduate of Duke
University School of Nursing,
Mrs. Bradshaw received her
masters degree in personnel
services from UF in 1964 and a
doctoral degree in education
from the University in 1968.
Dr. Bradshaws clinical field is
pediatric nursing. Her doctoral
dissertation was concerned with
the relationship between
maternal behaviors and infant
performance in environmentally
disadvantaged homes. 1
Dr. Bradshaw has been
associated with the College of
Nursing since 1968. Prior to
9m3gs!g
fvt,*
DR. CAROL BRADSHAW
... UF graduate
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Discover the discounts
in USA, Mexico, Hawaii
Canada & the Caribbean.
A
A Pyramid Book, only $2.25
at your campus bookstore
or wherever paperbacks
are sold.
' a ' :F- -'

1968, she served as medical
supervisor .for Standard Oil Co.
(N.J.) and pediatric head nurse
at the San Francisco Children's
Hospital and the Hermann
Hospital in Houston.

WBK I*
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. ~ *. xDitwi-i.suww.w'm 5 <
10 arn -2 pm AXii ~ Hub Service Booth
i. aAn Main Library

Mrs. Bradshaw is a member ot
Kappa Delta Pi. national
educational lion ora r y
organization, and is presently
serving as its treasurer.

Q MENS HAIR STYLING
;SH SHAMPOOING RAZOR CUTTING I
LONG HAIR STYLING
APPOINTMENTS 378-2015
SIMS BARBER SHOP J
817 W. UNIVERSITY AVE
|ga| Ef A > k Wo^



_ .. jKyo]H Buy One Roll-Get The Next One For H
' With The Coupon At The Bottom Os The jp|
. Pope nmnmiamnmnE3
ff j OFFER GOOD: jt |
JAN. 9th 10th 11th
NO DEALERS PLEASE
"Melody Series all purchases cash "Dyna-Range
3" 169 2.25 Feet 1.0 mil $.60 5"-201-600' 1.5 mil Acetate $2.80
5" -166 600 1.5 mil 1.24 5-202 600' 1.5 mil Polyester 2.85
?=IS:Sd I:"!! s:li swings add up during our :ISf:S& 15:1! 5:10.
HVfM
'.'',., - t
"Accessories
5 in. RB-5 empty reels $.65
Ic// p 7 in. RB-7 empty reels .75 / //
1 in- PRST-7 empty reels J
self-threading 1.50
r ___ 7 in. B-%-7 empty boxes .25
"Cassettes
j ' ' ; ' J
"Acetate Tapes 271 C6O mailer $3.20 "Polyester Tapes
r 273 C-120 album 5.34 M r
3" ll *1 l5O Feet 1.5 mil $ .70 5"- 150-900 Feet 1.0 mil $3.60
4" 111 300 1.5 mil 1.60 5" 282 600 1.5 mil 3.10
5" 111 600 1.5 mil 2.25 5" 290 1800 .5 mil 6.95
7 111 1200 1.5 mil 3.50 7" 153 1600 1.0 mil 6.20
5" 120 -600 1.5 mil 2.25 lf l iv/inn I oHorc 7" 282 1200 ,f 1.5 mil 4.95
5" 190-900 1.0 mil 3.50 Living LeiierS 7"-290-3600 .5 mil 11.95
7" 190 1800 1.0 mil 5.50
j
3 inches 290 600 Feet
.5 mil Acetate 2.95
' 1
f
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IsA(S I
COUCH'S %.

Thursday, January 9,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9, 1969

EDITORIAL

Student Governments ombudsman
program, designed to help UF students cut
through the mire of bureaucratic red tape on
this campus and find realistic solutions to
nagging problems, may be headed for
oblivion.
Not because of lack of response from
students. Not because of an inability to solve
the problems it receives. Not because of a
shortage of volunteer help.
The ombudsman may fold, simply,
because no one is willing to find office space
for it. The program doesnt really need a lot
of space, just a little cranny or nook to store
its records and files, to keep the
Dial-A-Phone to receive complaints.
But, despite a lot of promises for help, the
program is still shuffling around from place
to place usually in somebodys dorm room
or other such location without a spot to
call its own.
Ombudsman Robert Young was promised
space in a building and was elated. Until he
found out the building is slated for
destruction next month.
Short and sweet: The ombudsman
program was an imaginative attempt to
provide meaningful assistance to students
who cannot solve many problems, large and
small.
It would be a shame to see such
imagination go down the tube because it
cant find a home.

Good Copy Butchered;
But A Byline For Ace

By ROBERT SISTRUNK
A reporter has his ups and
downs like anyone else. His
work is occasionally exciting.
But sometimes he is a frustrated
soul.

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, is? p 111 i[ f :M
-:, ;rSj s;] J 2: < ; f ?
f,:| - j J ,-j i
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Vietnam, Mideast, Inflation, Crime, Campus Riots,
Hoo Boy, Will The Cartoonists Have Fun With That Nose!
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Bueinaes, AdvartMng offioas in Room 330, Rails Union. Phone
302*1681, 302-1682 or 302-1083.

A Cranny Will Do

Ace cub reporter comes in
the Alligator office at 9 a.m.
Monday morning. He glances at
the tip sheet to find a top-notch
story that no one has signed up
for. (Little does Ace know that

We suggest that Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale pick up his
telephone and Find a home for the
much-needed program.
Today.
A Sad Loss
The journalistic world has lost one of its
most distinguished sons with the demise of
William C. Bill Baggs, editor of the Miami
News for 11 years and one of the widest
known newsmen in the United States.
A staunch defender of the oppressed,
Baggs never hesitated to let his views be
known however unpopular they might
have seemed Fat the time. His steadfastness
gained him the admiration of many and the
not-less-intense hatred of others.
His demands for an end to segregation in
Floridas public schools brought a barrage of
- hate-filled and threatening mail.
But, never afraid to put his strong ideals
into frank words, Baggs always continued to
stand up for his beliefs.
His editorial stands won him many
awards, and last year he was nominated for
the Nobel Peace Prize.
But his brilliant career was cut short by
pneumonia and other complications
. Tuesday. He was 48.
The gap his untimely departure leaves in
American journalism will be difficult to fill.

the cards are already stacking
against him.)
First, the days ad material is
swiftly coming in. This will
eventually swallow up most of
the Alligator space.
Second, the wire is busy
putting out yards of copy. This
will also capture precious space
by the end of the day.
Ace, ignorant of these facts,
trots off to cover an important
trial set 2 hours before deadline.
Seven pages of notes and 30
minutes before the deadline, Ace
rushes into the Alligator
headquarters.
Give me 28 lines pronto,
demands the managing editor.
28 lines, cries heartbroken
Ace, I have enough material for
three times that amount!
The papers already laid out;
now get to work, says the
editor. v
Ace hustles out a story and
prepares to go over it.
Not enough time for that!
cries the editor as he rips the
story from the typewriter.
The editor quickly scans it,
cutting out a couple of
paragraphs.,
With head down Ace mopes
out of headquarters.
This is not the end, though.
The copy editor (Butcher) gets
the story next and cuts it until it
fits the space left after the ads
and wire copy are taken care of.
The next day Ace rushes out
and jyjabs an Alligator. There is
his by-line!!! He stares at it for
almost a minute. His story is
greatly chopped but he got his
first by-line!!!
Oh well, maybe working for
' flie Alligator isnt all bad.

The Florida Alligator I
>
"npripf freedom
/raSV&raK b * mrdM of
Harold A,dr Ch I
Dave Doucette
PlO/wJtW/ Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez James Cook 11
AmIAILM. Executive Editor News Editor

New Politics: I
[Key Toebellionn
Reprinted From the Middleboro Daily News

By RAY COHN
In the early wintery months
[of this eventful year a
§ poet-senator stomped the snow
| covered hamlets of New
| Hampshire preaching a new
| direction for America. Most
| thought he was embarking on a
I Don Quixote-type of expedition.
\ But Eugene McCarthy like
§ Abe Lincoln believed right
i makes might. So he valiantly
| fought an incumbent president
| and almost won. And with his
I near miss in New Hampshire the
| New Politics movement which
E sprang up on college campuses
| the nation over picked up
| momentum. The stature gained
| with the entrance of the late
| Sen. Robert F. Kennedy into the
| race, made the New Politics a
| force to contend with in the
| coming years.
| It is hard to pinpoint the birth
| of the movement. Although, it
| began in the academic
| community with student and
|. faculty dissatisfaction with the
| Vietnam war. It grew into a
| political force demanding wide
| range social reforms to cure our
| growing domestic ills.
5 New Politics also began on
| November 3, 1964 with the
| election of Robert Kennedy to
| the Senate. Picking up the
| mantie of his assassinated
| brother, Kennedy was disturbed
|by the nations foreign and
| domestic problems so he set out
|to charter a new course. He
= spoke out on subjects ranging
| from air pollution to Vietnam in
£ his fateful fight to bring change.
| The movement started, too, in
| the Senate with such early
| Vietnam critics as Senators
| William Fulbright, Wayne Morse,
= Frank Church, Kennedy, Ernest
| Gruening, George Aiken and
| George McGovern.
EE &
It also began with determined
| people who didnt let forces of
| the power structure stop their
| dreams of social evolution.
| University students flocked from
§ all corners of America to
| campaign for McCarthy,
S Kennedy and later McGovefn.
| Ralph Nader risked his life and
| reputation to bring safety and
= l a r play for the American
| consumer. And Caesar Chavez
| took on the powers of California
| agriculture interests to end
5 near -slavery conditions for the
| West Coast fruit pickers.
HB --r- ****> -* - ~

ss
These people along with the!l
political leaders give New! I
Politics its true meaning. For the! I
movement is basically a I
against the Establishment and! I
the Status Quo the military! I
industrial complex, giant|l
business and labor interest! I
groups, archaic and§
discriminatory draft rules,|
corrupt political machines ands
outdated political processes.
It is a political revolutions
against the Czarish Wilbm Mills.!
Everett Dirksens, Mendel Rivers,|
Richard Russells and William|
Colmers, who through the |
antiquated seniority system have!
continually buttonholed social!
legislation. It is a peaceful force!
aimed at dethroning!
old-fashioned political bossess
like Chicago Mayor Richards
Daley. And it is fed up taxpayers |
demanding an end to tax give |
aways such as 27!4 per cent oil i
depreciation allowance.
New Politics is now a|
crossroad. The McCarthy-5
Kennedy movement helped s
retire Lyndon Johnson. Butg
personality clashes and a tragic |
killing kept it from capturing thes
Democratic Party.
Party reforms passed at the =
Chicago convention, however, §
pave the way for the leaders of|
the participatory politics. The|
key for the reform elements is|
the 1970 congressional election. 3
For if they are to make a strong |
r.n. for the White House in |
1972, they must build a powers
base. |
A step in that direction was |
taken recently when McCarthy |
and Kennedy forces joined |
hands to form the reform |
minded National Democratic |
Coalition. Paul Schrade, United |
Auto Workers Union official, |
who was with Kennedy at his =
last victory celebration, and Dan |
Peterson, Wisconsin chairman g
for McCarthy, were elected |
cochairmen of the NDC.
But, above all, the New =
Politics will succeed only if they =
offer attractive candidates. And \
the outlook for 1970 shows such §
men available in all sections of \
the country. There is Theodore \
Sorenson and Gene Smith in \
New York: John funney and ;
Jess Unrah in California; Sergent |
Shriver and Adlai Stevenson 111 [
in Illinois and John Glenn and ;
John Gilligari in Ohio.
Their moment of truth is fast j
approaching. j



Speaking Out

MR. EDITOR:
Concerning new parking fees. This problem was
not presented to the faculty. My facts, therefore,
are only those gleaned from newspapers. As far as I
can ascertain, the central problem lay in the fact
that there were 7,000 parking tickets given by the
campus police in the past year. Since faculty to this
date have been provided parking space, the major
portion of these tickets, it must be assumed, were
those given students.
The method chosen to resolve the student
parking problem apparently is largely to load it on
the backs of this fringe-benefitless staff and faculty.
Whereas SI.OO was sufficient to register automobiles
in the past, somehow or another now $lO becomes
necessary.
The difference apparently represents a levy to
obtain a fund to begin a solution of the student
parking problem. Then the idea of making faculty

Another Atrocity Committed
By Man In His Inhumanity

MR. EDITOR:
In Mans long history of
inhumanity to his fellow man,
three major atrocities stand out:
1. The extermination of
6,000,000 Jews by Nazi
Germany.
2. The selling into world
slavery of 15,000,000 Africans
by the warring kings of that
continent.
*
3. The torturing, burning and
life imprisonment of untold
thousands of heretics by the
midieval Church.

Letters to the editor should be limited
to 300 words All letters must be signed;
however, upon request, the writers name
can be withheld Correspondence will be
subject to standard editing procedures so
that it complies with space limitations

U ( linS
Gee, Were Going To Miss Him

Faculty Pays For Student Parking

Now a fourth such atrocity
looms on the horizon; the rape
of lovely, primitive Viet Nam.
Left to work out their own
destiny, these people would long
ago have achieved unity and a
stable government. The
interference in their internal
affairs by Russia, China and the
U.S. with weapons and advisors,
perpetuates the agony. The U.S.,
by sending troops, must assume
the major guilt. We have already
napalmed, bombed and shot to
death 1,000,000 of these
pathetic little men, women and
children.

and staff carry as much of the load as possible is
implemented by a parking fee based upon salary.
Obviously the fee-differential has nothing to do
with space occupied. In essence it amounts to a
graduated income tax. Finally, to top this off, to
secure parking space formerly occupied with
convenient access to place of work, there is an
additional fee.
In the future, therefore, staff and faculty will pay
graduated levies on salary in order to come to work.
I wonder how many members of the Board of
Regents would like to be levied parking fees based
upon their incomes?
Is this the type of tax thinking they would like to
see applied on a state or local level. The next logical
step, it seems to me, Mr. Butts is to charge for office
space on the basis of salary. This charge would
provide monies for dearly-needed classroom
buildings.;

These are primitive farm folk
who dont know a communist
from a capitalist and couldnt
care less. These are patriots
fighting for their independence.
They will never quit. Are we so
far removed from 1776 that we
cannot understand this?
Breathes there a man with
soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath
said,
This is my own, my native
land..?
O America, this evii, like slavery,
shall forever dim thy lustre!
KENNETH D. TOMKINSON
Still Hope
For Gator?
MR. EDITOR:
Because of discontent and
unhappiness with the actions
and personalities of our present
political leadership, the
American electorate voted for a
change this year, to Richard
Nixon and Ed Gurney. I believe
that we would do well to follow
their lead, and demand
much-needed change on our own
campus.
We need a change from
selective law enforcement,
attempted violation of
doctor-patient relationships,
suggestions for harsh and
repressive measures against
drug-users, while ignoring 99 per
cent of the illegal alcohol-users,
and attempted coercion of
student committees. What about
Greek rumbles, secret files,
apathetic professors, and stifling
of academic freedom?
We also need a change from
out-of-date, inept coaching
practices.
Yes, if we ever hope to
achieve greatness or see The
Year of the Gator, we must
have change. We should replace
Steve OConnell and Ray Graves.
The times they are achanging,
so lets not stay behind. We want
the UF to someday achieve
greatness.
MIKE HITTLEMAN, 2UC

OWN FOKUM:
VIA&Mt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

/ Don't Know What's The Matter. My Back Aches, I've Got
A Headache, Fever, Feel Weak and My Stomach's Queezy ...
Correspond Abroad
The INTER-AMERICAN OFFICE in Brazil, (dedicated to promote
friendly correspondence among the youth in the Americas), is
receiving from all Latin American nations hundreds of letters
expressing a lively interest in exchanging correspondence with the
young people of United States of America, of both sexes and all ages,
in English, Spanish, French, Italian or German, and for any of the
following objectives:
1. To exchange knowledge on literature, arts, customs, folklores,
etc.
2. To practice and perfect the usage of foreign languages through
correspondence with foreign penfriends.
3. Possibility of vacations interchange among youths of another
countries being invited and received in foreign homes without
financial expenses, as more a member of the family.
4. To exchange stamps, postcards, magazines, books, records, etc.
5. To have a more intimate knowledge of other places, while at the
same time the chance to tell something about yoqjr own country
abroad.
Because of the many useful and wonderful experiences that can be
attained with only a little expense in postage, there has always been a
warm reaction to this movement which is aimed at fostering bonds of
friendship and understanding among the youth of different nations.
Those interested may please write to: INTER-AMERICAN
OFFICE, C. Postal, 474, Pocos de Caldas, M.G., Brazil.

Thursday, January 9,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Prof. LJ. Banninger

Anyway, faculty and staff now have had their
Xmas gift from the Board of Regents and the
Administration. Those of us in Economics and
Mathematics, at least, can shout gleefully, We have
a fringe benefit at last! but hollowly we must add,
negative in nature.
The one thing I have not wanted on this campus
is an activist-type labor union. It would have no
benefits for the Board and Administration and
mixed blessings for faculty and staff.
However, many more actions like this solution to
the parking problem would, in my opinion,
completely dissolve the illusion that we are a
professional group and bring into focus the fact that
we may De dealing with individuals who, to say the
least, do not have our well-being at heart. In such
instance, a strong union would be essential for our
protection.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9, 1969

Paris Talks Still Lagging

PARIS (UPI) North Vietnam dashed American
hopes Wednesday that it might still be willing
to accept allied proposals aimed at breaking the
deadlock over the Paris talks.
A North Vietnamese spokesman rejected a U.S.
suggestion that the Communists reconsider seating
and speaking arrangements proposed by the allies.
All these arrangements aim at making the
conference two-sided, the spokesman said. This is
unacceptable to us, U.S. deputy delegation leader
Cyrus Vance appealed to the North Vietnamese to
reconsider the proposals Tuesday after South
Vietnam had refused to make further concessions to
the communists.
Wednesdays restatement of Hanois position cast
gloom over the chances of reopening the talks soon.
The conference was to open Nov. 6.
There was no significant diplomatic activity
among the four delegations during the day.

Johnson Sees Surtax
Extended Into 1969

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Johnson expressed
concern Wednesday over the
latest rise in the prime interest
rate, which doubtless will
provide a strong argument for
retaining the 10 per cent income
surtax.
The White House reporting
the reaction, said Johnsons
concern will be reflected in the
budget for the 12 months
starting July 1, when the
surcharge is scheduled under law
to expire.
Johnson hopes his final
budget, which President-elect
Richard M. Nixon will inherit
Jan. 20, will combat inflation
and ease pressures on the
market, said press spokesman
Tom Johnson.
.The White House went no
further, saying no final decisions
had been made, Administration
budget drafters agreed, but said
the President was leaning
increasingly to the idea of
proposing an extension of the
full 10 per cent surtax at least
through calendar 1969.
Knowledgeable confressional
sources said Johnson would
almost have to keep the surtax if
he has any chance of realizing
his hopes of submitting a new
budget with a small surplus.
EXMUSIfD?
-UNDERSTANDING COMES
FASTER WITH
CLIFF S NOTES'
OVER 175. TITLES $t .FACH _
AT YOUR BOOKSELLER
lCOMOtT|0
LINCOLN NEBRASKA 68501
feJs. J

Johnsons reported concern
was aroused by the increase
Tuesday of the prime interest
rate, the basic charge on loans
that majorVbanks make to
corporations with the best credit

I *. i
I .. | I
I Dresses...reduced I
| 33 1/3% and 50% I
B| v
ra x
I 2401 Southwest Thirteenth Street Village Square 1
I OPEN 9:30 -6; 00 daily I
I "s C

Low-level working sessions were held between the
American and South Vietnam delegations but they
were understood to have involved only a review of
past strategy.
Though a new bargaining session between Vance
an(| North Vietnams Col. Ha Van Lau had been
forecast for early this week, both sides said no
arrangements have been made for it yet.
There were widespread reports here of a major
split in South Vietnam over conference strategy.
French radio reported that the Saigon delegation
coordinator, Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky, had
said he and his delegation were prepared to meet
around anv shaped table.
South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu,
often at odds with Ky, Tuesday restated Saigons
opposition to further concessions to Hanoi,
especially on the issue of a table.

rating. The rate went from 6%
per cent to a record 7 per cent.
The surtax was enacted last
year to help cover Vietnam War
costs and primarily to dampen
the overheating economy.

|i
'Man Rescheduled
: Student Government Productions has rescheduled the
ijplay Man of La Mancha. The date has been changed from
Feb. 6, to Sunday, Feb. 9.
Interviewing business & liberal arts seniors
for
Management Training Program
in
Atlanta
CRUM & FOSTER
January 17
Positions in the Southeast
See Placement Office for Details
!; WvXv
W vWw^s^J
Sg
yXv yWlwSySraffisw:
.*.. .*.*.'.* .y.y.y.y/ijfljflMljiWy
X'X-Xv'.-.
I T l
;* 1
I?*:,'
Ip Jfe
I
Playtex*invents the first-day tampon
(We took the inside but
to show you how different it is.)
Outside: its softer and silky (not cardboardy).
Inside: its so extra absorbent... it even protects on
your first day. Your worst day!
In every lab test against the old cardboardy kind...
the Playtex tampon was always more absorbent.
Actually 45 % more absorbent on the average
than the leading regular tampon.
Because its different. Actually adjusts to you.
It flowers out. Fluffs out. Designed to protect every
inside inch of you. So the chance of a mishap
is almost zero! w
Try it fast. I"5
Why live in the past? ** pl3ytCX
: 4SgS> tampons
will MWH i>lW#.il|W



A computer has no mind of its own. Its
brainpower comes from the people who
create the programs, says Rod Campany.
Rod earned a B.S. in Math in 1966. Today,
hes an IBM Systems Programmer working on
a portion of Operating System/360, a
hierarchy of programs that allows a computer
to schedule and control most of its own
operations.
A mixture of science and art
Programming means writing the instruc instructions
tions instructions that enable a computer to do its job.
Says Rod, Its a mixture of science and art.
Youre a scientist in the sense that you have to
analyze problems in a completely logical way.


JP;:-"'
Programming at IBM JMI
Its a chance
to use everything
youve got! )
:::r:v : -xv:::::?.-:-:-:- : : -::r:-:-:v:ggSa^MMII r
iwnrowwr
.^S?oc888a882BloooflBaB
il..
jTiX ?QO-:V)ift( -..* >Jj^^£JS i: 1 wSr* a fc&'jSft-'?tP&F' s**%^?jt 1 Vjn.*vj3,i > '**'^'^'-Vi''
J 1 *,;{%/I* 1 ,' 3, vVfr ra w ./ **** **' j^ jsv*^"'T* < '5, sf
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But you dont necessarily hunt for an ulti ultimate
mate ultimate right answer. There can be as many /
solutions to a programming problem as
there are programmers. Thats where the art
comes in. Any given program may work, but
how well it works depends entirely on the
ingenuity of the programmer.
. j -- *,
>
Programmers hold a key position in the
countrys fastest growing major industry industryinformation
information industryinformation processing. Business Week re reports
ports reports that the computer market is expanding
about 20 percent a year.
- ; < '.
You dont need a technical degree
If you can think logically and like to solve
problems, you could become an IBM pro-

Thuraday, January 9.1969, Th Florida AlligptofJ

grammer no matter what your major. Well
start you off with up to twenty-six weeks of
classroom and practical training.
Visit your placement office
Sign up at your place- j
ment office for an inter- ON
view with IBM. Or send CAMPUS
a letter or resume to
Charles Cammack, IBM, JAN*
Dept.C, 1447 Peachtree po OQ
St., N.E., Room 810,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
IBM.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9, 1969

QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOD THRU JAN. fJk>
2500. ARROW
Paper Napkins 29* f CH S! VM~ r EF A
Balk Tissue...s/sl. V AQ, 70< J
PfIBAF PllltAC
UUC| I HA I Km Ceffee el Your Chelco or more
O O wr m
rt. Pears... 3/sl.
f want TIDE A Fruit Drinks...4/sl.
V "4/ y Choc. Drink... 4/SI.
Limit I Datargant of Your Choke with 19 1 M
Chicken Noodle 79*
W-oi. CRACKIN' GOOD *- DfEP SOUTH...LImiI on. Mtiyonnnli. your cKolc. w/SS.OO or mor. purehaM . p Mih§
Big 60$ Cookies... MAYOKNAISE.... 39*
Burter MAYONNAISE.. 49*
1 Mil II Wi *OOOOOOOOOOOO
Strawberry Preserves 39* DETIRMf.:. 39*
Can VAN CAMPS
Vienna Sausage 5/$l
A FLO UP A' Tomato Sauce 5/SI.
1 m as% 1 Lima Beans 5/sl.
X. J 4#** Alaska Peas 5/SI.
Jumbo Roll VIVA
nylon hose 39* f PAPER TOWEL\\
BRECK SHAMPOO 48* I cu 1
BRECK SHAMPOO 88* /Os V
PETROLEUM JELLY39* A#
PI in Tuccc irril^l 1 !l!'j*i^2i . j i.' v IIM -----
pnimnuc cna ;EIJ * iEif wwsA rx
EXTRA STAMPSIBaF ~~ #Jf ijjf.. -- ;K# |;Hlf raa. i SB
w I Pvlvfi %A ^*^*j IT TTVTYTIPWIPirwWWTTYFETIJ I i aw i WlPWlVWÂ¥Wai J to 1 000 JA 1 1 J M|g3gw aooo thru jam. IA
' ll l ** mwwwwwt *^ ,t VniiiiViii j.DQmq ** ... ...
1-Lb. Pkg (Qtrs.) Rjouler 3/33< ... Beth Six* lA-os. SUNSHINE 0 J****' L
Marine S P Sl Cw>kies 53 XJS" Cleanser. . 29
5/M. Detergent Fab . 87'Pineapple Juice . 3/89* Ajax" Cleaner 69*



ITHE DIFFERENCE IN
CHOICE BEEF ffi|
WINN-DIXIE AND SEE. >BP

USUA CHOICE W 0 BRAND
JSDA CHOICE Dal PAMCt AO^
CORN FED CHUCK ROAST or Wl llVIl# li U M
USDA CHOiCE W 0 BRAND CORN HD ROUND BONE
I Chuck Steak i shM* Rast 89<
V Cft, J Strip Steak T
J7 Gr. Beef.... 3 T
W h BRAND SFTT SMi lit I't 111 Pint W 0 BRAND QUICK FROZEN 10 2 oi.
14oz. BORDEN'S SINGLY WRAPPED SHOD AMERICAN Mflgyp 3HORT i. in r y
CHEESE FOOD 79' Ribs 49* ?.**- M*
10-0. CRACKINGOOD Uoi. FALMftTO FARMS PIMENTO Mm BV OP fc " M JTvUIIVIIV# W W
BISCUITS 6/49' CHEESE 59' ee^^_
CHEESE 79* CHEESE....... 79*
QUANTITY AIOHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOD THRU JAN. >2 usi>ACHOia |Jk AA M OA4
U L Jh Ra 1% h
u ;i jmi n j UEnm m i
F_N m CHOPS 69* CHOPS.. $1.39
Kv/Klv wnUri OO |kfk|. lfi( Maiic 9 hia
FRESH BOSTON BUTT PORK FjjjSHWjR BKC AST .. IT IHOrJ.. '* }I I
ROAST 49* STEAK 59*
WIEHERS... 45' HAMS.... $2.99
BMAPut FROZEN FOOD SPECIALS
BQLUwNA 9# 3lEAliJbbbb99 77 8-OI OCOMA CHICKEN, BEEF er TURKEY
FREEZER QUEEN BREADED VEAL (ASTI O' SEA (In MjoH OF BM Mm |BH I£.
STEAKS.... T9' FLOUNDER 49' Mftfll D|OC 5/ $ l.
lo< oH ANY SIZE Ub Buy SUNNYLAND PORK BB HI
PIZZA SAUSAGE... 55* *jU2 8 ep SWB w ***
S. No. 1 n|#u ,*
DOT ATO K A COFFIE RICH 4/sl.
f rUIMIUEJ 'l SHRIMP CHUNKEES T
V 111 1 AOf V MEAT DINNERS 69
X^lv I 7 POTATOES 5 89
i IRANI it
61110 J 1 a TT^6^l
Potatoes... 10 49' Carrot* 2/29' mr J/^l IWIJI 87
VINE RIPE l ARC.L FIRM HEADS l u/
Tomatoes 29' Lettuce 29* GREEN PEAS 5/sl.
RED A LAMDtN WA! SWLH Ulw ASK)R HOUR!,
Apples 29' Potatoe* 4 69' BROCCOLI 5/sl.
FRESHFIRM HEAPS iRESH swin a pujmp .iraw gm H m mm mm m mm / H
Cabbage 10* 8errie5.......2 79* mfIEAM CORN 5/slo
US. No. 1 YEIIiFW l.Llb. Bvm FJv'l VWEEI 4 IIIIC > IIEMRIE ORANL-FS bv>' OR SWEET FIORIPA BJ BJ flkfl Bm AA B* / 8
Onions 5 39* Oranges 8 69* PEAS zL^ll.
* "" l f'j f,
j Margarine 2/89*
:HB| vM Mll HILL ml on MU I) ONI no i *x\3 roun pan-moi l> I,
* HHfo Otieeo talm.ooi count** i iouthun mu aX HuthouDDiei !K%;?iX U "Vi j uti,,.-., //1.H.1 &
iicofi f Cured Hum Deviled Crabs i c.OOO thru jan 12 GfOUWd
e#ee th*u jan it t KEBjOV *ooo th*u jam It < *Â¥> JB MOO t.u jn it j Rrj ' HBFjEB 0000 wo ' I HHMB|Rf|Ma|P|M A e/ % 1
i"?W..*BBMTBrTiTi ll ,, ,v, ,',r.T..T.T. mil* h J- I:Eb "... llMllJlir C 6/ 8
1441. GEORGIA MAID SWEET Ifol KRAFT BUKCKBERPY n C 303 Con WHITE ACRE r
Sliced Pickles .... 41 Jelly ...... 49* Peas w/Snaps . 2/37 Dog' Food
44*. FRENCH* limi. KRAFT AWL VEGETABLE I-lb 3Zt j.| b
Biack Pepper .. 49* Grape Jelly .... 39 4 Crisco ...... 89* 3/29*
V
S '
- -. i- ' v **; .- ; -..

Thursday, January 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
1964 Pacemaker Mobile home.
10x56. central air, front dinette,
S3OOO, best offer. 376-8281,
evenings. (A-4t-55-p)
Honda 1967 305 Scrambler. Knobby
tires, new chain and sprockets. 7000
miles. $450. Call 378-9352.
(A-st-56- R )
TV 19 inch Motorola portable. Also,
one year old post versitrig slide rule
with plastic case. Make offer. Call
378-4135 after 6 p.m. (A-st-56-p)
8x36 AC 2 br mobile home, $995.
Nothing down, no payments or
interest till 10 mo after you
graduate. Live in free or rent for
profit. 376-1436. (A-5t >*>-p)
1962 VESPA 150 cc with spare tire,
helmet included, good for campus
transportation. SIOO. Cali 378-7658.
(A-3t-56-p)
Yamaha, 1966, lOOcc, runs & looks
great, 65 mph, has bookrack, see at
119 Oatortown or call 376-8371,
(A-3t-56-p)
Honda S-65 like new in every way:
has been loved, 4 speed overhead
cam, excellent tires, will include
helmet and bubble, $l4O. 376-0387.
(A-lt-57-p)
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way
from carpets and upholstery. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-57-c)
Allstate motorscooter 1966 like new.
Saddlebags, helmet box & helmet,
$165. Call 376-3888 or see at 4002
Newberry Blvd. (A-3t-57-p)
The Happy Hanguplc Mini-hammock
weighs 5 oz. holds 250 lbs. 7 feet
long, only 6.99. Call 378-9144 after
4:00. (A-2t-57-p)
2 female roommates foi Williamsburg
2 bedroom townhouse apt. Pool,
dishwasher, laundry facilities. 52.50
mo. Prefer graduate student or over
21. Call after 6. 378-3345.
(A-2t-57-p)
2 Fender showman cabinets with
2-15s and 2-12s. Vox amp head
with reverb, tremelo, etc. All for only
$250! Call 372-771 1 after 5.
(A-4t-57-p)
Motorcycle: 160 Honda Scrambler.
New in Sept. Phone: 376-9450, ask
for Bill. (A-2t-5 7-p)
6O VW conv. with '6l rebuilt engine.
Runs well. Perfect for beach buggy.
S2OO call 378-7876. (A-lt-57-p)
Gibson 825 guitai with case and
extras. Excellent condition. $205
value for $125. Call 378-7876.
(A-lt-57-p)
J
68 Yamaha 100 Trailmaster, tool kit
elec. start, mirrow, book rack,
helmet, inspected. $325 call
378-4855 after 5 or come by 368
Union. Runs great! (A-st-57-p)
B
'SB Austin Healey, 100-6, mint
cond., all extras, $995 or best offer.
Contact Fred Miller, 4248 Ortega
Place, Jax, Fla, 388-4 158.
(A-6t-5 7-p)
STUDENTS WAIT! Shipment of
hundreds of desk chairs, files,
bookcases, & much more. Arrives this
Friday. Save up to 50% or more. New
used & refinished. Jan. 10th to
18th students save additional 10%
with IDS. JR OFFICE FURNITURE
& EQUIPMENT CO. 620t0 So.'Mam
St. Ph. 376-1146. (A-2t-56-p)
Quick sale! Honda 50 2 years old
step threw frame Helmet included.
Price SIOO. Call 372-7550.
(A-st-54-p)
'66 Honda S9O excellent condition.
440 actual miles. Bell helmet thrown
in. Call 378-5490. (A-st-56-p)
FOR RENT
College Terrace adiacent to
University, 6 months lease available
now to June 15th, Ramp parking
some under cover, pool, A-C,
elevator. $345. quarter single, or
$375 quarter double occup. Utilities
included. May pay ~ monthly.
378-2221.(8-4t-54-p)
h
Need one male roommate to share
three bedroom housr}. Call 3 76-0529.
yB-st-56-p)

FOR RENT
YOU'VE GOT TO SEE IT TO
BELIEVE IT. On the beautiful JR
Ranchette, A-l bedroom, air
conditioned. Furnished apartment.
Utilities, Garbage & exterminating
furnished. Swimming pool available
Jan. 1. $125 monthly. Lease
required. Sorry, no children or pets.
3 2-10 miles beyond 1-75 on
Newberry Road. Look for signs.
376-3900 or 376-1146. (B-st-56-p)
Wanted: male roommate, Jr. or
above 4 bedroom CBS house, own
room. 5 min. from campus by car.
$37.50/mo. plus 'A utilities. Call
76-0703. (B-st-56-p)
Must sublet desirable apartment, in
the heart of Sun City. One bedroom,
married couple only. Call 378-0652
after 5 p.m. SIOO a month.
(B-st-57-p)
Inexpensive, 2-man apt., 2 blocks
from campus 304 NW 15th St. Call
G. Joiner, 378-8122. (B-3t-57-p)
One bedroom University Gardens
sublet sllO unfurnished $125
furnished. Available immediately.
Call 378-0312 or 372-8646 after 5.
(B-3t-57-p)
Must sublet University Gardens apt.
immediately 1 bdrm. Call Terri,
372-7343. (B-2t-57-p)
Female roommate for Winter Quarter
only to share apt. no. 39 1513 N.W.
sth Ave. Call 376-0968 after 6 p.m.
(B-2t-57-p)
Modern trailer 10x50 2 bedrooms
modern kitchen $75 per month no
lease required. Water included. Call
Mrs. Joan Poteet after 5 p.m.
376-5856. (B-3t-57-p)
| WANTED |
Male roommate wanted 2 br. trailer
12x50 SSO mo. and to utilities. Call
378-3845. No. 87 Mobileer trailer
park. Archer Rd. (C-3t-56-p)
Wanted, one male roommate to share
two bedroom apt. Come see at
Landmark 170, or call 378-3120.
(C-3t-56-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apartment near campus.
SIBO/quarter. 372-1036. (C-3t-56-p)
Female roommate for 1 bedroom
pool Fr. QTR apt or info on available
apt. for one Can pay up to SBO.OO
mo. Call Patti at 378-7039 or
376-1583. (C-st-56-p)
Male roommate to share one
bedroom lux. Landmark apt. all the
amenities of sin city living S6O/mo. &
elec. Call 378-7751 after 6 p.m.
(C-st-56-p)
Coed to shaie modern 2 br trailer
with senior til June. Private room
close to campus. $57.95 mo. for
more information call 378-5850.
(C-st-56-p)
Two men needed to share 2 bedroom
3 man apt. $45/mo. each plus util.
Contact Tom Ojay, Village Park, Apt.
no. 16, tel. 378-4718. (C-3t-56-p)
Roommate wanted for one bedroom
apt. one block East of law school.
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call Debbi at
372-8248 after 1. (C-st-54-p)
Male roommate to share mep 2 bdrm.
apt. Have youi own bc'droom and
also be close to campus. Call
372-2244. (C-3t-sb-p)
1 male roommate to share 50x12 2
bedroom mobile home. Own room,
Treating, AC. In Andrews & Connell
*tF3yjW park. Call 378-5222 after 8
Female roommate to share 3 bdrm.
Gatortown apt. with three other girls.
Have your own room. Come by Apt.
250 anytime niter 6 p.m. (C-3t-56-.p)
Female roommate to share
one-bedroom lux. Apt in Gator Town
Apts. Prefer grad student or gnl over
21. Call after 5:30 372-0117, day:
3920143. (C-lt-52-p)

Malo roommate for poolside- French
Quarter apt. No. 78. AC, last mo.
rent paid for, pall 378-8756 or
378-6273. (C-3t-56-p)
Female roommate to share 2
bedroom apt. University Gardens.
Graduate Student prclmr cd
376-7670. (C-3t-56-p)
NEAR CAMPUS very nice 7
bedroom duplex. Need 3id. female
roommate $45/mo. plus 1/3 utilities,
Call 372-2048 after 6:00. {,C-st-54-d)

Page 14

\, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9, 1969

WANTED
Female roommate wanted Village
Park, winter and or spring low rent.
Phone 378-0933 after 5. (C-st-54-p)
Reliable couple wanted to manage 24
unit apt. bldg, for at least 2 years.
Non-working wife, no children or
pets.. Repairing abilit desirable.
Reply to Box X, City. (C-st-55-p)
Roommate wanted for nice apt. all
deposits paid, only SSO a month.
Contact Connie 378-3184 or
376-7430. (C-3t-55-p)
One female roommate wanted to
share 2 bedroom French Quarter apt.
no. 72. Call anytime 378-9934.
(C-3t-56-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apt. behind Norman Hall.
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call 378-7540.
(C-st-56-p)
Female roommate wanWd to share
one bedroom apt. at Colonial Manor.
S6O per mo. Convenient location.
Call 378-8210. (C-3t-^6-p)
Need one or two male roommates to
share poolside French Quarter apt.
Straight lease 175/mo. Lease till June
15. 378-6238. (C : 3t-56-p)
1 roommate wanted Colonial Manor
near Tigert Hall. 60/mo. plus utilities.
Call Richard 378-9817. (C-st-56-p)
One roommate for this term or
longer two-bedroom house, air and
heat, one block from campus, $33.75
a month & utilities. 1316 N.W..lst
Ave. 378-8895. (C-4t-56-p)
Part-time or full time. Be your own
boss. Have your own hours. For
appointment phone 376-9947.
(C-3t-57-p)
Witness to hit & run accident at
11:30 Sun morning, Towers parking
lot, REWARD. Call 392-7618 need
to find driver of dark blue Mustang
conv. (C-2t-57-p)
1 male roommate wanted to share
two bedroom furnished apt. 3 blocks
from Univ. Pool, central air & heat,
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call 376-9540:
(C-3t-5 7-p)
HELP WANTED |
Female subjects needed for speech
experiment. Must be native English
speaking, free of voice defects and in
the age group 30-39 or 50-59. $2.00.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway
Comm. Science Lab. 392-2049.
(E-lOt-54-c)
- y ~
Medical Technologist: A'SQP
, registered or eligible. 40 hour weefi
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
t
HELP WANTED: MALE. Mens
clothing salesman, part-time.
Discount privileges. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-55-10t-c)
ittfl NOW
2:SO\
|5:40 7:35 9:30
MMtyi NOW
I u \
I 1:35 4:00 l
j 6:30 9:00 |
I I
-p oiittjfl I
v -j#

HELP WANTED
**
.% .
Students, Faculty, Staff: Have any
talent? Come to the Rathskeller
auditions. Apply activities desk 3rd
floor, Reitz Union. (E-4t-54-c)
Outstanding qualified, competant
bookkeeper for construction firm;
proven ability" and experience a
necessity. Call 376-9950 days or
378-1308 t weekends and evenings.
(E-ts-56-c)
The Rathskeller is looking for some
one to be the voice of the
Rathskeller. A good master of
ceremonies type apply activities desk,
3rd floor, Reitz Union. We need you
now. (E-3t-56(-c)
STUDENTS need darkroom
technician for fifteen hour week in
Student Publications. Excellent
working conditions. Applicants must
have sound working knowledge of
darkroom procedures. Apply after 5
p.m. to Doug Case, Rm. 330, Reitz
Union. (E-56-ts-p)
SSI
ITwram I
ifrl METROCOCOft ~
I
ALSO AT 8:57
y wuraor^wTioaxM
Br'rj j.V-i, ROD TAYLOR
YVETTE MIMIEUXI

| The Fixer". based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning j
|. novel by Bernard Malamud. i
Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman
, ldn Holm, David Warner, Carol White @
i wu w.im Sf '\ Ij \
i i
BJALA?JJILLd-f lIM fl 111 ii
; My father My daughter
is impossible! is impossible!
Hes sore at me because Linda is failing gym class.'
Ive been arrested for How can a perfectly healthy
'' LJl,ljl "^
' "j on. the
|| i Metro Goldwyn Mayer Presents DAVID NIVEN.
%J { fH e Broadway kit is now a Holly wood howl 1
that bridges the generation gap with laughter! n j
, LOLA'ACBRIGHT CHAO EVERETT OZZIE NELSON ! FERRARE £££*, \§\ j

Use our handy
mall In order
form.

PLAZA THEATER
PATRONS
STATE THEATER.
Please accept the apologies
of the Florida Alligator for
any inconvenience you may
have, suffered due to the
wrong movie times published
in the January 8, 1969
edition of The Florida
Alligator.
HOUR OFIHE WOLF
I awe I
BLOOD CHILLING HORROR
"NIGHT OF THE
LIVING DEAD"
PLUS
"DOCTOR WHO
AND THE
DALEKS"
Starring Peter Cushing



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
0

HELP WANTED f
MALE STUDENTS without first
period class needed to help distribute
the Florida Alligator each morning.
Good pay for just a couple of hours
each day. Will consider applicants
who are able to work only part of the
week. Call Frank at 392-7527 or
392-1619. (E-ts-57-p)
Male & Female Various part time
openings both noon and evenings.
Hours suited to schedule. Good pay.
Apply Kings Food Host, 1430 SW
13th St. or 1802 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-ts-5 7-c)
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. National parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
SI.OO to Arnold Agency. 206 East
Main Rexburg, Idaho, 83440. Money
back guarantee. (E-7t-50-p)
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session or $2.50 for IV2
hour session. Must be native English
speaking and have normal hearing.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway,
University 392-2049. (E-55-10t-c)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
Student Publications. Full-time
employment with all university fringe
benefits. This job requires no filing
and is much more interesting than
just straight typing. Youll be using
IBMs new MT/SC typesetting
equipment, composing type for the
Seminole and the Florida Alligator.
An IBM representative will train you
at full pay. 40 per minute; 80 per
cent accuracy required. Call Mr.
French, 392-1681 after 5 p.m. for
appointment. (E-ts-56-p)
Delivery boys wanted. Larrys Fore
Boy Sandwich Shop. Transportation
provided. Flexible hours. Apply in
person. 1029 West University Ave.
(E-st-54-p)
Sports Department: Alligator needs
sports writers for news and features,
-opportunity for good writer, see
Marc Dunn or Bill Dunn.(E-tf-56-p)

is?
Sg Wf Hi £ <*\ fry ymHmk. j|| |BB H JSL I IB 881 >'.; Bgjji
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Oh, bv the way Newsweek mana/ino said 'about th entertainment is conlaqious We think you H aqrec )\
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PERSONAL
*' !*
Shelly B.: I still love you very much
and now realize all my mistakes.
Please give me one more chance. All
my love, R. (j-3t-56-,a)
AUTOS |
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offer. Call Phyl 392-1611 before 5
p.m. After 5 Lot 14 Pinehurst
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1965 Falcon Futura, 2 door hardtop,
6 cyl automatic, radio, whitewalls,
excellent condition. Only 38000
miles. 372-5703, 392-14 73.
(G-st-56-p)
Jaguar 1963 3.8 Mark 2 with
automatic transmission and other
accessories. Student leaving country,
best offer accepted. 378-8496.
(G-3t-57-p)
64 MGB excellent cond. New top,
tires, paint. Ph. 372-6175 call
anytime. (G-st-57-p)
LOST & FOUND |
Suede coat lost in Floyd probably. I
need it desperately, reward offered.
No questions asked, please return.
Call 376-5418. (L-2t-56-p)
Class ring & watch during finals in
Matherly. Ring has sentimental value.
Reward, no questions. Call 376-6280
after 5. (L-3t-57-p)

SERVICES .' |
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ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)
Its Not
T hat
Gator Ads
Sell More.
' Is
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Sense

LAST CHANCE I
(or SENIOR & GREEKS I
to have pictures taken I
for the SEMINOLE... I
Jan. 13th through 17th I
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&00 pm to 9:00 pm I
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KAPPA SIGMA I
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TUESDAY, JAN. 14th I
SENIORS I
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PHI EPSILON PI I
PHI GAMMA DELTA I
PHI KAPPA PSI I
PHI KAPPA TAU I
PI KAPPA ALPHA 1
PI KAPPA PHI
PI LAMBDA PHI
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON I
SIGMA CHI
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SIGMA PHI EPSILON 1
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15th I
SENIORS I
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TAU EPSILON PHI
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
THETA CHI
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PHI SIGMA SIGMA 1
SIGMA KAPPA
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FRIDAY, JAN.l7th I
LAST DAY I

Thursday, January 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9,1969

A bert 5 Has Fulfillina Hobby-Eatina Fish

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
It just isnt true that Alberts
favorite eating treat is enemy
football players.
Gator-brother Albert will eat
fish over anything. Thats the
alligators goal in wild-life,
Leslie Melvin, the official
mascot-keeper explained. Melvin
is also supervisor of grass
planting for the Department of
Physical Plants and Grounds.
Melvin has been caring for all
the Alberts since the university
came up with the idea of a live
mascot seven years ago.
All the Alberts?
The Albert who resides in the
cage next door to Century
Tower, is number five in six
years. The previous Alberts have
experienced tail-cutting
incidents, natural death, theft,
and murder by shot gun.
The current Albert-his two
years on campus setting a record
for the longest surviving mascot
in UF history-nearly died of
pneumonia last year when he
returned home from the
UF-Miami game at the Orange
Bowl in Miami.
When he came back he
wouldnt eat anything for a long
time, Melvin said.
He had to be nursed back to
health with penicillin pills,
Melvin said.
Albert couldnt ask for a
keeper who knows more about
alligators-even though 30 years
ago Albert and keeper Melvin

Albert smiles for 'Gator Photographer Tom Kennedy
'RED-TAG
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1236 N. W. 3rd. Ave.

might have been looking at each
other from opposite ends of a
shot gun.
Melvin, who has spent most of
his 51 years in the
Stark-Gainesville area, used to
hunt alligators as a teenager. He
and his friends sold the hides to
tourists and dealers before
alligator hunting was outlawed
following World War 11.
Eight-foot, 150 lbs. Albert is
about 25-30 years-old, his
keeper estimated.
As Alberts official keeper,
Melvins responsibilities include
feeding him, cleaning out the
pen, collecting the money that is
thrown into the cage and
retrieving objects that fall in by
mistake.
Albert consumes 15 lbs. of
fish at one sitting, once a week,
his keeper said.
I keep throwing the fish to
him until he cant eat anymore.
He usually doesnt even let them
hit the water-he swallows them
whole, like a snake, Melvin
commented.
Albert usually earns close to
$2.50 a week from coins thrown
into his cage. This helps pay for
his food and upkeep.
Homecoming draws the most
coins, Melvin said.
During the cold spells, and in
the winter, Melvin said he leaves
most of the water in the cage.
In nature, he explained,
the alligators hibernate by
burying themselves in a cave or
below ground for three months.
Albert can bury himself under
the water. Hell never freeze to

death-the water keeps him
warm.
Sometimes Melvin gets frantic
calls from students who have
accidently dropped valuable
items into the cage.
Ive been able to get out
everything thats fallen in, he
said.
How about taking Albert out
for a walk?
Melvin doesnt recommend it.
I never play with him that
way-it just makes him meaner. I
dont try to bother him. If you
handle him easy, you can move
him from one end of the pen to
the other without having him
fight, Melvin said.

I 0 DOUBLE-CHEESE
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Jan. 9 Jan. 10 Jan 11 Jan .12
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Tie Hague Pbilhannonic
UNDER THE GRACIOUS PATRONAGE OF
HER MAJESTY QUEEN JULIANA OF THE NETHERLANDS
University of Florida Students
$2.50, $1.50, SI.OO
Faculty, Staff, General Public
$3.00, $1.75, $1.25
University of Florida Gymnasium
SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 19694:00 P.M.
A Student Government Presentation
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WANTED
- V
Large campus organization looking for male, University of Florida students with the
following qualifications: must want more from college than classroom knowledge;
should desire experience in meeting people and making new friends; may have interest
in personal responsibilities, leadership positions, community projects and campus
activities; should enjoy brotherhood, parties, bloc seating, intramural competition,
Frolics, and more; desire for good grades very helpful. All interested individuals please
apply in person at any fraternity house during OPEN HOUSE RUSH, THURSDAY
AND FRIDAY FROM 8:00 pm to 12:00 pm.

Interfraternity Council

Thunday, January 9,1969, Th> Florida AlUgrtor.

Page 17



Page 18

t. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9, 1969

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Grubeshov (lan Helm) and Count Odoevsky
(David Warner) visit Yakov (Alan Bates) in his

'The Fixer Opens At Center

By MIKE SIMMONS,
Alligator Staff Writer
The Fixer, a film taken
from Bernard Malamuds
best-selling novel, will open
Friday at the Center Theatre,
sporting one of the most
impressive lists of credits to
emerge from Hollywood in quite
some time.
The films cast boasts four
leading Shakespearean actors
Alan Bates (Far From the
Madding Crowd, Zorba the
Greek), William Hutt, lan
Holm, and David Warner
(Morgan), and includes, as
well motion picture personalities
Dirk Bogard (A Tale of Two
Cities, Darling), Elizabeth
Hartman (A Patch of Blue,
The Group) and Carol White
(Poor Cow).
And joining director John
Frankenheimer (Seven Days in
May,'' The Train") and

Hague Philharmonic
To Perform Sunday

The Hague Philharmonic,
under the direction of Willem
Van Otterloo, will perform in
Florida Gym Sunday afternoon
at 4 p.m.
After a brilliantly successful
tour in 1%3, plans were
immediately made for this
second American performance
by the Queen Juliana-sponsored
Philharmonic.
Mr. Van Otterloo directs an
ensemble of 102 musicians. This
outstanding director has had
official decorations bestowed
upon him by The Netherlands,
Denmark and France for his

FORTOURNEXT CAR LOAN...
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION O A
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours:B:ooa.m. 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday

producer Edward Lewis (Grand
Prix, Seconds) in this
production are such notables as
academy award nominee Marcel
Grignon (cinematographer for
Is Paris Burning?) and
composer Maurice Jarre (A
Man and a Woman).
The novel itself won both the
Pulitzer Prize and the National
Book Award and has been
adapted for the screen by Dalton
Trumbo regarded as one of
Americas best screenwriters for
his work in such films as
Spartacus, Exodus, and
Hawaii.
The film centers around
Yakov Bok, a Jewish handy man
in Tsarist Russia, and is the story
of an innocent who unwittingly
becomes a symbol of suffering
for the poor and harrassed of all
ages. Says screenwriter Trumbo,
I can think of no more
important theme for a world in
which governments and

Van Otterloo
devotion to the orchestra and to
music in general.
Tickets for the Hague
Phil It armon ic s Sunday
performance are now on sale at
the Reit/ Union Box Office at
S1 < 51.50 and 52.50 for students
and $1.25, $1.75 and $3 for all
others.

prison cell. The Fixer' opens Friday at the Center
Theater.

ideologies, without exception,
glorify the expedient lie as
passionately as they fear the
inconvenient truth.

Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
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The most for your money
in .. Let us prove it!
' ?
Ph. 376-6720, or come
by 708 S. W. 16th Ave.
, c o

ANNOUNCEMENT
McDavlds Barber Shop
has moved to
she Village Square
2409 S.W. 13th Ave.
next to the Red Lion
Whats NEW at the
BOOKSTORE ?
WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR
REFERENCE SECTION.
WE KEEP IN STOCK
SEVERAL THOUSAND TITLES
ON ALL SUBJECTS,
IN BOTH HARD AND PAPER BACK EDITIONS,
WE ALSO HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK
OF HANDBOOKS,
MATHMETICAL TABLES
AND THE BEST KNOWN OUTLINE SERIES.
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
* Campus Shop & Bookstore



Students On The Woy Up
ik
Jeff Weil To Head DFS

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
Jeff Weil was named Tuesday
by Student Body President
Clyde Taylor to head this years
Dollars For Scholars program.
In announcing the
appointment, Taylors
administrative assistant Marc
Glick, said one of Weils first
tasks will be to re-name the loan
project.
Click said the name, Dollars
For Scholars (DFS)v had been
copywritted by a northern
university which had refused to
allow the UF to use it.
The project, which attempts
to raise money for loans to UF
students is backed by the
national government who
channels $9 back into loans for
each $1 donated by students.
Last year the program earned
$5,000, which meant $50,000 in
loans was made available to UF
students.
Weil said his efforts, after
Vicki Fagan
Named SG
Coordinator
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor has appointed Vicky
Fagan coordinator of the
Student Government Cabinet.
Miss Fagan is a veteran of two
years in Student Government,
having served as an aide and in
an informational capacity. She
was active in Taylors campaign
for the presidency last year.
Marc Glick, Taylors
administrative assistant, said
Miss Fagan was chosen for the
job because of her superior
competence, and her ability to
get along with people.
It was her idea to limit each
Cabinet member to one
project, Click added.
Limiting projects will make
Student Government more
productive. Miss Fagan said,
because the Cabinet members
will be able to concentrate on
one project at a time, rather
than start and not finish several.
Miss Fagan, who as
coordinator will be subordinate
lo the administrative assistant, is
to serve as a liasion official
between Taylor and the Cabinet.
She is to supply needed
information to the Cabinet, and
filter out problems that may
arise.
Jm
VICKI FAGAN ,l
. . coordinating

renaming the program, would be
the sponsorship of Student
Government Carnigras, a carnival
held on campus with all the
proceeds L. 0 to DFS.
He said he would attempt to
streamline the program and
eliminate duplication.
I hope to organize the
program so we can get the most
''t V
JM Bk
MHHHI
mHP i
JEFF WEIL
. . takes over DFS
money for our efforts, Weil
said.
Most students dont know
that one out of eight UF
students are on a loan made
possible by Dollars For
Scholars, he said.
He said he hoped to re-initiate
a plan for a governing board
made up of representatives of
the Interfraternity, Panhellenic
and Interhall Councils, as well as
other campus organizations.
The most important thing in
determining the success of the

Steve Woods Takes Over
As Honor Court Clerk

In the**first of a series of
expected changes, Steve Wood,
2UC, has taken over the duties
of Honor Court Clerk,
Chancellor Pete Zinober said
Tuesday.
Wood replaces Marti Cochran,
the first coed to be elected to
that position. He formerly split
the duties, which had become
too much for one person to
handle, with Miss Cochran,
according to Zinober.
Wood's duties will be
increased this quarter. He will be
expected to research judicial
records as far back as 1935. in
addition to the previous duties
of clerk.
Other changes being made
include the revision of forms in
accordance with new policies of
the Dean of Men's and Women's
offices. A release form has been
drawn up which would permit
the Court to obtain students'
records for investigation.
Students under investigation
bv the Ilonor Com t must now
sign an afladavil saving that they
are responsible tor- informing
parents of the inve>tigalion.
Zinober said because 01. Hie,
heavy case load-around 130

Carnigras this year, Weil said, is
the location.
If we can get the upper drill
field itll be great, he said.
Last year the Carnigras was
held in a much smaller field near
fraternity row. Because of the
space limitations the number of
rides had to be cut, Weil said,
and if the drill field is available a
much larger Carnival, possibly
even a circus act will be possible.
Weil has set a SIO,OOO goal
for the coming year, and said he
felt it was a reasonable one.
There is no reason why
students cant work to raise
some of the money which will
be given back to fellow
students, he said.
In addition to being speakers
chairman for Accent, Weil was
head of SGs spirit committee
anyl a past member of the
Student Senate.
Clay To Speak
On City Affairs
Grady Clay, a member of the
Presidents Task Force on
Suburban Problems and the
editor of the Landscape
Architecture Quarterly, will
speak at the University of
Florida Thursday.
Clay will analyze the pressures
of the contemporary city,
including suburban land
speculators and the new
outsider groups, of modern
society. Clay also will be
prepared to answer any
questions concerning the task
force's recommendations.
The speech is sponsored by
the Universitys College of
Architecture and Fine Arts and
will be held in Room 1058 of
the complex at 8 p.m. The
public is invited to attend
without charge.

cases a year-the Honor Court
has established a system of
docketing. Within a short space
of time after an offense has
been committed, a plea must be
entered by the student, he said.
Honor Court has also taken
steps to initiate a faculty
orientation to the court, similar
to last quarters student
orientation.

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11
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:j LARRY ALFORD ACCEPTS SCHOLARSHIP AWARD
"
: ... from scholarship committee
A-x<*:ox : K*X*vy.v.v//Av.v.v.v^//AVrtvK wvw.vw.v.v. J bV.v.v.v.v.v.v. i

ACADEMICS
V
By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Department of Music, in conjunction with the
Florida Music Educators Association, will present the 19th
Annual Clinic-Credit-Conference course in Daytona Beach,
Jan. 9-11. Four courses are offered as in-service training for
music teachers throughout the state.
The Florida Woodwind Quintet will perform for the
Annual Convention of Florida Music Educators Association
(FMEA). Following the performance, three members of the
Quintet will present workshops on their respective
instruments: oboist Earl Groth, bassonist John Kitts, and
clarinetist Terence Small.
Also featured at the FMEA Annual Convention will be
the Florida Baroque Ensemble.
- PROFS IN PRINT
Dr. Paul Thurston, professor of comprehensive logic and
English, has had his book Artistic Ambivalence in
Chaucer s Knight s Tale recently published. In this study.
Dr. Thurston includes an analysis ot the characteristics of
Chaucerian humor and satire, and an examination or courtly
love as essentially a literary phenomenon of the late
medieval period.

Grants Awarded
To 26 UF Faculty
Awards of UF grants for the 1969-76 Faculty Development
Program have been announced by Vice President for Academic Affairs
Frederick W. Conner.
Twenty-six recipients were named with 21 first alternates also
expected to receive awards if increased funds recommended for the
program are included in the legislative budget. Four additional
winners were named as second alternates.
The program, now in its third year, makes a period of time available
to eligigible faculty for scholarly activities undistrurbed by teaching
and administrative duties.
Grant recipients, listed with their area of speciality, are Dr. Walter
Auffcnberg, herpetology; Dr. John W. Brookbank, zoology; Dr.
Samuel 0. Colgate, chemisty; Dr. John T. Fain, English; Dr. Harry W.
Ford, horticulture; Dr. Arthur L. Funk, humanities and history; Dr.
John F. Gerber, climatology; Dr. Ashby Hammond, history and social
science; Dr, Alfred Hower, Portuguese and Spanish, and Kenneth A.
Kerslake, art.
Others are Dr. Kung Yun Lu,engineering science and mechanics; Dr.
Samuel P. Martin, medicine; Dr. Kenneth W. McKerns, obstetrics and
gynecology; Dr. James Nation, biological sciences; Dr. Arnold H.
Nevis, medicine and electrical engineering; Dr. Ants Oras, English; Dr.
John P. Pickard, English; Dr. Robert E. Reed-Hill, metallurgical and
materials engineering, and Dr. Daniel A. Roberts, plant pathology.
Also receiving grants are: Dr. Frank A. Robinson, agriculture; Dr.
Stanley C. Schank, agronomy; Dr. Paul H. Smith, bacteriology; Dr.
John Spanier, political science; Qr. Arman C. Tarjan, nematology; Dr.
William C. Thomas, medicine, and Dr. Merrill Wilcox, agronomy.
First alternates are; Dr, Lewis R. Arrington, animal science and
nutrition; James P. Bradshaw, English; Dr. Carl W. Campbell,
horticulture; Dr. Corbin S. Carnell, English; Dr. Arthur W. Combs,
education; Dr. James F. Cummings, assistant Broward County agent;
Dr. Myron A. Cunningham, education; Dr. Charles D. Farris, political
science; Dr. Richard E. Garrett, physics; Dr. Irving J. Goffman,
economics; Dr. A. Didier Graeffe, humanities; Norman C. Hayslip.
entomology; Earl M. Kelly, Lake County agent, and Ruth L. Milton,
associate state 4-H Club agent.
Ollier first alternates arc; Dr. G. Paul Moore, speech; Dr. William K
Robertson, agricultural chemistry; Dr. John J. Schwab, psychiatry;
Willaim H. Smith, rural area development; Edward C Troupin, music:
Dr. Charles 11. Van Middelem, biochemistry, and Dr. Wilsc B. Webb,
psychology.

Thursday, January 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

"news and views

.
Alford Gets
Scholarship
4
'
i
A senior in the Lb's College j:
ol Pharmacy is the Inst winner*
ol the SIOO ( hire Bowen;!;
Scholarship Award to be given*
annually by the Ladles Auxiliary*
of the Leon County
Pharmaceutical Association.
William Larry Alford of*
Bonifay was selected from a list
of applicants on the basis of j:
extra curricular activities.*

leadership abilities and scholastic
achievements
/. I
w**V.v.v.v.v. w .v. w V. S

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9,1969

Track Year On The Move
With Trip To Washington

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
UF track gets on theTrnove
Friday as individual performers
of the Gator track team, ranked
in the top 10 nationally, depart
for two big indoor meets.
Thirteen members of the
varsity track team were invited
to compete in the National
Invitational in Washington, D.C.
on Friday and at the
Chesterfield Invitational in
Richmond, Va., on Saturday the
11th.
Coach Jim Carnes expects
Ron Jourdan, who recently
broke the meet record in the
Northeast Louisiana Indoor
Invitational with a high jump of
7-foot-l to give an outstanding
performance.
Ron is one of the top high
jumpers in the world and has
been invited to all of the big
meets, says Carnes.
The two-mile relay team is
expected to do quite well
according to Carnes. The team,
comprised of Bob Lang, Ken
Burnsed, Eammon OKeeffe, and
John Parker, recently broke the
old meet record in the Northeast
Louisiana Indoor Invitational by
five seconds and is currently
rated 4th in the nation.
Invited from the Fla. Track
Club, whose membership is
composed of graduate students,
are Jack Bacheler, number one
5,000 meter runner on the 1968
U.S. Olympic Team, and Frank
Saier, first high jumper in the
South to clear seven feet in the
high jump.
The Fla. Track Club is
allowed to compete against the
collegians in these two meets
because they are open AAU
sanctioned meets, as opposed to
inter-collegiate meets.
Other Gators invited to make
the trip are John Morton,
All-American in the shot put and
discus, Joel Sarrett, consistent
15-foot pole vaulter, Steve
Atkinson, miler, Joe Schiller,
high hurdler, and the one-mile
relay team of Bill Ballinger,
Jerry Tannin, Eammon OKeeffe
and Jim Dyson.
ENROLL FOR YOUR
STUDENT INSURANCE
NOWH!
Don't be left without
insurance this quarter.
Protect yourself from
expensive doctor bills due
to sickness or injury. Enroll
now in Student Health and
Accident Insurance. You
may enroll for this
insurance from Jan. 2 thru
Jan. 24.
Worried about protection for
your family as well as yourself?
Then enroll in our Dependent
Coverage Plan. With this
coverage your wife, children, as
well as yourself will be
protected.
You May Pick Up Brochures And
Enrollment Forms From The Places
Listed Below (Dr Mail Them To
McGriff-Scarborough & Assoc.
INFIRMARY STUDENT
GOVERNMENT OFFICE
McGRIFF-SCARBOROUGH
& ASSOC.
376-8393- 537 N.E. Ist ST.
I -'I- L-y ,-- c :

1968-69 TRACK SCHEDULE
Indoor Schedule
Jan. 10 National Inv.
Jan. 11 Chesterfield Inv.
Jan. 25 Ohio State (dual)
Jan. 31 Millrose Games
Feb. 8 Baltimore All Eastern
Feb. 14 Tennessee and Ga. Tech
Feb. 15 Mason-Dixon Games
Feb. 28 Southeastern Conference
March 1 Southeastern Conference
March 8 Jesuit Invitational
March 14-15 ~ NCAA Indoor
Outdoor Schedule
Ohio State (H)
March 25 Yale & Southern Illinois
(H)
March 28-29 Florida Relays (H)
I
Wtk,: Bwt

OLYMPIC CINDERMAN
. . Jack Bacheler

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April 5 State Record Relays
April 7- Baptist College
April 19 Gulf Coast Inv. (FSU,
Alabama, Auburn, Miss. State)
April 26 Penn Relays
May 3 Florida State
May 16-17 Southeastern
Conference
May 24 Southeastern U.S.T.F.F.
June 19-21 NCAA
June 27-28 National AAU
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Orange League
Led By Betas

Beta Theta Pi will be trying to
maintain a slim five point lead in
the Orange League as all
fraternities take to the bowling
lanes Wednesday, Jan. 15 at the
Reitz Union.
The Betas currently have 360
points with Tau Epsilon Phi on
their backs with 355. The Phi.
Delta Thetas are next with 282.
Lambda Chi Alpha won
bowling last year with a high set
***************
Sport Trivia
By MIKE SEGAL
Alligator Special Writer
Good morning! Im back
again after copping out the last
few weeks of the fall term, but I
hope to be more consistent this
term, and have a quiz in the
paper .every Tuesday and
Thursday.
Speaking of consistency, the
top SEC football teams had it
over the holidays.
I think perhaps football in our
conference has been resting on
past laurels. Ah, well, as the
famous and oft-used statement
in Gatorland goes Wait til
next year!
1) Match these former SEC
basketball stars with the schools
they attended.
a) Bailey Howell Ole Miss
b) Bob Pettit LSU
c) Clyde Lee MSU
d) Donnie Kessinger Ga. Tech
e) Roger Kaiser Vandy
2) What professional
basketball team does Tom
BoerwinkJe play for?
3) What football team did
Auburn beat in the Sun Bowl,
and what was the score?
4) What was the nickname of
the New York team in the AFL
before they were the Jets?
5) This one is for real
football fans Give me the
starting offensive backfield for
the 1957 Baltimore Colts.
***************
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McDonald s Corp 1968
201 N. W. 13th St.

of 1745. The high set last year
was bowled by the Delta Tau
Delta with an 1801. The DELTs
followed that big score with a
low 1595, as they were humbled
by the Lambda Chis in the
semis.
The Delts showed how
drastically the scores tend to
change from day to day and to
pick a favorite in this years
tournament would be*
impossible.
The Tau Kappa Epsilons won i
the Blue League tournament last
year with scores ranging from
1612 to 1853.
Chi Phi currently holds a
commanding lead in the Blue
League race with 425 points. Phi
Gamma Delta is the closest frat
to them with 337.

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TO ACQUAINT OUR GAINESVILLE NEIGHBORS
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Thursday, January 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 9 r 1969

Harlan 'Pools Best Group Yet

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
*£
Though the Gators swim
team has captured 13
consecutive Southeastern
Conference crowns, the goal this
year will be national recognition
and a better showing in the
NCAA Championships.
The Gators open their home
schedule Friday against Georgia
at 4 p.m.
Head Coach Bill Harlan has
assembled what he considers
probably the finest group of
swimmers ever at the UF, an
organization that will again rate
as favorites for the conference
title.
In the midst of an appeal over
an Honor Court violation that
may determine whether he can
compete this season is
All-America butterfly-artist
Barry Russo. Russo pleaded
guilty to a court charge and
received a suspended sentence
that would bar his competition
in all but the conference meet.
The sentence is under appeal.
Leading the squad as captain
is freestyler Andy McPherson, an
NCAA All-America last year.
Mark McKee, who set a record
almost everytime he got in the
pool as a freshman, will be a
strong contender for national
recognition in the individual
medley. His clocking in the 400
IM ranked him 10th in the world
last season.
Sophomore Bruce Williams,
All-America as a freshman, holds
two SEC individual records and
three relay marks going into his
second year. Williams is
expected to shine in the middle
distances.
Again, the Gators will have
one of the best all-around diving
teams in the nation, led by Mike
Chalbeck, who placed first in the
SEC in the three meter category.
The UF will get stiffer
competition this year with the
emergence of swimming as a
major sport at Tennessee,
Georgia, Alabama and
Vanderbilt.
North Carolina and North
Carolina State offer the stiffest
non-conference tests in a tough
dual meet schedule.
We have a good team, says
Harlan, One capable of beating
the best and for our graduating
seniors, this could be their big
year in both the conference and
nationally.
The Gators last week posted
their first win by trouncing the
University of South Florida.
Despite the fact that the
Gators have been conference
title holders 21 times in the past
28 years, they have yet to gain
the stature of the six perennial
swimming powers that have
dominated the NCAA in past
decades lndiana, Michigan,
Stanford, UCLA, Southern Cal
and Yale.
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If your car needs repair
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mmm jyf &*#> f

* W *: it
jSK I Wk i§
MARK MCKEE
... tops as a f rosh
*******
* ---aiiHSiiffMSS
BRUCE WILLIAMS
... All American
In their effort to make this
the year of the splashing
Gator, the ( UF swimmers will
again be using the antiquated
outside swimming pool, and, in
doing so, will remain the only
SEC swim team that can make
that clamor.

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FACE BULLDOGS FRIDAY

Rocking Chair /T>*/iw\ I
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pp
; Iv'v
mm
Carol White, of Poor Cow
fame, in her new role as Raisl,
the girl who marries Yakov Bok
(Alan Bates ) and then runs off
with another man in MGM's
ii The Fixer , screen version of
Bernard Mala mud's famous
novel, 1967 winner of both the
Pulitzer Prize and the National
Book Award for fiction. Dirk
Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Hartman, lan Holm and
David Warner also star in the
John Frankenheimer-Edward
Lewis production, filmed on
locations in Hungary in color.
THE FIXER

Hn jm : I HHj|
ANDY MCPHERSON
... team captain

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Theres little doubt in anyones mind looking
back on football season that the state press was one
of the Gators biggest foes during the season.
Theres little anyone can do Norm Carlson
included -about the free flow of news . and
rightfully so. The even freer flow of armchair
quarterbacking however, done by the states sports
editors controlled the attitudes of reporters, fans,
players and even the coach.
A team can be technically perfect, says Dr.
Jordan Scher, but because of their own attitudes
about themselves and what they heard other people
say about them they cannot conceive of doing
anything right.
Football players are avid Sunday morning
newspaper readers win or lose and the player
who hears or reads deprecating statements about his
ability is provided with a rationalization for failure.
Whats written in the newspapers gives everyone
a recognition of the role they are supposed to play,
explains Scher. They may not like that role as
interpreted by the papers but sooner or later its
bound to creep into their subconscious.
The same goes for other sports. The baseball
player who hears someone say he cant hit the
knuckleball wont be able to hit it. A football team
that hears that it has nobody to catch a football
begins to believe it despite the talent.
Most important, says Scher, a Chicago
psychologist, of all the attitude-framers is what is
read in the newspapers. Newspapers are
tremendously influential in framing things.
The Florida press continually harped on these
points:
What if Larry Smith gets hurt?
an overall weakness in flankers and ends
a bad effect on teamwork by juggling Rentz
and Eckdahl

UF GATORS
... damaged by publicity?

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THE CLIPBOARD

Press Psyches Gators

UNDERGRADUATE WANTED
*
TO ARRANGE AND SHOW WEEKLY A PROGRAM OF
SPORTS, TRAVEL AND HISTORICAL FILMS, TO ALL
AREA COLLEGE GROUPS FREE OF CHARGE
PROJECTOR AND SCREEN PROVIDED EARN 2.00
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. YOUR CONVENIENCE-CAR NECESSARY.
PHONE GUS BELL 914-245-5921 COLLECT

the possibility that the UF would be
underdog in all games after the North Carolina loss
the haplessness of the Gator offensive unit
that the Gators could not make it through a
game without a fumble
Everyone ot these attitudes to some extent
became fact before the season ended despite a high
pre-season ranking.
Very often, explains the psychologist, the
individual doesnt want to lose, hes just incapable
of achieving winning. Feedback from outside
reinforces his feelings of incompetence and he gets
hung up with this set oCattitudes.
Another way the press hurts an athletic team is
explained by head trainer Brady Greathouse:
When the injuries of key players are pinpointed
by the press, the opponents are given added
advantage and will key on the injury like a boxer
does when he knows his opponent is ailing.
Still another effect of the press on the outcome
of football games comes when reporters report new
formations when they are revealed in practice,
introduced for their surprise effect on their next
foe. When the press spells these out in ink, the
opponent is given time to adjust-.
Ray Graves knows the effect. It was not until the
week preceding the Miami game that practices were
closed off to pressmen.
News management, however does not seem to be
the answer because it tends to create even more
second-guessing. A higher degree of honesty
between coaches and theTpress would lead to a
better understanding of the meeds of both and
would permit football games in the future to be
played on the gridiron and not on page 1C of your
local daily.

By BILL DUNN
* Alligator Assistant Sports Editor

Smothers, Ace Gymnast
Television comedian Tommy Smothers, star of the weekly
Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, was a gymnast at San Jose State
University.
He tied for first in she California State College Gymnastics
Championships on the parallel bars and later became a pole vaulter on
the freshman track team.

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Sign up for interviews through your Placement
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Lexington, Massachusetts 02173.
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An Equal Opportunity Employer

Thursday, January 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 23



Page 24

), The Florida Alligator, Thursday January 9, 1969

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Spinach no. 303 cans
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