Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 56

AS P.E. DEAN
Stanley Resigns
After 23 Years

The senior dean at UF, Dennis
K. Dutch Stanley, who has
announced his resignation as
dean of the College of Physical
Educatioq and Health, Tuesday
said if he had it to do over he
wouldnt change a thing
except to try and do it better.
The former sports great, in
reminiscing about his 34 years at
UF as a student, coach and dean
said, Its been a lifetime and I
wouldnt give anything in the
world for it. Id do it all over
again if I had a chance, but Id
do it better.
Dean Stanley, 62, will step
down July 1 after 23 years as
dean of the college. He will
remain on the faculty.
A committee will be named
soon to find a successor.
A'
A member of the all-time
great 1928 football team, former
University coach and
nationally-known consultant in
his field, Stanley has served as
physical education dean since
1946.
Stanleys major contribution
to the UF athletic program came
in 1945 when he was asked by
Henson Markham, Chairman of
the Board of Control, to return
and rebuild the division of
physical education in the
post-war years. His plans so
impressed the Board of Control
that the College of Physical

Champion Debaters
Lack Tourney Funds

UFs champion debate squad
is suffering from an acute
lack of funds. Before the fall
quarter began, the squads
budget was cut from $ 11,000 to
$7,125, leaving the debaters in a
financial quandary.
John Wittig, director of
forensics, Tuesday told the
Alligator he had requested an
increase in funds this year
because of the squads success
last year and his feeling that it
was capable of participating in
many more debates.
Last year the UF debaters
won more than two-thirds of
their debates and were in the
national championships, the first
time for the UF since 1960.
Despite scrimping by the
department, each debater spends
SIOO or more a year for
transportation, tood, and
supplies. Some of the money
that was cut from the budget
had been intended tor
scholarships. At the present time
UF offers no scholarships for
debaters.
Scrimping has included
driving to most tournaments

The
Florida Alligator

Education, Athletics, and Health
was created as the first such
university-related college in the
nation.
University President Stephen
C. Oconnell, paying tribute to
Dean Stanley, said: Few
individuals have served the
University of Florida for as
many years or with as great
success as has Dutch Stanley.
He has excelled as student
athlete, as coach, as teacher and
as administrator. Dean Stanley
has given the major portion of
his life to building increasingly
better athletic programs
intercollegiate and intramural
and to constructing college of
physical education and health
that is a model.
OConnell added: All regret
that health forces his retirement
as dean, but are happy that he
will remain active as a teacher
and will continue to serve in
other ways.
Dean Stanley noted both that
I want to return to teaching
and I want to turn the
administration over to younger,
more energetic hands to guide
the college in the growing years
ahead.
On teaching, he said: I want
to be in a position where I can
talk freely as a faculty member.
I have a message to give and I
want to give it. When you teach,

instead of flying, which means
missing more classes and
providing extra funds for food
(SEE 'DEBATE' P. 2)

£ &
4 u \ w I
'''fit ~ ; 't* ,<:
%sss,\ WmX lllpwfc ft WBm ,- ,, >jg
NEW BOOK BLUES
Long lines and long faces show the plight of most students as they rushed to area
bookstores tu gr^terialg^giy--.o- h metbv hours of waiting to get out.
: ::: ; T ia^y'"^y''-Sr~ '':
..N .. >- r '! -*'* ' K ' ;><;., >l .'.'i4*,' 'Jjs' I '-' .*'

University of Florida, Gainesville

w
K j M
DEAN DENNIS STANLEY
... steps down
you should inspire your students
and 1 want to do that.
Referring to the future, he
said: We already have been
designated by the Board of
Regents to be the university in
the state that presents a masters
program in health education.
We are building our research
capacity so that in a few years
we anticipate requesting Ph.D.
status for one of several of our
particular specialties. We now
are revising faculty
assignments.
While a corps of experienced
personnel is needed, Dean
Stanley said the administration
should be handed to a younger
individual with a spark of
enthusiasm to carry our program
forward.
A native ot England, Stanley
came to Umatilla with his family
at age 13, then moved to Tampa
where he was all-state end and
football and basketball captain
(SEE 'STANLEY' P. 2)
Burnett Announces
Budget Deadline
The deadline for student
organizations to submit budget
requests to Student Government
for the next fiscal year is Feb.
15, Student Body Treasurer Phil
Burnett announced Tuesday.
Budget requests must be
submitted to the treasurers
office, room 305,'Reitz Union.

Committee Seeking
Med Center Head

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
A presidential committee was
named Tuesday to find a
replacement for resigned Health
Center Provost Samuel. P.
Martin.
The committee, appointed by
UF President. Stephen C.
OConnell, will be headed by Dr.
Frederick W Conner, vice
president for Academic Affairs.
The resignation, effective
June 30, was sent to OConnell
Nov. 18, following a storm of
controversy which arose over a
59-day budget crisis that almost
forced closing the health center
last spring.
The crisis, which at times was
so critical that it jeopardized the
clinical training of 1,129 UF
students at the center, has been
predicted for a repeat as early as
February if the hospitals
operating budget is not beefed
up.
So far, $501,000 has been
requested from the state budget
commission by the Board of
Regents. However, 'this is
$400,000 less than the center
asked for, and Martin said late
last year that the total would
have carried us through.
The centers budget problems
have been investigated by a joint
legislative committee which
submitted its report Sept. 14,
but Martin in resigning said he
was leaving unsolved the
problem in the area of our
relations with Tallahassee.
Martins replacement selection
will be difficult and extremely
important, Conner said.
Other members of the
-
committee are: Stuart A.
Wesbury, Jr., Shands Teaching

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Wednesday, January 8, 1969

Hospital director; Malcolm
Randail, Veterans
Administration Hospital
director; Dr. Edmund F. Ackell,
Dean of the College of
Dentistry; Miss Dorothy M.
Smith, Dean of the College of
Nursing.
Dr. Harry H. Sisler, Dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences;
Darrell J. Mase, Dean of the
College of Health Related
Professions; Dr. Kenneth F.
Finger, Dean of the College of
Pharmacy; Dr. Emanuel Suter,
Dean of the College of Medicine;
and Dr. Myron W. Wheat, Jr.,
Professor of Surgery.
Reitz Union
Paiking Lot
Remains Open
The Reitz Union parking lot,
operated last quarter as an open
lot on an experimental basis, will
continue in that status for the
present, according to Union
Director W. E. Rion.
Rion said that he anticipates
the lot to become a first class
problem now that the
supervisor of the lot is no longer
employed due to lack of funds.
The supervisor was employed
last quarter to give students
notices encouraging them to
park in the lot only while in the
Union. He also checked the lot
for cars which remained for long
periods of time and were
obviously not owned by persons
in the Union. Though he had no
power to issue tickets or prevent
anyone from parking, Rion said
that the plan seemed to work
since the lot was seldom filled
during the prime class hours of
between 8 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
Rion said that the new
campus parking plan would
place an additional load on the
lot since it might pronjpt
employees to park in the Un(ion
lot rather than the general lot
now being constructed which is
about two blocks further from
the middle of campus.
The employees who work in
the Union have been instructed
not to park in the lot and have
complied with this order. Rion
said.
Generally people cooperated
last quarter and the lot remained
a fluid one, but the effort at
educating the car owners is not
something you can do for one
quarter and then forget.
Rion commented that he had
"A
no plans for improving the
situation at present, but
concluded, We qant live with
doing nothing very long.



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 8, 1969

Page 2

'SurpriseRegent Appointee
Replaces Wife On Board

The announcement that a new
Regent, John O. Bahringer, a
Fort Lauderdale securities and
insurance executive, had been
appointed came as a surprise to
most members of the Florida
Board of Regents at the meeting
Monday. Behringer took the seat
previously occupied by his wife,
Margaret.
This action came after a
juggling of terms and
appointments by Gov. Claude
Kirk Jr. Behringer will be serving
the three remaining years of D.
Burke Kiblers appointment.
Kibler will serve the seven years
left in Mrs. Behringers term.
Later in the meeting, Kibler
was elected chairman for a four
year term made possible by this
switch.
Chairman Chester H.
Ferguson, ill and unable to
attend the meeting, was not
informed of this action until
Monday when he was
News Editor
Baggs Dies
MIAMI (UPI) William C.
Bill Baggs, editor of the Miami
News and one of the widest
known newsmen in the United
States, died Tuesday night at the
Miami Heart Institute after a
brief illness. He was 48.
A man of strong ideals who
expressed them in a regular
front-page column with clarity
and candor, Baggs had been
under treatment for viral
pneumonia and other
complications. He entered the
hospital Dec. 28.
His condition, which varied
from serious to critical, became
very critical on Jan. 3. He failed
to rally after that and slowly
weakened until he passed away
at 6:05 p.m. EST Tuesday.
The tousle-haired Baggs, born
in Atlanta, Ga. on Sept.
30,1920, became editor of the
Miami News in 1957, and only
11 years after he was employed
as a general assisgnment
reporter.
Never afraid to put his views
in print, even if they were
unpopular, Baggs opinion
sometimes drew a flood of
hate letters,such as when he
first demanded an end to
segregation in Floridas public
schools.
Baggs editorial stands won
him many awards, and last year
he was nominated for the Nobel
Peace Prize.

SALESSERVICERENTALS
AmM "Authorized
SRffJ \ l Smith Corina
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Office Equipment
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and is published five times weekly except during June, July end August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reltx
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per rear or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the rignt to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run sevefal times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

telephoned by Vice Chairman
Henry Kramer who had heard of
the change at a cocktail party
Sunday night.
Mrs. Behringers resignation
had been rumored for several
months. Kirk aides told
newsmen that her ineffectiveness
was embarrassing to the
governor who had appointed her
as a reward for her husbands
fund-raising during his campaign.
Behringer raised over $700,000
to help elect Kirk governor in
1966.
Behringer stated that his wife
just hasnt had the time to give
to the many duties of being a
member of the Board of Regents
and also look after three
children at home. He said his

Goodrich Definitely Out
Os SG Presidential Race

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body Vice President Gary Goodrich,
front-runner 5 in the Spring Presidential race, said
Monday that he will not be a candidate for Student
Body President.
Goodrich, who graduates in March, is not sure he
will be returning next quarter. His planned
enrollment in the UF College of Law hinges on his
draft classification, which is now under review.
Even if I should return to UF, Goodrich said,
I can say without hesitation that I will not be
running for president.
There had been speculation that bad grades might
force Goodrich to drop out of school. He said that
although he received poor grades in the beginning of
his term of office, he earned a 2.8 last quarter and
plans to graduate on schedule.
If he leaves school in March, the vice presidency

Dean Stanley Steps Down

f FtOM PtGE OWE 'jj
at Hillsborough High School.
He played for the 1928 Gator
team that scored 336 points,
held opposition to 44 points and
compiled an 8-1 record.
Stanley also was discus and
javelin thrower on the Florida
track team.
After receiving his bachelors
degree in 1929, he was
University assistant coach in
track and football and director
of the intramurals program from
1931-33, and head coach from
1933-36.
Commenting on his reign as
head football coach, Stanley
said, The income of the athletic
department at that time was of

wife had been under no pressure
to resign.
His appointment would have
come some time ago, according
to Behringer, if he had not run for
Broward County Commision (he
lost) and become Florida
treasurer for Richard Nixons
campaign. He said he was merely
waiting for Mrs. Behringer to
step down and let him take over,
after his defeat in the Nov. 5
election. Behringer, a native of
Indianapolis and a graduate of
Dartmouth in 1943, with a
degree in economics, came to
Florida in 1956, where he
started Manage Securities Inc.
and the Behringer Insurance
Agency Inc. of Ft. Lauderdale.

course not as large as it is now.
There were no scholarships or
nationwide recruiting. W e had a
good bunch of boys who we
thought were doing a good job.
We won more than we lost.
At that time we were in the
Southern Conference which was
composed of about twenty
teams presently members of the
Southeastern and Atlantic Coast
Conferences.
Stanley received his masters
d e gre/fe v in 1934 from
Pennsylvania State University,
then served as University
director of intramurals, assistant
coach and professor of physical
education from 1936-39.
From 193946, when he
returned to the University, he
served as professor of physical

Instructions In The Catholic Faith
will be given on Tuesday and Thursday
evenings at 7:30 during the Winter Quarter
First Class on January 14
Instructor Fr. George D. Kirkpatrick
Meets in Library of Catholic Student Center
1738 W. University Avenue >
i: S /
v $ i > -, .
ii
I L. ;
No Indulgences Sold A|| Wekome
. .. ? .Jv.
:- ~
' 1 I

will be vacant for five weeks until elections are over.
Goodrich said he and Student Body President
Clyde Taylor had not discussed who, if anyone,
would be appointed to fill the vacancy.
Goodrich expressed confidence that his staff of
eight would be able to carry on the vice presidential
duties until after the' election. He said in his opinion
the appointment of a new vice president would
probably not be worth the political haggling it
would involve.
Now that Goodrich is out of the race, speculation
moves to other presidential hopefuls. -Goodrich
listed Charles Harris, majority floor leader of the
Senate, Marc Glick, adviser to the student body
President and Mick Callahan as top contenders.
Goodrich said he has heard rumors that Florida
Blue Key President Manny James is backing
Callahan. This, in Goodrichs opinion, would make
Callahan the strongest candidate at this time.

No Hearing Set
For Kiker Petition

No hearing has yet been
scheduled for a petition seeking
a writ of habeas corpus for Dr.
John Kiker, charged with
first-degree murder in the slaying
of his wife on Oct. 21.
A hearing before a judge of
the Circuit Court had originally
been scheduled for this week but
was postponed since all parties
in the case could not be present
at that time.
A heavily-filled court calendar
has created difficulties in
rescheduling the hearing for a
time when all parties will be able
to attend.
A report by two Gainesville
psychiatrists that Kiker was
unable to distinguish right from
wrong the night police say he

education and assistant coach at
Duke University, Durham, N.C.
Senior member of the
Athletic Committee and Board
of Directors of the Athletic
Association, Stanley has served
on nearly 50 state, regional and
national committees in the field
of physical education and health

We are looking for Someone to be the
Voice of the Rathskeller
A talented master of ceremonies type, quick of tongue, witty
and sharp. Apply at the activities desk, 3rd floor Reitz Union.
Do It NOW

fatally shot his wife is allegedly
the nucleus of the petition, filed
with the clerk of the Circuit
Court.
This is the only legal criterion
in judging the sanity of a
defendant.
petition was filed by
Chester and Nathan Bedell of
Jacksonville, Kikers attorneys.
Kiker is a professor of
engineering and chairman of the
department of environmental
engineering.
UF Debaters
Need Money
FROM PA6E ONE
and lodging. Last quarter the
debaters had to drive as far as
Washington D. C.
The approved student budget
and finance committee
allowance is $lO per day for
lodging, but the debaters use
only $5. Their food allowance is
also cut to an average of $3 per
day.
The budget deficit also
prohibits the UF squads
participation in any west coast
tournaments.Wittig said that this
year there are two national
novice championships in which
the UF is qualified to
participate, but probably will
not for lack of funds.
This year the problem is
particularly disheartening,
Wittig said, because we have
on our squad one of the top ten
debaters in the country in Gregg
Matthews.
Lack of scholarship hurts
recruiting the best high school
debaters. Other universities
which offer scholarships include
Miami, South Florida, Georgia,
Emory, and Auburn.



Profs Discuss Progress
Os Paris Peace Talks

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
UF professors of political
science have some interesting
and varied views on the progress
of the Paris peace talks now that
Henry Cabot Lodge has been
appointed as the United States
chief negotiator.
Dr. John W. Spanier feels
Lodges appointment is good.
He is acquainted with the
situation and is considered a
shrewd and tough bargainer,
Spanier said.
However, Dr. Oscar Svarlien
said the appointment makes no
difference and is not the crucial
issue.
The crucial issue is that the
administration is going in a
positive direction. It wants to
get out of Vietnam and will find
away out by gradual
withdrawal, he said.
On the other hand Dr. Walter
A. Rosenbaum thinks the
appointment indicates no
significant departure politically
or militarily from the basic
approach of the past seven years.
If Nixon wanted a major
departure from policy he
probably would have done it by
appointing someone other than
Lodge, he said.
I t means we are willing to sit
down and wage a long, long
fight, Rosenbaum added.
No major U.S. pullout is seen
by the professors.
There will be only minor
changes in the Paris peace talks
because the North Vietnamese
will be testing the knowledge
and toughness of the new
administration, Dr. Spanier said.
I personally expect little
progress toward real peace for
about 6 months. Dr. Spanier
said.
Dr. Spanier feels progress will
be possible only after our
endurance is tested and the war
WUFT To Detail
New Parking Plan
The UFs new traffic and
parking plan will be presented in
detail Thursday over television
station WUFT beginning at 9
p.m.
Through the use of slides and
film, Department of
Architecture Chairman Arnold
Butt will explain the total
concept of the plan which
resulted from a long study by
professional and local planners.
The program will run from 40
to 60 minutes and is open ended
at the close of the educational
television stations daily
programming in order to allow
full coverage of the plan.
New auto registration and
parking regulations are
scheduled to go into effect on
the campus March 31.
Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
-
' SAL ES-SER VICE VICE"REPAIRS
"REPAIRS VICE"REPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Untv. Ave. 372-4373

takes a toll on North Vietnam
and the Viet Cong.
Dr. Svarlien saw a gradual
withdrawal of U.S. troops from
Vietnam instead of a major
pullout because it looks better,
as if the U.S. were pulling out
only because their job in
Vietnam is finished.
The progress of the peace
talks will be galatialDr.
Rosenbaum stated. While he
admitted a gradual withdrawal is
possible, he foresaw no
possibility of a unilateral
pullout.
Such a pullout would bring a
tremendous amount of criticism
and would be seen as a sellout
on Nixons part by critics, Dr.
Rosenbaum said.
He compared the U.S. to a
man whose foot is stuck in a
bucket of hardening cement.
Its not easy to get out all at

Ag Provost Nixes
Nixon Appointment

UF Provost of Agriculture,
Dr. E. T. York Jr., turned down
an appointment Tuesday to a
sub-cabinet post in the U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
There are many activities
underway here that would make
it very difficult for me to leave
at this time, Dr. York said.
Dr. York had been
recommended for the position
of assistant secretary for science
and education, following
President-elect Nixons request
for names of people capable of
filling positions in his
administration.
Stating that he had declined
the post for personal reasons,
Dr. York pledged my
wholehearted support and
cooperation to the new
administrationy short of a move

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once. . (
The squabbling about the
shape of the table at the talks
were given great significance by
all three professors.
By giving the Viet Cong a
separate position at a table, the
Viet Cong will be recognized as a
separate political entity, they
explained.
The Viet Cong wants status
and have political ambition
Svarlien noted. This sort of
protocol is not unusual in such
talks, but is very important as a
face saving process. We are being
just as picky he added.
' - "j'~-
The shape of the table
symbolizes a psychological
victory Rosenbaum said.
If it seems silly to fuss about
symbols, remember that flag
burning is simply burning a piece
of cloth, Rosenbaum said.

to Washington.
Dr. York told the Alligator
that he might consider such an
appointment at a later date, but
that now there are many things
left undone.
Dr. York came to the UF in
1963 and created the Institute
of Food and Agricultural
Sciences.
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STEAKS
FINE FOOD
at
student prices
Breakfast served
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1614 N. W. 13th ST.
378-0955

I UF's REPRESENTATIVES I
Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
pU- J * I Dan Sapp Bill Worsham
I PiiliCw TT"* 7 ""! Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
1 vc=q George Corl Harold DeVane
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I NO WAR CLAUSE 376H208* I
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LEARN KARATE I
AT UNIVERSAL KARATE DOJO, "SCHOOL OF CHAMPIONS"
224 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
WITH DIRK MOSIG, 3rd DAN BLACK BELT
SPARRING, KATA, AND BOARD BREAKING CHAMPION
' iHP SR
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i
NEW BOURSES FOR BEGINNERS START WITH AN
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING TODAY. JANUARY Bth, AT
6:00 PM 244 W. UNIV. CLASSES WILL BE HELD M W F
6:00 7:30 PM. FOR INFORMATION CALL 378-4126.
MURPHREE AREA
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
Buckman A 372-9343
B 372-9317
C 372-9319
D 372-9367
E s 372-9391
Sledd F 372-9352
G 372-9351
H 372-9341
Fletcher 7 ; ~3 372-9326
K 382-9312
L 372-9219
M 372-9370
N 372-9358
O 372-9111
P 372-9134
R 372-9200
S 372-9388
~A 372-9252
B 372-9184
C 372-9179
Thomas D 372-9180
E 372-9177
F 372-9167
G 372-9176
H 372-9120
J 372-9168
Murphree A 372-9421
B 372-9425
C ,372-9435
D 372-9289
E 372-9426
F 372-9144 ~~
G 372-9138
H 372-9135
J 372-9268
K 372-9390
L 372-9306
M 372-9364
ft
public service
f t
announcement C
- :

Wednesday, January 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 8,1969

Concerts Begin Sunday

Performances of the national
company of Man of La
Mancha and pianist Van
Cliburn will headline the
Student Government Concert
Series for the Winter Quarter.
The series begins Sunday at 4
p.m., with a performance of the
Hague Philharmonic. Conducted
by Willem Van Oterloo, the
orchestra is on its second
American tour.
David Atkinson stars in the
prize-winning musical, Man of
La Mancha, scheduled for
Thursday, Feb. 6, at 8:15 p.m.
He portrays playwright Dale
Wassermans interpretation of
double role of Cervantes and his
character Don Quixote.
.. t
In this musical version of the
folk tale, Don Quixote, defender
of the right, sallies forth into

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DON QUIXOT£^
.. David Atkinson as Don Quixote in the Broadway production of
"Man of La Mancha."
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the world prepared to defend
the oppressed and undo
wrongs. He chooses as his
dream maiden Aldonza, played
by Patricia Marand. When
informed that knighthood has
been dead for 300 years and
that is a fact, he replies, facts
are the enemies of truth.
\ Ruth Pages International
comes to campus on
Tuesday, March 4, at 8:15 p.m.
This repertory features a
re-staging of The Nutcracker
Suite, Carmina Burana, and
Swan Lake.
Van Cliburn will appear in the
last schedule Student
Government concert on Sunday,
March 16, at 8:15 p.m. Cliburn,
who became famous overnight
when he won the Tchaikowsky
Competition in Moscow in 1958,
is on a transcontinental tour.

The Supremes and tenor
Jan Peerce are among the
concerts scheduled for April.
Tickets for all Student
Governemtn productions are
available at the box office, the
Record Bar, and Belk-Lindseys.
Got a Sick Car?
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UF Opens
$3 Million
Law Center
UF welcomed in the new year
and the winter quarter with the
opening of the new Law Center,
Monday.
The $3 million building stands
isolated from the main beat of
campus north of Fraternity
Row. Surrounded by moss
covered trees and thinly
distributed grass it might be
considered a work of art.
Walking up one of the four
outside stairways a vistor isnt
too sure if he is inside or outside
the structure.
Students passing time on the
ground floor collonnade
described the Law Center as
fantastic or nothing great
and everything inbetween.
Hallways crisscross and circle
the entire floor and sometimes
seem to lead only to a brick
wall.
The library is the center of
attraction. Bare cement pillars in
the reading room and the smell
of a new cars interior tinge the
senses.
Carpeting covers most of the
floor space. A two story
carpeted lecture room has a
design ahead of its time.
The atmosphere of the Law
Center is a cross between Alice
in Wonderland and Star Trek
and the architecture upon first
experience is moving ana
exciting.

Strikers Picket
San Francisco State
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) San Francisco State Colleges cafeteria
and bookstore were closed today by picket lines of striking teachers
and students. w
The college was reopened Monday in relative peace after the
Christmas holiday, but unionHeachers added to the schools already
lengthy list of woes by their walkout. They were joined in picket lines
at campus entrances by striking students from minority organizations
and the Students for a Democratic Society.
Thirty miles away the college of San Mateo also reopened calmly
under police protection, but the home of Philip C. Garlington, dean of
instruction, was firebombed early today by arsonists.
Garlington and his wife escaped injury after being awakened by
what the trustee said sounded like two shots. The blaze engulfed the
garage at Garlingtons hillside home, destroying two cars.
Like San Francisco State, the San Mateo College was the scene last
month of violence by racial minorities and subsequently was placed
under police guard.
The San Francisco State College bookstore and cafeteria closed
after about 100 union workers there voted to honor the teachers
picket lines. However, library workers decided to remain on the job.
Students should bring sandwiches like 1 do, said acting President
S. I. Hayakawa who has vowed to keep the campus open with police
force and volunteer teachers if necessary.
Hayakawa allowed some pickets on campus Monday under legal
advice but prohibited rallies and demonstrations in a quandrangle
area near the administration and classroom buildiifgs.
For the first day in weeks, there was no massive rally on the
commons, Hayakawa noted.
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
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99 Students Recommended

Ninety-nine students have
been recommended to 22
University committees after two
quarters of work by Kathy
Wilkins, secretary of university
committees and a staff member
of the Taylor administration.
Mrs. Wilkins spent these two
quarters questioning committees
on their functions, placing
advertisements in the Alligator
for interested committee
members, and helping Student
Body President, Clyde Taylor
make his recommendations.
In an expanded participation
program led by Taylor, Mrs.
Wilkins paved the way for more
students to serve on all
committees and recommended
students on committees
previously unrepresented.

TO UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES

An alternate program was also
established by Mrs. Wilkins to
insure constant participation on
the committees.
Though the recommendations
have been made, Mrs. Wilkins
will continue to press for more
students on all the committees
in the university system
including the separate colleges,
according to Marc Click, a
Taylor advisor.
Kathy has made positive
strides in this direction with the
help of several college heads,
particularly in the Arts and
Sciences department and the
College of Education, Glick
said.
The committee appointments
are a representative group of
students from all factions of the
University, Glick said.
In the University College
there are 12 students
represented in the committee

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... led program .:. need his ok

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recommendations with 24
students from Arts and Sciences,
and 11 from the Law School.
One-fourth of the students are
women.

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ANNOUNCEMENT
McDavids Barber Shop
has moved to
the Village Square
2409 S.W. 13th Ave.
next to the Red Lion

Wednesday, January 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

TEE

The recommendations will be
sent for ratification to the
Student Senate and then sent for
approval of UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 8,1969

\/ 1^ i. \
iM*a*n A \ V V
J .' Jr z]K|B|L
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W. J- \( m^^HMr
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Okay, One Waltz Just Dont Try Anything Tricky
Th Florida Alligator /
#"Th* price of fraadom
is * axarcfca of raaponribiNty.*
. ~ ;> '_- ... . ..
Dave Doucette
r$U/k&ktA/ Managing Editor
M Raul Ramirez James Cook
vAifU/ILCM Executive Editor News Editor

The Case Os The Lusting Lovelies

I looked down at the victims
tear stained face and tried to
imagine how it had looked
before the three sex crazed
hoodlums had ravished it.
I dont like these cases. My
names Johnny Stud. I work for
the Alligator. Whenever the cops
get a case like this, they send for
one of the Alligators tough,
gutsy reporters. It was just my
bad luck to be available this
night.
I had opened the back door
of the kampus kops station and
walked in. The victim had been
huddled in a chair. Sargeant
Stuped had stood itearby. He
hpd almost smiled at me. We had
worked together when the Gator
had exposed a vicious tattoo ring
operating on campus.
Hello, Stud, he said.
Hello, Stuped.
Bad case.
Rape'?
Right.
When?
Hour ago.
How many?
- Three.
' Where?
Broward.
Jesus!
You said it, he said,
makes the fifth time today. I
dont know what were going to
do, Stud. I just dont know.
I looked at the crumpled
figure of the victim*
Whatd they do?
You name it, they did it.
They made up a couple of new
crimes while they were at it.
I walked over and put my
hafef*) on the victims shoulder.

The victim shimpered, flinched,
and screamed.
Whats your name? I asked
kindly.
Harold, sir, the victim
quavered.
Harold What? I asked him,
giving him my straight-from-the straight-from-theshoulder
shoulder straight-from-theshoulder look designed to make
powerful men grovel, taught to
all beginning Gator reporters.
Harold Purely, he said.
Amazing, Stuped said,
you got him to talk. Thats
more than all the kampus kops
together were able to do. Gad,
what men you Gator reporters
are!
I accepted the compliment
casually, Gator men being
conditioned not to blush at the
torrents of praise they receive
from a deliriously approving
student and faculty body.
Do you want to talk about
it, son?
Harold shook his head, trying
at the same time to preserve his
modesty with the few scraps of
clothing his lustful attackers had
left him.
No. I didnt want to come
here. I just want to forget the
whole thing.
Look son, Stuped said,
you cant take that attitude.
Those fiends still out there.
Do you want the same thing to
happen to some other boy?
I dont care, he said, tears
running down his cheeks, I
couldnt bear it if everybody
knew. The stares, the snickers,
the gossip. And thats just the
boys.

editorial
Attending University:
A Voluntary Choice

Our friends send us mail.
We got a letter a couple of weeks ago
asking us to print an extract from the Nov. 5
National Review. Since our fans are always
closest to our hearts, we herewith grant the
request:
Mindless revolution will encounter
tougher going if a recent decision by four
federal judges in Missouri (reported in the
St. Louis Globe-Democrat) is taken to heart
nationally. A couple of rebellious students,
whomped by their academic lords, sued for
their constitutional rights. The judicial
opinion:
Attendance at a tax-supported
educational institution of higher learning is
not compulsory. The federal Constitution
protects the equality of opportunity of all
qualified persons to attend. Whether this
protected opportunity be called a qualified
right or privilege is unimportant. It is
optional and voluntary.
/
The voluntary attendance of a student
in such an institution is a voluntary entrance
into the academic community. By such
voluntary entrance, the student voluntarily
assumes obligations of performance and
behavior reasonably imposed by the
institution of choice relevant to its lawful
functions. So long as there is no invidious
discrimination, no deprival of due process,
and no abridgment of a right protected by
circumstances, and no capricious, clearly
unreasonable or unlawful action employed,
the institution may discipline students ...

I dont know what to do.
Stud, Stuped said. Weve tried
everything we can think of.
Weve to his civic
responsibility, his decency,
moms apple pie. Nothing
works.
For once in my success
checkered career, I too was
stumped. How could I look the
illustrious old man in the eye
when I reported to the Gator the
next day. I had failed.
Sunk in a morass of
uncharacteristic despair I failed
to hear Stupeds next words.
. .. and Id send some of my
men in there except that three
of them were raped yesterday.
Two of them are still in the
hospital, and one of them
disappeared from the hospital
last night.
Its hard to believe things
like that can happen at the UF.
I know, I know. I told them
this would happen back in 67
and 6B when they abolished
womens curfew and instituted
compulsory ft open house. I told
them it was sinful and immoral
and that you couldnt trust
young people with that much
freedom.
And see whats happened.
Those young punks got so
aroused by their freedom that
they started raping right and
left. As it is now, no man is safe
anywhere on this campus.
I looked through the window.
It was a cold, wet November
night. I felt like taking a good
stiff belt. Instead, I gave the kid
one.

What do you think youre
doing?
Persuading him to talk. Im
going to appeal to the one
instinct you havent tried to
reach yet. Self preservation.
What happened, Harold?
I-I was taking Mary Lou
home from a movie The
Naked Springs of Lust. It was
chilly and she was standing near
the door to her dorm. I was
getting ready to ask her for a
kiss when she sort of growled in
her throat and tackled me.
I dont remember what
happened next too clearly. I
remember cheering and shouts
~ Go get it. And then then
*&
I came to and Mary Lou was
gone. There were three of them,
a blonde, a brunette, and a
redhead. They were, you know,
stacked. And they started
. walking toward me. I tried to
crawl off on my hands and
knees, but they were too fast for
me. They surrounded me, and
then

t
The Florlda All igator
Published- by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial. Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681,392-1682 or 392-1683.

Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the Univenitv of Florida.
*

No student may, without liability t 0
lawful discipline, intentionally act to impair
or prevent the accomplishment of any lawful
function of an educational institution.
The judgment would apply, a fortiori, to
private institutions.
We hope this bit of information was
passed along to us merely for our own and
our readers edification and enlightenment.
The thought crossed our mind, though,
that the sender was somewhat sympathetic
with Mr. John Greenmen, a UF agriculture
professor who is better known for his
masterful resolution submitted to the
University Senate last quarter. :
The infamous resolution condemned the
disruption of orderly processes by
militant minority groups.
You know, those are the kids who want a
voice, both here at the university and on the
national scene, in the decisions which
determine their destinies.
The trouble arises when they react like
human beings and get a wee bit upset when
the existing power elite denies them a
meaningfulvoice.
Like Greenman, our sender of mail may
believe there is some insidious plot by
students, who incidentally, attend UF by
their own choice.
Is the alternative, we wonder, that they
who disagree with the policies of the
institutions they attend by choice may also
leave that institution by their own choice?

He gave a terrible shriek and
collapsed onto the floor.
Poor devil, Stuped said.
I gave the pathetic figure on
the floor one last look and
walked away. I buttoned up my
sexy, tumed-up raincoat, and
prepared to walk out into the
night.
Hey, Stud.
I turned and I6oked at
Stuped.
Dont do it, Stud. Even a
Gator man couldnt handle those
girls.
Im going to find the punks
that did that to him and make
them pay, I said.
I squared my shoulders and
walked into the night rain. It
was cold against my face. I lit a
soggy cigarette as my heels
clicked on the pavement. I knew
I was heading for trouble but I
couldnt help myself. Those sex
starved girls could kill a man
with love, and just might. But,
Im Stud, and more important, a
Gator man, and we Gator men
never back away from a
challenge.



Wednesday, January 8, 1969. The Florida Alligator,

OPEN FORUM: ; I
aoJ VtAttot
There is no hope for the complacent man.

Student Tutors Needed
For UFs Project Samson

MR. EDITOR:
What is poverty? Because
most of us are from middle class
families, only a few of us have
personally experienced poverty.
All of us have criticized the
various government poverty
programs, but we only look at
the problem from ai far removed
middle-class view. Have you ever
stepped foot into a ghetto?
The answer to this question
for 95 per cent of you will be
no. Ive made that step into the
ghetto. I saw fourteen human
beings trying to live in a small
shack, a child eating a few
cookies for his dinner, and a
family of ten that was deserted
by the father and left to survive
on its own.
Would you like to join the
fight against poverty? Many of
you have decided to join the
Peace Corps after you graduate,
but there is something you can
do right now. The poor dont
need your pity or sympathy, but
they do need your help. They
are trying to help themselves,
but they have to have a little
guidance.
A University of Florida
sponsored program, Project
Samson, gives you the
opportunity to help the
impoverished. Project Samson
does not carry out any programs
of its own but matches the
student with a local program in
need of his help. At the present
time, Samsons main endeavor is
working with VISTA in its
tutoring program.

Another View

Learn A Little From 6B

Another of the swinging sixties has rolled by and
a short review of disaster '6B, and its lessons tor 69,
seems in order.
Our nation saw two of its greatest leaders, and
fighters for human rights, cut down by assassins.
Robert Kennedy would very probably be the man
to be inaugurated in a few short weeks if a
Jordanian immigrant had not shot him moments
after his California primary victory.
Vve will sorely miss the apostle oY non-violence.
Dr. Martin Luther King, when a President
unsympathetic to the black mans cause begins his
administration.
We also saw an incumbent President, leader of an
unpopular and indefensible foreign war. forced to
retire Then s:,v lmv undemocratically our
electoral process work's when Hubert Humphrey was
nominated despite the peoples* wishes as shown in
the primaries. But at least policy changes were made
In the administration and the problems in our
political system were dramatically uncovered.
Man continued his history of war and violence, in
Vietnam. Bialru. and the Middle Last, in our own
country Chicago and Columbia proved to the whites
what the Ne ; ioes h.fve been telling us. lot \ears
that widespread police brutality is a real it >.

Page 7

In this program each
University of Florida student
tutors a child once a week for
about two hours. These children
are desperately seeking
friendship.
Youll be more than just a
tutor to these children. Since
many of these children come
from broken homes, they need
someone they can identify with.
You could be that needed father
or mother image. Most of the
tutors want to tutor for much
longer than the two hours a
week.
If you can spare two hours a
week, Im sure youll learn more
than you could ever teach the
Who Is
Unde J. ?
MR. EDITOR:
One soon becomes familiar
with the rantings and pavings
which are the life of a college
newspaper, but one may wish to
know whose views are being
promulgated.
Would you be so kind as to
identify, in print. Uncle
Javerneck?
Thank you.
B. MICHAELS, 7AS
(EDITORS NOTE: Uncle
Javerneck is a retired recluse and
a former columnist for the
Tennis Racket Stringers news
bulletin).

Sy Mike Hittlemaru

Cherished beliefs were questioned when the Pope
struck the worst blow of the year against mankind,
by his birth control decree. When the government
can take your life, but not allow you to vote or
drink, change is needed. Wien three hundred acts ot
violence are committed each week on network
television yet sex is closely censored, values must be
re-examined.
Our country should learn that it is not the
world's policeman, that the job ol ending racism,
rebuilding our cities, and achieving the guarantees of
justice and fairness to all Americans must come
first.
\Vc must revise our electoral system h\
eliminating conventions and the Electoral College,
and instead instituting national primaries and a
direct popular vote system.
Guns must be controlled, media violence should
bo studied, and justice must accompany the desired
law and order. Nixon must end Vietnam quickly,
and if Saigon continues to prove to be our biggest
problem, unilateral withdrawal should begin. Our
universities must reform to keep up with the times,
and allow students and faculty more pow er.
These are the lessons we should leu in from '6B.
We must pray thaLmankiml will leakn a little
from 6B, of we may all not see main years on
this good earth.

children. If youd like more
information about Project
Samson, call the Student
Government Office.
JERRY FRY, SEG
! J ID
Ml . jjijj
"The Delegate From Saigon
Nguyen Cao Ky .
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for 1 just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Speaking Out

A Climate Os Anti-Think

Any mans death diminishes
me, wrote John Donne, and so it
is with Fred Kenalis departure
from the University of Florida.
Once again a black man has felt
it necessary to leave because of
the rampant racism of the
community. Yet, from the
President to students, the
university remains curiously
silent.
The tolerance of racism and
repression is what bothers me far
more than the acts themselves.
One can almost dismiss the
incidents as the acts of
crackpots, unreconstructed
types, a species which is destined
to go the way of the dinosaurs
for the same reason brains too
small for bodies. But the absence
of condemnation of these acts
and the absence of effective
action to prevent further such
incidents is appalling.
This stands in stark contrast
to the hamhanded persecution
(cq) of John Claxton and Lavon
Gentry. These two worthies are
perceived as threatening the very
fabric of the Republic and this
must be punished to the laws
limit.
Claxton has become a visible
target for the communitys vapid
leadership in an attempt to gain
political mileage and play upon
the frustrations of a misled
public.
And who speaks for Fred
Kenali? Dont everybody
volunteer at once! There is no
hope for the benighted barbers
who turned him away nor for
the vicious neo-Brown Shirts
who spat upon him. One should
expect, however, that an act of
this sort in a sodiety commited
to equality and human dignity
would arouse more than quiet,
albeit well-meaning, resolutions.
The Gainesville atmosphere,
and indeed the atmosphere of
the state and region, is proving
itself ideal for the cultivation of
anti-democratic attitudes. The
Yahoos of anti-think go
unrestrained and unchastised*by
their pscudo-Bourbon elites and
so the atmosphere spreads.

PROBLEMS
FOR COMING
YEAR*
war
POPULATION
SMKVAriOH
POVERTY
POUUTIOH
REVOUmON
mm*
PEAR
/fuf Oltl .tlnvilv"
,_', T ..
, .. ... : ,.

By Lewis Livingston

It is apparent that the same
climate is spilling into the rest of
the country. Nine million
Wallace voters, the gleeful regard
for the brutal behavior of the
Chicago police and other
instances underscore the spread
of a climate, which, if allowed to
flourish, will make Salem look
like a tea party.
It is not enough that students
and other members of the
university community be
friendly and courteous to black
students. The leaders of the
university community must
speak out firmly against those
who perform such acts as led to
the departure of Kenali and
former law professor Stephen
Boyer. If speaking out fails, then
the leadership must urge and
put in effect other measures.
It would be well to remember
that Hitler and the Nazis did not
come to power alone. They were
tolerated and even encouraged
by die seine Herren, the elegant
gentlemen, of German society
who thought they could use the
Nazis to accomplish short term
goals and then discard them.
But, like the lady from Niger,
they returned from their ride
inside of the tiger.
Before the parallel be
dismissed out of hand, it should
be pointed out that in the
Weimar Republic dissent from
the Left was restricted and
ultimately constructed by a
coalition of conservative and
right wing social groups and
institutions while Right
radicalism was permitted to
flourish.
In times like these it is
exceedingly hard to be a
counselor of moderation, to
caution that America and this
community and its university
can in fact solve their problems
without the root and branch
surgery of revolution. Our
society can move in one of three
directions to the chaos of
revolution, to a living death in a
garrison state or toward its
ideals.



Page 8

' Th Flo,ida All, a,of Wednesday, January 8, 1969

J^^^Bi : .>>>&.
.j
* o^
jj 'i Shon /'^
refreshing story of red, ~
2:30, Saturday, the Jr. a*
Terrace Dept. Modeled by >
" :.1./o,m. *^\
Colony Shop pantsuit of cotton doited v I
SJ 1 in chocolate and white
trimmed w ith sheer *# |
> ICC,l CC ,? r 1 ian ruf f les Ofer
ell-shaped pants. The M
lacket i s tied on y w th a m : M
& ee r bow. $30.00. Modeled M W A
by Jan. -+...... =|Hf ;



P L
' w^WK.
S Mam \ H
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jpfy SSp J _, Bj
:i^i;:> f ill M > .-<- '3* B
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& Js&jO. ; >.. .' : < '< .-V.^VlB
Ik ||| '.-, *ji fl^^B
JBBES? Jb£BRL
holiday yellow and navy. A bottom k^edp^ttsJop^^^^^
sport jacket by John Meyer BfVH^ jtM afli with a long, puffy sleeved,
completes the outfit. Hose f + < button-down blouse
by Rudi Gemreich and jMMfi^^^^B^lL*(| | accented by a black and
shoes by Villager. Warm *8 S f or a blustery day. Modeled by Susie.
Modeled by Penny.
Young Victorian creates
| m high-waisted skirt of naVy PHOTOS BY
r 'm/lj m crepe offset by a leg <0 X) // //.
f # mutton sleeved dacron Cto^yi(^JZu£^
MW 0 blouse of navy glen plaid on /J
red. Modeled by Candy.

HMnaaday, Jmmmy 8,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
.r /
_ > M

I for sale i
1964 Pacemaker Mobile home.
10x56. central air, front dinette,
S3OOO, best offer. 376-8281,
evenings. (A-4t-55-p)
65 Honda 90Excellent condition.
Good transportation. Bell helmet
included. All offers considered. Call
Dave Rogero 376-9129. (A-3t-54-p)
Quick sale! Honda 50 2 years old
step threw frame Helmet included.
Price SIOO. Call 372-7550.
(A-st-54-p)
Honda 1967 305 Scrambler. Knobby
tires, new chain and sprockets. 7000
miles. $450. Call 378-9352.
(A-st-56-p)
TV 19 inch Motorola portable. Also,
one year old post versitrig slide rule
with plastic case. Make offer. Call
378-4135 after 6 p.m. (A-st-56-p)
8x36 AC 2 br mobile home, $995.
Nothing down, no payments or
interest till 10 mo. after you
graduate. Live in free or rent for
profit. 376-1436. (A-st-56-p)
JUST ARRIVED Hundreds of desk,
chairs, files, bookcases & much more.
New used & refinished. Save 50%
or more. Additional 10% off Jan.
10th to 18th to students with IDs.
JR OFFICE FURNITURE &
EQUIPMENT CO. 620V* So. Main St.
Ph. 376-1146. (A-6t-56-p)
1962 VESPA 150 cc with spare tire,
helmet included, good for campus
transportation. SIOO. Call 378-7658.
(A-3t-56-p) r
STUDENTS WAIT! Shipment of
hundreds of desk chairs, files,
bookcases, & much more. Arrives this
Friday. Save up to 50% or more. New
used & refinished. Jan. 10th to
18th students save additional 10%
with IDS. JR OFFICE FURNITURE
& EQUIPMENT CO. 620 Va So. Main
St. Ph. 376-1146. (A-2t-56-p)
Yamaha, 1966, lOOcc, runs & looks
great, 65 mph, has bookrack, see at
119 Gatortown or call 376-8371,
(A-3t-56-p)
'66 Honda S9O excellent condition.
440 actual miles. Bell helmet thrown
in. Call 378-5490. (A-st-56-p)
CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer. SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-56-c)
FOR RENT
y
v v
''yX'X-.V. SV.sv.*
Trailer 8x42: AC-Ch furnished
carpeting 1 br. 378-2039 after 6 P.M.
(B-st-54-p)
Interning. Must sublet my share 2
BDR. apt. from Jan. to March or
June. Call immed. for $40.00 mo.
rate. Call Linda 378-4219. Univ.
Gardens. Heat/Pool/Air. (B-3t-54-p)
College Terrace adjacent to
University, 6 months lease available
now to June 15th. Ramp parking
some under cover, pool, A-C,
elevator. $345. quarter single, or
$375 quarter double occup. Utilities
included. May pay monthly.
3 78-2221.(8-4t-54-p)
Male roommate for Williamsburg
2-br. on pool. Dishwasher, AC. No
lease. Split January rent. SSO/month
4 V* util. Mark, 378-7061.
(B-3t-55-p)
Female roommate. Own bedroom &
bath in 5-br. house. 1-block to
campus. Central AC & heat. Rent
paid to Jan. 15th. Paula, 378-7061,
1406 NW sth Ave. (B-3t-55-p)
Need one male roommate to share
three bedroom house. Call 376-0529.
(B-st-56-p)
YOUVE GOT TO SEE IT TO
BELIEVE IT. On the beautiful JR
Ranchette, A-l bedroom, air
conditioned. Furnished apartment.
Utilities, Garbage & exterminating
furnished. Swimming pool available
Jan. 1. $125 monthly. Lease
required. Sorry, no children or pets.
3 2-10 miles beyond 1-75 on
Newberry Road. Look for signs.
376-3900 or 376-1146. (B-st-56-p)
Wanted: male roommate, Jr. or
above. 4 bedroom CBS house, own
room. 5 min. from campus by car. *v
$37.50/mo. plus >/4 utilities. Call
376-0703. (B-st-56-p)

WKVeV>VVV>%%VVAV.V
I WANTED |
Coed to share modern 2 br trailer
with senior til June. Private room
close to campus. $57.95 mo. for
more information call 378-5850.
(C-St-56-p)
Two men, needed to share 2 bedroom
3 man apt. $45/mo. each plus util.
Contact Tom Ojay, Village Park, Apt.
no. 16, tel. 378-4718. (C-3t-56-p)
Male roommate to share nice 2 bdrm.
apt. Have your own bedroom and
also be close to campus. Call
372-2244. (C-3t-56-p)
-1 male roommate to share 50x12 2
bedroom mobile home. Own room,
heating, AC. In Andrews & Connell
trailer park. Call 378-5222 after 8
p.m. (C-3t-56-p)
Female roommate to share 3 bdrm.
Gatortown apt. with three other girls.
Have your own room. Come by Apt.
250 anytime after 6 p.m. (C-3t-56-p)
Female roommate to share 2
bedroom apt. University Gardens.
Graduate student preferred.
376-7670. (C-3t-56-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apartment near campus.
$ 180/quarter. 372-1036. (C-3t-56-p)
Male roommate for poolside French
Quarter apt. No. 78. AC, last mo.
rent paid for, call 378-8756 or
378-6273. (C-3t-56-p)
.
Female roommate to share
one-bgdroom lux. Apt in Gator Town
Apts. Prefer grad student or girl over
21. ckL-after 5:30 372-0117, day:
3920143^(y-lt-52-p)
Roommate wanted for one bedroom
apt. one block East of law school.
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call Debbi at
372-8248 after 1. (C-st-54-p)
NEAR CAMPUS very nice 2
bedroom duplex. Need 3rd. female
roommate $45/mo. plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 372-2048 after 6:00. (C-st-54-p)
One female roommate wanted to
share 2 bedroom French Quarter apt.
no. 72. Call anytime 378-9934.
(C-3t-56-p)
Female roommate wanted for one
bedroom apt. behind Norman Hall.
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call 378-7540.
(C-st-56-p)
Female roommate wanted to share
one bedroom apt. at Colonial Manor.
S6O per mo. Convenient location.
Call 378-8210. (C-3t-56-p)
Male roommate to share one
bedroom lux. Landmark apt. all the
amenities of sin city living S6O/mo. &
elec. Call 378-7751 after 6 p.m.
(C-st-56-p)
One roommate for this term or
longer. Two-bedroom house, air and
heat, one block from campus $33.75
a month & utilities. 1316 NW Ist
Ave. (C-4t-56-p)
Reliable couple wanted to manage 24
unit apt. bldg, for at least 2 years.
Non-working wife, no children or
pets. Repairing ability desirable.
Reply to Box X, City. (C-st-55-p)
Roommate wanted for nice apt. all
deposits paid, only SSO a month.
Contact Connie 378-3184 or
376-7430. (C-3t-55-p)
e
Will pay between sls-20, depending
on condition, for a men or womens
26 in. bicycle of any make. Contact
.'Steve,i Murphree Hall C, Room 471.
(C-2t-55-p)
Female roommate for 1 bedroom
pool Fr. QTR apt or info on available
apt. for one Can pay up to SBO.OO
mo. Call Patti at 378-7039 or
376-1583. (C-st-56-p)
_ T
Wanted, one male roommate to share
two bedroom apt. Come see at
Landmark 170, or call 378-3120.
(C-3t-56-p)
Male roommate wanted 2 br. trailer
12x50 SSO mo. and l h utilities. Call
378-3845. No. 87 Mobjleer trailer
park, Archer Rd. (C-3t-56-p)

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 8,1969

Page 10

I WANTED
Need one or two male roommates to
share poolside French Quarter apt.
Straight lease 175/mo. Lease till June
15. 378-6238. (C-3t-56-p)
1 roommate wanted Colonial Manor
near Tigert Hall. 60/mo. plus utilities.
Call Richard 378-9817. (C-st-56-p)
Female roommate wanted Village
Park, winter and or spring low rent.
Phone 378-0933 after 5. (C-st-54-p)
HELP WANTED f
Female subjects needed for speecn
experiment. Must be native English
speaking, free of voice defects and in
the age group 30-39 or 50-59. $2.00.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway
Comm. Science Lab. 392-2049.
(E-10t-54-c)
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session or $2.50 for IV2
hour session. Must be native English
speaking and have normal hearing.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway,
University 392-2049. (E-55-10t-c)
Medical Technologist: ASCP
registered or eligible. 40 hour week
with no night or weekend work. Paid
vacation, holidays and sick-leave.
State retirement plan and other
fringe benefits. Salary commensurate
with education and experience.
Apply Personnel Director, Alachua
General Hospital, 912 S.W. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Phone: 372-4321. (E-ts-55-c)
Delivery boys wanted. Larrys Pore
Boy Sandwich Shop. Transportation
provided. Flexible hours. Apply in
person. 1029 West University Ave.
(E-st-54-p)
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. National parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
SI.OO to Arnold Agency. 206 East
Main Rexburg, Idaho, 83440. Money
back guarantee. (E-7t-50-p)
Students, Faculty, Staff: Have any
talent? Come to the Rathskeller
auditions. Apply activities desk 3rd
floor, Reitz Union. (E-4t-54-c)
Outstanding qualified, competant
bookkeeper for construction firm;
proven ability and experience a
necessity. Call 376-9950 days or
378-1308 weekends and evenings.
(E-ts-56-c)
The Rathskeller is looking for some
one to be the voice of the
Rathskeller. A good master of
ceremonies type apply activities desk,
3rd floor, Reitz Union. We need you
now. (E-3t-56-c)
STUDENTS need darkroom
technician for fifteen hour week in
Student Publications. Excellent
working conditions. Applicants must
have sound working knowledge of
darkroom procedures. Apply after 5
p.m. to Doug Case, Rm. 330, Reitz
Union. (E-56-ts-p)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
Student Publications. Full-time
employment with all university fringe
benefits. This job requires no filing
and is much more interesting than
just straight typing. Youll be using
IBMs new MT/SC typesetting
equipment, composing type for the
Seminole and the Florida Alligator.
An IBM representative will train you
at full pay. 40 per minute; 80 per
cent accuracy required. Call Mr.
French, 392-1681 after 5 p.m. for
appointment. (E-ts-56-p)
gSggQgfg STARTS TODAY
BLOOD CHILLING HORROR
"NIGHT OF THE
LIVING DEAD"
PLUS
"DOCTOR WHO
AND THE
DALEKS"
Starring Peter Cushing ji

I HELP WANTED |
** V
** ......
Sports Department:..,Alligator needs
sports writers for news'and features,
opportunity for good writer, see
Marc Dunn or Bill Dunn.(E-tf-56-p)
| AUTOS J
1967 Triumph Spitfire MK2, well
cared for, WSW R&H convertible top.
Tonneau cover, front bumper guard.
Robert Palmer, 376-0911.
(G-st-56-p)
62 Tempest, radio, heater, AT 25
miles per gal. Inspected, S3OO or best
offer. Call Phyl 392-1611 before 5
p.m. After 5 Lot 14 Pinehurst
Park, 34th St. Archer Rd. (G-st-56-p)
1965 Falcon Futura, 2 door hardtop,
6 cyl automatic, radio, whitewalls,
excellent condition. Only 38000
miles. 372-5703, 392-1473.
(G-st-56-p)
Shelly B.: I still love you very much
and now realize all my mistakes.
Please give me one more chance. All
my love, R. (J-3t-56-p)
i^yy'WMVVV*V*ViV#VVV.Vi*>I*>!WVV4
i LOST & FOUND I
s >
Suede coat lost in Floyd probably. I
need it desperately, reward offered.
No questions asked, please return.
Call 376-5418. (L-2t-56-p)
SERVICES |
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-c)

The Hour Os TT11; Wolf
is the hour between
night and dawn.
It is the hour when most
people die, when sleep
is deepest, when
nightmares are most real.
It is the hour when the
sleepless are haunted
by their deepest tear,
when ghosts and demons
are most powerful.
The Hour Os The Wolf" is
also the hour when most
children are horn.

lAIIIIL ~?M

F jj
"ti r. ii
Inc Fixer rUI
based on theVJ^j/
Pulitzer Prize-Hwl
winnins novel by 1
Bernard Malamud.jW > 1
MGM presents BBeflPp
the John Frankenheimet-
Edward Lewis Production of 4 J
the fixer m
Alan Bates J J V
co-stirrmq
Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman,

Use our handy
mail In order
form.

;yV.:.w.y.W
SERVICES
x
HELP WANTED: MALE. Mens
clothing salesman, part-time.
Discount privileges. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-55-10t-c)
rSniun
LeWHcramaN I
UD m w metrocoior
%*> I
BALSO AT 8:67 mm |r 1
H-'irA IJB mTT!MMIEUX|
ikmm M
OTTO PREMINGER /Mue*£T SKiOOO"
JACKIE GLEASON CAROL CHANMNG
FRANKIE AVALON FRED CLARK
MICHAEL CONSTANTINE FRANK GORSHIN
JOHN PHILLIP LAW PETER LAWFORO
BURGESS MEREDITH GEORGE RAFT
CESAR ROMERO MICKEY ROONEY
WGROUCHO MARX
TAKES
Pil!S!|fs4 1:35 4:00 ~
I -mrrrr Ul 0:30 9:00
mm mfflsmiimn
l^ctOPDoiSfS
20t* Ceotwry FM
Color by Delude 3£2&



ON THE
MOVE!
High and dry I
stands the sign I
announcing the I
site of the new I
home o f I
another UFI
fraternity.l
Along with the]
Phi Taus, Kappa
Alpha and Chi
- Phi fraternities
also have new
chapter houses i
planned.

Teaching Gallery
Shows City Art
By ROY C. CRAVEN, JR.
University Gallery Director
The wedding of building and city is a subtle art. Though history
has provided us with many great examples: St. Marks in Venice, St.
Peters in Rome, the Royal Crescent and Circus at Bath, to name but a
few, creating a happy marriage between city and building in the
twentieth century is an increasingly difficult task.
The streets of the city besides providing access for people and
simple vehicles must now cope with cars, buses, trucks, water, gas and
electrical supply, sewage disposal, communication lines, and
sometimes subways and public transportation. All of these services
form the infrastructure of the city and must somehow be related to
buildings.
The building in many cases itself has a population the size of a
town, with complex facilities for moving people the equivalent of
several city blocks up into the air, conditioning the air, providing fire
protection and mail distribution, telephone communication,
automobile storage and a myriad number of specialized services.
Given the magnitude of our urban growth and the increasing scope
of our building projects it would seem unlikely that we could
continue to think of our cities as being only an unrelated collection of
buildings and streets. If we forsake our traditional attitudes about the
physical form of the city what possibilities are open to us?
The present exhibit suggests some answers. Organized and
assembled by Prof. Robert Lytle of the University of Michigan,
Department of Architecture, the exhibit presents twenty projects
which have forsaken the traditional attitudes which relate buildings to
cities. The projects represent a very broad spectrum of spirited and
imaginary approaches to contemporary problems of urban
environment.
The large scale of the projects present construction solutions which
are innovations in themselves. But more important is the fact that
each project suggests what might be accomplished if the city were
conceived as a single dynamic organism, with prime concern given to
amenities provided to the user and the conservation of land area.
This display will be on display in the UF Department of Art s
Teaching Gallery through Fri., Jan. 31. The Teaching Gallery isopen
free to the public from 8 a.m. to 12 noon, and from 1:30 p.m. to 5
pjn. It is closed weekends and holidays.
I A 1232 W. UNIV. AVE. I
I flifllui 376-7657 I
I ir FIRST OF I
I QUARTER I
SPECIAL
j H
I LADY CAREFREE I
I INSTANT LOAD I
I OUTFIT I
II 8 88 VALUE ONLyI3^J

* &
i PM KAPPA TAul
TOM KENNEDY

WELCOME BACK TO SCHOOL
j TO ACQUAINT OUR GAINESVILLE NEIGHBORS
WITH THIS NEWEST & MOST ADVANCED METHOD
I- OF FABRIC CARE
I* WERE HOLDING THIS SALE FOR 2 WEEKS FOR THE
STUDENTS Ist GARMENT REG PRICE
BENEFIT 2nd LIKE GARMENT l£ I
4-DAY SERVICE" J
T MAKES R DRY S s J
1120 WEST UNIVERSITY
of guaranteed insurance
for practically
peanuts.
i
t
What are you waiting for? $102,500 of life insurance regardless of what your fu-
Pacific Mutual Life has come up with a plan de- ture health may be. And with the Key Plan there aren't
signed exclusively for college students. Its called the any notes to sign, no loans to make.
Key Plan. The beauty of it is that you start out with Its a permanent life insurance policy designed ex exs2soo
s2soo exs2soo of life insurance for less than $6 a month. And pressly to match your present and future financial needs,
you also have eight guaranteed options that can increase We think it's the best plan in the business. Why not find
your coverage to $102,500. No other insurance company out for yourself. For more information, just mail the
offers a plan quite like it. coupon below. A PML representative will fill you in on all
PMLs Key Plan allows you to purchase up to the details.
! Pacific Mutual Life
m? Th. WhIT mutual BE. mturanc company
' 6 J nesvi,,e Florida 32061
t& : W '%! Id lihu more information on the Key Plan.
. J I'm interested in becoming a PML Key Plan
j mmm j
Waiter Bell L 1
. .-f .
. / ' V* .V
: * l *

There
is abetter
Apartment
Eametot
(At Westgate)
Professional Management by:
Ernest Tew Realty Inc*
Resident Manager 373"0296

Wadnaailay. January 8,1969. Tha Florida Alligator.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 8, 1969

Swingers Start New Season
At Senior Bowl Tourney.

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
the new season today in Mobile,
Ala. at the Senior Bowl
Tournament.
Led by All-Americans Steve
Melnyk and John Darr the
Gators will be competing against
some of the top teams in the
country, including Houston,
LSU and the other southern
powers.
Coach Buster Bishop, with a
four year 46-6-1, brought UF its
first NCAA title for any athletic
team. Bishop is very optimistic

a wimM
V. jmk
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hi ; ;
1? Br Minim,'ln| "'Hii
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jBSm f
I il ife,
jP \ Hr
"mWk JP'M JB r\ IK
> -> A T-.,......
* ~.,s ;a
How's My Form ?
.. Miss Chris Noel is not a Gator, but Coach Bishop surely couldn't
find anything wrong with her swing.
RECENTLY SEPARATED
f id
MILITARY SERVICE
Your Servicemen's Group Life Insurance
has guarantees for future protection
which may be important and valuable to
you, providing you act within 120 days.
For a full, plain English explanation, call
us.
Talking this over does not cost money
it pays.
Hsiame
I ADDRESS I
PHONE |
CALL OR REPLY TO:
I BILL OLINGER-STEVE WHITE I
. : -'.,:H-' ~ 1831 N.W. 13th St. |
' Gainesville, Florida
L Phone 378-1391 J

about the Gators repeating as
national champs in 1969.
Other starting returnees from
last years squad include Wendell
Coffee, Hal Hutchinson, John
Sale, and Richard Spears.
The Gators will have a long
layoff after the Senior Bowl,
their next match is Feb. 15th
against Florida State University.
Melnyk is the current
champion of the Florida
Intercollegiate Tournament and
the SEC Championship. Darr
placed fifth in the NCAA and
placed second in the 1968 Cape
Coral Invitational.
Spears was third in the

Florida Intercollegiate and
fourth in the SEC. Hutchinson, a
junior college transfer, won the
freshmen division of the Cape
Coral Tournament. Sale placed
eighth in the SEC and 20th in
the NCAA.
The schedule is:
l-eb. 15 Florida State
University
Feb. 22 St. Leo. Rollins.
South Florida
March I Florida
I ntercollegiate
March I 5 Florida State
March 26-29 Miami
Invitational
April 2-5 Cape Coral
Invitational
April 12 Tennessee
April 16-19 Houston
All-American
April 26 Georgia
May 1-3 Southeastern
Conference
May B-10 Pikes Peak
Invitational
June 23-28 NCAA
! ~ tectil 0.0. r"l . |;1 1
paaiiaa
1 vu h. w. tw> $. Jfcr
Elizabeth Hartman in her neiv
role as Zinaitla, the sex-ob sex-obsessed
sessed sex-obsessed girl ulio helps bring
about the downfall of Yakov
llok (Alan Hates ) in MGM's
The Fixer, screen version of
Hernard Mala mud's famous
novel, 1967 winner of both the
Pulitzer Prize and the National
Hook Award for fiction. Dirk
llogarde, Hugh Griffith, tan
Holm, David Warner and Carol
II liite also star in the John
Fran ken hei mer-F production, filmed on locations
in Hungary in Metrocolor.

UNIVERSITY
/''J'ft/tfMMA
TRACE
*>. f t
New Name, New face, New Management
The most for your money
in town .... Let us prove it!
Ph. 376-6720, or come
oy 708 3. W. 16th

I Savings |
I 40% 50% 60%
E m
V y/
i 1620 WEST UNIVERSITY M
UNIVERSITY PLAZA V/
HaU-privv to
poUotjv stadvnts and
favulty:
thv nvirspapvr that
non'Mpapvr pvoptv
road. .
At last count, we had more than 3,800 news newspaper
paper newspaper editors on our list of subscribers to The
ChristianfScience Monitor. Editors from all
over the world.
There is a good reason why these pros read
the Monitor: the Monitor is the worlds only
daily international newspaper. Unlike local
papers, the Monitor focuses exclusively on
world news the important news.
The Monitor selects the news it considers
most significant and reports it, interprets it,
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UF Pair In Senior Bowl

Gator tackle Guy Dennis, end
Jim Yarbrough and their
Southern teammates, their
gridiron colors in tatters, get one
final chance to rise again
Saturday in Mobile in the
play-for-pay Senior Bowl.
Meanwhile Fullback Larry
Smith has decided not to play in
the same game due to injuries
received in Tampas American
Bowl game last Saturday.
The past several weeks have
been grim ones for Dixie
football.
Its three top college teams
Georgia, Tennessee and Alabama
were all worked over by teams
from other sections of "the
country. And, the South lost
three straight all-star games in a
10-day period.
The North beat the South 3-0
in the Shrine Bowl at Miami,
21-15 in the American Bowl at
Tampa and 13-7 in the Hula
Bowl at Honolulu.
Maybe this Saturday will be
different. The South, which had
far more than its share of bowl
teams, will be at its strongest in
the Senior Bowl.
It has the same two
quarterbacks Edd Hargett of
Texas A&M and Loran Carter of
Auburn who failed at Tampa.
But Florida States Ron Sellers,
one of the nations all-time great
college receivers, and Houstons
great runner Paul Gipson came
from Hawaii to* bolster the
South forces.
The North has the same two
quarterbacks who won at Tampa
Bob Douglass of Kansas and
Greg Cook of Cincinnati and
that pair should be tougher this
week than last.
Douglass was the star of the
American Bowl only two days
following the Orange Bowl, and
Cook, the nations top collegiate
yard gainer during the 6B
season, developed a sore arm
several days before the game.
Theres a different attitude in
the Senior Bowl than at other
all-star games. Up to now, this
gypsy band, made up of many of

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1 credit cards accepted \ I
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I representing all major J/\ I
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v 9am. noon shopping center

the nations top seniors, has
been playing for glory and
expenses.
Saturday they become pros.
Members of the winning team
get SI,OOO each; the losers
S6OO.
It s probably a good thing.
Its Not
That
Gator Ads
Sell More.
Just Plain
Good
Sense
I o@l I
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
l Cars, Trucks, 4-wheel .
I drive. I
1 No. 1 in Japan 8
I Godding & Clark I
Motors
| 1012 SOUTH Main St. f
I Open 8 A.M. 8 P.M. ft

Thirty-four of the 56 players in
the Senior Bowl played in an
all-star game just this past
Saturday 22 at Tampa and a
dozen in Honolulu. Theyve
been practicing and playing for
AVi months and its -doubtful
they would be very enthusiastic
about another game if paychecks
were not involved.
The pro scouts have been
flocking to these all-star games,
making their final comparisons
in preparation for the annual
draft which begins Jan. 28.
French Fries
The best of the very best!
. . made from
Idaho Premiums
. . prepared with
extra care
... crisp and golden
brown
. . served piping hot!
Youve never had French
Fries so good. Come in
any time-and bring the
family for a treat in food
,n fun. McDonalds means
goodness in food and
lots of it.
McDonalds.
is your kind off place.
t McDonald s Corp 1968
201 N. W. 13th St.

I LAST CHANCE I
for SENIOR ft GREEKS I
(
I to have pictures taken I
I for the SEMINOLE... I
I Jan. 13th through 17th I
I 9:00 to 11:00 1:00 to 5:00 I
| 600 pm to 900 pm |
I ROOM 346 REITZ UNION I
I I
MONDAY, JAN. 13th
SENIORS
A- 6 GREEKS
I ALPHA EPSILON PI j
ALPHA GAMMA RHO
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
BETA THETA PI
CHI PHI I
DELTA CHI
J DELTA SIGMA PHI j
I DELTA TAU DELTA
DELTA UPSILON
J KAPPA ALPHA
j KAPPA SIGMA
I LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
TUESDAY, JAN. 14th
SENIORS
I H -M GREEKS
PHI DELTA THETA
PHI EPSILON PI
PHI GAMMA DELTA
PHI KAPPA PSI
PHI KAPPA TAU
PI KAPPA ALPHA
PI KAPPA PHI
PI LAMBDA PHI
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON
SIGMA CHI
SIGMA NU
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
I WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15th
SENIORS
N -R GREEKS
I TAU EPSILON PHI
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
THETA CHI
ALPHA CHI OMEGA
ALPHA DELTA PI
ALPHA EPSILON PHI
ALPHA OMICRON PI
CHI OMEGA
DELTA DELTA DELTA
DELTA GAMMA
I I
THURSDAY JAN. 16th
SENIORS
S Z GREEKS
DELTA PHI EPSILON
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
KAPPA DELTA
PHI MU
PHI SIGMA SIGMA
SIGMA KAPPA
ZETA TAU ALPHA
FRIDAY, JAN. 17lk
I LAST DAY I

Wednesday, January 8,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 8,1969

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BIG MAN ON CAMPUS W
... Vandy's Turner has trouble in the shower, needs a nine-foot
bed, and figures 'highly' in future Commodore plans.
J. Wayne Reitz Union
Barber Shop
Hair Styling
0
Hair Straightening
BT ';
Razor Cuts
8 Chairs Shoeshine 25<
8 Mon. -ir l
9 Saturday

UAUIW r C TAIIECT CTADV

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
Seven-foot-2# inches tall
with his knees bent, the
comment that best describes
Steve Turner, Vanderbilts
7-foot-4, 220-pound freshman
basketball player.
Thought to be the worlds
tallest eager, Steve personally
says he wouldnt know about
that.
A native of Memphis, Tenn.,
he received over 120 scholarship
offers including all the SEC
schools, numerous junior
colleges, the Atlantic Coastal
schools and some eastern
colleges.
Asked why he chose Vandy,
he mentions that they were real
good to me and I wanted to play
for a top contender.
Vandys freshman team was
rated fourth nationally in a
pre-season poll, but was
humbled by the Gator frosh
Monday night 98-79.
Despite coming from a
non-spectacular basketball
environment, Turner is
considered at this stage more for
his potential rather than his
actual play. His statistics bear
out that he has been no Lew
Alcindor.
Against the Baby Gators he
scored but nine points and
pulled down seven rebounds. He
is the fourth leading scorer on
his frosh team with a 13.5
average and only the second
leading rebounder.
Psychologically down after
the loss, Turner admitted he was
harassed a lot.
Its about the same on every
road trip.
X
Turner says his height causes
him some problems but that hes
adjusted pretty well.
Tom Arnholt, Baby
Commodores leading scorer and
Steves roommate on the road,
says that Turner has a hard
time in the shower. He cant get
low enough to wash the
shampoo off his head.
Wm JU, %-
y' * fiMimfir
/v? T w|l iM,
f OVERHAULED SokM $
Ua s J
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ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
El mw tenon. amrvhl#
Hk-AH. AM.7M SAT. Ik Ml
PHttl

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
The Students Friend
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N Main St. Phone 376-7 581
in nr - -

NCAA Outlaws Beer
By a narrow margin, the NCAA membership voted to deny
approval by its television committee to authorize sponsorship of
NCAA football telecasts by producers of beer and other malt
beverages. *
Voting this winter, the association members cast 211 votes for
permitting the sponsorship, while 115 were cast against the measure.
The needed percentage of two thirds was not attained.
Climb aboard
)lhe S.S. Winnjamnrier
Luncheons served from 11:00A.M. Wj
J Dinners to 12:00 P.M. jj
\ Bemie Sher at the Organ A\
/ on 1 .r
Thursday, Friday & Saturday M'
Oysters & Clams on the half shell f
Michelob on draft \/
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. \j*
Reservations accepted / jjr
| v- Harry M. Lanton, Manager 'M [/
Closed Sundays
H*
Gator Freeze
-JL I TTw&rl*
3743 W. University Ave.
Near Westgate Shopping Center



.THE CUPBdARD,

Black Power At UF

Its far too early to tell just how well the UF
recruiters survived in their harvest of high school
prospects but one things for sure.
Head Coach Ray Graves was not dreaming of a
completely white Christmas.
Along with three other Southeastern Conference
colleges, the UF broke the football racial barrier
that has existed, if only in critics minds, for 53
years since the schools founding.
The Gators signed two Negroes, both considered
among the blue chip category by competing
recruiters. To date, another blue chip Negro
prepster yet to sign anywhere, could round out a
brand of black power in the 71 Gator backfield
that would put Carmichael, Cleaver and Rap Brown
in a category with The Supremes.
Willie Jackson, the 6-foot-3, 210-pounder from
Pennsylvania, scored 21 touchdowns in his senior
year and was surburban Philadelphias most honored
gridder.
With the signing, UF became the last state
institution of higher learning to sign a Negro
footballer. Tampa, Miami, Florida State and, of
course, Florida A & M and Bethune Cookman,
preceded. Bethune, by the way, signed its first white
athlete.
Also high in Gator coaches minds was Tampa
Jesuits halfback Leonard George who signed before
Christmas. Yet to ink a pact with anybody is
Gainesvilles quarterback Eddie McAshan, who

W ackers
Topping
Bombers
The Tally whackers have
whacked their way to the top of
the Independent league with 256
points. The Whackers captured
the basketball crown enroute to
the lead.
The B.F. Bombers have
managed to stay in close range
with 244 points. The Bombers
dropped the Whackers in
football last quarter.
The league race is tight with
10 teams up close, the Spudnuts
have glazed their way into third
place with 221 points. The 13th
Street Gang have also been a
bang swith 219 points. The
Cuban Power has managed to
hijack 218 points and the
Roadrunners have raced for 217.
The Flavet Tigers have been
rugged with 207 points and the
Chemical Catalysts have created
206. CSC-1 are in ninth place
with 204 and the G-Squad
rounds out the top 10 with 192.
Bowlers Form
New Leagues
Four new bowling leagues will
be started this quarter in the
games area of the Reitz Union,
Games Area Manager Patrick
Day said.
They will be mixed or mixed
doubles and there are no
requirements except an interest
in bowling and in meeting
people** he said.
Cost* are lower at the Union
than they would be for
membership in a league at a
public bowling lane, Day said.

1969 Caprice Coupe r ... i[fi .. i r
HHr IIIU jffif*
X., :
I I r r > j Hug?' / T \ 9
j jf. y.... .... L .... 9

No clowns. No hoopla. No
funny hats.
This is an event for the serious
car buyer. The man who has X num number
ber number of dollars to spend and is deter determined
mined determined to get his moneys worth and
maybe more.
Come to a Chevrolet Showroom
during our Value Showdown.
Ask the man to show you, on
paper, how you can order most any

' r. -/.
The Chevrolet
Value Showdown is on.

appears to be leaning to Florida State or Florida A
& M, because his girl friend is headed that way.
Racial barriers also fell at Georgia Tech and
Auburn, both schools signing small scatbacks.
One of the highlights of the recruiting for next
years Gator frosh was the signing of Orlando
Edgewaters All-Southern linebacker Eddy Moore.
Moore learned his lessons well from now-Gator
linebacker Mike Kelley who was two years ahead of
Moore at Edgewater.
Moores older brother Harold, was a Gator
red-shirt this past season and is listed as a tight end
in Floridas plans for 1969.
Making the biggest inroads into Floridas prep
scene this season among out-of-state schools have
been Alabama with seven Florida signees including
one of the states top three quarterbacks
Tallahassee Leonas Billy Sexton.
Georgia Tech signed 15 Florida boys; Memphis
State 7; Tennessee 5; Vanderbilt 5; Georgia 5; and
Tulane 5.
The rest of UFs recruits:
Ken Folsom 6-0 175 HB Mayo; Dan Flanders 6-2 190 LB
Savannah, Ga.; Terry Myers 6-5 180 HB Miami Norland;
Albert Mayfield 6-0 210 FB Pensacola Catholic; Steve
Romero 6-0 190 QB-LB Pensacola Catholic; Steve
Ghesquire 6-1 190 E. Pensacola; Larry Morris 6-1 200
Pensacola; Dennis Tucker 6-1 210 T Crestview; Duane Doel
6-0 180 HB Plantation; Scott Warbritton 6-2 215 LB Jax
Englewood; Glenn Diebert 5-11 215 T Fort Lauderdale
Nova; Jan Gowland 6-2 205 G Lakeview; Greg Harlow 6-0
210 C Tampa Jesuit; Greg Bachman 6-2 185 E St. Pete
Boca Ciega; Ronald 801 l 6-1 210 E Lake City; John
Bloodsworth 6-0 185 HB Sarasota; David Poss 6-2 195 G
Titusville; Larry Frosch 6-4 190 QB Sarasota; Pete Giebeig
6-3 210 E Lake City; Mark Hewitt 6-3 185 E Miami
Norland; Terry Myers 6-5 190 Miami Norland.

By BILL DUNN
: Alligator Anistant Sports Editor

1969 Chevrolet with a big V 8 and
automatic transmission for less than
you could last year.
Come in and spend some time.
Dig, probe, ask questions, take notes.
You owe it to yourself to be thorough.
Go for a drive.
Get a free sample of Chevrolets
luxurious full-coil, cushioned ride.
Shut the windows and see how fresh
the interior stays, thanks to Astro
.k / > : * -A '- -.

Bartletts Expression: Oh, The
Pain Os It All li

fIH'J- A r r ;/v*XyA J AA';v;>v - A' V; ' £ A.- : W ,' A~
Si wM
SgHk

Wadnaaday, January 8,1968. Tha Florida Alligator,

Ventilation. Feel the kick of the big biggest
gest biggest standard V 8 in our field.
Then go down the street or across
town and see how we stack up against
Those Other Cars.
We think youll wind up with a
Chevy.
More people do, you know.
Putting you first, keeps us first.

:>: s:33Mmfev: .v^^ll^HHt.
- *.
PHOTOS By NICK ARROYO

Page 15



i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 8, 1969

Page 16

dlranti Opening
January 17th
OVER 30 CONTINUOUS HOURS OF
OPERATION WITHOUT CLOSING

The doors open at 7:30 on the 17th and don't close
until the wee hours of the 19th or until we run out
of customers whichever comes first.
i

FANTASTIC DECOR AND ATMOSPHERE
* r
i *' '
The most authentically designed RATHSKELLER
(German pub to you who don't speak German) this
side of Munich. Stained glass windows, oak beams,
soft lighting, the whole bit. In other words, like
nothing this campus has ever seen.
1 i
* .
** ... r* /
SERVICE EXTRODINAIRE
Service and attention excelled only by the charm and
attractiveness of the RATHSKELLER frauleins in
their special RATHSKELLER costumes.

W hat were trying to say is: Dont plan anything for the weekend
of the 17th, weve already taken care of 30 hours of it.

Watch the Alligator for more information about your Rathskeller.
t m .%
m
&atlj£ikdler
0 -I |

r
GREAT ENTERTAINMENT

A top New York New Orleans group specially
imported to the wilds of Florida for the grand
opening of the Rathskeller . plus other special
features and GALA events for your pleasure and
entertainment.
*
DELICIOUS FOOD
I \

A German-American menu specially created for the
RATHSKELLER by our very own German chef .
and at very reasonable prices you can afford. For
example where else can you get Knockwurst Mit
Sauerkraut Oder Kartoffelsalat und Roggenbrot for
only 75 cents?