Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 54

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BRIAN GOOOHEIM
EXHIBITIONISM

Visitors to the University Gallery's Fourth
Annual Faculty Exhibition pause before an
exhibitionist exhibit. The event, which was first

New Housing Authority
Will Maintain f lacklist

Mental Report
Filed On Kiker
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
When Dr. John E. Kiker Jr., UF professor and
chairman of the department of environmental
engineering, reportedly shot his wife to death at
their southeastern Gainesville home, he did not
know the difference between right and wrong.
This, Kikers attorneys alleged last week, is the
nucleus of a report from two Gainesville
psychiatrists who examined Kiker after his arrest
on a charge of first-degree murder.
If the allegation that Kiker was mentally
incompetent part of a petition for a writ of
habeas corpus is accepted by the court, Kiker
would not be brought to trial on a charge of
murder.
He would probably be committed to a mental
institution for treatment instead.
The ability to differentiate between right and
wrong is the only criterion used to determine a
defendants sanity.
The psychiatric report was prepared by Dr.
John R. Stiefel and Dr. John F. Nelson and was
filed with the District Circuit Court in
Gainesville, which will hear the plea for habeas
corpus. A date for the hearing has not yet been
set.
The petition for the writ of habeas corpus,
including the report of mental incompetency,
was filed with the clerk of the court by Kikers
lawyers, Chester and Nathan Bedell of
Jacksonville.
Although the petition is a document of public
information, the Alligator was not able to obtain
the actual contents of the petition Sunday.
Chester 'Bedell declined to comment on the
Kiker case Sunday, saying he preferred not to
discuss the case of a client over the phone.

The
Florida Alligator

featured with the opening of the gallery in
September of 1965, opened Sunday and is
scheduled to continue through the 31st of January.

By DAVE REDDICK
' Alligator Associate Editor
An off-campus housing authority, which will
keep blacklists, has been formed on campus to
educate students in the legalities of rent agreements.
Michael Katz, secretary of legal affairs, said the
authority will keep on file names of students who
have refused to pay rent, as well as landlords who
have overcharged students.
These lists will be open to the public.
Katz said the main duty of the authority will be
to educate students concerning leases.
He said the authority plans to have leaflets and
flyers printed and distributed in dormitories as well
as sending staff mefnbers to on-campus Jiving areas
to answer questions.
The authoritys aim, Katz said, is to avoid
problems before they arise, rather than solving them
after they happen.
Working as an arm of the Universitys off-campus
section of the Housing Division, the authority will
work as an executive committee until it is granted a
charter as a student organization.
An office on the ground floor of the Reitz Union
has been made available to the authority, Katz said.
The doors are expected to open within a week.
The authority will work with off-campus division,
headed by Carl Opp, Katz said.
The authority will maintain inspection teams to
investigate student complaints, and will attempt to
persuade landlords to live up to their end of rent
agreements.
Katz said he expected all the major landlords and
most of the small one and two unit landlords will
work with the authority.
The whole authority is founded on
cooperation, Katz said, without it, we will get
nowhere.
Vanderbilt Tickets On Sale
Tickets to the Vanderbilt Game will be made
available today at 5:30 pjn. They may be picked up
at the box office at the Fforida Gym. Students are
urged to pick up their tickets as early as possible
since there are only a limited number available.
V','

University of Florida, Gainesville

BSP Probes
'Gqfor Ethics
/ See Editorial, Page 8
By RAUL RAMIREZ
\ Alligator Executive Editor ;
The Board of Student Publications has launched an
investigation reporting practices including the
handling" of a controversial series on birth control at the
5 request of Vice President for Student Affairs Lester Hale.
Hale asked the BSP to determine if two Alligator staff coeds who
investigated the infirmarys practice of dispensing birth control pills to
unmarried coeds had intentionally given false information to obtain
prescriptions for contraceptives.
The coeds obtained prescriptions for the pill from infirmary
physicians as part of their research for the story.
If either of the girls did indeed provide false information, Hale
stated, their actions may need to be judged as to the ethics of their
reporting and possibly as violations of the Student Code of Conduct.
Hale told the Alligator his suspicions that false information was
given staff physicians derives from statements that I heard made to
me from health service people that misrepresentation occurred.
He also asked the BSP to rule on the propriety and purpose of
quoting a four-letter word from a Purdue University editorial page.
The word was included in a story describing the controversy ignited
when a Purdue student editor printed the word in an editorial attack
against the schools president.
Hale also referred to two Alligator reporters who remained in the
UF library after closing hours to proye the insecurity of the
building. \.
He said the stories make one wonder whether canons of
responsible journalism are being consistently upheld by the Alligator.
Dr. Glenn Butler, chairman of the student-faculty BSP, has
appointed a four-man subcommittee headed by law professor Dexyer
Delony to investigate the alleged violations.
Hale said he expects the BSP to refer any violations of the Student
Code of Conduct to the Student Conduct Committee.
I would assume that a reporter would not be immune to the Code
of Conduct, he said.
But both Butler and Delony said the BSP would concern itself only
with possible violations of BSP policies.
We are concerned with whether BSP policies have been
violated by the r writer of the articles or the editor of the Alligator,
Delony said.
He said Student Code of Conduct matters are completely outside
the jurisdiction of the BSP.
(SEE 'ALLIGATOR' PAGE 5)
jMgsik,
Ilf
BRIAN^GOODHEIM
CANT DISGUISE THEIR LOVE
The caption might have read, Darling, something's come
between us" or We can't go on meeting this way" but to tell
the truth, it's just Jo Ann Langworthy and Rick Arey, two
Jennings Hall Residence advisors, trying out their new flu
filters". For the whole story, see page 16.

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Monday January 6, 1969



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6,1969

Page 2

BilliardsOkayed At UF

UF students under 21 years of
age are allowed to play billiards
in the Reitz Union in spite of a
state statute prohibiting minors
from the sport.
A Florida statute says no one
under 21 may play billiards
unless he has a notarized
permission from his parents, is
married, or is in the armed
services.
The matter has been studied
and is now considered settled,
William Rion, director of the
Union, said Sunday.
In January of 1968, Attorney
General Earl Faircloth sent the
University the opinion that the
statute did not apply to full time
students at the University
because the Union was confined
to the faculty, staff and
students.

Council Delays Collection
Os Hiaher Parkinq Fees

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Increased parking fees costing
students $lO and faculty
members up to $25, slated to
begin this quarter, have been
postponed until next quarter.
The decision by the UF
Administrative Council to delay
implementation of the second
phase of a long-range traffic
program came shortly after the
end of classes last quarter.
Shortly before the decision to
postpone was announced, a
resolution by members of the
zdblogy department condemned
plans for any parking fees this
year.
They argued that one
registration fee had already been
paid for this year and that
another payment was unfair.
The fifteen petition signees
pledged that they would not pay
a second time within the same
academic period.
In a Dec. 20 memorandum to
"
students and faculty, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
attributed the delay to a need
for a shakedown of operating
procedures.
Also, when parking charges
are started next quarter, they
will be only an adjusted portion
of the $lO-25 charge for full
year parking permits.
According to the
memorandum, students willjpay
a $4 registration fee to cover the
final quarter of classes. Faculty
members will pay a registration
and parking fee ranging from $2
for those making less than
$4,500 to $lO for faculty and
staff over the $7,800 mark. A $1
charge will be made for all
motorcycles. S
The parking charge will be
used to operate a bus system,
which will run without fares.
Additional revenue from the fees
will be used to construct parking
lots.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the otflcUl student newspsper Os the University of Florida
and is published five time* weekly except during June, July and August when it is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. EdltdHals represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Roitx
Union Midtag, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 3MOi. The Alligator is entered
u _aapend cfnss jnattpr at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32001.
Subacnption rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
til norida Alligator reserves the rtgnt to regulate the typographical tone of all adver-
Hsinnfi sad to revise or tun away copy which it considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
levelvlugr typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. Hie Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Mottoes for correction must be given before next insertion.

Dr. Lester L. Hale, Vice
President of Student Affairs,
interpreted this to be applicable
only to students at tjite
University, Rion said.
Rion, in a letter to Coach Ray
Graves in March 6B conceded
that this policy could cause
considerable difficulty in the
general area of public relations
because the Union would be
forced to deny the right to play
billiards to many visitors to
campus . to prospective
athletes.
As late as June of this
summer, guests under 21 were
still not allowed use of the
billiard tables without notarized
permission from their parents.
Rion asked that the Union
Board of Managers look over the
Attorney Generals opinion for a
new interpretation.

I 1 iff' 1 jpjjSP g
PMUCIN* R \ Jt A
Proposed Shuttlebus System

A commuter lot south of
Hume Hall is now under
construction, and will open
upon completion later this
month. For the present,
commuters will have to walk
between the lot and the central
campus area.
The 912 spaces at the Hume
lot, however, are expected to fill
only part of the 7,000-plus gap
between the 14,000 autos
registered on campus, and the
6,442 parking spaces which are
presently available n campus.
Os those spaces now in use,
275 spaces will disappear when
two temporary lots; one a
commuter facility south of
Century Tower, and the other,
between the Plaza of the
Americas and Walker
Auditorium, give way to new
buildings in March.
The memorandum said that
the shuttle buses planned for
campus service will not begin
running until money is available
from parking fees to lease them
from the city. This will be at the
beginning of next quarter.
The Hume commuter lot is
only the first of several planned
such facilities on campus. Under
an emergency State Road
Department appropriation,
$150,000 has been made
available to the University for
the construction* of parking
areas.

The Union Board of Managers
decided in October that guests
of students or of the University
could also be included as
exceptions' to the state statute.
The opinion of the Attorney
General was sought originally as
a result of an investigation of a
city law which forbade billiard
tables jto be open on Sunday.
Cole B. Roberts of Robbies
Billiards and Snack Bar lodged a
complaint asking to amend the
ruling. He wanted the University
tables closed on Sunday, or his
allowed to stay open on Sunday.

Chemical Engineering Project
Destroyed In Second Break-In

For the second time this year
a room in the chemical
engineering building containing a
research project has been broken

|!
The second in the planned
series of lots will be located east
of the new law school complex
along S.W. 2nd Avenue.
When shuttle busses are
implemented in March, there
will be three lines in operation.
The first will begin at the Hume
lot, and will go to the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.
The second will also begin at
the Hume lot, but will serve the
central academic area of campus.
The third will begin operation
upon completion of the 2nd
Avenue facility, and will serve
that lot, with stops in Corry
Village.
At
your
newsstand
NOW
, iqwppyv (96V 1
Liv tag-Loving-Dying #
Part one of the authorized
Hemingway biography
PLUS:
For Local Control in the
Schools
What Went Wrong in Vietnam?
Israel and the Arabs

Immunization Plan
Reaches Phase Two
t- i' \ '
The Hong Kong flu immunization study at UF goes into
phase two next week when students receive booster shots,
according to Dr. Robert H. Waldman, assistant professor of
microbiology and medicine.
Approximately 700 UF students are participating in the
study which started the last week of the fall quarter, says
Waldman.
The time and dates for the second set of shots will be similar
to the schedule used during the last week of classes, Waldman
said.
Waldman said the schedules will be published inithC Alligator
and posted on dormitory bulletin boards.

into and the project vandalized.
Damage is estimated at more
than SIO,OOO.
Investigating officers from the
University police and the
Federal Bureau of Investigation
examined room 405 where the
damage was discovered Dec. 20
by a research assistant in the
chemical engineering
department.
Various articles of glassware
were found shattered and nitric
acid poured on various

Winter Registration Lower
r". r v 7
Winter quarter registration ran smoothly and routinely Louis V.
Voyles, director of records and registration, said Sunday.
18,500 students have enrolled so far, he said.
Last quarter, 19,714 students had enrolled by the end of regular
registration.
This enrollment drop is normal for winter quarter registration,
Voyles said.

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components of the project,
including electronic monitoring
equipment.
It is not known whether the
foundation will authorize the
UF to start the project all over
again.
In both instances in August
and December, entry was gained
by breaking of glass panels in the
door to the rooms.
A University Police
spokesman said the matter is still
under investigation.



Lighter Glick Pounds Heavy Hand

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government right
arm Marc H. Glick, visibly many
pounds lighter, has returned to
campus for another inside
administration stint.
Glick has been absent for one
quarter in a totally unpolitical
move affeV a productive summer
term.
He will be taking over his old
job of adviser and assistant to
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor.
Although Glicks official job
will be presidential
administrative assistant, he says,
titles are not needed to get
things done.
He already has outlined his
plans for pushing the Taylor
administration into more action
before next quarters
campus-wide elections.
says he will limit each
cabinet member to one project
apiece to give them time to
coordinate their own
departments.
Among the long-range
projects he lists for the present
administration and future ones
are more tapes for the Century
Tower, re-decoration of campus
cafeterias with menus to match
the decor, an SG film series to
compete with high-priced
downtown movies and
permanent campus bulletin
boards.
He says he wants cabinet
members to improve their liason
with the Alligator.
It has been said that Glick, a
four year SG veteran, is 1969
presidential candidate material,
and in an obvious pre-campaign
statement said he is an
advocate of SG for the
students.
He is most well known for his
statement last summer that
erupted the broiling
Board of Managers dispute.
As far as being for students,
he said, this place (Reitz
Union) is frigid. A student union
without enough student
activities is like a heart without
enough blood its worthless.
ENROLL FOR YOUR
STUDENT INSURANCE
NOW!!!
Don't be left without
insurance this quarter.
Protect yourself from
expensive doctor bills due
to sickness or injury. Enroll
now in Student Health and
Accident Insurance. You
may enroll for this
insurance from Jan. 2 thru
Jan. 24.
Worried about protection for
your family as well as yourself?
Then enroll in our Dependent
Coverage Plan. With this
coverage your wife, children, as
well as yourself will be
protected.
You May Pick Up Brochures And
Enrollment Forms From The Places
Listed Below Or Mail Them To
McGriff-Scarborough & Assoc.
INFIRMARY STUDENT
GOVERNMENT OFFICE
McGRIFF-SCARBOROUGH
& ASSOC.
376-8393- 537 N.E. Ist ST.
Sponsored by Student Government

RETURNS TO ADMINISTRATIVE POSI

4 § Jngi BF T|
I gh || f s llw
H JT i iflW tfl {
\ \\X v W i &I w
WmMm f
SG To Click With Glick?"

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Monday, January 6, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

| UF Prof
Toi
| Heart Study |
5 A UF professor has been :
|: appointed to a new study group*:;
jrjdealing with heart transplants. *i;
i; Gladys M. Kammerer,*:;
of political science and|
jjdirector UFs Public*:;
:sAdministration Clearing Board,x
j;j will act on the task force y
by Dr. Theodore :
| Cooper, director of the National;:;
of Health. :
5 The group will study the:-:
medical, social and:-;
'i economic issues arising from:-;
smedical developments in the:*:
Afield of heart transplants. Their*:;
:jreport is due by June 30, 1969.*|:
: ; Dr. Kammerer is the only lay ij;
ijmember of the group. Sheij;
the groups first £
:meeting in Washington on Dec.?
516. ji

Page 3



l. The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6,1969

Page 4

Health Center Gets $ 19.7 Million Grant

Approval of the largest grant
of federal support in the history
of Florida higher education,
approximately $19.7 million,
was received December 23 by
UF President Stephen C.
"OConnell.
The funds will be used in the
533 million expansion program
of medical and dental facilities
of the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.
This means that the first
phase of the Health Centers
10-year expansion program will
receive approximately $6:6
million for medical education
facilities and sl2 million for
dental education facilities.
In addition the Board of
Regents of the National Library
of Medicine has recommended
approval of expansion of the
Health Center library. The
amount of federal funds to be
approved for this portion of the
overall construction project is
expected to be approximately
sl.l million* bringing the total
anticipated federal support to
the $19.7 million.
Release of the National
funds is
Planned Expansion^
contingent upon availability of
federal funds and upon
appropriation of nearly sl3
million in matching funds from
the Florida legislature for the
coming biennium. This will
make possible the construction
of facilities for the states first
College of Dentistry by 1971,
expansion of the College of
Medicine and the Shands
Teaching Hospital, in order to
increase the resources of
physician and dentist manpower
in the state, and as a result, in
the nation. ~ \
Upon notification of the
approval, U.S. Congressman Don
Fuqua said: The federal
government has come through
with the biggest bargain in
Floridas history: A promise to
fund a health facilities and
educational program in the state
of Florida which will greatly
enhance its abilities to meet the
health manpower needs of its
citizens and to explore and treat
its health problems. Included in
this approval is the largest grant
in the nation thus far for a new
dental school.
The funding for the project
will 4elp alleviate existing and
projected health manpower

DANSKIN
LEOTARDS
and
TIGHTS
AVAILABLE AT:
UCHTERS
IN THE MALL
HEADQUARTERS IN GAINESVILLE FOR DANCEWEAR
*'" I* \

deficiencies. Two other projects
are part of a 10-year long range
plan for the Health Center but
are not included in the present
award.
The present J. Hillis Miller
Health Center "facility is valued
at $lB million exclusive of
equipment and involves 758,519
square feet. The new
construction which will come
from the new federal support
and the matching funds from the
state will virtually double the
building space. It will provide
College of Dentistry facilities for
40 entering dental students in
1971, and subsequently for 60
each year; for dental faculty and
clinical programs. It will permit
the expansion ofv medical
student enrollment to 100 new
students annually instead of the
present 64 and a more flexible
approach toward the
improvement of medical
education. It will be a first step
toward much needed space for
the College of Nursing and the
College of Health Related
Professions.
The project calls for:
A five-level basic sciences
building as an extension to the
northside of the present facility.
This building, dubbed
communicore by the planners,
will be a unique experiment in
education which maximizes the
use of time and space for
students and faculty. Its design
centralizes learning resources for
dental and medical students into
a comprehensive multi-discipli multi-disciplinary
nary multi-disciplinary space which includes
laboratories, classrooms, basic
supporting facilities and an
expanded library.
A southwest extension
which will house College of
Dentistry facilities, an
outpatient unit,- graduate
programs, offices for dental
faculty, laboratories for dental
research, and provide facilities
for a new dentalhygiene
program.
Enlarged general outpatient
facilities and increased bed
capacity in the Shands Teaching
Hospital to meet the activities
resulting from increased
enrollments. It will add about 90
beds, expand the medical
outpatient clinic and establish
dental clinics by 1971.
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Artist's View Os The Proposed Health Center Northside Expansion
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LEGAL ADVICE
A stern warning to would-be short-cutters graces a bulletin board in
front of the newly opened law library. Inside, the library offers an
even wider selection of taws, statutes, injunctions, precedents, rulings,
etc., ad inf., et al.
Alligator Probed
f' FROM PA6f OMt *j|
It is left to Hales office to concern itself with student conduct,
Delony said.
He said the committee would look into possible violations of board
policies which call for high standards of ethics, accuracy,
truthfulness and fairness.
Hale said journalistic irresponsibility is the kind of thing I dont
want to pass judgment on.
Its the Boards business to do so, he said.
He said in all likelihood he would abide by BSP
recommendations, but added he would reserve judgment until the
board reports to him.
There have to be very extenuating circumstances for me to do
otherwise, he said.
But Hale emphasized there are no reasons at this particular time
to indicate he would not abide by the BSP findings.
Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich said Hales request for an
investigation is a subtle but nonetheless contemptible attempt to
influence the editorial policies of the Alligator.
Aldrich said he had prepared an extensive, 2,500-word statement to
present to the BSP investigative subcommittee, but declined further
comment until the investigation is completed.
Delany said his subcommittee would meet somewhere around the
13th of January to prepare its report to be submitted to the BSP
Jan. 20.

Regent Bugged
The flu seems to bug Board of
Regents Chairman Chester
Ferguson.
When contacted by an
Alligator reporter Sunday
concerning his expiring term
with the Regents, Ferguson
would only say: Im sorry, I
cant talk to you, young lady. I
have the flu. And hung up.

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Monday, January 6, 1969. The Florida Alligator, I

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6, 1969

Page 6

Reitz Union
Under Study
By SG Group
The Reitz Union Study
Commission, recently appointed
by Student Body President
Clyde Taylor, has scheduled its
first meeting for Wednesday at 4
p.m.
The special commission was
created to study problems and
complaints related to operation
of the union. It will be chaired
by Dr. Delton Scudder,
chairman of the Department of
Religion and former chairman of
the Union Board of Managers.
In a letter to the 11
commission members, Taylor
pointed to five particular areas
which warrant perhaps
the most basic being the
philosophy of the union.
Clashes between union
officials and Student
Government last quarter
apparently centered around the
basic philosophy of the union.
Union Director W. E. Rion
contended that the Union
should be a community center
for the entire university.
SG leaders did not deny that
the union should be a center for
everyone in the university, but
argued that the unions primary
interest should be for the
students, since it is primarily
financed by student funds.
Other areas the group should
study, Taylor said, are the
composition of the unions
policy-making body, its fiscal
operations, the role of paid
employees (particularly the
administrative staff), and the
relationship between SG and the
union program council.
Commission r members are
Marc Glick, Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale,
Joseph Hilliard, Eric Katz,
Robert Buck, Harold Aldrich.
Other members are W. E.
Rion, Dr. Delton Scudder, Mel
Sharpe, Jack Vaughn and Bob
White.

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UF Still Top
In NDEA
Scholarships
The UF Graduate School has
been awarded the largest number
of National Defense Education
Act (NDEA) scholarships in the
nation, according to Dr. Linton
E. Grinter, dean of the UF
Graduate School.
Thirty-eight scholarships went
to graduate students in various
graduate departments. This is a
drop of 52 scholarship awards
from three years ago and a drop
of six awards from last year.
However, UF is still the top
recipient of the scholarships,
Grinter said.
He attributed the drop to the
tightness of federal funds for
graduate students.
It means a drop in support
for graduate students on the
federal level, Grinter said.
Its now necessary for the
state to do more for graduate
students, he said.
N DEA scholarships are
available for graduate students
through the graduate
departments.
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Monday, January 6,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6,1969

With an investigation of the Alligators!
controversial pill series last term underway by
the Board of Student Publications at the
request of Vice President for Student Affairs
Lester L. Haler a word of explanation might
be in order.
The three-part series, which revealed that
Student Health Service physicians were issuing
prescriptions for birth control pills to unmarried
coeds for contraceptive purposes, drew heavy
criticism from many readers.
The charge: disservice to the community and
hence irresponsible journalism.
The Alligator believes that a newspaper
should not be compelled to justify the facts it
publishes. But we will break from tradition in
this instance and relate some of the thinking
which went into the writing and publication of
the series.
We received word early last quarter from a
very reliable source that the Board of Regents
was considering investigating a rumor that the
UFs infirmary was giving birth control pills to
coeds.
Our reaction was shades of Charley Johns
and his homo hunt.
So, in the first place, public recognition of the
facts involved would be far better coming from
within the university itself instead of an
ominous Regents investigation.
It may be that, in truth, the Regents would
have done nothing. Or they may have cleaned
house. Whichever, the question became
academic after the Alligator story.

Staff Writings

Reading over my handy
dandy copy of Rights In
Conflict, the story of the riots
during the Democratic National
Convention, I realized something
very important; since
newspapers arent allowed to
print certain words, it is
impossible to accurately report
what went on in the Windy City.
One word, the same one, by
the way, which caused the
Florida State University literary
magazine to be censored last
year, was used over and over
again by cops and hips,
bystanders and agitators.
But, because the public
doesnt like to read or hear that
word, newspapers and television
reporters were not able to give
the complete story of the
disturbance.
But the authors of the report
felt differently:
We have, they said in the
introduction, with considerable
reluctance, included the actual
obscenities used by the
participants.
Extremely obscene language
was a contributing factor to the
violence described in this report,
and its frequency and intensity
were such that to omit it would
inevitably understate the effect
it had, the report said.
So why shouldnt newspapers

V ,
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Burin, Adtiling officat in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
302-1681,302-1682 or 302-1683.
*
, OpfcakMU npmed in the Florida Alligator arc those of the editora or of
the writer of the article aid not those of the Univerritv of Florida.

Use Numbers Instead Os Nasty Words

Prudence And The Pill

be able to print that word?
Why shouldnt TV
commentators be allowed to use
that word?
The answer, of course, is
simple. Too many children
would be influenced by hearing
or reading the nasty words.
Therefore I propose a
solution:
Catalogue all the nasties
and assign each of them a
number. Print this book of
filthies every month or so
with a simple cover: DANGER:
This Book Contains Words
Which May Be Hazardous To
Your Mental Health.
Then, whenever a writer was
faced with the problem of
reporting the screaming of an
obscenity, he would merely
write the number corresponding
to the word and those who had
the catalogue could look it up
and get their kicks along with
the true story of what happened,
while those who wished not to
have their ears singed would not
have to worry.
That, of course, would lead to
such stories as:
ANYTOWN Police Chief
W. H. 5 Wilson, covered with
8 from head to toe, charged
outside agitators with causing
the riots which have hit his city
in the last two days.

EDITORIAL

Secondly, during the course of the
investigation the Alligator learned that ho
infirmary officials and the university could
possibly be sued for giving birth control pills to
minors without express parental permission.
Infirmary officials would neither confirm nor
deny that minors were given prescriptions for
the pill without parental permission. The
Alligator confirmed it in actual practice. Our
underage reporter got the prescription she
requested. t
Some physicians apparently believed that the
blanket authorization for medication signed by a
students parents was sufficient permission. Not
so, said the lawyer we interviewed. For practical
purposes, he said, the blanket permission was
acceptable, but in a court case, it wouldnt hold
water.
In our opinion, if the Alligator, story did
nothing more than inform physicians of the
danger they were risking and thereby prevented
a costly, both monetarily and professionally,
malpractice suit, then the story was worth at
least the space it was printed in.
Some other considerations. Most college
students are financed by their parents. Do the
parents not have a right to know about things
which affect their childrens lives? Also, many
coeds rely on the black market for the pill,
just as they do for other drugs. Do they not have
a right to know that they can get the pill with
medical advice rather than risk buying unsafe
pills.
Another question. Is it not the duty of a

Those 3-7 mother 9ers are
trying to bum the whole 3-7 city
down, Wilson said.
Those hippies and other 3-7
radicals store up 8 and throw it
on us, he said. And thats for
8,
As Wilson spoke, some 5,000
students marched on the police
station.
Although there was no
violence, the students shouted
many chants such as 9 the
fuzz, 6 no we wont go, and
8 on the pigs.
Wilson said his department is
planning a crackdown on the
students and plans to have the
disturbances under control
before sunset.
By 3, Wilson said, Well
get to the 3-7 bottom of the 3-7

[ Sunshine, Joy, Light, Bliss,
i v
All Make Tomorrow A Full Day!
v

ByANNEHARTE
: A siren in the night splits the atmosphere with
: its shrill sound. The air is crisp and cold. Mouths
: breathe frost. Toes and fingers are without
j feeling. The would spins on, but I am not
watching. Darkness surrounds and envelopes.
: Everything around me takes on new proportions
and dimensions.
j And yet all is safe and secure. Rather than
; disquieting and making me uneasy, darkness
j comforts and numbs, like a balm for my anxious
: heart. Its healing effect is like a restful shadow in
; the brilliant summer sun.
Sunshine is wonderfully happy, and I rejoice in
; it. But with no opposite comparison, my rejoicing
is without meaning. The night provides a wayside
\ for me when I am sun weary, and a thoughtful
\ interlude between one demanding day to the
: next. Problems extinguish themselves like
j: matches when the sun sets on the water.
: Solutions seem easy to find and matter little.

newspaper to let the people know, to tell its
readers the truth about what is happening in the
world and community around them? Or is a
newspaper to avoid telling the truth, to sidestep
controversy, because someone might get upset?
Publication of the story might possibly have
resulted in termination of the practice. And a
number of coeds might have brought unwanted
children into the world. Or worse yet, they
might have sought criminal abortions with all
the resultant terror and danger.
But the story might also have lifted the cloaks
of secrecy and deceit off the practice and put it
out in the open sunshine where it belongs, where
after careful study, the university could stand by
its commitments to students and their well-being
officially proclaiming birth control medication
as acceptable student health care.
We believed at the time, and do today, that
the Alligator published the story for the best of
reasons the public interest.
Such is the stuff democracy is made of.
The Florida Alligator
#"The price of freedom
is the exerciM of responsibility."
Haroid Aldrich
Dave Doucette
PaCtfkttJtM/ Managing Editor
J\HH Raul Ramirez James Cook
wAltoftoCftH Executive Editor News Editor

mess.
If I have to clobber every
one of the 3-7 mothers Ill get
them out of this 7 town,
Wilson said.
There could be some
problems in this coding system
though.
When someone was being
interviewed on TV he wouldnt
say the number, he would say
the actual word. To impose a
beep over the sound would be
obnoxious, so it would be better
to instruct them in how to curse
without being censored.
That way would be to speak
in numbers rather than words.
I can see it now.
The crowds would really be
chanting 9 the fuzz, 6 no we
wont go and 8 the pigs.

Day and night are amazingly like joy andjj:
sorrow. One without the other has no meaning.
Each is dominant in its turn, and provides ajj
natural balance. An acquaintance with sorrow £
makes my joys into bliss. Having known joyg
makes my sorrows succinct.
Life is a continual struggle between the two, jj
and a truce would bring only monotony. Rather g
than being opposing forces, each works to make :j|
the other more vivid. $
Monotony, too, is a reality, but my mosts
memorable experiences are joys and sorrowsX
because they are extremes... like day and night.j::
Tomorrow is another day, full of light which :|j
illumines my strengths and blatantly exposes my
weaknesses. Roles must be played and titles jj;
uplived. The dawn of a new day brings %;
subconcious waiting. Waiting for dusk when v
shadows are distorted and unclear. Pressures are }
.I*!?.and darkness surrounds and envelopes.

By Dave Reddick

And the cops would answer
Kill the mother 9ers, Get
the 3-7 hippies, and Knock
the 8 outa*em.
But then, pretty soon
everyone would know what the
numbers stood for, and they
might be offended to hear them.
So another method would
have to be found to protect the
eyes and ears of the
narrowminded.
Maybe they could publish a
catalogue with the numbers
which would correspond to a
series of letters and we would
read:
Soif the fuzz, Ewrr no we
wont go, and Typn on the
pigs.



TAYLOR GOODRICH
Promises And Results
i v
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer

Campaign promises are nebulous creatures
written by usually patronage-minded platform
committees and become the curse of political
candidates.
What has the Student Body President Clyde
Taylor and Vice. President Gary Goodrich
administration been doing with their campaign
promises? Here they are.
Student Participation. Actively encourage
greater participation in all phases of student
activities, thereby bringing a broader range of
experience, programs and ideas into Student
Government. Opening up decision-making offices,
previously held by a self-perpetuating clique, will
provide such incentive.
Hiring and Tenure Policies. Seek to place a
student representative on the instructor selection
and tenure-granting committees in the various
colleges.
Student Survival Clinic. The program we
propose would offer a series of seminar and panel
type discussions designed to ease the social,
psychological and academic adjustment to college
life.
Public Functions Authority. Secure the
consolidation of the Lyceum Council and the Union
Board for Student Activities (Now the Union
Program Council) into a popularly elected Public
Functions Authority. This authority would be
accountable to the student body through popular
election ...
9 Selective Service Information. Accumulate
data on all phases of armed forces programs and
training, and on the Selective Service System.
i Off-Campus Housing Authority. Incorporate
an off-campus non-profit Housing Authority to
secure services for off-campus residents, and to
redress grievances.
9 Grade Appeals Board. Insist that UF establish a

No Voice Os Protest

MR. EDITOR:
Sometimes I cannot help
thinking that cynicism and
hypocrisy are the order of the
We Support
Green man
MR. EDITOR:
The Student Agricultural
Council of the College of
Agriculture agrees in principle
with the resolution proposed to
the Faculty Senate by Professor
J. R. Greenman.
We feel that the treatment of
the resolution by the Florida
Alligator was neither fair to the
University community, nor in
keeping with principles of
objective journalism.
In fairness to all concerned
and to insure that democratic
decision making processes be
based on complete rather than
partial information; and since
The Florida Alligator has made
numerous stands in support of
academic freedom and the rights
of individuals to free choice, we
respectfully request that the
entire resolution be printed.
THE STUDENT
AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL

day in this world and, most of
all, in the U. N.
When civilians are killed in
Israel at the hands of Arab
terrorists, when mines are
planted in school yards or under
a*school bus, when 400 pounds
of explosives, covered with 200
pounds of scrap metal and
empty beer bottles, explode in a
busy market place in Jerusalem
killing 12 persons, nobody
bothers to raise his voice to
protest. But when th| Israelis
retaliate (being very direful to
prevent any loss of lives, at great
risk to themselves) they are
condemned unanimously and
the Pope finds it necessary to
express his grief and sorrow for
the loss of the Lebanese aircraft.
Lebanese propaganda was
trying to create an image of a
peaceful state; the facts are
different, however. Between
September and December 26,
1968, 18 terrorists incidents
have taken place from Lebanese
soil with the overt
encouragement of the Lebanese
Government.
The Lebanese Prime Minister
said on
message to the nation:
Fadayeen actions are
legitimate, and no one can~

Grade Appeals Board for each of the various
colleges to review unjustly assigned grades, and poor
grading procedures.
RESULTS
9 Student Participation. Admittedly an
ambiguously worded promise, its implementation is
the hardest to define. In SGs attempt to eliminate
self-perpetuating cliques, Lyceum Council lost its
budget support and subsequently dissolved. Course
and teacher evaluation was given to a mens
leadership honorary and the Accent chairmanship
was made an elective office.
9 Hiring and Tenure Policies. No success so far.
Its biggest stumbling block has been the University
Senate. All attempts to reach fruition have been
thwarted, SG sources say.
9 Student Survival Clinic. During fall registration
the seminars and discussions had very poor
turnouts. Freshman and new student apathy and
little publicity were the likely causes.
Administration sources chalk it up as a success since
students were reached, however few.
9 Public Functions Authority. Lyceum Council
was eliminated when it lost its budget and the
promised consolidation of the council and the
Union Board for Student Activities was sacked.
9 Selective Service Information. A draft
information bureau was opened by SG last quarter*
Both pro and con materials on the draft are
available at the bureaus office on the first floor of
the College Library.
9 Off-Campus Housing Authority. This is
scheduled to open this quarter and will be
coordinated with the Off-Campus Housing Office.
Some cases have already been solved.
9 Grade Appeals Board. Despite the
Taylor-Goodrich administrations insistent appeals,
there has been little progress through the Action
Conference to get UF to organize the board.

condemn the fadayeen for what
they are doing. Following the
attempt to destroy the El A1
plane at Athens Airport by
members of a Lebanese terrorist
group, Radio Cairo quoted
Lebanese officials as praising
the courage of the perpetrators
and the Lebanese official
newspaper, El Hadaf, wrote,
The action at Athens was an
outstanding act of heroism.
ARYE R. EPHRATH, 4EG

Junk The Greenman Plan

MR. EDITOR:
Either Dr. Greenman is
completely out of touch with
reality or he has closed his mind
to the elerrtentary lessons of
psychology and diplomacy t
taught by recent student
bloodshed.
If the Walker Report
contributes nothing else, the
public must realize from its
analysis that militancy on the
part of the establishment is at
least a catalyst, if not a
contributory cause, of campus
violence.
There has been no militancy
here. I am proud of the way this
University has quietly and

- "MACE!

OPEN FORUM:
ViMmt
There is no hope for the complacent man."

Sophomore Backs
Present PE System

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to express my
feelings toward the question of
compulsory versus vdluntary PE
and also the question of whether
credit should be given to the
course. Since I have taken four
quarters of it and still have two
more to go I feel I have some
grounds on which to speak.
I believe that everybody needs
the exercise and that the 3 or 4
hours a week is not going to be
the reason for anybodys grade
to suffer in their academic
courses. Therefore I think it
should remain compulsory.
As far as assigning credit*to it,
I believe it would not be to the
benefit of the majority of
students because if one did

positively responded to the
rational demands of its
forward-thinking student
leaders. Campus disturbances
have been limited to noise from
David Nobles ten watt amplifier
in the Plaza.
But out of the ranks of the
establishment comes the voice of
militancy. We are faced with
' threats: threats of police
violence and threats of a
reactionary response to our
modest demands.
Dr. Greenman made the first
move. Now students who were
moderates are riled by the idiocy
of a reactionary faculty voice;

Monday, January 6,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

receive credit for it then the
total credit hours needed for
graduation would probably-be
raised to compensate for it and
then the student would just have
another course to worry about
getting a decent grade in. The
way it is set up now, you are
guaranteed a D just for
attendance and with a minimum
of effort you can easily receive a
C or a B. Since everyone is
required to take two years of
PE, everyone has the same
handicap as far as precious time
being taken out of the students
busy schedule. Therefore I
conclude that compulsory PE as
it is now at the University of
Florida should remain
unchanged without credit. j,
JOHN STEEGER, 2UC

their reaction is a form of
militancy, whether it be only a
gut reaction or a more overt
demonstration of frustration.
This is the way the seeds of
revolution are sown. If the
Greenman Resolution is passed,
those seeds may grow into a
monster with which we may not
be able to cope.
Recent human experience has
formulated a clear tenet:
militancy is met with militancy.
Dr. Greenman has cast the first
stone.
Dont help make a good thing
go bad. Junk the resolution*
BILL DOUBERLEYj 3LW

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Janaary 6,1969

Lodge Will Head U.S. Peace Delegation

NEW YORK (UPI)
President-elect Richard M.
Nixon Sunday named Henry
Cabot Lodge, former
ambassador to South Vietnam
and currently ambassador to
West Germany, as his chief
negotiator at the Vietnam talks
in Paris.
At the same time, Nixon
named Lawrence E. Walsh, 57,
formerly a deputy U.S. attorney
general and a U.S. district judge
in New York, as Lodges deputy.
Nixon said he also had
detailed Marshall Green, 52,
currently the ambassador to
Indonesia, to work with the
delegation and to give it
additional professional
competence and support.
The announcements were
made by Ronald Ziegler, Nixons
press spokesman at Nixons
Hotel Pierre headquarters.
Ziegler said Cyrus R. Vance,
currently one of the chief
negotiators under the Johnson
Administration, had agreed to
stay on for about one month
after the inauguration so that
no momentum will be lost and
continuity can be maintained.

South Viet Supply Shipment
Increase To Prolong War?

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
House subcommittee reported
Sunday that since the United
States stopped bombing North.
Vietnam, supply shipments
toward the South increased
five-fold creating a situation that
could prolong the war if peace
talks fail.
If the Paris talks collapse, the
report said, the bombing halt
will have provided the North
with a new lease on life and the
conflict will certainly be
prolonged.

Alligator Staff To Meet
There will be a mandatory meeting of the editorial staff of the
Florida Alligator Tuesday night at 8. All reporters and editors must
attend.

I HOUSE OF TRAVEL I
I I
I credit cards accepted j \ I
I specializing in cruises J ] I
I representing ail major J/p I
I no service charge |
I mill (Travel I
I OPEN DAILY: 3415 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
| v 8:30A.M.-5:30P.M. GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
SATURDAY WESTSIDE B
I 9 A.M. NOON g
TniiiiiiiiijsM_T____iil^^

In __ addition, Ziegler
announced that Philip Habib, a
foreign service career officer
who formerly headed the
political section of the American
Embassy in Saigon and has been
with the American negotiators in
Paris since the talks began,
would continue to serve on the
negotiating team.
He is one of our best
informed and most competent
officers dealing with Vietnam
and we are pleased that his
services can be continued,
Ziegler said.
W. Averell Harriman, who
heads the American negotiating
team, has indicated he would
like to be relieved of his
responsibilities by Jan. 20 and I
have accordingly requested the
new team to be prepared to
assume its responsibilities
immediately thereafter, Nixon
said in a statement read at the
briefing. v
In the statement, the
president-elect praised Lodge,
Nixons vice presidential running
mate in his unsuccessful bid for
the presidency in 1960, as
having not only a distinguished

In such an event, it added,
the alternative to an all-out
military effort to bring the war
to a speedy conclusion.
The special panel of the
House Armed Services
Committee said the shipments
exceed replenishment needs of
troops and the civilian populace
and it appears that the North
Vietnamese are establishing a
massive logistic system which
could be used as a foundation
for future expanded
operations.

career in the political life of our
country, but also a distinguished
record in foreign affairs.
Pointing out that Lodge had
served twice as ambassador to
South Vietnam, 1963-64 and
1965-67, and had served seven
years as the U.S. representative
in the United Nations, Nixons
statement said he thus brings to
this grave responsibility the
finest and most pertinent
qualities of experience, and he
enjoys my full confidence.
Walsh, who served as deputy
U.S. attorney general from 1957
until 1960, was given the
personal rank of ambassador
during his assignment. Walsh
served as U.S. district judge for
the Southern District of New
York before resigning in 1957 to
accept the Justice Department
post. He currently is a partner in
the New York law firm of David
Davis, Polk and Ward well.
Green is a career diplomat
with extensive experience in
Asia. He has been ambassador to
Indonesia since 1965 and will
continue in that post while
simultaneously serving on the
negotiating team.
Nixon said he made the
appointments on the
recommendation of his secretary
of state-designate, William P.
Rogers.
Nixon attended church
services earlier Sunday with
evangelist Billy Graham, a
longtime friend, and Grahams
associate, Dr. Grady Wilson, and
was their host at lunch in his
Fifth Avenue apartment.
He spent most of the
afternoon at his headquarters at
the Hotel Pierre working with
assistants.
Ziegler also disclosed that
Nixon talked by telephone with
U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam
So Whaf!
It takes about six pounds of
fresh apricots to make one
pound of dried apricots.

Ellsworth Bunker Saturday
night. He said Bunker had agreed
to remain his post in Saigon for
an indefinite period.
Ziegler said the length of
Bunkers stay in the job would

Climb aboard v
j The S.S. Windjammer W
. i K' - - - ->j
L Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. |f|
I Dinners to 12:00 P.M. ij
! Bernie Sher at the organ \\
I on rj
Thursday, Friday & Saturday \(j
Oysters & Clams on the half shell A
Michelob on draft V,
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty m
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. V*
7r~ Reservations accepted i mi
-v- Harry M. Lanton, Manager m
Closed Sundays
| Sale!
Mens Pattern Pants
Values to SIO.OO
NOW $7.85
One Group Long Sleeve
Turtleneck Shirts
Values to $8.95 =
NOW $2.50
and fOs 77
Dacron & Cotton Jackets
unlined
Value $12.95
NOW $8.95
G2LTOB SHOP
Across
the street MEIIEI
! from.
Murphree
Area S2LTQS SBDPI
On the Gold Coast
| 1710 W. University

be worked out in the near future
when U. Alexis Johnson
recently named to the number
three post in the State
Department, visits Saigon.
V



Another Arab War
Seen By Hussein

BEIRUT (UPI) King
Hussein of Jordan Sunday
warned that the danger of
another Arab-Israeli war is
immense and expressed hope
that the major world powers
will take a closer look at the
deteriorating situation.
There were no reports of
renewed fighting along
Arablsraeli borders during the
day. But Beirut had its second
air raid alert test in two days.
Hussein conferred for two
hours with President Charles
Helou during a stopover on his
way to London for medical
treatment. The two heads of
state discussed the heightened
crisis in the wake of the Israeli
commando raid on Beirut
Airport and the possibility of an
Arab summit conference.
The Jordanian king told
newsmen on his departure:
If the situation deteriorates
any further it will affect world
peace. I hope the great powers
will take a closer look at what is
happening here. r
Hussein, however, spoke more
SFSC Policed
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
Violence-wracked San Francisco
State College ended its extended
Christmas holiday Sunday with a
pledge from acting President S.I.
Hayakawa that those striving to
destroy the college will be
stopped.
Hayakawa said he would use
uniformed police and his powers
of expulsion to enforce stringent
new campus rules when classes
resume Monday morning.

|
f Ladies Dep'h 225
Mezzanine Floer W. UNIV. AVE. |
v Ij!
AFTER CHRISTMAS
1
I 1
% ;i
A Most Timely Clearance In Our
I l
Ladies' Department
1 1
j: CASUAL DRESSES UP TO
|| COCKTAIL DRESSES 1 /
l KNIT DRESSES /
| KNIT SUITS AND i
| PANTS
| BLOUSES 1 /
| SKIRTS /O
/ * ACC
| SWEATERS | f TOPS |
V ;
sJOT*!TOW%%%%v.%sv.VA%v*%%v^v?w # *w;w;v.WAv;v;w;v.v;*Aw.v.*.v.v a v;vf

optimistically of the chances for
peace in the Middle East on his
arrival in London.
I believe that if we are able
to move with the help of the rest
of the world toward accepting as
a whole the principles of the
Security Councils resolution we
might well be on the way toward
peaceful coexistence, Hussein
said.
His reference was to the
resolution adopted by the
council after the 1967
Arab-Israeli war which called for
the withdrawal of Israeli troops
from occupied Arab territories.
The United States, Britain,
France and the Soviet Union
already have expressed concern
over increased tensions in the
Mideast. Moscow already is
known to have forwarded a
proposed peace plan to the other
capitals.
The London Sunday
newspaper, the Observer, said
the plan would include the
stationing of peacekeeping
forces, possibly including
American, British, French and
Soviet troops, on both sides of
the Arab-Israeli borders.
Thirty minutes after Hussein
left for London, Beirut
underwent its second mock air
raid in less than 24 hours. Sirens
wailed throughout the city,
police halted all traffic for 15
minutes, and pedestrians were
ordered off the streets. Saturday
night, Lebanon held a 20-minute
blackout as part of new civil
defense precautions against the
possibility of an Israeli air
attack.

VALUES GALORE
from COUCHS
a,'
' f ; V, . :
YOUR store
,Hlf ; OIAG. 721 sq. in. picture
Ijttijiadjj Big-screen for the family to
Bli Metal cabinet in textured Charcoal
HlIWi- iifflip 1 Brown color. Super Video Range Tuning
JSmWI System. 5" x 3" Twin-Cone Speaker.
I fIAJ | 'Add 2 9 /i" to depth for tube cap
-
A O
- t *-
INTRODUCING A REVOLUTIONARY L h CA N f7 / V,odel ZSSBW
NEW IIVINR PRFQFMCP nc cmiMn Features 24-watt peak music power Solid-State Amplifier,
in Sol OF SOUND With Zenith Micro-Touch 2G Tone Arm; Zenith "Stereo
TCIMTU-C Stereo with Precision Automatic 4-Speed Record Changer.
ZENITH S exclusive giant 14 Compact, Portable Cabinet is enhanced in a
rectangular dual speakers beautifully grained Walnut color
$149.55
LOOK WHAT ZENITH'S
MIT INTO A PORTABLE!
WAYS
The ROYAL 16 with 4-pc. gift box
I This unique billfold design lets you take a pocketful of
1 pleasure wherever you go. Plays open or closed with
superb tone.
PAY l2 95
COUCH'S ,nc
* I
'"Where service is our most important product"
608 N. MAIN Ph. 376-7171
1

Monday, January 6, 1960, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6,1969

j.m.IiELDS
ONCE-A-YEAR PRfflSfi
WINTER SALE *f
LEWIS
l-BROADWAYsiroi^T^HH^fil^^B
I* MOVIES CHILDRENS J^pnriii!^7^|
-COUNTRY- SING-A Aliiiur uKtAI i&LL
S- f mmods stars at odr I
1 l~ BMWS mNO I LOWEST PRICE f
~1 (HAWAIIAN II A VMM g
6 11 m II HiaMs ts ArtlsM I
II J I I
VHfl JC7
J * fl*|f ;
h per I I H h
H BOX I I H Schwanns
H f._ ~ Catalogue
om l Vttlvts to 599 I I 479.579
* -p OPE N 9A^^M^SUNDAnNOON^"p!!f""'**""^
.IJCLrIELDS Gin#svill* Located NW 13th St. at 23rd Blvd. mffiHnfcftrerttfcfare
JiALMUJUIig ACRES of free parking s^mnmM|MMl



A TOR CLASSIFIEDS

S FOR SALE |
a £
i\%v; ivXv^^w^V'SvsvAv; ;v;v:v:v:. .:i'
65 Honda 90Excellent condition.
Good transportation. Bell helmet
included. All offers considered. Call
Dave Rogero 376-9129. (A-3t-54-p)
One of the finer things in life Blue
Lustre carpet and upholstery cleaner.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-54-c)
Quick sale! Honda 50 2 years old
step threw frame Helmet included.
Price SIOO. L Call 372-7550.
(A-st-54-p)

Residential lots and small Acreage
plots, reasonable restrictions, 12
miles South or about 15 minutes
drive from University of Florida.
Lake Front Property 11 acres with
nice lot fronting on Lake Annie, 20
miles East of Gainesville. $7,250.
Good terms to approved buyer.
Roberts C. Smith Reg. Real Estate
Broker U.S. Hwy 441 Micanopy, Fla.
Ph. 466-3120. (A-51-2t-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are requiredAiinimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior lo starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
04 K 4
I l I l I lI £
#o2c*22
0 p £ a 2, O
=~ S >
o
z
b- ...
O Q
tt
11,1 U1 b> l\ M
a a a q a "n
di 5T oi oi & a Lh
< < < < < 3
t/t / £
q, *-* *

NJQ £ £ E U
I I ' 2P < # # A mpm
a a a ~ J 2
8 Ilf s
8-,. I 8 Z
3 3 3
mhm
TO
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? q o 5 >
_ o 3 o §**
rn 3 P 0
=&
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. TJ O
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n r
-
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II II li I

FOR RENT M
Trailer 8x42: AC-Ch furnished
carpeting 1 br. 378-2039 after 6 P.M.
(B-st-54-p)
Trailer 8x42: AC-Ch furnished
carpeting lbr. 378-2039 after 6
p.m.(B-st-54-p)
Must sub-lease 1-br furn apt for
winter quarter. No lease. Free
utilities except gas. Two blocks from
grad lib. SBO mo. 116 NW 16
St.(B-2t-51-p)
Must sublease in Williamsburg. Best
in Gville. 2 bedroom, 2 bath
complete, dishwasher, tube. Call
Doug, 376-0362. One person. (B-2t-5l
-P)
interning. Must sublet my share 2
BDR. apt. from Jan. to March or
June. Call immed. for $40.00 mo.
rate. Call Linda 378-4219. Univ.
Gardens. Heat/Pool/Air. (B-3t-54-p)

Monday, January 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
x-:-r.v.y.?.*x*x-x-x*x*x **" > xwxwS'.v^
All panelled 2 bdrm furnished house
central heat. Sunken living room.
Just redecorated. Convenient to
campus. Available on or before Jan
Ist. $l5O for 3 $l6O for 4 Call Mrs.
Albertson at Town & Country Realty
3764664. (B-3t-50-p)
a
College Terrace adjacent to
University, 6 months lease available
now to June 15th. Ramp parking
some under cover, pool, A-C,
elevator. $345. quarter single, or
$375 quarter double occup. Utilities
included. May pay monthly.
378-2221. (B-4t-54-p)
I
| WANTED l
1 female roommate, over 21, to share
2 bdrjTi. apt. close to Med Center
57.20/mo. Call Kathy 378-8637 after
5 p.m4C-2t-51-p)
v
Housewife will iron in your home or
mine, free repairs, Call before ten
p.m. 372-5269. (C-47-4t-p)
i
Law or grad student wanted to spare
3-bedroom furnished house. Must be
quiet, neat. Call Bill in early evening
at 378-2261. $75-month.
(C-2t-54-p)
Female roommate to share
one-bedroom lux. Apt in Gator Town
Apts. Prefer grad student or girl over
21. Call after 5:30 372-0117, day:
3920143. (C-lt-52-p)
Female roommate wanted Village
Park, winter and or spring low rent.
Phone 378-0933 after 5. (C-st-54-p)
* -V
Roommate wanted for one bedroom
apt. one block East of law school.
SSO/mo. plus utilities. Call Debbi at
372-8248 after 1. (C-st-54-p)
' -
NEAR CAMPUS very nice 2
bedroom duplex. Need 3rd. female
roommate $45/mo. plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 372-2048 after 6:00. (C-st-54-p)
HELP WANTED I
Female subjects needed for speech
experiment. Must be native English
speaking, free of voice defects and in
the age group 30-39 or 50-59. $2.00.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway
Comm. Science Lab. 392-2049.
(E-10t-54-c)
Listeners wanted Will pay $1.50 for
1 hr. session or $2.50 for IV2 hour
session. Must be native English
speaking and have normal hearing.
Please call Charlotte Hardaway,
University 392-4029.
-

M G M presents
the John Frankenheimer-
Edward Lewis Production of
the fixer
Based on the Pulitzer
Prize winning novel
by Bernard Malamud.
jPsTARTS
r-; 11 JAN. IO
|M| V Metiocoloi

Page 13

HELP WANTED -f
;:.x.x-x*X-x-i*:-:x-x-x-!-x-v v-V"V ***- ;v. x*xM

Delivery boys wanted. Larrys Pore
Boy Sandwich Shop. Transportation
provided. Flexible hours. Apply in
person. 1029 West University Ave.
(E-st-54-p)
... /
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. National parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
SI.OO to Arnold Agepcy. 206 East
Main Rexburg, Idaho, 83440. Money
back guarantee. (E i 7t-50-p) <
Vv
Students: need work? Rathskeller
needs bus boys. Flexible hours.
Apply at activities desk, 3rd. floor,
Reitz Union. (E-2t-54-c)
Students, Faculty, Staff: Have any
talent? Come to the Rathskeller
auditions. Apply activities desk 3rd
floor, Reitz Union. (E-4t-54-c)
Students wanted for position as
bartender. Must be at least 21. Apply
at activities desk, 3rd floor Reitz
Union. (E-2t-54-c)
Wanted: Responsible students for
crowd control in Rathskeller. Must
be at least 21. Night hours. Apply at
Student Activities Desk 3rd floor,
Reitz Union. (E-2t-54-c)
\
;.?o:*x<.vv.% , ;*x x-x*xx-x.ssvx x*x x :*:*f:
PERSONAL
&
Friendly coeds, at least 21, wanted
for glamorous jobs as Rathskeller
Frauleins. Come to the tea in the
main cafeteria Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
for more information and exciting
details. (J-lt-54-c)
>.vxvx*x-x-:-sv.v.v;rt*x-x < x*x-X"X.v.vx x^i
SERVICES |
:'>x'v ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical / systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SW Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-ts-54-C)
I nwmi alum dan 1
RAQUELWELCH blocker!
I 7:07 & 10:59 C QLM I
I I
M I WOT ADMITTED UNLESS ACCOMPANIED I
I m |bt pawewt or adult guardian |
also ANN MARGRET-BING CROSS yB
1ooin "STAGECQACH'coLOtJ

I *lll *1 ;I I,PT BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
SHOW STARTS 7:00
T STARTS TODAY
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
MIA FARROW more haunted than in "Rosemary's Baby"
[£| "SECRET CEREMONY CMNICOIOII
********[ROBfeT MItCHUM
pr, aisoat tony "SWEET
u 9*05 FRANCIOSA in RIDE"

Use our handy
mall In order
form.

SERVICES
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-54-c)
WANT
Z-l-P-P-Y
RESULTS?
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
sum
L J
U THRU"
TUES
3:00.5:00
7:05.9:15



Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6,1969

Co

Want to meet the Florida men
Who neecl no Introduction ...
And get paid while doing it.
become a JUtljsikeUer frauletn
*j .
M
Find out how at the Tea,
tomorrow at 7:30 P. M. in
the Main Cafeteria
.. } c r n *-
Rathskeller

.-. _
FEEL
H an AM fl|
AFTER YOU LEAVE
THE BOOKSTORES?
. <*
The object of every mistake
is not to make it TWICE!
a '
j*
We Sell At Prices
The Bookstores Couldnt ...
We Buy At Prices
The Bookstores Wouldnt
- t-
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
BOOK EXCHANGE
; i '.. ' T ' . .. r ; .. .. .\
REITZ UNION Rm 118
THROUGH FRIDAY JAN. 10
WILL RE-OPEN AT TERMS END

>UU U
Campus Crier
\ sponsored fry Student Government.
l\ lj Lfu ir^u >nJtJll>njlJ i_ji< n*-* >#!< lonjmnryw
/
/- \
{ <*.

, STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRESENTS...

-r' ' >
..The H
Haguem
Philharmonic
WILLEM VAN OTTERLOO
Conductor
(102 MUSICIANS)
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GYM
SUNDAY JANUARY 12, 4:00 P.M.
, : _< ;
Faculty, Staff, General Public
$3.00, $1.75, $1.25
' t
University of Florida Students
$2.50, sl^o,sl.oo
UNDER THE GRACIOUS PATRONAGE OF
HER MAJESTY QUEEN JULIANA OF THE NETHERLANDS
- i



(Prof Wants |
| Free Speech, j
(Not Violence)
j: Free speech as an
: alternative to violence is the
jj concern of Dr. D. E. Williams,
£ professor of speech at UF and $
secretary of the Research
Committee on Contemporary
:j Public Address for the Speech :j:
£ Association of America :*i
| (SAA). |
He expressed this concern
* in a SAA symposium
: newsletter published recently
on The Speech Teacher and
ft the Violent Society.
The newsletter warned:
$ Whenever citizens feel $
V .'t
Â¥ alienated from the ordered :
V *
ft processes of republican
x government, that government j:
operates under a profound :
handicap.*
% Speaking of unrest and £
£ violence, both in the cities J
j:j and on college campuses, he £
$ urged classroom teachers to £
Point out the effects of £
frozen, unrelenting
polarization which tempts the £
contesting parties to let force
and counter-force decide the £
dispute. : :
£1
* ml, HI
a| 9 9
M H s
: ;B9Hr : : :
x
5 DR. D. E. WILLIAMS
... Free speech

SgZAHUT\
_ -v
or Foster Service Sun. Thru Thurs. tHrnntrh M
ot.i, 20 Minut.s 11:3012:30 A.M. T 0 J
.1 Fri. & Sat. Januarv3l^^^^

University College Launches
Undergrad Seminar Program

.. Student power is a positive
force in the University College,
says Dr. Franklin A. Doty, dean
of the undergraduate unit at UF.
As a direct result of a
proposal from its Student
Council, the college will launch a
new series of freshman-sopho freshman-sophomore
more freshman-sophomore seminars during the winter
quarter, beginning Monday.
The seminars will have no
tests and no texts are required.
Students asked for a chance
for a little less structured class,
with more individual work in the
tutorial manner, explains Dean
Doty.
He adds, The seminars will
extend the opportunity for
elective general education. The
new program is designed to
prepare the underclassman for
the research and papers required
in the upper division of the
University.
The new seminars will require
both intensive individual
research and group projects.
The first two seminars offered
each will be worth four credits.
Registration will be limited to
15 students in each seminar,
with the approval of an advisor
and permission of the instructor
required for admission.
Hava r,
, / Your Generator
I OVERHAULED Special |
SASO j
INCLABOM
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
90S NW S* AVE. GAINESVILLE
MON.-MI. S AM-7PM SAT. TIL 9 PM
379-4011

Two of University Colleges
seven departments will
participate in the original
seminars, approved this week by
the colleges Curriculum
Committee.
The first seminars include
social sciences with Man-Land
Relationships: An Investigation
of Human Ecology and
physical sciences: Problem
Solving in Research
Laboratories.
Dr. Guy C. Omer Jr.,
professor and chairman of the

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Physical Sciences Department,
will conduct the problem solving
seminar.
Students will participate in
laboratory research including
microbiology, physics and
mechanical engineering.
Dean Doty describes this
seminar as learning to build
from experimentation to
hypothesis, to theory to fact.
Dr. Charles A. Hoffman Jr.,
assistant professor of social
sciences, will direct the ecology
seminar.

Monday. January 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Dr. Thomas Emmel, assistant
professor of biological sciences,
is preparing a seminar for the
spring quarter. His topic wi)Lbe
Human Population Problems.
The other four departments
are considering seminars. These
are: English, humanities, logic
and fundamental mathematics.
Dean Doty suggests that
interested students check with
advisors for admission. Seminars
may be added to completed
schedules.
The seminars are not open to
first quarter freshmen.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6,1969

{Masked Studentsj
| Test 'Flu Filters |
;5 -By GAYLE McELROY *}
I Alligator Staff Writer J;
jj Masked students scattered among classrooms afe all a part of :j:
jj an experimental operation by a team of campus physicians in ij:
jj curbing the Hong Kong flu. ijj
ij Students living in the Jennings dorm area are being asked to ijj
ij participate in the month-long experiment in which the wearers jjj
jj£ will test the effectiveness of the light blue paper masks that jjj
jij cover the nose and mouth area. jjj
j:j The surgical masks are designed to filter out airborne droplets jjj
;j of saliva which may contain the flu virus. The team hopes to jj:
jij discover whether wearing the masks can be effective in jj
ij preventing epidemics. jj:
ij Medical students began the experiment Thursday and were jj
jij asked not to take the masks off in the presence of any jj
ij contaminated air. A few practical problems encountered ;j
| include smoking, eating and kissing. £
ij We are asking students to wear the masks all times in j:j
j public, said Dr. Wilmer Coggins, director of student health j:j
ij and only to take them off in the privacy of their rooms. jij
ij The medical students have found that it isnt practical to jij
ij: wear the masks propped up on their noses while eating, he said jij
ij so at that time the students can remove them. jij
ij Students who participated in a December project to get Hong jij
ij: Kong flu vaccine will be excluded from this study. Some of the jjj
jjj volunteers will not wear masks to provide doctors with a control jj:
jjj study group. jjj
jjj Specialists in the College of Medicine predict that by jjj
jjj mid-January the influenza epidemic, now affecting other parts :j:
j:j of the United States will infect more than 30 per cent of the :j:
jjj student body. :j:
jjj Coggins accredits this in part to students who went north for :j:
jij the holidays and were subjected to the virus. jjj
jij There obviously is a need to develop and evaluate simple :ji
jji readily available means of protection against such diseases, :ji
jjj doctors told students in a letter. :ji
jjj Working with Coggins in the experiment are Drs. Parker A. jji
jjj Small Jr., Leighton Cluff, Joseph E. Johnson and Robert :ji
jjj Waldman. ji
jjj We feel this may be a simple, inexpensive way to prevent a ji
jjj flu epidemic on campus. Cooperation of students in entering £
jjj into this study is extremely important, Coggins said. j:
, :y.y.v.%v.w.v.y.v.v.xvv.v.v.v.;.;.v.v.v.;.>;.>v.;.x.>>v.>v.>v.y.y.v.y.y.y.y. .v.v..
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UF Gallery To Highlight Faculty

Environment is a hard act
to follow. The homemade
psychedelic installation, the
December exhibit at the UF
Gallery, broke all University
Gallery attendance records. Its
sights, sounds and sensations
drew 1,343 persons in a single
day.
.Created on a shoestring
budget, Environment was the
brain child of design students of
the UFs Department of
Architecture.
Now its the art facultys turn.
Having first opened on
Sunday at 4 p.m. in the
University Gallery, the 4th
Annual Art Faculty Exhibition
will be on display through Jan.
31.
Gallery Director Roy C.
Craven Jr. terms the show, One
of the Gallerys most diverse,
stimulating and professional
displays of contemporary art.
The 1969 showing features 19
artists, the largest number ever
presented, says Craven. Almost a
third of the exhibitors are new
faculty members.
A second exhibit opens today
in the Universitys Teaching

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Gallery titled The Art of the
City. It presents 20 projects
representing a spectrum of
spirited and imaginary
approaches to contemporary
problems of urban environment.
The show spans nearly 50

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years in time and includes
examples from the United
States, Canada, France and
Great Britain.
The Art of the City will run
through Jan. 31.



RFWgWS
_____ <
'The Brotherhood 1 j
Unimaginative Show

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
The Mafia just aint what it
used to be. This is the
statement made by The
Brotherhood, now playing at
the Plaza 11.
The movie contrasts the old
guard of former important
in the Mafia and
current syndicate powerfuls. In
the middle is Frank Ginetti
haunted by memories of his
father and the old days and
pressured by the progressive new
wave to either follow or be left
behind.
Franks brother Vince, an
army veteran and a college
graduate, joins the Brotherhood
on the recommendation of his
prominent brother. However,
soon swept by the modem ways
of crime, Vince and his brother
become enemies to the point
of Franks murder at the end of
the film.
The old Mafia was concerned
with vengeance against those
who harmed or threatened the
Brotherhood and protecting its
own. The new syndicate survives
as a unit only by mass greed and
general insecurity. Therefore,
the audience can understand the
murder Frank commits as being
one for the old Brotherhood.
The movie as a whole is a
little film. One gets the
uneasy feeling throughout it that
there is not enough substance to
the story.
Told entirely from the
perspective of a man inside the
syndicate, contact with the law
is conspicuously absent. Even if
the viewer could accept the
everyday life of a criminal of
this type as being so devoid of
adversaries outside of his own


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group and were to look at it as
an inside expose on the home
life of a Syndicate man, the
story is still shallow.
The wives of the respective
brothers are too mute and too
unquestioning to be believable.
Vinces ambitions are hardly
brought out enough to justify
the murdering of his brother,
and, what was meant to show
the vice that the members of the
Brotherhood are caught in
comes across as more frustrating
than unbelievable.
Strange as it may sound, Kirk
Douglas portrayal of Frank is
done with much gusto and the
hearty nostalgic, loving character
dominates the story as Douglas
_ turns in undoubtedly the best
performance.
Irene Papas as his adoring wife
is concerned but not
outstanding. Alex Cord as
brother Vince deserves
worst-acting award for his
tight-lipped unexpressive
performance.
Unimaginative and incomplete
The Brotherhood is but
there was probably sincerity in
its production. Perhaps a great
story was lost between the
original conception and the final
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Monday, January 6,1908, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator. Monday, January 6,1969

Art Show 'Fresh, Vital

By ROY C. CRAVEN, JR.
University Gallery Director
Last month, for a shorter display than we had
hoped for, the Gallery featured one of its most
unique and successful showings: The
Environment. This homemade installation, created
on a shoestring budget, by the Design Students of
the University of Floridas Department of
Architecture, broke all University Gallery
attendance records by drawing 1343 persons in a
single day.
Again this month, to start the New Year off in
the most exciting manner we know, the Gallery
presents another major event drawn from our own
local art resources: The Annual Art Faculty
Exhibition. This exhibition for the past four years
has proved to be one of the Gallerys most diverse,
stimulating and professional displays of
contemporary art, and there is no reason to expect
less this year. In fact, with the continuing growth of
the University of Floridas Art Departments
program, this years show will feature the largest
number of teacher/artists yet presented.
Most of the nineteen artists exhibiting will
already be well known to the Gainesville audience,
but the following artists work will be on view this
year for the first time: Stephen L. Hodges, Leonard
E. Kesl, Ronald Kraver, Jon Petruchyk, Kathran
Siegal Petruchyk, and Douglas Prince.
Other artists exhibiting are: Roy C. Craven, Jr.,
Hollis H. Holbrook, Stuart R.; Purser, Hiram D.
Williams, J.G. Naylor, Jerry N. Uelsmann. Phillip A.

DUBS ... A NEW LOOK,
AND
VIC WATERS and THE W ft.
ENTERTAINERS Here for a limited 4-day THE ORANGE PEEL
promotional tour for Capitol Records. You wont Direct from their record-breaking performances
want to miss this U-man show. at ,he Blwe Room in St. Petersburg.
> o f \' k
Jan. 6th thru 9th. |
ill i 3 , j '*
albums to their credit. Fast becoming the nations
leading attraction from coast to coast. I
Hiway 441 N. at N.W. 13th I

Ward, Kenneth A. Kerslake, Jack Nichelson, Robert
C. Skelley, Bernard Francis Voichysonk, John Ward,
and James W. Sajovic.
Since this exhibition is a function of the
Department of Art it is appropriate here to present
Chairman Eugene E. Grissoms comments on this
years show.
* >
The current exhibition projects an unusual
amount of freshness and vitality which can be
traced to the fact that many of the established
faculty are working in new directions and in some
cases are involved in exploring different media that
they have been associated with in past exhibitions.
In addition, the largest number of new faculty
to be introduced in any one annual exhibition
accounts for almost a third of the total exhibitors.
This new group brings an abundance of both youth
and experience to the established faculty and
represents artistic commitments as widely divergent
as the geographical locations from which they
eminate.
The Fourth Annual Faculty Exhibition
continues to serve its traditional role by reporting
evidence of its research to the students and faculty
and by providing the public at large with the
opportunity to make personal contact with
contemporary art developments.
This exhibition will be on display through Friday,
Jan. 31st. The University Gallery is open free to the
public Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. and on Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. It is
closed Mondays and holidays.

fl- IN M Mft
1 I isi
Gallery On 13th Street
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Eamelot
(At Westgate)
Professional Management by:
Ernest Tew Realty ? Inc.
Resident Manager 373"0296



Entertainment Calendar Offers Full Quarter

By TEDREMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
UF has many entertainment
features on tap for the winter
quarter. Various campus
organizations will sponsor
everything from rising national
politicians to an internationally internationallyknown
known internationallyknown ballet company.
The quarter begins with
music, a speaker and drama in
January. The Hague
Philharmonic Symphony will be
here Jan. 12 courtesy of Student
Government Productions.
The new Reitz Union
Rathskellar opens the weekend
of Jan. 18 with a three night run
of Your Fathers Mustache, a
nightclub carabet group direct
from New York and New
Orleans. Father lan & Caroline
Mitchell, a folksinging Episcopal
priest and his wife who visited
UF during the summer quarter,
will be back again Jan. 19 during
Religion in Life Week.
The Union Board Forums
Committee is bringing M.
Philippi T. de Vosjalf to speak
Jan. 30. The next day begins the
two-day run of the Florida
Players production of
Telemachus Clay.
February begins with the
Union Board Fine Arts
Committee presenting the
Preservation Hall Jazz Band in
concert Feb. 1. SG Productions
is bringing the long-run
Broadway musical Man of La
Mancha Feb. 6.
The weekend of Accent will
bring Julian Bond of 1968
Democratic Convention fame
Feb. 7 and Senator Wayne Morse
Feb. 8. The UF Symphony
Orchestra will perform Feb. 16
in University Auditorium. Feb.
19 will find the Gainesville Civit?
Ballet performing in the MSB
Auditorium.
Gary Pueket and the Union
Gap& Godfrey Cambridge will
be featured, at IFC Winter
Frolics Feb. 21. The UF Music
Department will present the
Gator Variety Bands 19th
Abolish Marriage
vThe Oneida Community,
founded in 1848 in Madison
County, N.Y., abolished formal
marriage.

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Annual Jazz Concert Feb. 25.
The Florida Players weekihg
production of After the Rain
begins its run Feb. 24.
*
SG will bring the Ruth Page
International Ballet Company
March 3 to begin the third
month of entertainment. Florida
Players last performance is
scheduled for March 7 through
March 9. They will present a
three-day run of T.S. Eliots
Murder in the Cathedral, the
story of Thomas Becket. SG will
feature Van Clibum, noted
pianist, March 16 in the winter
quarters last production.
The Union Board Films
Committee has many
outstanding movies planned
during the winter quarter.
oekto^fcolri^ w jJvl
STARTS FRI.
JAN. 10
. .. v.vv.-.-. vwQbhQQOR( jOHQp >9BB r
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A chained Alan Bates, in his
role as Yakov Bok, falsely ac accused
cused accused of having murdered a
small child in the Tzarist Rus Russian
sian Russian city of Kiev, is taken to
the scene of the crime in
MGM's The Fixer, screen
version of Bernard Malamud's
heroic novel, 1967 winner of
both the Pulitzer Prize and the
National Book Award for fic fici
i fici tion. Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Grif Griffith,
fith, Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman, lan
Holm, David Warner and Carol
White also star in the John
i Frankenheimer-Edward Lewis
i production, filmed on locations
I in Hungary in Metrocolor.
fpmrzMmm
LLiliLLldj

FROM POLITICIANS TO BALLET

Casino Royale starring Peter
Sellers, Ursula Andress and
David Niven will be playing Jan.
17. Steve McQueen, Brian Keith,
Martin Landau and Suzanne
Pleshette will play in Nevada
Smith Feb. 7 and 8.
Alfie with Michael Caine
and Shelly Winters will be
playing Feb. 28 and March 1.

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La Boheme, an opera studied
in comprehensive humanities,
will be shown March 6 through
9.
If you had rather entertain
yourself, the Union Board
Continuing Projects Committee
is sponsoring several lessons in
the union. There will be classes
in Painting for Fun, Dancing,

Monday, January 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Beginning Bridge, Self-Defense
for Women and Charm offered
thoughout the winter quarter.
Further information concerning
these classes can be obtained in
room 310 of the Union or by
calling 392-1655.
Study anyone?

Page 19



Page 20

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6,1968

Potpourri (the t is silent) is a general mixture of often disparate
or unrelated materials or subject matter.
* *
Four Gators participated in post-season All-Star games, nobody
made the headlines but just the same they were selected. Larry Rentz
and Guy Dennis were in Miami for the North-South Shrine game.
Larry was the starting quarterback for the South, but reinjured
himself during the game and didnt get to see it through. Guy did play
without getting hurt, and tried to show the pros he can make it. Larry
Smith and Jim Yarbrough were over in Tampa for the first American
Bowl game. Big Jim caught two of the three passes thrown to him and
Larry, used most of the afternoon as a blocking back, gained some
crucial short yardage for the South in a losing effort.
* *
The Gators signed their first black football player, Leonard George,
5-foot- 11, 165-pound tailback who scored 23 touchdowns for Tampa
Jesuit High this season. They also signed Willie Jackson, another
outstanding black athlete who played at Valley Forge Academy in
Philadelphia. There are a couple more possibilities still in the
undecided stage. The Athletic Department has pulled its finest move
by signing more than one black football player, congratulations.
** v ~
Albert was four for seven in his bowl game predictions. His winners
were Ohio State, Penn State, Mississippi and Texas, and the losers
were Alabama, FSU, and Georgia. That was below the season average,
but then the predictions were made almost two weeks before the
games.
*
The Gator Cagers are 6-2 after a shaky start and are currently tied
for second place in the Southeastern Conference. Vandy comes to
town tonight, a win would be a nice welcome, so would a big turnout
by the students.
* *
Has anybody here seen George C. Wallace?
* *
Golf, track, swimming, baseball and tennis all get started this
quarter. All the Gators return from winning seasons and should do as
well this year.
* *
The golf team is the current NCAA champ, the tennis team finished
fourth in NCAA and the swimming team was 12th. The baseball team
won the SEC Easterri Division last year.
* *
A recent poll by football coaches, players and writers concluded
that the greatest game ever played was the 1958 Colts-Giants NFL
championship game. In that game Baltimore tied the score on a
last-second field goal, and then won in sudden-death overtime.
* *
Sport Magazine All-American team included Lew Alcindor, Jo Jo
White, Pete Maravich, Calvin Murphy and Bob Lanier. It seems they
went after scorers instead of rebounders and playmakers, with an
emphasis on scoring it should be an exciting year.
* *
Fifteen of the 16 .300 hitters in the major leagues in 1967 posted
lower averages in 1968. The only player to raise his average was
Cincinnattis Pete Rose who went from .301 to .335, the league
leader. The other fifteen dropped an average of 46 points per man. I
guess it was the year of the pitcher.
* *
The Alligator Sports Department will accept letters to the editor or
just questions by you sports fans. We reserve the right to edit all
letters we receive in the interest of space. We will make the letters a
weekly feature. Address them to Alligator Sports Editor, Rm. 330,
Reitz Union.
UF Mermen Open
With Conquest Os USF

The UF Gators opened their
1969 swimming season Saturday
with a 61-49 win over the
University of South Florida in a
meet that wasnt as close as the
score indicates.
Results: 400 yard medley relay.
Florida, 3:47.4. 1,000 yard freestyle:
Bob Appleget (UF), 11:34.1; Phil
Sheehe (UF); Len Smally (USF).
200 yard freestyle: Bruce Williams
(UF) 1:47.6; Dave Naffziger (USF).
50 yard freestyle: Steve Hariston
(UF) 22.4; Dave Keene (USF); Skip
Volves (UF).
200 yard individual medley: Fred
French (UF) 2:15.5; Alan Stelter
(USF).
One Meter Diving: Bob Link (UF)
206.7; Rico Maschino (USF); Jeff
Montgomery (UF); Bob Pfaff (USF).
200 yard butterfly: Andy
McPherson (UF) 2:06.9; Joe
Lewkowicy (USF); Terry Brazel
(USF).
100 yard freestyle: David Keene
(USF) 50.8; Skip Volves (UF); Dave
Naffziger (USF).
200 yard backstroke: Bob Bridges
(UF) 2:10.5; Pete Kenning (USF);
Mike McNaughton (USF).
500 yard freestyle: Bruce Page

Potpourri
By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor

(UF) 5:20.5; Len Smally (USF).
200 yard breaststroke: Bill Kelley
(USF) 2:26.8; Alan Stalter (USF);
Fred French (UF).
Three Meter Diving: Bob Link
(UF) 233.4; Rico Maschino (USF);
Bob Pfaff (USF).
400 yard freestyle relay: USF.
SEC RACE
W L Pet.
Kentucky 1 0 1.000
FLORIDA 2 1 .667
LSU 2 1 .66.7
Georgia 2 1 .667
Miss. State 2 1 .667
Vanderbilt 11 .500
Alabama 1 2 .333
Auburn 1 2 .333
Tennessee 0 1 .000
Mississippi 0 2 .000
TODAY
Vanderbilt at FLORIDA
Auburn at Georgia
Kentucky at Miss. State
Tennessee at Mississippi

SEC RACE TIGHTENS

Florida Out To Overthrow
Vanderbilts Democracy

Coach Tommy Bartletts'
basketball Gators may not be
facing the Southeastern
Conferences best cage squad
tonight but they will be facing
the most democratic.
Vanderbilt Head Coach Roy
Skinner, who says this is a
rebuilding year for his team,
claims he is letting his players
pick the starting lineup by secret
ballot.
Naturally, I count the votes,
but this is an interesting way to
select a starting team from a list
of inexperienced ball players.
Bartlett and his team, fresh
from their opening conference
win Saturday over Auburn, will
try to keep the record clean
Monday night at 7:45 at Florida
Gym against hot-cold Vandy
(1-1 in conference play.)
When we took the first
ballot, explains Skinner, it
looked like cliques were
developing and that friends were
going to start rather than the
best players. The sophomores
seemed to stick together.
Seven of the eleven Vandy

jiPy
*" lift JFM P* |L_jk yf
SaiPdPMHPMMi J| ft
. % f sHk ~
GUS MUSTELIER
> Too Many Hands Spoil What?
if THE CUPBOARD AVV.v.vw.y/Avv.y.v.v.y.y.y.y.-.y.'.'jj
1968 Athletic Awards
t By BILL DUNN $
Assistant Sports Editor '****''*'
Before the New Year can get too far along, the Alligator sports staff
must present its yearly awards for 1968:
the I call em like I see em Award to Gator sportscaster Otis
Boggs and sidekick Ted Covington.
the Little 01 Winemaker Award to Dr. Robert Cade.
the Shopping Too Early Award to Wayne Barfield and Terry
Morris.
the Nepotism Award to Jackie Eckdahl, Boyd Welsch, Jr. and
Dave Fuller, Jr.
the Archives Antique Award to the Florida Swimming Pool
and Florida Gymnasium.
the Whats a Touchdown Award to journalism professor H. G.
Buddy Davis.
the Objectivity is our Watchword Award to the Gainesville Sun
and the Tallahassee Democrat.
the Pigskin and Corset-Seer Award to Playboy Magazine.
the Elmers Glue Award to the offensive football unit for its 23
fumbles (Where are you Dr. Cade when we really need you?).
the Look at me now Award to Harmon Wages, Kay
Stephenson, and Pepper Rogers.
And now for some superlatives:
most likely to succeed to Larry Smith.
most hours worked overtime to football trainer Brady
Greathouse.
least influential chapter of the alumni association... Pahokee.
shortest television show of the year. *.. Florida Football
Highlights after the Georgia game.
most popular... Ray Dorman, director of student ticket policy,
most likely to be succeeded... Senator L. K. Edwards as Gator
Growl emcee.

The
Florida
Alligator
players are sophomores but
returning center Bob Bundy
(6-9) and All-SEC guai:d Tommy
Hagen are sure to start despite
Vandys electoral college.
The top sophomore is Thorpe
Webber, an agressive 6-7 forward
whos been hitting around 15
points per game. Center Bundy,
the teams leading scorer, should
provide Gator center Neal Walk
with formidable opposition.
The Gators topped Vandy
twice last year by a total
difference in socres of eight
points, an indication of the tight
rivalry between the teams over

the years, UF has won 12;
Vandy 18.
The Gator frosh will face the
Baby Commodores and 7-foot-4
Steve Turner, the nations tallest
player (some say he is the
worlds largest), at 5:45 p.m. in
the preliminary.
On-again, off-again Georgia
got back on its game Saturday
night, blasting Vanderbilt
104-80, and jumping into the
thick of the Southeastern
Conference race after the first
full week of conference activity.
Louisiana State, beaten only
once early in the season and a
giant killer in recent weeks, took
an 85-82 setback from lowly
Alabama despite 42 points by
Pete Maravich. The Tigers loss,
their First in conference play,
dropped them into a second
place tie with Georgia.
Kentucky, as expected,
jumped into the conference lead
after only one game, but had
unexpected difficulty in bringing
off a 69-59 victory over
stubborn Mississippi. Earlier in
the week, the Wildcats, ranked
among the nations top five
teams all season, dropped a
69-65 shocker to Wisconsin.
Georgias Bulldogs, winners of
their first five games of the
season, dropped their next three
while their stock fell sharply
with each loss.
Maravich, who maintained his
46.3 nation-leading average, hit
only 19 of 49 shots from the
field and his teammates could do
no better as LSU fell to the
Crimson Tide, previously winless
in two conference games.
Kentucky, trailing 31-28 at
halftime, grabbed the lead with
five minutes remaining and
edged Mississippi, 69-59. The
victory boosted the Wildcats
into the top SEC spot with a 1-0
record. They are the only team
still undefeated in conference
play.
Tennessee, expected to be a
conference power, fell 58-57 to
Mississippi State and Florida,
after edging Bucknell 74-70
early in the week, beat Auburn,
68-59 behind Neal Walks 22
points and 16 rebounds in
conference play.
Chen Wins
EG Citation
Wayne H. Chen, professor and
chairman of the UF Department
of Electrical Engineering, has
been named a fellow of the
Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers.
The grade of fellow is one of
the highest professional
distinctions and is conferred
only upon a person of
outstanding qualifications and
experience in the fields of
electrical engineering,
electronics, radio, and allied
branches of engineering. s
The award; which was
presented for contributions in
the fields of network theory and
switching circuits, and for
vigorous leadership in
engineering education, became
effective Jan. 1.
Chen joined the faculty of the
Department of Electrical
Engineering in 1952 and became
chairman in 1965.



Gators Survive Auburn. 68-59

UF captured its sixth victory
of the young season Saturday
night as Neal Walk paced the
Gators to an eight point first
half lead over Auburn and some
of the squads smaller players
shone in the second half to
preserve the win, 68-59.
Walk collected 17 points and
13 rebounds in the opening
period as he played one of the
finest halves of his career. The
All-Americans performance led
the thrice-beaten Gators to a
12-point bulge at one time early
in the game.
UFs rout ended shortly after
the intermission when Walk
picked up his fourth personal
foul and Coach Tommy Bartlett
cautiously benched him. With
6-5 Andy Owens the tallest
Gator on the court, Auburn
quickly closed the gap to 31-29.
Boyd Welsch and Ed Lucko
picked up the slack with some
hot outside shooting and, in the
next six minutes, pumped in 14
points between them as the
Gators stretched their lead back
to eight, 47-39.
The Gators managed to open
a 16-point margin at one time as
the team shot at a 42 per cent
clip from the floor, one of their
best efforts of the season.
Walk returned to the game
with five minutes remaining and
led both teams with 22 points
and 16 rebounds. Welsch
finished with 15 and Lucko 13.
UFs victory over Auburn
marked the Gators third straight
win, their longest victory streak
of the season.
After a shaky four-point loss
One-In-Five
NEW YOKK (. UiMJ one
of every five Americans is a
habitual litterbug, according to
the Litter Letter of the Na National
tional National Council of State Garden
Clubs. That adds up to 40 mil million
lion million regular litterbugs, not to
mention those people who oc occasionally
casionally occasionally fall into bad habits.
The Letter says each habit habitual
ual habitual litterbug drops an average
of eight items a day for a
daily litter fallout on the na nation
tion nation of 320 million pieces of
rubbish. The answer is rooted
in lack of understanding of
what litter really is. Vast num numbers
bers numbers of people think they are
mot littering because the things
they discard are small. Thats
the main problem: small,
harmless things are what add
up to the big piles of litter.

LEARN KARATE
AT UNIVERSAL KARATE DOJO, "SCHOOL OF CHAMPIONS"
224 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
WITH DIRK MOSIG, 3rd DAN BLACK BELT
SPARRING, KATA, AND BOARD BREAKING CHAMPION
Hil ii 8
H ' i &%* &$&. ife* J mm
S^-B|jgLg§ ..#
NEW COURSES FOR BEGINNERS START WITH
AN ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY Bth, AT 6:00 PM 244W.UNIV.
CLASSES WILL BE HELD MW F 6:00-7:30 PM
FOR INFORMATION CALL 378-7416
-1

to Jacksonville University in the
opening round of the Sunshine
Classic, UF bounced back to win
the consolation game against
Miami, scoring 111 points.
The Gators began their
Southeastern Conference
schedule after exams with a road
victory over Alabama and a
narrow overtime loss to LSU as
Pete Maravich bombed Florida
for 45 points.
After beating Wisconsin in
:||| v
Fotiou Takes A Down
Intramurals
Dormitory basketball and
independent volleyball headline
the start of intramurals during
the winter quarter. These
activities will begin on Jan. 20th
and the deadline for signing up is
Jan. 14th.
Fraternity action starts on
Jan. 15th with the Reitz Union
Lanes expected to be crowded
with the onset of the Orange and
Blue Bowling.
Engineers and Lawyers will
start on the 27th of this month
with basketball.
The Intramural Department
needs officials for both
volleyball and basketball.
Anyone wishing to register a
team or referee should contact
Ray Rollyson in Room 229
Florida Gym or call 392-0581.

traveled back to Jacksonville for>
another tournament, the Gator
Bowl Invitational. UF again
picked up the consolation
honors as they dropped the
opener to Northwestern and
then defeated Georgia in a game
that does not count in the SEC
standings.
Last New Years Eve, the
Gators began its celebration a
little prematurely and Bucknell
overcame a 16-point Gator lead
to come within two points and
eventually lose by four. This ran
: UFs record to 5-3 before the
Auburn encounter.
Bartlett feels that his team has
not yet played up to par and he
! expects continuous
| improvement as the season
progresses.
I Thus far, Walk has assumed
his role of team leader almost as
well as he did last year. His 23.5

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point scoring average and 15
rebounds per game lead the
other Gator players by wide
margins and rank among the best
in the SEC.
With outside shooters Skip
Lewis, Mike McGinnis and Todd

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Monday, January 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Lalich lost through injury, the
latter for the season, Welsch and
Lucko have stepped in to take
up much of the slack. Welsch has
hit for 39 points in UFs last two
games and Lucko has been in
double figures all season.

Page 21



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6,1969

Page 22

Morton Subs Dallas To 17-13 Win

By CHARLES E. TAYLOR
United Press International
MIAMI Craig Morton,
subbing at quarterback for Don
Meredith, threw a 20-yard
touchdown pass to Craig
Baynham with 2:13 to go in the
third quarter Sunday as the
Dallas Cowboys bounced back
from a 13-point deficit to defeat
the Minnesota Vikings 17-13 in
the ninth annual National
Football League Playoff Bowl.
Morton, who took over for
Meredith in the second 'half
according to a pre-game setup by
Coach o Tom Landry, hit
Baynham with a 21-yard pass
before tossing the go-ahead
strike to Baynham, who caught
the ball between two Viking
defensers.
A poor Minnesota punt
helped set up the Cowboys
winning score, giving Dallas
possession on the Minnesota
41-yard line.
Dallas fell behind 13-0 before
Meredith got the Cowboys
attack moving in the second
quarter.
With heavy rain falling,
Meredith threw a 51-yard
touchdown pass to Bob Hayes,
who outdistanced the Minnesota
defense on a post pattern. The
Cowboys cut the lead to 13-10
when Meredith threw 37-yards
to Lance Rentzel to set up Mike
Clarks 11-yard fieid goal. The
kick came after Meredith failed
three times to pass for the go
ahead score.

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Minnesota moved ahead
quickly in the first quarter when
Bob Bryant took the first Dallas
punt and raced 81 yards for a
touchdown. Earsell Mackbees
interception of a Meredith pass
on the Dallas 47-yard line set up
Fred Cox 37-yard field goal,
giving the Vikings 10-0
advantage.
Statistics
Dallas Minnesota
First Downs 18 15
Rushing Yardage 62 68
Passing Yardage 330 247
Return Yardage 78 173
Passes 20-35-215-35-0
Punts 5-43.6 6-35.3
Fumbles Lost 11
Yards Penalized 20 24
Mackbee also set up
Minnesotas final score of the
game in the first quarter. The
veteran cornerback recovered a
Don Perkins fumble on the
Minnesota five and the Vikings
ended an 80-yard march with
Cox second field goal a 23
yarder.
Meredith, goat of \the
Cowboys loss to Cleveland in
the Eastern Conference

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championship game, was named
the games Most Valuable Player
on offense. He completed 15 of
24 passes for 243 yards in the
half he played.
Sub-quarterback Gary Cuozzo
took over from Joe Kapp for the
Vikings in the second half and
almost pulled it out. Minnesota
drove to the Dallas five-yards
line on Cuozzos 38 yard' pass
to Gene Washington in the last
period, but on the next play,
Jim Lindsey fumbled and Leroy
Jordan recovered for Dallas.
-a
A sparse crowd of 22,961 sat
through pouring rain to watch
the ninth and possibly
last Playoff Bowl.
It was Dallas second
appearance in the Playoff Bowl.
The Cowboys lost to Baltimore
35-3 in 1966. It was Minnesotas
first post-season game.
It was also the last time under
the current contract with the
Orange Bowl committee and the
CBS television network. There is
speculation that the game may
be changed to a playoff between
the runners-up of the American
and National Football League,

who merger is completed in
1970.
Dallas 0 10 7 0 17
Minnesota 13 0 0 0 l3
Minn-Bryant 81 punt return
Cox kick

KEEP YOUR EYES ON GATOR ADS
FOR DOGGONE GREAT VALUES!!
<2>
thirsty
ft GATOR ft
"A WOMAN ONCE DROVE ME TO DRINK
NEVER DID GET TO THANK HER FOR IT
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10 till 2 6 days a week

MinnFG Cox 37.
MinnFG Cox 23.
DalHayes 51 pass from
Meredith Clark kick.
DalFG Clark 11.
Dal-Baynham 20 pass from
Morton Clark kick.
Att22,961.



Paper Gator Bench Jockey
Earns Wages At Falconry

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Aanstant Sports Editor
A falcon, says Noah Websters
big book, is any hawk or bird
of prey trained to hunt and kill
small game.
Being an Atlanta Falcon
professional football player, says
former Florida benchjockey
Harmon Wages, is not much
different except his prey is big.
Professional football is a
business from the start, says
Wages, who played in every
Falcon game this season,
emerging as their second leading
rusher.
Each players job is to
support his family, not to make
friends. Working with these guys
is like working with business
executives. With a major
coaching shakeup and some key
injuries, Wages found himself
fast becoming the
glamour-boy of Atlantas
backfield. And for more than his
looks.
In twelve games he carried the
ball more than 50 times for over
300 yards, caught 12 passes for
150 yards and scored two
touchdowns.
I was a little surprised
myself. I didnt see how Ive
managed to go through the
season without a scratch. Maybe
its because I still drink my
Gatorade.
Marked by Paul Hornungs
renowned No. 5 jersey, Harmon
faces a bright career with a team
with an even brighter future.
Wages claims the Falcons are
hopeful of drafting Florida

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Wages (5), Errol Linden Ramble
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fullback Larry Smith in the
impending player draft.
Theyre all pretty high on
Lany here. We expect O.J.
Simpson to go first to
Philadelphia. Then Leroy Keyes
should go to Buffalo. We have
third choice: I think the Falcons
will take Larry.
After Wages signed with
Atlanta as a free agent
quarterback last May, coaches
were impressed with his
versatility at more than one
position. For awhile he was
considered as a defensive back,
flanker, then running back.
Having been a quarterback, I
think I have a keener sense of
the defenses than most backs.
Our other running back Perry
Lee Dunn (a former Mississippi
quarterback) agrees.
I still work at quarterback
once a week but will not play
there unless our top two men get
hurt.
Physically, the pros are
rougher. The defensive line is the
main difference. The defenders
are as quick as the offensive
backs. The holes are open about
half the time they would be in
college.
Mentally, its easier to get up
for a college game. Its hard to
stay high for all your pro games
especially when youre in the
middle of a long 18-game
schedule.
The pro coaching staffs, says
Wages, offer much more
personal work than in college.
He says the head coaching job is
more ( closely attached to the
players whereas in college its

more of an administrative and
coordinating task.
After a 44-0 lashing at the
hands of Baltimore, Wages
predicts the Colts will take the
Super Bowl against anybody.
Ive never been hit so hard in
all my life.
This quarter, Wages is back in
Gainesville rooming with Gator
flanker Gene Peek and
completing his final quarter as a
finance major.
Perhaps he will be passing
along to Head Coach Ray Graves
how he manages to run through
a season of organized mayhem
called professional football
without a scratch.
It would be valuable advice, as
it is obvious he is no Paper
Falcon.

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Page 23



Page 24

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 6, 1969

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