Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Regents Ask Additional Hospital Funds

By DAVE OSIER
AtNgtaor Staff Writ*
The Board of Regents has decided
to request supplemental funds to help
the budget-plagued Shands Teaching
Hospital from die state budget
commission.
The Regents Monday asked for
$501,000, which is $400,000 less than
the hospital requested. The money is
necessary, hospital administrators say,
to avert a possible budget crisis,
predicted for early February and
similar to one that arose last Spring.
What the Regents approved was

PacemMter
AH-Amcrioafi

VoL 61, No. 52

Gentry Action
Called Unfair
By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
At Wednesday's teach-in students and faculty members called on
UF authorities to admit they were wrong in the handling of the Lavon
Gentry case.
Gentry was arrested in August when University Police picked him
up for taping Bust the Draft posters on a UF building and was
subsequently turned over to local authorities for prosecution. He
recently lost a battle for a jury trial, and is expected to come before
Gainesville Municipal Court next quarter on charges of willfully and
maliciously defacing a building.
Gentry spoke at the teach-in, describing the circumstances of his
offense and arrest.
Clyde Ellis, 3LW, Student Senate and Action Conference member,
told an estimated 300 participants in the Southern Student Organizing
Committee (SSOC) sponsored teach-in that Gentrys arrest was
selective law enforcement and that authorities should either hold an
open investigation or admit they were wrong.
Probably the most correct analysis of the situation is that the
(SEE GENTRY' PAGE 2)
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... discusses Chicago riots at teach-in

just part of the package, Dr. Samuel
P. Martin, who recently resigned as
provost of the J. HilHs Miller Health
Center of which the hospital is a part,
said. The original request would have
carried us through. i
Martin said he cant really say if the
crisis wOl be averted or if the
requested funds will take up the slack
since nothing is final yet.
A 59-day crisis last spring almost
forced the dosing of the hospital.
The hospitals request for funds is a
result of a number of problems which

The
Florida Alligator

University of Florida, Gainesville

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BRIAN GOODHEIM
HIS OWN COMMERCE

The Gainesville Christmas Parade Wednesday
offered some the sights and sounds of bands,
floats and St. Nicholas himself. For this man it

OConnell Wasnt There,
Questioned ln Absentia

UF President Stephen C. OConnell didnt attend
the Southern Student Organizing Committee
(SSOC) teach-in Wednesday, but he didnt exactly
get off the hook.
Questions* SSOC members planned to ask
OConnell were read aloud and activist Ed Freeman
called for the faculty and students to unite to
legally take power away from do-nothing
administration.
The questions dealt primarily with the handling
of the Lavon Gentry case, asking, for example, why
the university assumed responsibility for two
football players arrested for theft while Gentry
was turned over to local authorities.
They asked OConnell if he, as former Chief
Justice of the Florida Supreme Court, considered
the case an example of selective law enforcement,
and if so, why he had not taken corrective action.
Another question contrasted the discretion of
the University police in turning the participants of
the recent SAE-Sigma Nu late-night fist fight to the
Interfratemity Council local authorities.
Lastly, the members commented indirectly on
OConnell's absence by asking:
Why do you persist in showing your blatant

have been compounded since last
March.
The main issue seems to be the low
percentage of funds the hospital gets
from the state for operating costs.
It is 19.1 per cent, the lowest in the
nation for a comparable situation. For
example, the University of Georgia
receives 80 per cent for its teaching
hospital.
Because of this the hospital has
been forced to absorb the cost of
indigent patient care. Welfare patients
are sent to the hospital from various
state and local agenties which are able

to pay only three-quarters of the cost
A total of $314,000 in delinquent
hospital accounts was written off by
the Regents at their last Gainesville
meeting.
A Joint committee, headed by
James N. Gator Beck, decided to
investigate the problem and in
September held several hearings at the
hospital.
The committee report described
conditions at the hospital as being in a
critical state
It listed four problems facing the
(SEE 'REGENTS* RAGE 18)

offered an opportunity to make soma money
selling balloons and toys to people Mnin the
streets at the Jaycee sponsored much.

disregard for students by refusing to speak to us?**
They answered their own question:
President O'Connell could not be with us
because he had to write his address for the
Christinas tree lighting ceremony tonight.**
Kiker Examined
In Sanity Quest
Psychiatrists have been appointed to examine UF
Professor John E. Kiker Jr., to determine his sanity
now and at the time of his wife's murder on Ofct.
21.
The doctors were appointed by County Judge
John Connell Monday in Gainesville on an oral
motion by Asst. State Atty. Mack Futch.
Kiker, 62, is accused of shooting his wife in the
bathroom of their home. He is being held in the
Alachua County Jail awaiting formal action by the
Alachua County Grand Jury when it convenes for
the winter term.
Kiker has been a member of the UF faculty for
21 years and is chairman of the Environmental
Engineering Department.

America's
Number I
fnlhgg
Daily

Thursday, December 5, 1968



GEORGIA COACH VINCE DOOLEY
.. .the Squelch for Big Thirsts"

Judge Questions Walker Report Motives

CHICAGO (UPI) A chief
federal judge said Wednesday a
special grand jury might well
look into the timing and
motivation behind a report that
charged some police rioted
during the violent disorders of
Democratic National Convention
week.
William J. Campbell, chief
judge of U.S. District Court in
Chicago, suggested the grand
jurors might look into whether
the release of the controversial

Gentry Incident
Declared Unfair
WON M6E ONI
discretion lies with the police and the administration should not
interfere, but this isnt always the case, Ellis said.
He cited the SAE-Signa Nu incident where police resorted to the
use of Mace to quell a fight, then turned the case over to
the Interfraternity Council.
Philosophy Professor James Millikan said it was unbelievable to
him that the UF would participate in such selective law enforcement.
This is a funny kind of university when they send a student to jail
for defacing a building but cannot do anything when one person
defaces another person, he said.
Millikan was referring to UF President Stephen C. OConnells
statement that there was nothing he could do about student hostility,
which led to the withdrawal of a foreign student in November.
OConnell told the Faculty Senate Tuesday an Action Conference
recommendation for a coordinator of minorities was not possible
because there was no such position, Millikan said.
He didnt say there was no money, he said.
Millikan also called on the UF to recognize that students are
exploring and should be protected from the wrath of the people on
the outside.
It should not be the duty of the university to enforce law and
order, but to act as a buffer between members of the university
community and the outside community, he said.
A university has to be a place where people can be different.
Students must be able to explore themselves in order to learn, he
said.
Millikan said the UF does not always take into account that there
is a powerful amount of difference between students and people
outside the university environment.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U tbs official student newspaper of the University of Florida
sad la pattlshed Ova Haas weakly except dnrtac Juae, July and Aucust when It la published
seal-weekly, sad during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official apWoas of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Halts
Ualoa Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 3X601. The Alligator la entered
ke_j*eepd_ claps jnattpr at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 3X601.
Subscription rate it $ 10.00 per year or 13.50 per quarter. r >
The Florida Alligator reserves the ngat to regulate the typographical tone of all adver-
Uaawiria nd to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
Inullt^tnMlrffiT WUI 90 tU r Fame* tor any advertisement
teSdn (I) can day after advertisement appears. The Florida AlligatoTwiTl
mmrnm* tor more than one Incorrect IMon of. adv.rtte.me* schmteled

Walker report Sunday was
designed to influence the grand
jurys own exhaustive
investigation of the riots.
The judge also questioned the
objectivity of the report, labeled
it just the report of one
individual, and expressed doubt
that Daniel Walker, head of the
task force that prepared it, was
qualified in the field of
criminal investigation.
Walker, who submitted the
report to the task forces parent

Bulldog Brew Begets
Bottle Imbibing Battle

By RITCHIE TIDWELL
Alligator Special Writer
Bulldog Punch, the squelch for big thirsts
I being promoted by University of Georgia Coach
1 Vince Dooley, has arrived in Gainesville.
| And the label on the jug reveals ingredients
I almost identical to the controversial Gatorade.
Yes, amidst a three-way impending struggle
for royalty rights to Gatorade between Dr.
Robert Cade, the University of Florida, and the
federal government, comes forth a look-alike,
supposedly same-effect drink and is being sold
around the southern states.
The Punch has the same ingredients as
Gatorade with one exception. Instead of .053
calcium cyclamate used in Gatorade, Braswell
used .05 sodium cyclamate.
A UF chemistry professor said that the two
cyclamates are only artificial sweeteners used in
conjunction with saccharin and that there should
be no noticeable difference in the two.

National Commission on
Violence, sent an open telegram
to Campbell replying to the
judges news conference
statements.
I was given a deadline of
mid-November by the
Presidents National Commission
on Violence, the telegram said.
1 met that deadline. I was
informed that the commission
needed my report in time to
make their interim report to
President Johnson.
The commission decided to
release the report because of its
great public interest. I concurred
in that decision because I felt
that to have the completed
report withheld from the public
would not be in the tradition of
full disclosure which is expected
of governmental operations.
Campbell, speaking at a news
conference, said he was not
directing the grand jury to
investigate the release of the

'Action Absentees

The!* Action Conference members have not
attended any of the four conference meetings:
Harold Aldrich, Kitty Oliver, and Clyde Taylor.
These persons have not attended three of the
four conference meetings: Gary Goodrich, Gree
Jones, Cliff McClelland, and Pete Zinober.

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Yet, Dooley boasted. Now, we know weve
overcome one competitive edge enjoyed by some
of our opponents especially in one of the states
more southern than Georgia!
Gatorade, the beverage developed by UFs Dr
Robert Cade, has a lemon-lime flavor and was
especially formulated to quinch normal thirst
particularly during periods of physical exertion.
It is advertised as the thirst quencher and is for
active people.
Bulldog Punch, formulated by an alumnus of
the University of Georgia, A.M. Braswell Jr., is
advertised as the big squelch for big thirsts for
active people. Braswell manufactures and
bottles the product.
TV ads for the product are almost identical to
the first ads for Gatorade, except that Bulldog
Coach Vince Dooley appears in the commercial
rather than Gator Ray.
Dooley said that team used of Bulldog
Punch has added spirit and vigor to practice
sessions and to the game play of Dooleys Dogs.

Walker report but I assume
they will look into the matter.
The Walker report,
according to all I have read, is
just the report of one individual,
not of the commission, the
judge said. It covers only in
part the matters the grand jury is
going into fully.

Youths Hit Meeting
NEW YORK (UPI) About 50 young people in hippie garb broke
into a New York University auditorium Wednesday and broke up two
speeches, one by New York Times Executive Editor James Reston and
he other by a South Vietnamese United Nations observer.
The youths, who said they were members of the Students for a
Democratic Society, first walked into a meeting on the main floor of
the Washington Square College auditorium where Nguyen Huu Chi
was speaking to about 15 members of the Young Republicans Club.
Chi was hustled away by campus security guards and the crowd
moved upstairs to where Reston was beginning to deliver the colleges
annual Home A. Watts Lecture.
They beat on the auditoriums metal doors, chanting Ho, Ho, Ho
Chi Minh and making it impossible for the crowd of 500 to hear
Reston.

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Deceit** 5 }

Page 2

Sometimes Senators

These senators did not answer role at Tuesday
nights Student Senate meeting: Larry Martin, Bill
Sadowski, John Morton, Bill Modlin, Pat Tidwell,
Howard Foster, Karen Kinnin, Donna Betts, Jan
Dyro, Harriet Halperin, James McGrady, Barbara
Baxter, Bob Marshall, Tom Cone, Steve Bull
(resigned), Jake Schickel and Michele McCarton.

To release the report at this
time, when the grand jury hasnt
completed its investigation, and
without first submitting the
report or seeking its (the grand
jurys) approval might give rise
to a question as to the
motivation and timing of its
release.



Thursday, December 5, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Great Issues And How They Grew

Can a radically-inclined issue find
happiness in a not-so-small Southern
university town? If not happiness, at
least steady work?

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PAMME BREWER
... hearings began to gat to her

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The enigmatic Marshall Jones,
who recently fled campus
trailing clouds of radical glory,
was to controversy what Johnny
Appleseed was to apple trees.
Jones was denied tenure last
year because his conduct
reflected unfavorably upon UF.
The controversy began when
the UF Personnel Board headed
by then UF President J. Wayne
Reitz denied Jones his
continuing contract.
Jones claimed his tenure
denial was a result of his
political beliefs.
Before the controversy arose
Jones name had appeared
infrequently in the news. In
March, 1966, he said, Only by
challenging the political process
to act on central questions of
our times can we make
democracy a reality as well as a
philosophy that we say we
believe in.
In June, 1963, Jones spent
five days in St. Augustine jail for
participating in civil rights
demonstrations there.

By JAMES COOK
Alligator News Editor
If issues were horses, UF would make the Hialeah stables look like
a one stall shed.
In lieu of an Eldridge Cleaver or Mario Savio, both students and
faculty members have seemingly been working overtime to bring a
spark of passion to the generally mundane workings of a full-sized
university.
Efforts in the fields of nudity, war, birth control, drugs, draft, civil
rights, etc., have reserved the UF community space in the New York
Times, most of the Southeastern papers, radio, and television, notably
the program To Tell The Truth.
The issue of nudity was brought to a head with a Charlatan
magazine feature exposing young Miss Pamme Brewer fully arrayed in
natal attire.
Previous to the Charlatan exposition, UF coeds had posed nude for
Playboy magazine and since that time a UF graduate, Faye Dunaway,
has appeared only strategically covered in the movie, Bonnie and
Clyde.
The highlight of the UF skin saga, Pamme Brewer, was herself
proceeded by a nude Sue Schmidt in the pages of that same magazine.
Miss Schmidt was spoken to, punished, and never heard from again
while Miss Brewer went on to greater fame.
In the next issue, another Brewer pose, as naked as the first, sent
the administration into a tailspin. She decided to (or as some say, was
pressured to) withdraw from school and turned from skin to
psychedelia in the form of a poster shop downtown.
Gainesville police then auditioned for a part in the continuing
Brewer story by arresting her for sale of supposedly obscene
literature. The case didnt stand, however, and Miss Brewer, visibly
weary of courtrooms and hearings, hurried into semi-obscurity.
Not long afterward, across the state in Tallahassee, trouble was
brewing over censorship of an issue of the FSU literary magazine
which contained a vulgarized word form denoting sexual
intercourse.
Close inspection revealed that the exact same word graced the
pages of the UFs own magazine, the Florida Quarterly. The incident
passed quietly while the Quarterlies were distributed, notorious word
intact.
Then, just this quarter, the Alligator successfully finished what
Charlatan editor Bill Killeen started out to do, ran a nude picture in
its magazine supplement. Under a new UF president, the feature
hardly became an issue at all and no heads rolled on the carpet.
In fact, Gainesville itself was hardly disturbed.

The Enigmatic Mr. Jones

His outspokenness, more than
anything else, was likely the
cause of the attention he
received in the news and
consequently why he was cited
by UF administrators.
They cited his willingness to
challenge the law by disobeying
it as an indication of i seditious
JONES' PROSECUTOR ENWALD
... just wanted the facts

Page 3

nature, which had no place in a
university communitv.
Although administrators
denied Jones was being sacked
for his revolutionary stands, the
questions asked at his famous
tenure hearings earlier this year
range from his advocacy of
challenging of civil authorities
when laws are contrary to his
own views to questions on his
participation in the
anti-compulsory ROTC
controversy.
One of Jones last
demonstrations in Gainesville
was last spring after Dr. Martin
Luther King was killed in
Memphis. At a memorial service
for King, Jones laid down in the
middle of the intersection of
University Avenue and Main
Street thereby protesting the
arrest of Black Power militants.
Jones pulled a masterpiece of
one-up-manship by leaving UF
before the final tenure decision
was made for another job after
ten months of tenure fighting.
He is now doing research at Penn
State Universitys Hershey
Melton Medical Center.
He says he is in political
retirement.

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NEVER A DULL MOMENT
Gainesville and University police were never fair weather friends.
They stuck it out through heat and cold, marches and jail searchings.
And if a policeman's lot is not a happy one, at least it's been
interesting.
The Pill Os Passion
By JAMES COOK
Alligttor News Editor
What to do with a good news story, finally became an issue when
one of the Alligator's star reporters, Sydney Frasca, burst into the
office clutching a pill prescription in her news-ready hands. Sydney
was over 21 but completely unmarried and, as Background Reports
go, this was a thriller.
Editor Aldrich gagged on his coffee and decided to hold the story
till he could get in touch with Student Health Service Director
Coggins... then ran it in a three part series.
The most immediate reaction on campus was scarcely one of
amusement. Those who favored the existing (4 no policy" policy, felt
that the revelation would be the death of pill dispensing facilities.
Staff writer Frascas reaction, when asked for a statement recently,
was:
If Director Coggins doesn't have to answer questions,
neither do I."
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ALLIGATOR STAFFER SYDNEY FRASCA
... she really didn't WANT a pill controversy



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Dacamber 5,1968

Page 4

Centrex Svstenrh'Pecu iantlSS Not major

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Centrex system has no
major problems, only a few
* 4 peculiarities Calvin Green,
director of the physical plant
said Tuesday.
The articles in the Alligator

Final Week Testing Continues
In Spite Os Presidents Memo

Some UF professors and
instructors have been giving tests

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DUCKY DATE 001,6 CASE
Betsy Puncke, lUC, and Jerry Coker, lUC, discover the old UF
pastime of feeding the ducks. Nice way to spend an afternoon.

WHATSHAPPENING

IN CHESTERS CHARGRIN:
Last year Chester Ferguson,
Chairman of the Board of
Regents, made a speech on this
campus in which he, among
other things, praised compulsory
ROTC and condemned teacher
unions. I view of that, I bet he
wont even be invited to the
American Federation of
Teachers cocktail party for new
faculty members at UF.
The (rush?) party is from 5
p.m. til 7 pjn. today, and will be
held at the International
Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers building on the corner
of NW 6 th St. and 25 Ave.
IN FOR ALL THE MONEY
HE MADE, YOUD THINK HE
COULDVE AFFORDED TO
BUY A NEW TYPEWRITER:
professor ben pickard speaks on
e.e. cummings in rooms 122
and 123 of the reitz union
today at 4:30 pjn.
IN ROBBINS FROM ROCK
CITY: Jane 0. Robbins, from
Boulder City, Colorado, will
speak tonight on the topic
What Choice Do You Have?
The talk is sponsored by the
Christian Science Organization
and begins in the Union
Ballroom at 7.
Miss Robbins is a member of
the international Christian
Scientist lecture team.
IN CONTROLLING THE
ELEMENTS: The Alachua
County Alumni Club gives
interested persons a chance to
see the Gators transform a
hurricane into a spring breeze (in

are more tongue-in-cheek than
factual, he said.
However he did offer some
explanation to certain
reported.
One, mentioned in a letter to
the editor in Mondays Alligator,

and quizzes during the last week
of classes in spite of a

"By DAVID CHAFIN'
Alligator Staff Writer

fall, yet.) Movies of the game
will be shown in the Union
Auditorium tonight at 8.
IN HURRYING-UP VERY
SLOW: An Action Study
Council meets in room 150 Aof
the Union today at noon.
IN GREEK-LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Phi Beta Kappa
will have Dr. George K. Davis
speak at its initiation banquet
today at 4:40 p.m. in the Union
Auditorium. Dr. Davis will speak
on The Revolution in
Biological Science.
Phi Kappa Psi meets in the
West Gallery of the Union
Auditorium today at 3 p.m.;
Panhellinic Council gathers in
rooms 122 and 123 of the Union
at 7; Beta Gamma Sigma meets
in room 243 of the Union at 7;
Alpha Kappa Psi comes together
in rooms 355 and 356 of the
Union at 7:30 tonight.
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referred to the extremely long
delays 30 or 40 rings before a
caller dialing the Universitys
main number was answered.
Greene conceded a VIP
from the outside had
complained of this matter also.
This happens only because the

presidential memorandum that
would prohibit this type of class
activity, according to the
academic affairs office.
According to a presidential
memo dated Feb. 2, 1967, no
examinations, quizzes, special
projects, or term papers shall be
given or assigned during the final
five class days of the regular
term.
Take-home examinations
shall be due prior to the
regularly scheduled examination
period.
In addition, changes in the
scheduled times for final exams
must be approved by a
sub-committee of the Schedule
and Calendar Committee.
Requests for changes must be
justified and must include a
statement of how the proposed
change will affect the students in
the class.
Ac c o rding to the
memorandum, department
chairmen and deans have the
responsibility of enforcing this
policy.
Students objecting to
professors who have announced
tests for the last part of this
week should report to the
academic affairs office in room
233, Tigert Hall.

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operators are all occupied at the
time with a stack up of calls,
he said.
As the outside callers get
more familiar with the
University numbers this delay
will decrease he said.
In most cases the waiting
time for callers who dont know
the number of the party they are
trying to reach and who dial the
main number has decreased to a
reasonable level he continued.
Another puzzling experience
has been met by callers dialing
nine, then zero, for outside
information only to get the
recording:
The number you have dialed
is not in service. If you need
assistance call the University
operator.
If the phone is unauthorized
to make outside calls, as some
phones are, then the recording
will result because the caller
must go through the campus

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operator for outside calls, he
said.
If the phone is hooked up for
outside calls, and the caller still
gets the recording under these
circumstances, they should call
the trouble number in the front
of the directory, he said.
However the recording
could mean a bunch of things,
he said, the caller may have
dialed the wrong number or
forgot to dial nine.
Sudden disconnections could
mean the malfunction of a cable.
The telephone company is able
to track these down and repair
them he said.
At times callers have been
alarmed by loud, blaring noises
emitting from the receiver.
If the telephone has been
left off the cradle for a certain
time, the noise could possibly be
the warning tone to let owners
know their phone is off the
hook. he said.



Thursday, December 5, 1968, The Florida Alligator

AT SAN FRANCISCO STATE
Classes Open Under Guard Os 600 Police

SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
San Francisco State College was
generally calm Wednesday as
600 police guarded the campus
to prevent new of
violence by student radicals.
Class attendance was near
normal in spite of threatened
disorders by militants angered
by stiff regulations imposed by
acting President S. I. Hay aka wa,
who vowed to break up this
reign of terror by anarchists.
In the worst violence in the
school's history Tuesday, 33
demonstrators were arrested in
repeated clashes with police. The
militants hurled steel bars, bricks
and bottles at the club-wielding

Sheppard Is Sued For Divorce

CLEVELAND (UPI) Dr.
Samual Sheppard, convicted in
the 1954 bludgeon slaying of his
pregnant first wife and acquitted
in a retrial after serving nearly
10 years in prison, Tuesday was
sued for divorce by his second
wife, who told the court she
feared for her safety.
The German-born Mrs.
Ariane Sheppard, 39,
immediately was granted a
petition for an injunction
restraining Sheppard from
attempting any contact with her.
She said in the petition to the
Cuyahoga County Common
Reas Court she feared he would
do her great bodily harm.
The blonde, attractive Mrs.
Sheppard married the
44-year-old osteopathic surgeon
in Chicago July 18, 1964, three
days after he was freed from the
Ohio penitentiary on orders of
the U.S. Supreme Court.
Mrs. Sheppard, the former
Ariane Tebbenjohanns, began

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Page 5

officers.
As the classes opened
Wednesday for the 18,000
students, not a picket was in
sight for the first time since the
Black Students Union went on
strike Nov. 6. But, members of
the Strike Support Committee
later began handing out leaflets.
.. .If there are students in
classes who continue to be a
party to Hayakawa and his pigs
police, it is a certainty that black
and third world students, other
minorities and thousands of
their white student supporters
will move in one form or
another to stop the strike
breaking by their fellow

writing to Sheppard while he
was in prison and she was in
Germany. She told him she
believed he was innocent of the
crime for which he was
convicted. Their romance
bloomed by mail.
On June 6, 1964, the
Supreme Court voided
Sheppard's conviction on a
charge of first degree murder in
the July 4, 1954, bludgeon
slaying of his first wife, Marilyn.
Sheppards appeal to the
Supreme Court was argued by
the noted criminal attorney, F.
Lee Bailey.
The court based its ruling
on prejudicial publicity
surrounding the first trial, one of
the most sensational in court
annals.
In a retrial in 1966
Sheppard was acquitted of the
slaying. Some of the principals
in the first trial died in the
intervening period.
In jail Sheppard received

UPI
REPORT
students, the flyer read.
Hayakawa will send in the
pigs and we will fight by
whatever means we can to
protect ourselves, as well as
guaranteeing the continuation of

his first letter from the daughter
of a wealthy Duesseleorf,
Germany, industrialist and
sister-in-law if the infamous Dr.
Paul Josef Goebbels, Hitler's
propaganda minister.
They corresponded until
Ariane was invited to come to the
United States to meet her future
husband.

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the strike until the demands are
met.
The Associated Students
board of directors announced it
would seek court action to
prohibit police from the campus
and shut down the college.
Directors reaffirmed their
support of the strike and
condemned Hayakawa's
administration.
Attorney Terence Hallinan
was asked to petition the
courts and to take whatever legal
steps are necessary to restrain
and prohibit the San Francisco
tactical squad and other military
personnel from entering upon
this campus and or legally close
the college through court action
until such time as it may be

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Hallinan, who often has
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The fiery attorney was
physically involved in a campus
uproar last spring when he was
sent sprawling to the pavement
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and radicals. He faces trial Dec.
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Hallinan has pending a
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Page 6

>. Th> FcfkU ABigrtor. Thndiy, Pfmbr 6,1968

Honor Frail
Shows Loss
For Owners
*
By 808 FRASER
Alligator Corropondwnt
Honor Fruit has a 30 per cent
discrepancy in its returns,
according to Pat Dallas, 2UC,
co-owner of the concession.
Some stands are better than
others, Dallas said, regarding
the discrepancies between the
fruit furnished and the fruit paid
for.
We were told by the former
owner, Gary H. Neely that quite
a few people build up a bill and
pay it off after it reaches a dollar
or so. We like to believe this is
the case, he said.
Dallas partner, the Rev. Don
Cross, a Presbyterian minister
teaching in Hawthorne, plans to
enroll in the College of
Education as a graduate student
next fall.
One fruit stand, located in
front of the architecture
building, has a 60 per cent
discrepancy, Dallas says.
We might have to remove
that stand if it doesnt improve,
he said.
Honor Fruit, on-campus since
1942, is a concession handled by
Student Government.
Dallas and Rev. Craas deliver
the fruit between 6 ajn. and
7:30 everyday in order to
comply with campus traffic
regulations. They select and buy
the fruit in the evening from a
local wholesale dealer.
The fruit is not always
available since the dealer must
ship it from Jacksonville. The
demand is there, but we cant
always get the supply, Dallas
said.
Dallas is selling the fruit to
bolster his income from the G.I.
Bill. He has a wife and two
children. Rev. Cross is married
and has one child.
Being your own boss is a
good feeling after working for
other people for so long, Dallas
said.
When the discrepancies clear
up, well be able to sell the
apples for the same prices we sell
the oranges and bananas, 10
cents, he said.
A lot of our friends told us
we would lose our shirts, Dallas
said, but Don and I have faith
in human nature.
Union Sale
Closes Out
The Union Board
Christmas sale which ends
today will feature an all
items reduced close-out sale.
The sale, a Christmas gift
bazaar, is being held in room
235, Reitz Union, from 10
a.m. to 9 pm.

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'Silent Vacuum At UF, Senate Says

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Two important resolutions
and the cheerleading charter
were approved Tuesday night at
the Student Senate meeting.
The cheerleading charter
passed its second reading with
no senatorial comment.
This was the case with most
business on the senate floor. The
meeting was brief and discussion
was held to a minimum.

Rape Inquiry Continues

The alleged rape of a
19-year-old UF coed by eight
students Monday night is being
investigated by university
authorities.
Dean of Men Frank Adams
said Wednesday his office is
gathering full statements to
determine what happened and
has not decided what action will
be taken against those involved.
Five students were arrested
early Tuesday after the coed
told police she had been raped

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Senator Bruce Boudreau of
off-campus housing passed a
resolution claiming a silent
vacuum exists between the
administration and the students
in the area of academic affairs.
The resolution urged UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
to take immediate action and
place students on the Petitions
Committee to alleviate the
inequities.
The resolution stated there is
absolutely no representation on

by eight males at a S.W. 16th
Ave. apartment building.
They were released the same
afternoon when the coed refused
to sign an affidavit before the
county judge.
Although only five were
arrested, the administration is
aware that eight were involved in
the incident, Adams said.
Gainesville Police Chief W. D.
Joiner said his office would not
become involved in the case
unless additional information
warranted further investigation.

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the they feel it
it is of critical importance that
the voice of the students be
heard in these matters and that
the rights of the individual be
protected.
The second resolution
concerned the recent departure
of an African foreign student
who left UF because of
personal indignities he
received on campus and in the
Gainesville community.
The resolution, presented by
Senator Charles Harris, said the
incident questioned reference

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to the UF as a great university
because of the shadow of this
grave threat to academic
freedom and racial equality.
Positive steps were urged to
be taken by the UF to encourage
compliance with the universitys
non-discriminatory policies in
housing.
It also urged making legal
counsel available to students and
faculty who encounter violations
of civil rights legislation.
Second readings were
conducted on several charters
and special requests.



Thursday. Dacambar 5.1968. Tha Florida Alligator. I

THOUSANDS PARTICIPATE
Italy Pummelled By Students And Workers

ROME (UPI) Thousands of
striking workers and students
waving leftist flags and portraits
of Mao Tse-tung stormed
through Italian cities and towns
Wednesday, smashing windows
and attacking police in a violent
prelude to a massive strike
Thursday.
Angry mobs pummeled police
in Naples before reinforcements
beat back the crowds. A second
demonstration erupted in the
city after dark and 1,000
persons marched on police and
government offices, throwing
bottles of red dye and rocks.
Many carried protraits of Mao
and Josef Stalin. This time
police did not intervene.
In Rome, hundreds of riot
police were mobilized in
anticipation of more violence

Vietnamese Ambush
Is Military Setback

SAIGON (UPI)- About 600
North Vietnamese ambushed
160 U.S. troops near Saigon in
the biggest American battlefield
setback in two months, military
spokesmen said Wednesday.
The Communists waited 20
minutes while the U.S. Army Ist
Air Cavalry Division troops
landed by helicopter 69 miles
north of the capital Tuesday and
then opened fire with armor
piercing rockets, machine guns,
mortars and rifles.
The spokesmen said the
Communists killed 25 U.S.
troops and wounded 52 more.
While a radio operator called for
help, the other American
survivors beat back repeated
charges by the North
Vietnamese.
U.S. commanders rushed in
more troops and pounded the
North Vietnamese with artillery
and aircraft fire. After four
hours, the Reds slipped away in
the jungle. There was no report
of Communist losses.
Military spokesmen said the
fight marked the highest
American losses since Marine
battle on the northern border a
month before the Nov. 1 halt to
bombing North Vietnam.
To the west 56 miles north
northwest of Saigon and 11
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Page 7

during the strike, to protest
officials failure to provide
higher wages and other social
benefits. One government
already has fallen because it was
unable to meet the demands.
The rampage began after
Sicilian police shot to death two
demonstrating farm workers
Monday and has grown each
day, with clashes reported
Wednesday in Naples, Florence,
Milan, Genoa, Trieste, Trento,
Bari, and other cities and towns
along the length of the Italian
peninsula. More than 180
persons have been injured.
But throughout the violence
leaders of Italys major political
parties have been reported
making progress toward
formation of a new government
that can handle the crisis, the

miles south of the Cambodian
border, other Communists early
attacked another unit of the Ist
Air Cavalry with 75 to 100
rounds of 82mm mortar plus
rifle fire.
They wounded 18 Americans.
But 18 Communists were killed
as the Americans called in
artillery, helicopter gunships and
jets with rockets.
The increasing military action
near Saigon marked a continuing
allied drive to sweep the capital
area of Communists, following
government reports the reds
might try a new offensive against
the city.
The Communists attempted
to blow up three ships in
Saigons main river channel with
mines Tuesday and today but
were unsuccessful, U.S.
spokesmen said. Shrapnel
sprayed the deck of one ship but
there were no casualties.
Far to the north, the
battleship New Jersey blasted
the North Vietnamese half of
the Demilitarized Zone DMZ
between the two Vietnams
Tuesday for the first time since
the bombing halt.

your GAINESVILLE UTILITIES

worst in eight years.
As the mobs rampaged, the
24-hour strike called for Rome
and the metropolitan area
showed its muscle. Traffic in
Rome was jammed and officials
forecast a breakdown of vital

Diplomats Predict Broadened
Paris Talks Will Begin Soon

PARIS (UPI) American and
Communist diplomats predicted
Tuesday that broadened Paris
talks on Vietnam will begin next
week, possibly on Wednesday.
The Communist side was
expected to reply favorably
within the next few days to an
American package plan on basic
conference protocol-an opening
date, seating arrangements, order
of arrival for delegations and
similar diplomatic niceties.
North Vietnamese and Viet
Cong delegations conferred
Tuesday on a joint reply to the
American proposal made
Monday in secret by Cyrus R.
Vance, deputy chief of the U.S.
delegation.
Diplomatic sources on both
sides said agreement on these
basic items was so close the
negotiators could sit down
formally in a matter of days.
They saw Wednesday of next
week as a likely kickoff date, in
part because earlier
Washington-Hanoi preliminary
talks were held regularly on
Wednesdays.
Although there was no
indication when South
Vietnamese Vice President
Nguyen Cao Ky would arrive to
direct the 100 man delegation
expected from his country, one
of his advance men arrived
Tuesday.
Nguyen Thieu Nmhonn, the
Ky aide, is to be followed
Wednesday by Saigon delegation
member Dang Due Khoi.
Ambassador Pham Dang lan,
who is expected to head the
actual Saigon negotiating team,
was to arrive Thursday or Friday.
The expanded talks, stalled
for more than a month since

services when the full force of
the million-man walkout was
felt.
Some public officials said
they feared that continued
strikes and violence could
mushroom into a crisis of

President Johnson first proposed
them publicly in his Oct. 31
bombing halt announcement,
will add representatives of
Saigon and the Viet Cong to the
conference table for the first
time.
The expanded talks are
expected to lead ultimately to
bargaining on the basic issues of
military cease-fire and political
settlement, but both Communist

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anarchy like that which shook
French last spring.
Wednesdays protests brought
thousands of angry students and
workers pouring into the streets
where police were waiting for
them.

and American diplomatic
sources agreed Tuesday the first
order of business will be more
argument on protocol.
KEEP ,N
jjp ST E p with
GATOR ADS



Page 8

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, December 5, 1968

EDITORIAL
Give Due Credit

Word is trickling through official
Washington circles and the nations press
that President-elect Richard Nixon is
considering Floridas Jim Bax to head the
Office of Economic Opportunity.
Bax holds a similar position in the Kirk
administration and is also the head of
Operation Concern, Kirks much-maligned
program which began in Gainesville to uplift
the living conditions of slum Negroes.
The state press has been reporting lately
that Bax has also been responsible for a
program known as Operation Student
Concern, which reportedly was started at UF
and spread to other state universities.
The project is designed to offer college
students a direct role in improving the
society in which they live. Students work in
the ghettoes of their communities on a
broad range of projects, from painting slum
houses to tutoring disadvantaged students.
The idea of Student Concern was a good
one, and it has produced some meaningful
results in the few months it has been
underway. If nothing else, college students
have received a greater understanding of
what it means to be black in America.
And the people the program has tried to
reach have been grateful for the help,
although they, along with the students
involved, acknowledge that programs such as
this are only a beginning to atoning the sins
of generations of Americans.

By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Good morning. I dedicate
todays column to you Taurus
folk. According to astrologists
you, (April 2DMay 21), are
fearless, kind, gentle, strong of
mind and body (sounds good),
pessimistic, emotional and
dangerous. Your lucky day is
Monday and your unlucky day is
Sunday. Your best months are
Nov. and Dec. I once knew a
Taurus but unfortunately
parental objection taurus apart.
John Steinbeck was a Taurus.
(For those who dont know him,
he is the author of that great
novel about Mexico, FLAT
TORTILLA).
Today's questions:
1. What cities were these two

ilie American D r *=- =======^=^=====s=BSa9Bg^_l
Cops Didnt Like It; He Wos Different
By Uncle Joverneck

John came back to St.
Augustine from California last
weekend to spend a few days
with his mother over
Thanksgiving. He had been gone
for about two years.
He called me up Saturday
morning and asked me to come
over. Maybe we can do
something tonight. His voice
was high with enthusiasm.
That night we went out to the
beach. John, myself, a fsw
friends, sitting in the car,
talking, looking for firewood on

The Florida Alligator
MNM fay students of the University of FlorMi wi*r m
MpfeMof *t Board off Student NMMom.
or 982-IM3.

The Alligator Inquizitor

men assassinated and in what
hotel: Martin Luthor King,
Robert Kennedy?
2. The following questions
deal with the comic book
LULU: a)what was her fat
friend's name b)how about the
name of the little kid (Tubbys
friend) c)Lulu often told of a
little girl who went through the
woods to pick (?). The little girl
often ran into a mean witch
whose name was (?).
3. Who was the man on the
Air Force football team who ran
98 yards for a touchdown on the
opening kickoff of the opening
UF game this year?
4. The Chipmunks were a
popular TV show and singing
group several years back. There

the beach, playing tag, flying a
balsa wood airplane, like little
kids.
John sat on the sand running
his fingers through his long hair,
over his beginning beard, curling
the ends of his moustache,
looking at everyone and smiling.
1 wondered how such a
simple, guileless being could
have traveled the truck routes
from Frisco to Chicago, made
sense out of New York City,
survived in Mexico City. How he
lived from town to town

The state press, however, has slightly
distorted one aspect of the program.
There is no Operation Student Concern at
UF. There is, though, a program called
SAMSON. It was underway long before the
governor decided to get some national
publicity with Operation Concern.
SAMSON is not after headlines. The
dedicated students involved have no desire
to quibble over who gets credit for what.
The groups only goal is to improve the lives
of black people. The students only
motivation is that they care.
But it is unfair for either Kirk or Bax to
take credit for something which is not
their*s. Such a ploy is worse than the
tokenism of Operation Concern.
The idea of Operation Student Concern
was to set up programs at all of the states
universities similar to the program already
underway at UF.
So just to set the record straight:
SAMSON is not in any way connected with
the state, with Kirk or Bax. It is a project
created by UF students, it is administered by
UF students, and it is funded by UF
students through Student Government.
And for any student who wants to get
involved in the world around him, for any
student who is disillusioned by Americas lip
service to equal opportunity, for any
student who cares theres a welcome place
in UFs Project SAMSON.

were three of them, (cartoon
characters) can you remember
their names?
5. What are the five books of
the Old Testament?
6. What was the name of the
famous french chef who was
accused of having bad broth?
Yesterday's answers:
1 .Henry Morgan, Bess
Myerson, Betsy Palmer, and Bill
Cullen. Gary Moore was
moderator. 2) Harriman, Vance,
Thuy Thi-Binh 3)
brownish-gray, yellow
4)Darlene, Annette, Bobby,
Don, Karen and Cubby, Doreen.
.. 5) Little Sister
Think of how finals are good
for you today.

without money or friends. What
he was like inside after all he had
done.
Later, in town, the inevitable
thing happened. John went into
Lums to say hello to someone
hed known in high school.
Somebody got a little upset over
his strange appearance and called
the police.
The cruiser pulled up, they
went inside, grabbed him by the
arm and asked to talk to him.
One of the officers had been in
4-H with John and knew who he
was. Nevertheless they asked for
identification. They flashed a
light in his eyes and asked if he
had been taking drugs. They
asked if he had *ever been
arrested. They put him in the
back of the car.
I went up to see what was
happening.
What can we do for you?

The Florida Alligator

Pui/kiiu/u
AM-Awumm

Staff Writings'

A Healthier State

The Florida Medical
Association last spring proposed
a new liberal abortion law for
the state. The proposal would
permit legal abortion when there
is danger to the mothers
physical or mental health, when
there is reason to believe the
baby would be deformed or
when the pregnancy resulted
from rape or incest.
The proposed law, similar to
the one which narrowly missed
approval by the legislature last
year, provides for three
certifying physicians to approve
each abortion. The present law
permits abortion only when the
mothers life is in serious danger.
So far, the proposal has gone
exactly nowhere. It has run up
against extreme opposition by
special interest groups lobbying
in the state legislature and
reportedly has been sent to
committee for review.
In committee it will surely
die.
The FMA proposal echoes the
views of the American Medical
Association and the American
Bar Association.
According to national medical
statistics, there are about four
million births, one million
spontaneous abortions and one
million extra-legal abortions
annually. In other words, about
one in six pregnancies result in
an illegally induced abortion.
In Florida this means that
about 25,000 abortions are
performed outside the law
yearly. If these figures are
anywhere near accurate, the

asked an officer named Nicolo.
Id just like to find out
whats happening to John.
Nicolo flashed the
high-powered light in my eyes.
Dont do that! I said.
Ill do it as damn long as I
want to, Nicolo replied. Were
you with this boy tonight?
Yes.
Where did you go . who
were you with . who drove ..
. He cracked the questions like
a whip. I answered them all,
outlining everything that had
happened.
And you spent ALL that
time out on the beach just doing
that? he asked insinuatingly.
I havent even told you how
long we were out there. What do
you mean, ALL THAT TIME*?
I replied in exasperation.
The other officer ran out of
questions to ask John. He gave

- The price of freedom
is the exercise of- responsibility
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor

Dave Reddick
Assignments Editor

By Dave Osier

state has a problem.
In a nationwide survey last
year more than 86 per cent of
those physicians who responded
favored liberalized abortion laws
similar to the one proposed by
the FMA, AMA and ABA.
Ninety-three per cent favored
widened sanctions on
therapeutic abortion. These
figures clearly show that doctors
want fewer restrictions on their
practice.
Present medical technology
does not warrant the restrictions
placed upon it. Todays abortion
laws stem from 19th century
primitive medical practices.
Then abortion mortality rates
were high. The laws have not
kept up with medical science.
Passage of more liberal laws
will not stop all illegal abortions
or for that matter anywhere near
all of them. Physicians know
abortion cannot be a substitute
for birth control.
A pregnant woman, who is
determined to get an abortion,
will get one, legal or not. But
doctors want to be free from
present laws that restrain
therapeutic practice. And
passage of a state law adhering
to the FMA proposal will be a
step in the right direction.
States that have ignored social
and medical change by clinging
to outdated abortion laws are
living in the past while trying to
mold the future.
The FMA proposal is a fair
one. It does not deal with
morals only health.
Florida needs a healthier law.

him a stern warning to be careful
what he did while he was home.
We were free.
I asked John what happened.
He didn't know. His former 4-H
buddy was being pressured by
the other two cops to arrest him.
But they can't do that kind
of thing, I protested.
I don't know, John
mumbled. They do.
And I saw it in his tired,
shaggy face. He was guilty by
definition.
He was guilty of violating the
American Dream. It didnt
matter wlmt he did. He was
guilty for what he was. And the
worst thing was, he felt guilty.
Ive got a quarter, John
said. Wanna Coke?
Nah.
And John and I, a couple of
bums, walked on down the
street.

James Cook
News Editor



Thunrtay, December 5,1968, The Florida Alligator,

OPEN FORUM:
y\df)UlOMJll DlAMwf
There is no hope for the complacent mam"
~ i
Listen To Evers
MR. EDITOR:
UGH! I have just read A Dying Breed of Black American by
Larry Jordan and would like to congratulate him on really blowing
it. Especially edifying was the following:
Black Americans learned that 1. integration does not work,
2. only black people can be reliably counted on in the struggle and
3. the only way blacks could ever hope to achieve freedom was by
using any measures available and necessary. Violence ... if it is
necessary should be used.
So wake up President Johnson. Everything you have stood for, all
civil rights legislation such as open housing and school integration was
a waste of time because integration does not work. Roll over in
your grave Robert Kennedy for, only blade people could be counted
on in the struggle. Your life was in vain.
Most important, defend yourself white America for, The only way
is violence.
Beautiful Larry. Just beautiful. You say the Charles Even approach
is dying and the only alternative left is to slap white America noth
reality. Good move limy, but face the cold facts.
The black community is a minority group the little guy. If he
starts pushing the big white apathetic community around he is going
to get his head beat in. So cool it.
Realize too that due only to the education of either aide hat this
transitory stage in the evolution of the Black man taken place to a
degree that you are now able to publish your view* without being
hung from the nearest lampost as an uppity Bigger.
A great deal of education about the Blacks has been contffeuted to
the whites by people tike Charles Evers. The appeal to reason and
fairness is the way to get the evolution going without heppaug on that
big white toe and chafing the apathetic community kite a Wallace
America.
Year article feeds the flame of them whiles who want a qrechd
type as Shout mthp/T law aud order, beca a viehmos,if aaremmy,
dkouhl hr mod,
ghetto, lot mom turn hate to greater degree if Om Wade
mutant has h* way and aheaates the while commuutv.
Let ua hope the Cfcmies Evers approach is not dpaag became the
black fist is not the way. Te of the injustice Larry Jordan woo
white support.
Show complacent white Americans what is happening and what has
happened. Invoke die muses Larry, but remember the soft touch wffl
win even the fairest of maidens.
JOHN T. SENNETTI, 7AS

-Speaking Out 11
f Am A Criminal So Punish Me
*y Alan Jacobson

Since compulsory ROTC has
been abolished on campus we
have seen a flowering, a
renaissance of thought, learning,
an elightenment of individuals.
The Board of Regents, in their
infamous act, struck down that
glorious institution that was a
major force in strangling this
university. Now those great
progressives directing student
conduct have only to rely on
Pmudent OCooneiTs power of
suspension, the local police, and
such faculty members as John
Greenman to bring conformity
to these ivy wafis.
In all deference to Colond
Mitchell, students here know the
alternatives, they know all about
the ROTC program and the
graft. After all, these are some

Page 9

sort of laws against burning draft
cards and refusing induction.
Students tend to reflect on these
tilings when theyre not running
to get to compulsory PE on
time, preparing to go to a
mandatory concert for
Human ttin or rushing to
it filter only to find everyone
out to lunch.
But more and more, after
weighing Colonel Mrtchctfs
alternatives, students are
rejecting all of them. Can these
students be blamed? cant
blame them. I am entirely in
sympathy with them, even to
the point where I am trying to
learn Danish so when I graduate,
1 will also be able to reject the
alternatives if necessary.
If refusing to kill another
human being is a crime, then by

Stand Up And Act
Pres dent O'Connell


MR. EDITOR:
Again we read of a man who has thought ft better
to leave the University than to stand the indignities
which this community continues to direct toward
black people. The American Federation of Teachers
at the University of Ffcfid* notes the Kanali
incident with dismay. In its tong history, the AFT
has fought opeidy against racism in American life
and especially m education. Moreover, as a union of
professional educators, the bed AFT reaffirms the
wen-established belief among social scientists (me
the Report of the National Advisory Commission on
Civil Disorders) that unless racism is resisted
actively, especiafly in education, there is tittle hope
for the humane reconstruction of our society.
Therefore, the local AFT is in special agreement
with that portion of the Political Science
Departments resolution which identifies President
OConnefl as the moral leader of the University
community and catts upon him to take positive
action to see that such incidents are not repeated.
At the mmamum, we think that this calls for a
statement to die press giving a dear explanation of
the incident and a recognition of the fact that
racism is active on the campus; a public apology to
Mr. Kanali (following (he apology made by the

Statistical Majority Rules

MR. EDITOR:
I have increasing doubts about
the useMheas or validity of
certain kinds of policlerhig and
statistic moagoring. Many of us
have reason to fed bitter toward
the polls which gave the
Democrats such a difficult start
in the recent campaign; ft's hard
tu get money or workers for a
candidate who the oddinmen
place far behind. I have been
wondering how responsible the
journalists who took our
temperatures eight times a day
and blasted it ml over the front
fW-
I also wonder about the
advisability of publishing the
unverified report that SO percent
of our students have tried
marijuana. I know many
studesrts petty wei and I simply
don't believe it. Too many of
them are skeptical about the
beauties of the drug-world, or
skeptical of the view that there
are no medical risks not to
mention the problem of legal

all means I am a criminal. Even
more, if refusing to be
regimented, to being forced to
conform, to salute, grovel, and
obey others to the point where a
man's self respect is lost are
crimes, then again I am a
criminal and should be punished.
its such irony that working in
the CIA is considered more
important and more necessary to
the wefl being of the UJ. than
working in the Pence Corps or
for Vista. But that appears to be
the way todays adult generation
feels, and who can blame them,
for they were brought up to
admire the military and its fine
traditions. America, since its
birth, has been an imperialist
nation, not caring for its
tradition and founding as the
most liberal nation in the world;

penalties. This kind of
superfitiafty-arrived-at statistics
can only confirm the worst
prejudices of the less aware
people in the state and this is
bound to be reflected in the
Legislature. If ft were a proven
fact, I'd feel differently.
I agree drugs are a serious
problem which we must fare up
to. But why begin by setting
ourselves short? We have enough
dtortcomings to admit. It's a
little like the freshman indstance
that over 80 percent of our
co-eds are promiscuous.
According to University of
Wisconsin psychiatrist Seymour
Halleck, the reverse is true. He
cites careful studies which
indicate that non-virgins are still
in the minority, that at no state
university studied did the
number exceed 22 percent.
If one wants to Uve
irresponsibly, its comforting to
think everybodys doing it,
whatever it may be. I do not
believe that morality can be

a place for all men to be free.
Perhaps this generation can
thank its predecessors for
making this an affluent society,
where man has time to
contemplate his fate and do
something about it. Let us make
our contribution to democracy
and the revolution by
eliminating the need for a
military as protector of the free.
Let us end racism,
suppression, and poverty, ml
only by rejecting those
established wines can this he
IfVIII* JWwIH pWNMVvIJ 9110
hack, wastes at least two yearn hi
the military, and then enters
business nothing wffl change.
But a new society must be
developed out of the old and if
the youth of today refuse, the
youth of tomorrow may not get
the chance.

'
Political Science Department); and a determined
aaoanf that the FmMents office, and the
iriminnlfUlmi in general, will be U9ed actively to
check the cancer of racism among us.
Thsae ia in American thinking a naive belief that
out should not criticize unless he can offer a better
aphatlnii. At other times we might challenge this
taiC but for tie present let us accept the view.
The Political Science Department has made a
mwnfrt* of specific proposals to improve community
race rriMiotu.
In addition to a public recognition of the
problem by the President, these proposals call for
steps to be taken to enforce non-discrimination in
homing and social services, a legal counsel for
students and faculty whose civil rights have been
violated, and action on proposals of the Action
Conference concerning black student problems.
hi other words, many in the University have
proposed in good faith alternatives to racism, and it
is now up to the President to act in good faith on
those proposals. A solution to this problem will wait
no longer.
ROBERT R. SHERMAN, PRESIDENT
AMERICAN FEDERATION of TEACHERS
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA

statistically determined, but for
those who think it can be, let us
do some careful studies first.
CORBIN CARNELL
PROFESSOR of ENGUSH
Reminds Me
Os A Story
MR. EDITOR:
The College of Arts and
Sciences, in addition to
including many major fields,
offers a number of service
courses. Notable among the
service courses are the
required foreign language
courses and the non-calculus
physics.
This brings to mind the story
of a man from the city who
went to visit his uncle in the
country. During this visit, the
uncle asked his city nephew to
take his mare to a neighboring
farm to have her serviced. The
nephew agreed, although he did
not understand what this meant.
When he returned, he was
chuckling to himself.
When asked why, he
explained, For years now, I
have heard businessmen in town
declare that they are interested
only in giving service to the
community. This hasn't made
sense to me as I know they are
making more than a good living
in their businesses. Today when I
ran your errand, I realized what
they have really been saying all
mete yean*
WM. D. ADAMS, 4AS
JAY C. WEBER, 4AS
urns**
to wlu to m par to the
ABtagtos letfcrs to the riitw
should (tot exceed 300 weeds
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space*



i. The Florida Alligator, Thunday, Daeambar 5,1968

Page 10

wu3\( ANDR fI
I Or more any J
Health & Beauty Aid Item GREEN
STAMPS
mm EXTRA EXTRA s 5
1
Freexer Queen ; j Booth's Froxen ; > $1 or more of any < $1 or more of any ;j! $1 or more of any w |
I Gravy & Sliced Beef Lobeter Tails Candy Items jli School Supplies Glassware Items Rj
| two pound pkg. 9-0%. pkg.
S a (bains Sat, Dai, IMS) a bains kli Dm. T. IMS) 41$
*~ rr^r
j reenStamps EkJ| [llli^Gree T nStamps mps pHlI M
i "$l or more of any T Planters Maxwell House Upton's il;
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Empire Bruges | | 3 /,-o*. can 6-ox. jar i ; tt "jJJ£ 2T B
7. llwim Sat. DM. T, IMS) || (S*JrM Sat. oat, IMS) < a (bsina Sat, Dm 7, ISM) It (SasiiM Sat. Dm T. ISM) iiannnnni xfttMMMKMHMMHMMMMtftft^ftaPPPftaftaaaft^tf^^xaaaagaaaaaaflaftftaa^ftaaaaanrtnftns^^fefi
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LAero Wax ft Lysol Spray 1| Purina Dixie Cup i Garcia Spanish
Floor Wax 8 Disinfectant || Dog Chow Dispenser Bean Soup 1
26-ox. can or half gal. i 14-ox can || 25-lb. bag 5-ox. sixe three # 2 cans H
is. riipina tit tn T tt-Tt *a ob*lMSasaDSDftlSSO || M- (Basina Sat, Dm. r, ISSS) IS. (Baaim Sat. Ok. r, ISM) g IS.
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three 6Vi-ox. cans 1| quart can 9 3-lb. can ... 12-ox. bot. mi
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wivm tuis coupon ah* rvacMASi ov HbiieifllhAbJll umtss this couron BiiiflJLJl wits BheiaHbJLi witn this coupon amp puicuasi or with mis couross
I Holloway House Froxen if Patio Froxen Mexican || Sara Lee Froxen <| Jell-0 Assorted Old Dutch Sweet J
Pixxa with Sausage k Cheese || Combination Dinner || Danish Cinnamon Rolls :| Puddings & Sour Dressing
16-ox. pkg. il 12-ox. pkg. || 9-ox. pkg. ;| four reg. plcgs. 8-ox. bot.
n. (Basina Sat. Dm 7, ISSS) il as. (Busina Sat, Dm 7, ISSS) 18 # SS. (Basins Sat. Dm 7. ISIS) as. (bains Sat, Dm 7, ISSS) at. (SaaitM Dat. Dm 7, ISSS)
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I Upton's Onion ; | Gold Medal Plain ; I Publix Canned Soft Drinks Greenwood £ I Nestle'*
Soup Mix I or Self Rising Flour 1 1 Regular or Diet Flavors Red Cabbage ;| > Quick Cocoa mU
reg. Pkg. ; | 5-lb. bag ; | six 12-ox. cans two 16-ox. jars l 1-lb. pkg.
S7. (Basins Sat, DM 7. IMS) | 5 M. (SaairM Sat. Dm 7, ISSS) < E as. (BasirM Sat, Dm 7, ISM) 3*. (bsina Sat, Dm 7, ISM) | | . (Basina Sat. DM 7, ISM)
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| 16-ox. pkf- ; 12-ox. pkg. 10Vi-ox. pkg. ; j regular pkg. 22-ox. can
£ ** (Basina Sat. DM 7, ISM) (Basina Sat, Dm 7, ISM) -|, 31. (BasirM Sat, Dm 7, ISM) ![ [ 34. (Basins Sat, Dm 7, IMS)
reenSta m ps reenSta m ps reenSta mps reenSta m ps reenSta m ps
Planter's Dry ;|! Kraft's Wishbone j| Comet !]: 20 Below
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1 24-ox cans il 13-ox. jar f 2-lb. jar 1 0 C \AI QAU CT
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Crackers "Z 37*
Chocolate, Os Duplex
FIR Tasty Miss Wisconsin Medium Aged Cheddar 1£ .'
Apricot Halves Z 39* Cheese J,~ 65* ?fl iTHIIiIIiJ^F
Peach Halves 3 tL 2 89* Cheese 89*
Bartlett Pears Q x Margarine
Fruit Cocktail 5 2? *1 Mush £.29*
Delicious With Fresh Pork! Flllsbury Apple, Blueberry or Cherry
PAP Meal-Maker a
Sliced Beets 7 # *1 *** specials ** ^'frC-j!
FAR #303 can Cream Style or 12 at. can Whole Kernel / \ Hi**** Fr ** h I iTOIPn /
Golden Corn 6 e *1 Potato Salad 39* N^S/
F&P Tender, Delicious Delicious Sliced XUllllv/
Garden Peas ...6 ?ii 3 *1 Cooked Ham ,. $ l
F&p Appetizing 5 149 SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
Cut Green Beans .. 7 £U 3 $ l BBQ Pork Ribs . I INSPECTED PROTEN WESTERN BEEF SALE!
F&P Whole Solid Peck or J K W Kitchen Fresh Tarty RJS*i9VHfl 1 119959S I V999P99I!VI9ffI!S9VW9MII
Stewed Tomatoes 5 f a 3 3 $ l Cole Slaw . 39*
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Stew Vegetables £ 39* -,?,-l C/lUCk Steak ... .* 69
Irds-Eye Free* A D Ik Swift's Promium Proton Bone-In Beef
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H is i2oz. ctn. Short Ribs >* 49
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PiUiburv* Assorted
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Seedless Raisins iT' 29 JJJfSSJie 'ir 59* PRICES EFF^IIVE W 7f
Extra Large Prunes &. 39 A B 7 e f s 'L iver *69* M 5,,,,
Del Monte Coilo Herman's Orange-Bond Pork
Medium Prunes 3z. i* Roll Sausage ...*. 39* ...(jJUQlvtow 4^rpw
Tomato Ketchup 2 2 2z 59 X e ! 125 SW 34th ST Bnnniit/8
.n previ... Wieners eC 59* ll PURIIX ll
(Trape Drink .. 7. Bologna 25* 45* 59* 2630 N.W. 13th ST. ^../l
Tea-Flake Sliced Cooked Salami or (Deli Special) j| Kl II & Ikl C"T
Saltines ....... /9' Chopped Ham P r-49* 1014 N. MAIN ST; Miiifli

Thursday, Dacambar 5,1968. Tha Florida Alligator.

Page 11



Page 12

!, Th* Florid* Alligator, Thursday, Dacambar 5,1968

USFs Whistler Faces Disciplinary Board

TAMPA Joe Engressia, recently-famed
telephone whistler, will appear before the disciplinary
board at the University of South Florida Dec. 9.
Engressia, 19-year-old junior at the USF, was given
the option of withdrawing or facing suspension. Not
wishing to withdraw, he is presently fighting
suspension.
The accused whistler began his career after another
student waged a bet with him that he could not place

Civil Engineers Single Out
UF Professor As Tops In State

The guiding light in the
Florida Section of the American
Society of Civil Engineers moves
into the spotlight himself iat
Clearwater Saturday.
Byron D. Spangler will be
honored as the outstanding
engineer in the Florida Section
of ASCE in 1968.
An associate professor of civil
engineering at the UF, Spangler
has served in all society positions
during a 17-year ASCE
membership.
Spangler will receive a plaque
at a 7 p.m. banquet Saturda)
from Thomas Niles of Chicago,
ASCE president-elect.
Walter Kuhrt of Orlando,
president of the 1,000-member
Florida Section, said Spangler
has given outstanding service,
leadership and counsuling as
the guiding light of our society
since 1951.
A UF faculty member since
1949, Spangler is only the third
OConnell
Addresses
Blue Key
Student leaders of 1968-69
face the greatest challenge for
leadership any class has ever
faced, according to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
OConnell Tuesday night
asked 32 new initiates of Florida
Blue Key, mens leadership
society, to accept the challenge
of leadership in trouble times,
when the University is beset
with problems of growth and a
clash of ideas.
At the induction dinner at
University Inn, new Blue Key
officers were installed.
They are: President, Manny
James of Key West; vice
president, Jack Harkness of
Miami; secretary, Bruce Levy of
North Miami Beach, and
treasurer, Henry E. Mehlman of
Palm Beach.

Seniors and
Graduate Students
Career hunt with 90 of the finest companies
having operations located in the New Jersey/New
York metropolitan area. On December 26-27 at the
Marriott Motor Hotel, intersection of Garden State
Parkway and Route 80, Saddle Brook, New Jersey.
For more details, including a listing of spon sponsoring
soring sponsoring companies, see your college placement
director or write to the non-profit sponsor of the
second annual Career-In: Industrial Relations
Association of Bergen County, P. O. Box 533,
Saddle Brook, New Jersey 07662.

person to receive the
outstanding engineer honor
by the ASCEs Florida Section.
Spangler received bachelors
and masters degrees in
engineering from UF in 1947
and 1950.
A specialist in fallout shelter
analysis and design, he has
conducted courses on that
subject in cities throughout the
state annually since 1961. He
teaches structural engineering at
UF.
Active in seven professional
Iff mm ?
BYRON D. SPANGLER
... outstanding engineer
fiwroe\
\ |1 AOS l
) JysaL \

a long-distance call through the whistling method.
Engressia developed a" code in which the sound
wayes of his whistles were varied so as to create the
telephone signal for the number he wanted. He won
the bet and his reputation became so well known that
he was soon charging students $1 each to place calls
for them.
Engressia is a blind student majoring in electrical
engineering. He has always been fascinated by

organizations, Spangler served as
president of the ASCE, Florida
Section, in 1960 and president
of the Florida Engineering
Societys North Central Chapter
in 1964.
Other memberships include
the Association for Protection
from Nuclear Attack, American
Concrete Institute, American
Society for Engineering
Education and the Society of
American Military Engineers.
Indian Club
Plans Film
The UF India Club will
present the popular Indian film
Kohinoor at 2 pjn. Dec. 15.
The movie will feature
sub-titles in English and will star
Dilip Kumar, Meena Kumari and
Jeevan. Admission is 50 cents.
The film will be shown in the
Union Ballroom rather than the
Auditorium because of repairs
that will be in progress.

jjSjm
ShUSSoSI BSfiBSSS wBSQHP
*r,~ IM m WT I : 'VFI ~JH|
i£ r - L '*, -** > '** *- ~ >v >*, ;;>*. * *. '-** -<.,
*-v A V%T '<' '-.*M^ t : i !?::**< V. '- ./T &/>** ' -J* *** r< ,"'*'> _. jj^L
' -" -X ' ;\: ~
"I know the way home
with my eyes closed"
Then you know the way too well
Because driving an old familiar route can make you
drowsy, even when youre rested.
When that happens, pull over, take a break |w*#
a nd take two NoDoz Action Aids.-Theyll help you
drive home with your eyes open.
NoDoz Action Aids. No car should be without them. g^^pPyjf
*T.M. <5)1968 Bristol-Myers Co.

PRIMROSE INN
JfgKrth WnR Pood
Suptrb Service
Attractive Atmosphere
Private Portm
8 'WSSST Practice! Prices
114 W. University Ave. Piraoe 176-1472
Josteis
University of Florida
Gator Riags of DisHaction
Free Tape Recorder
GE Model
Register Today at
Malones Annex
1714 West University Ave.

telephones and plans to get a doctorate degree in
electrical engineering. He previously has been a
volunteer trouble-shooter for Southern Bell in Miami.
Telephone officials have declined to prosecute but
have turned down his offer to assist General
Telephone Co. as a trouble-shooter locating line
problems.
Engressia is currently attending USF on a Florida
Council for the Blind Scholarship. If expelled, he wOl
attempt to enroll in a northern university but prefers
to remain at USF.
After all, I came here to get an education, so I
dont mind probation or social probation. I came to
study, not to whistle, he said.



Thqnday, Dacwnfef 5,1968. Tht Florida Alligator, I

Engineering and Science at IBM
The interdisciplinary
environment keeps you
technologically hot! mr^
Working in data processing today pretty much
I work with systems design engineers, aK
history: "A memory systems man ( JBk ;rf
comes to me with memory circuit 4 'j||lHPjl
designing the circuit, Igo to see a 'gH I B *lM.\" V 4B B
physicist. He helps me select an *** \ x ;\a||i
appropriate technology for the : 1
monolithic circuit.
As the design develops, I work with a iMdHHHr
test group and also check back with the Piiiiy .am *'-*
systems and semiconductor people to make y
sure
The interdisciplinary environment at IBM helps
you keep up to date technologically. As Nick
puts it, Youre constantly to
other m
needs graduates to
manufactur manufacturand
and manufacturand defense projects. We also need technical
people
your office
IBM, ask your
for more
Or send a resume or letter to Charles
Cammack, IBM Corp., Dept. C, 1447
Room Ga. 30309. Wed
for graduate or military service.
An Equal Opportunity
JV

Page 13



l, Tha Florkte AMigator, Thtmday, Dooambar 5,1968

Page 14

START YOUR 18(9 CHRISTMAS
fH PANTRY PRIDE'S EVERYDAY
SAVE YOU *5.00 OR MORE
HVV|PMM|^V|VPIIWK
gggnjSJ jAMjApi^j
min
COMPARE! "£§ COMPARE! S? §T COMPARE! WF#I!
PANTRY PRK TEA RAGS 68* 79< H< PANIRT FMDE SALT 9< 13 M CHOCOLATE JUMBO FES 3/SIOO 3/1117 I7i
PANTRY PHDE BLEACH 99* 45* H IODDT BOY PEANUT BUTTER ZSUm 89< 99 10c MANDARIN ORANGES > 4/SIM 4/tu u!
SUN AID GRAPE JEIIY ** 39* 49* K)* CARNATION SLENDBt 4 * 89* 99* 10* CRSCO SHORTENING ** jZ '*££ .Z
HANOI INPE TOWNS m~ 47* 4* 2 t PANIRT PM* POTATO CHIPS 38* 59 21* TOWN TALK SYRUP 40! Si {£
OPEN GIANT PUS 4/SLOO 4/sljo6 8* CAMPBHL'STOMATO SOUP 8/SI.OO 8/51.12 12* PANTRY MAID LUNCH BAGS < 5/Sl M 5/tm £
HLTMORE LUNCHEON LOAFB/SIOO 3/51.17 17* KRAFT DINNER OOUXE 45* 47* 2* 7 oz. COLD DRINK CUPS iZ '*£, X*
REAL KRLFLY&MOSQUITO BOMB 88* 99* H POP-UPS tr POP-TARTS 39* 42* 3* BOOK MATCHES It! 10! X!
BEST-PAK FREEZER RAGS * 25* 29* 4* ORUW/BEANS 5/SI.OO 5/5145 45* PANTRY PRIDE BLEACH igt 2
TURKEY IRNNER3B* 49* Tl* FROZBI FRENCH FRIES *-- 4/SU 4/SLS6 56*. CHICKEN POT PIE 6/SUW 5/li m vt'
KRAFT MACARONI DINNER ~~ If* 23* 4* DEL MONTE CUT GREEN BEANS 4/SI.OO 4/51.16 I<* PKLSBURY CAKE MIX 3/floo 3St
PANTRY PRIDE COOKING OK 69* 93* 24* FISH STICKS 3/JI.OO 3/51.17 17* GALVANIZED GARBAGE CAN SIM tfoo ,£
PANTRY PRIDE HOUR * 37* 47* TO* CHOC ORP COOKiS 4/SI.OO 4/51.32 32* WHISTLE SPRAY CLEANER 4O! S
ALUMINUM FOIL *- 4/SIOO 32* TUNA FISH 5/SI.OO 5/J1.35 35* CLAPPS STRAINED BABY FOODS.> 2 J 2 nt
OXFORD ROYAL MUSHROOMS SSr*. 4/SLOO 4/JL32 32* CUT GREEN BEANS 25* 33* 8* CHARCOAL BRIQUETTES 35! 99* llj
BZDBS23 Riuii'J.fiiiiMJJi mmmmiim rMMiMivMwjk imii'ii.KiiJwjk
fflwffa fTTroy jnSija tsms
iiill
S' m V X" N. felilM Irtonv
f discount health and beauty aids A f IflM g* l vEmiE!5!Si ,4 1 rtl fh# ov ~ n!
I (PEST AM 1 fiLEEM I I I tastitiwaticda**t.aoi'
I tow 67* I BREAD /shejhr^-m
I DIAL SHAMPOO 39* I OMI A | SPLIT ROLLS 27v
J 4/99* JmirnnarzELm
Vagg? / ** J m CHOCOrATE iTKF"9St
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rrog in oiiTj SS^
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COMPARE! COMPARE!
DRIFT 83* 87* 4* CRISCO SHORTENING 79* 89* 10*
JOY u,- BT* 83* 2* CAMAY SOAP ma*. 2/31* 2/33* 2*
THRILL DISH DETERGENT 59* 61* 2* SAFEGUARD SOAP M _ 2/41* 2/43* 2* _-
IVORY SNOW 83* 87* 4* ZEST SOAP M 2/4T* 2/43* 2*
CASCADE 75* 77* 2* UVA SOAP 14* 15* 1* ____ I
DUZ 83* 85* 2* SPICK SPAN 95* 99* 4* IQC ABE ST.'STSJ I
IVORY LIQUID lw 59* 61* 2* MR. CLEAN 67* 69* 2* J WB I
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OXYDOL 83* 87* 4* TOP JOB 67* 69* 2* UULU mtUAL |
TOE 75* 87* 12* DOWNEY FABRIC SOFTENER 81* 83* 2* I FLOUR X*mV
CHEER $1.43 $1.47 4* CINCH SPRAY CIEANER 74* 77* 3* ilffif:
8010 M- *. 83* 85* 2* BIZ PRE-SOAK POWDER 75* 77* 2* J
DASH f_m $2.29 $2.39 10# CHASE & SANBORN COFFEE 77# 83* 6* \ tSSVT&Sf**"" I
SALVO a 77# 79* 2# REGULAR HAWAIIAN PUNCH rXT.3/95* 4/1.00 5* -~_T_ J
IVORY SOAP .mu. d- 2/23* 2/25* 2* LOCAL HAWAIIAN PUNCH JJ27<21.3/95* 4/1.00 5*
PERSONAL SIZE IVORY 29* 31* 2* MORTON FROZBI PBS 3/89* 3/1.00 11*



CLUB TODAY.A A. .ass'
LOW PRICESyM- H m
nvveeh ft l^ j
RVTffYMWFjR 1
[SIRLOIN! (££,*£, (FRESH (FRESHSTEAKS
STEAKS (FRESHSTEAKS SH 2 I
I I I I I WHOUMOMD I
i I I uv.ua. I urniotu fIH lB i
H||
HeM S 3 MSI Ilell K££9
\ COMPARE! TSTSM? COMPARE! Wr#t!
|
M I SOHIISS FUND "" W l" W I 1 jji
I# I pom ton uuuse *** mi i wi gj-gy *** :Ir :!: ~.
M I slice* loiooni mi s*t wt Mlf Ilr }~ t
I VVvV RRMM I MILD DAISY CHEESE l 7t 10L **£ WK tOIH l?i S ...
I IB 1 SUCED AMEMUN CHEESE Ml 7L lOL **??* Es lv ,i. A. AT.
I IB I souiouo sir mr * aKEMffuvE * Jr
1 J HY6RADI CHEESE LOAF ,m 59 or if JJJJJA r i7tllM . * m
V S nm ORg . W Ml l#t MOIEH CHKKEN GIZMOS - "l
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B B bbbhbbl
\ COMPARE! liitr §-?f COMPARE! SF §'Vf
f MAKING SIZE ROMEBEAUTY j FAKn(Y re|DE SAUD '39* 59c 20c Jgg £
I OK BDBDI IB* I TWIN PET CAT FOOD <* 3/29* 3/39 10c LTrecr?!..- 59* 63* 4*
I MB DD HHr I CUT GREtN BEANS
I I WHUE POTATOES ~ 1/51.00 8/5U6 16c s2*7*
-tTWI* JM+ I <* 1* SffffiWTT 4/s, £ 4/, 'i" W
u 01A( aisasgs?"* "w s "
[~2_ as-s '-'' **

Thursday, December 5, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



~
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Mobile 'home lot 100 ft. x 100 ft.
Septic tank, gas, telephone & power
pole. Pay equity and take over
payments, $29/mo., water fncl. Ph.
378-6392. (A-3t-49-p)
Schwinn 10 speed racer 2 years old.
New tires, S4O. Call Duane after 6,
376-6983. (A-3t-50-p)
1967 Triumph 650 cc excelled!
condition helmet Included. Call
Cheryl at 392-7603 after 5:00 p.m.
(A-3t-50-p)
Honda 90 1966 C2OO Model. Make
an offer. Call 372-9427 or 376-9208
between 5 and 7 or at noon. Ask for
Mike Moore. (A-2t-50-p)
ANTIQUES UNIQUE ageless
gifts to cheer a heart or home. 1791
NE 23 Btvd. Closed Monday.
(A-2t-50-p)
1968 Honda 125 Scrambler, yellow.
Less than 1500 miles. 8330. Call
378-8993. (A-3t-50-p)
For Sale: everything, large lighted
bar, barllghts, mlsc. apt. decorations,
rugs, some furniture, dishes, post &
pans, portable TV everything for
$lOOl Ph. 372-6443. (A-3t-50-p)
1967 HONDA 450. 43 hp, very fast,
good condition, priced to sell fast,
$550. YAMAHA TD-1B production
road racer, 35 hp 130 mph, new
Dunlop triangles, $450 with fairing,
Call Jon 372-9370. (A-3t-50-p)
Honda 305 Super Hawk. Excellent
condition, must see to appreciate.
1966 model, never abused, no need
for worry, $450 or best offer. Call
376-1819. (A-3t-50-p)
Cheap! Reliable! Your very own
bike, 26 In. black english racer, 2
weeks old. A SSO value going for
$35. Dont hassle with parking any
more. Call Bob, 378-4204.
(A-3t-50-p)
8x36 mobile home with Bxls
cabana, air conditioned, completely
furnished, 2 bedrooms, close to
campus, SISOO or best offer. Call
372-0690. (A-3t-50-p)
Cleaningint carpet cleaner you ever
used, so easy too. Get Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture co. (A-lt-51-c)
11 In. Sears TV only 9 mos. old best
offer over S7O call 376-9774.
(A-2t-51-p)
COLOR TV must sacrifice asking
$125 console 265 sg in Call 376-7439
ask for John or leave message
(A-51-2t*p)
BASENJI Pups AKC reg. Choice
ofllter Some sired by Ch. Reveille
Relay to Wilbarrle sl2s.xand up
after 4 p.m. phone 481-2362.
(A-5 l-2t-p)
Ruger blackhawk .357 magnum 6 Inch
Blue barrel $75.00 with holster call
3783455 ask for Roger or 3787441
Inr I MtAT f A-lt-51-Di

aiK TOf LWIBT
P|ateteUjjj W ROD STEI6ER I
Mtm I ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
UaTrZa JL BEST ACTOR
The Heat Os The H>j)hf |
"ROD STEI6ER HAS
DONE IT A6AINI
Cut Magaiin*
I s a sol
AMERICAN
COULD
K HAVE bro-
| t £ UGHT OFF JM
THIS KIND rr |J
G OF MULTI-
* FACETED § mj.-v.dfev.
A TOUR DE- J|
FORCE../' Ofi
-Time Magazine
/'.rvj&r M
FaVuHiImSII mm
ir iffiWM
PARAMOUNT presents
ROD LEE GEOROE
ignmiHl non nm an.
WBiaiaiHll W WAY Ti TREAT A LAOY
TMMMOIM* a paramount PICTURE..
liss 2i 2

| FOR SALE I
Residential Lots and small Acreage
Plots, reasonable restrictions, 12
miles South or about 15 minutes
drive from University of Florida.
Lake Front Property 11 acres with
nice Lot fronting on Lake Annie, 20
miles East of Gainesville. $7,250.
Good terms to. approved buyer.
(A-51-2t-p)
FOR RENT |
Furnished downstairs apt., 2 Br., Air
conditioned. Call after 5:30,
378-7845. (B-48-ts-C)
Modem 2 bedroom, air coridftloriT
heating unfurnished. Available
December 30. $165 per month.
Landmark Apts. Call Ac hey
372-6535. (B-15t-38-p)
Sublet 1 BR apt. Frederick Gardens.
$l2O per mo. Rent paid thru Jan. 1.
Apt. furnished & AC. Call after 3
p.m., 372-5948. (B-4t-49-p)
Must sublet 1 br. Landmark Phase II
apt. for 2nd qtr. AC pool,
dishwasher. Call 378-8992.
(B-4t-49-p)
Must sublet: 2 BR furnished (St
unfurnished) apt. at the Summit
House Rent paid to Jan. Ist. Move
In Immediately 3 76-9688.
(B-4t-49-C)
Private room, one block from old law
school. Central heat and AC, linens,
maid service and kitchen privileges.
Call 372-6263. (B-3t-50-p)
1 Br. furnished apt., central heat and
AC. 300 block NW 14th St. 2 Br.
furn. house, SW 34th St. area. 2 Br.
unfurn. house, SW 34th area. Call
372-6263. (B-3t-50-p)
Sublease 2 Br. Village Park apt.
starting Winter Quarter. Call
372-5792 or come by no. 14.
(B-3t-50-p)
College Terrace adj. to unlv. lease
available Dec. 15 to June 15. Ramp
parking, pool, AC, elevator, s34sqt.
single, or $375 double occ. Utilities
Included. Ph. 378-2221. (B-3t-50-p)
iHelgal
I 7:07 & 10:37 co "|
I -WOW I

Page 16

i. The Florida AMgstor, Thursday, December 6,1968

FOR RENT I
A beautiful 2 bedroom unfurnished
brick deplex apartment S9O/mo., no
lease required, best apt. buy In
Gainesville. Call 372-5817.
(B-3t-50-p)
Must sublet: one bedroom AC apt. 3
blks. from campus, washing machine
£360 per quarter call-3720747 or
3787686. (B-2t-51-p)
Furnished one bedroom
APARTMENT will become available
*o' Dec. Rent payed thru end of
month. Airconditioned, Goon
location Call 378-9277. (B-2t-51-p)
"Must sublease 1-BR furn apt. for
winter quarter. No lease. Free
utilities except gas. Two Blocks from
grad lib. SBO mo. 116 N.W 16 St.
(B-2t-51-p)
Roommate needed to sublet V
landmark apt. Dec. Rent paid. sec.
deposit paid. $45 mo. Call Dave
376-3643. Apt. 7 move In anytime.
(B-2t-51-p)
Moving Into frat house, must sublet
my space in 4-man poolside apt. in
tanglewood, starting Jan. $47.50An0.
tutl. You keep my security deposits
Mark 376-9129. (B-st-49-p)
Furnished 2-bedroom apt. central air
and heat. Carpet. Rent paid to Jan. 1.
available by Dec. 15 Call 378-3408.
(B-2t-51-p)
Must sublease in Williamsburg, best in
Gville. 2 bedroom, .2 bath complete,
dishwasher, tube. Call Doug,
376-0362. One person. (B-2t-51-p)
To sublet 1-bedrm. apartment, AC
$ 104/mo. Available Dec 15, or Jan 1,
if desired. Four bloocks to campus.
Call 378-0584 or 372-1714.
(B-2t-51-p)
Must sublet lbr townhouse AC and
heat, walking dlst. to campus, Dec.
rent pd. avail. Imme. willing to
bargain, $l2O per month, 378-7067
for Shelly (B-2t-51-p)
Ki&U
NEW YORK I
HOURS...TO I
OUT OF TOWN !>
/ Academy Awards!
4 RICHARD HARRIS kI
SI VANWA RIDGRAVS
4nE| p
Its time to speak \
unspoken things.. \
MW* ELIZABETH
lifJ TAYLOR
tHawTMIA FARROW
1 jncf3*T73l
el93Sn3!l' f
e I lfjr*
5 Imwt w. issaTv lylln
: QQMH :
iBRUTTS! SAVAGES!
THEYRE PAID TO DO A JOB 6
P El. e
* MGM^AGEOMSiWFSwS
: ROD YVEfIE JIM :

LEE MARVIN point AT 5c15 + 9i30
I'DAIMT Dl A HIT A> "HLI
J rUlnl PUMP ALBERT RNNEY |l
is fg THRU USiffiJl
5000' STRIP OPENS WITH SSOOO PURSE
N.H.R.A. CARNIVAL OF RACING
SAT. DEC. 7th & SUN. DEC. 8h
GATES OPEN 8 A.M.
RACING STARTS 12:30 P.M.
GAINESVILLE, FLA. -3% Mi. North of Airport
SIMUTRA
sHCWNAT^s^O2s^^js^^2so-9i53
bIDHFI WFI Pll RtCHARD MARTIN LAINIE PAT I
CONTE GABEL KAZAN HENRY PMMsnr I
I BLOCKER NOW PLAYING SM J
TODAY i|
sp3 . l§il
1 KIM NOVAK-PETER FINCH-ERNEST BORGNINEI
METROCOLOR 'tSaZJ ,lU,t S^l
I



Thursday, Pacinbar S, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

* GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

f**" FOR RENT |
'Furnished AC eff. private parking
two blocks from campus SBO per
month call 378 8203 (B-2t-51-p)
Off-Campus Housing- Room and
Board SIBO per Qtr. Freshman and
sophomores eligible. Apply Collegiate
Living Organization 117 NW 15th St.
Call 378-0851 376-9420 (B-2t-51-p)
Sublease 2 br. apt.. University
Gardens, at low 12 mo. lease rate.
Available Dec. 20. Call 376-1404
evenings. (B-3t-50-p)
MALE roommate. OWN ROOM in
spacious house. Must see to
appreciate. Short walk to campus.
SSO/mo. 376-6072. (B-3t-50-p)
Sublet one bedroom Frederick Apt.,
Jan. June or Jan. Aug.
Furnished, faces pool. Call 378-8993.
(B-3t-50-p)
Sublease College Terrace apt. for 1 or
2 persons. Vz block from campus
376-9889. (B-3t-50-p)
All panelled 2 bdrm. furnished house.
Central heat. Sunken living room,
just redecorated. Convenient to
campus. Available on or before Jan.
1. $l5O for 3, $l6O for 4, Call Mrs.
Albertson at Town & Country
Realty. 376-4664. (B-3t-50-p)
Must sublet 2 Br. Landmark Apt.
January 1. AC, pool, dishwasher, Call
372-6409. (B-3t-50-p)
WANTED
V "e*
Male roommate wanted to share pool
side 2 bedroom Tanglewood apt.
Good All American Roommates
Available Dec. 12 Call 372-5937.
(C-2t-51-p)
Two coeds to share spacious' 3
bedroom house in town available Jan
Ist Total Rent S9O per month Call
Nancy 3784578 (C-2t-51-p)
Need 1 female roommate for 1
bedroom Colonial Manor apt for
winter quarter CaH 378-6959 after
7.00. (C-2t-51-p)
Wanted: Female roommate to share
Luxurious poolside 1 bedroom
Landmark Apt. Reasonably priced,
available Dec. 17 378-1921 Inquire
apt. 156 (C-2t-51-p)
Girls to share FQ apt strating Jan.
376-9659. (C-2t-51-p)
2 roommates needed to share apt. 1
block from campus 33.75 per mo.
and V 4 of expenses. Call Dennis or
Steve at 376-6101. (C-2t-51-p)
Roommate wanted secluded 2 br.
House $46.50 per month plus 1/3
utilities 1229 SW 14th Avenue
3783455 3787441 ask for Roger or
Lester (L-2t-51-p)
Fourth girl to share 2 bedroom
tanglewood apt. Prefer upper
Division Student with car. Call
376-1015 after 6:30 (C-2t-51-p)
Two coed roommates starting winter
quarter to share two bedroom apt.
$38.75 a mo. Butler Gardens call
372-3115 (C-2t-51-p)
Male roommate to share 2 bedroom
bouse. 2 mi. from campus. $42./mo.
and Vi utilities. Call 378-5472
mornings and after 5. (C-2t-51-p)
Male roommate to share two
bedroom apt. with 3 others beginning
winter quarter. AC, pool. S4O/mo.
and V util. 928 SW 16th Ave.
372-7291. (C-2t-51-p)
Needed 1 coed roommate to share
two bdrm apt, 72 Fr Qtr. available
Jan. 1. call 378-9934 anytime.
(C-2t-51-p)
1 female roommate, over 21, to share
2 bdrm. apt. close to med center. 57
20/mo. Can Kathy 378-8637 after 5
P.m. (C-2t-51-p)
COMMERCIAL ART student to
design letterhead, logo and brochure.
Experience preferred, 372-0893 after
7 p.m. (C-3t-50-p)
Female roommate to share University
Apt. 1513 NW sth Ave. no. 39. Call
376-0968 or visit. (C-2t-50-p)
a U ?. _.* uWet a Pt- I" Landmark.
Available starting Winter Quarter. It
i 3 one bedroom facing the pool.
JTlce is $140.00 monthly. Contact
manager. (C-3t-50-p)
Male roommate, spacious poolside
apt. in Williamsburg Village. Call
376-0362 between 5-7 p.m.
(C-3t-50-p)
One or two male roommates to share
new 3 br. house. No deposit. Grad
student preferred. Call Steve at
378-7648 and leave name and
number. (C-3t-50-p)
One male roommate needed to share
two bedroom apt. with two others.
Call 378-5748 for money-saving
details, k-1. Summit House.
(C-3t-50-p)

Page 17

lux. apt. K-21, own room. Summit
House. $77.50 mo., now to Aug. 5
Thurs Sat- *-., all Sun.
(C-2t-50-p)
Two male roommates needed at
Village Park for Winter Quarter.
Phone 376-9529. (C-3t-50-p)
One female roommate to sublet 2 br.
FQ apt. starting January. Call Rita,
Betty or Gail. 378-0279. (C-st-45-p)
Need 2 female roommates to share
bedroom In 2 bedroom apt. In
Landmark apts. On pool, call
378-3378. (C-3t-50-p)
Really want to stay here 2 bdrms.,
AC, TV, need 2 coed roommates,
$43/mo. Call Liz, 378-6608.
(C-3t-50-p)
Roommate wanted January Ist to
share two-bedroom apartment with
one girl. Call 376-0962. (C-50-3t-p)
One female roommate for 16th ave.
apartment starting in January. Share
with three other girls. Call 378-2017
or 378-0426 after 5:00 p.m.
(C-3t-50-p)
Male roommate to share modern two
bedroom apartment with two others.
Call 372-6648 for information.
(C-3t-50-p)
Female roommate wanted for Jan.
Private room, AC, washer & dryer, 3
blocks from campus. $37.50/mo.
378-3291, 376-3582. (C-2t-49-p)
Studious male roommate to share
two bedroom apartment with three
others. Summit House. Call
372-6959. (C-6t-48-p)
3rd Roommate to share 2 bedroom
Olympia apartment for winter or
remainder of year. Phone 378-7909
after 4:30. S4O/mo. (C-st-49-p)
1 coed for luxury 2 bedroom 2 bath
Camelot Apartment starting Winter
Quarter. Pool, sauna, fireplace,
dishwasher. Call 378-9694.
(C-41-49-P)
HELP WANTED 1
: :~xc-x.xc.x-x-:-x-x-:-x-x-x-y-w-w;-is ; x-ffi
Listeners wanted: Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wllkerson.
Univ. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-c)
Part time waitresses. Noon hours or
evenings. Arranged to your schedule.
Apply Kings Food Host, 1802 W.
Univ. Ave. or 1430 SW 13th St.
(E-47-ts-c)
DELIVERY BOYS: Apply In person
1029 W. Univ. Ave. LARRYS
PORE-BOY. (E-st-48-p)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nation's 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person. Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
Like movies? Want to review for the
Alligator? Turn in a review of any
movie in town the day after it opens
to the entertainment editor's desk,
third floor Reitz Union. We will call
you. (E-tf-38-ACO
Part time grill help. Noon hours or
evenings. Arranged to your schedule.
Apply King's Food Host, 1802 W.
Univ. Ave. (E-47-ts-c)
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. national parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
$1 to Arnold Agency, 206 East Main
Rexburg, Idaho, 83440. Money back
guarantee. (E-7t-50-p)
Girls want to work . c bose own
hours. If interested Call 378-9476.
( E-2t-50-p)
Men need to work call 378-0526.
Part time or full time. High income.
(E-10t-50-p)
AUTOS |
;W-:-x.xaiwww MUST SELL! 1968 Pontiac Tempest
350. Power Steering, Automatic
Transmission Perfect Condition. Call
Williston 528-3761 or Extension
2-1782 (Nancy) (G-52-2t-p)
1967 AH Sprite excellent cond.
convertible w/boot & Tonneau cover
Michelin x Tires, R&H, $1695 or best
offer, see Steve, Room 472 Murphree
D (G-2t-51-p)
62 Falcon good condition automatic
inspected $395 Stereo penncrest
AM-FM automatic phono console
$l5O leaving country 3726625 Sue
(G-2t-51-p)
1960 Valia t 4-Dr 3 ort the floor not
much class but a lot of personality
SIOO or best offer call 3726416 or
see at 219 T Flavet 3. (G-2t-51-p)
PORSCHE 912 / 1966 Model 5-speed
trans Engine completely rebuilt in
Oct D Blue w/Black interior & more
-call 466-3276 (G-2t-51-p)

1 AUTOS §
For s file: Flat 1100 4 dr. sedan. Good
student trans. One owner Call after
six. 378-7061. (G-3t-49->)
65 Corvair auto 140 hp 4 single bbls
convt. auto. Call 372-7659 after 6
p.m. (G-4t-49-p)
64 Buick Skylark con., radio, heater,
power steering, power brake,
excellent condition, $995 or Karman
Ghla radio, heater, only $449. Call
378-4814. (G-3t-50-p)
1966*vw sedan, RB>H, push out rear
windows, & complete service records.
Perfect condition. 1350. 378-8956
after 5 p.m. (G-st-49-p)
62 MGA MKII 1600, white w/black
top, tonneau, radio, spare included.
Very good condition. Best offer
accepted. Call 372-5792 or come b'y
14 VP apt. (G-50-3t-p)
1964 Fairlane Ranch Wagon Small
equity and take over payments. Must
sell leaving U.S. this week.
378-6440. (G-2t-50-p)
Rover 90, leather and mahogany
Interior, R&H, $595. Call 376-0640.
(G-3t-50-p)
Triumph Spitfire 1963. Radio and
heater. Navy blue. Excellent
condition. S7OO or best offer. Call
378-8057 or 372-9303. (G-3t-50-c)
1960 TR-3 red, new seats, tonneau &
windows, R&H, priced to sell
quickly. Phone 372-7418.
(G-3t-50-p)
xc*x*>xx-x*x:>x*x*:x.:^
| PERSONAL 1
fcy.yyra-xfrM 11 w-x-x-x-x-v-s-x-x-x*:^
LAST CHANCE TO RESERVE
YOUR NEW YEAR'S IN NEW
YORK spot for $l6O, call 392-1655
or stop by Rm. 310 Union NY in
N.Y. (J-st-49-c)
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
Up ir>n
receive Credit 1- for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europe's
most famous campuses. For iqfe. call
392*1655 or come by 310 Union.
(J-18t-36-c
Join Gainesvilles nicest minority
insist on the very best and enjoy
spudnuts the big donut thats
better. Spudnut Donut Shop & Snack
Bar, 1017 W. University, Open til 7.
Call 372-3100 for your next party or
meeting order, 30 delicious varieties
and Free Delivery. (J-3t-50-p)
Need one passenger to share expenses
to California san Diego week of
Dec. 8 thru Dec 15, in twin engine
beechcraft private aeroplane with
4000 hr. pilot, holding multi-engine
instrument rating Call 376-3157
(J-2t-51-p)
Landlord says we must get rid of
lovable, adorable puppy. Will give
away FREE to good home. Call
3787683 after 5:00 p.m. (J-2t-51-p)
Wanna have fun? UF graduate is now
interviewing for travel companion to
US West and South America.
378-0293 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
(J-3t-50-p)
1964 Grad lt was great while it
lasted. The time lapse has brought no
hard feelings. If youd like a buddy
over the holidays give me a call. 1965
grad. (J-3t-50-p)

1 ||j|l Ombffiw/A fltochi/tftyi- 1
L#round steak"'s^c/Tb! 1111(1,11111111111,1 IW VALUES WORTH I
Es ROUND CHUCK 3 for $1.29 B DniMTlNft 01 IT I
B END CUT PORK CHOP 49 SMOKED BACON 49 PURE PORK SAUSAGE 65 ALL MEAT WEINERS 3/lb. 0 / rfL
CHUCK ROAST 49 IV ALL KINDS OF BARBECUE i
I WHEN YOU RUN OUT-RUN IN AT
I QUIK SHOP
I GROCERIES-MEATS-FROZEN FOODS I
I COMPARE THESE EVERYDAY BARGAINS I
I 4122 N.W. 6th St. Ph. 372-6011 % j

| ~IPERSONAL 1
Those Interested In receiving
CREDIT for TRAVELING ABROAD
come to meeting Thurs., Dec. 5, 7:30
p.m. Rm. 118 J.W.R.U. (J-2t-50-p)
Three weeks are such e very long
time. Be they happy for you. A
strange Lady. (J-lt-51-p)
LOST A FOUND |
Lost 1 pair prescription dark glasses
with wire frames and dark blue vinal
case. REWARD. Call t.ou Tally
392-8021 Trm. 320 North
(L-34-49-P)
Found: Gold band ring near
Gotdcoast. Call 376-0505 after 5:00
p.m. (L-2t-51-P)
Lost an ID bracelet with name Leon
in or around Pi Lam House week of
homecoming. Would appreciate Its
return. Please call 392-8279
(L-2t-51-p)

LOOK FOR THIS SIGN
\
jL^P

< pVVSSV?NsNXCC<*XXW*:S
It LOST A FOUND |
! ScccoccN>*is%NssswK::*N>:*sv-%!.i'
Lost prescription sunglasses Tlgert
Hall call Qail 392-7619 (L-2t-51-p)
Found set of keys in engineering
complex parking lot. Black, 12
compartments, VW key. samsonlte
key, 2 others check at Fla. Union
Land F (L-2t-51-nc)
1 SERVICES i
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SE Second Street, 378-7330*
(M-10-ts-c)
Need a place to stash your stuff over
Christmas? Cheap-convenient call
3726625 ask for Lynn. (M-lt-51-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-lt-50-p)



Page 18

I, The Florida AMiptci, Thwrio>, Pooombw 6,1988

Regents Ask Additional Hospital Funds

KjkK Olt
Lack of general revenue support;
Lack of flexibility in funding to
permit the application for matching
finds for services provided by the
dical center;
9 The diversion of the patient
ome, and
i The excessive increase in patient
rges.
The committee made
recommendations for immediate
consideration/* which include a
budgeted reserve for one months
operating cost and a system to allow
money from patient care to be used
only for medical center needs.
Budgetary requirements were
< "iplicated because during the fiscal
*r 1966-67, $550,000 was diverted
(Vu.ii patient income and expended
elsewhere by the Regents and the
budget commission.
The main recommendation the
committee made was for the hospital
to prepare a supplemental budget
request to help carry it through the
predicted crises.
This request, made in Mondays

Patient Donating Heart
Must Be Totally Dead

MIAMI BEACH (UPI) The death of a patient
whose heart is to be donated must be declared
irreversible before the transplant can be made,
the American Medical Association ruled Wednesday.
The AMA meeting also featured a forum on sex
problems and trends in which one expert reported
that there is more sexual fulfillment among
married couples now and that some 30 million
Americans have sexual intercourse every 24 hours.
Closing out a four-day convention, the AMA's
policy-making House of Delegates approved a
resolution which, in effect, guards against over-eager
transplant surgeons prematurely cutting out a
donors heart before he is totally dead.
The safeguard measure was adopted in the wake
of a year of transplant operations around the world.
An AMA spokesman said there have been 94 heart
transplants and 49 of the recipients still survive.
However, only two of the survivors have so far
lived more than six months with their new hearts,
the spokesman said.
Fifty-one of the transplants were undertaken in
the United States where 28 of the recipients are still
alive, according to the AMA. Os 43 transplant
operations abroad, there are 21 survivors.
One of the final medical forums at this 22nd

UF Jazz Bandsman Wins
Kenton Clinic Scholarship

Henry C. Wolking Jr., 2UC,
has been awarded a scholarship
to study jazz composition and
anangonent at the Stan Kenton
Clinic in Indiana.
Wolking won the scholarship
at the Pensacola Invitiational
Jazz Festival Sunday while
performing with the UF Jazz
octet, who regularly are a part of
the Gator Band.
He is the leader of the octet
which is patterned after such
at"
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SEHVICE SALES-SEHVICEBBPAIBS
BBPAIBS SALES-SEHVICEBBPAIBS
CRANE IMPORTS
SO6E.IMv.Am. 375-4S7S

Regents meeting, will go to the budget
commission for approval. The money
can be allocated either by a provision
in the law which allows the Regents to
transfer funds between appropriated
agencies with a surplus, or by drawing
money from a general revenue
appropriation of $500,000 or a
combination of both all with the
approval of the budget commission.
Martin has said one of the primary
hang-ups in getting requested funds is
in the budget commission.
A St. Petersburg Times article said
recently, Martin appealed to the
budget commission for $300,000 in
supplemental funds and an okay to
use, in advance, $250,000 of its
1968-69 appropriation last April
during the crisis. The article said, He
got neither.
Wallace Henderson, executive
director of the budget commission,
denies this.
The article was grossly inaccurate
and misleading, he said. This is not
the case at all.
The first I knew about the
hospitals problems was April 24,
when the Regents sent a request for
release of $300,000, Henderson said.
The commission gave the Regents

groups as Miles Davis,
Cannonball Adderly and Hugh
Masakela.
Members of this group have
played with name groups like
Warren Covington, Brenda Lee,
and the Four Tops.
GIVE US YOUR OLD
CLOTHING AND
WELL GIVE YOU A
$ 1 00
ALLOWANCE ON A
PURCHASE OF A
SIMILAR ITEM FROM
OUR WIDE STOCK OF
MEN'S WEAR
Hnturrjtty. &fjnp
MEN'S DEPT.
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
UNIV. PLAZA

clinical convention was dedicated to sex problems
and trends.
Dr. Harold T. Christensen, Purdue University
sociology professor, reported that:
Nearly one-fifth of unmarried college females
and about one-half of unmarried college males have
at one time or another experienced sexual relations.
In the general population, approximately
one-half of the females and three-fourths of the
males have full sexual experience at some time
before marriage.
In the neighborhood of one-sixth of all brides are
pregnant at the time of the wedding.
Dr. David R. Mace of Wake Forest University
Medical School said sex in marriage has
undergone more of a revolutionary trend than sex
outside marriage.
Without the abandonment of traditional ideas
that sex was unclean and unwholesome, married
couples have been liberated to seek new and higher
levels of sexual fulfillment, he said.
He made a rough calculation that across the
United States 30 million people have sexual
intercourse every 24 hours.
The causes of most marital-sexual problems are
emotional rather than physical, Mace said.

THEY LOOKED IN

exactly what they asked for, he
added.
Martin does not agree. No
additional funds were released. All the
commission did was refund the
existing budget and allowed the
hospital to make purchases of needed
medicine cn anticipated increased
revenue, he said.
Henderson said the commission
hasnt heard from the Regents about
the hospital since the crisis when as
the Times article said, the clinical
training of 1,129 UF students using
the hospitals facilities hung in the
balance.
The hospital is not going to close
because of a lack of funds. There is no
crisis and there wont be, he said
when asked if the $501,000 would be
sufficient to avert another critical per period.
iod. period.
Loren Lovell, administrative
assistant to Secretary of State Tom
Adams, a commission member, said
the commission, which is officially
comprised of cabinet members, has
been confused with its staff and
director.
No one on the commission staff
was approached by the writer of the
Times article, he said.

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r HOW T 0 PLAN YOUR engagement and wedding ]
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Lovell agreed that there is a missing
link in getting a viable budget for the
hospital. When the hospital made its
budget it was apparently adequate. By
the time it passed the legislature it was
obviously not enough.
The legislature is the ultimate
authority, Lovell said. If that's the
way they fund it, its final.
Lovell said he had made only a
cursory review of the committees
report.
Rep. Robert Graham, D-Miami,
says the hospitals problems are much
broader than what the committee
found. He is heading a committee that
plans to tour state health institutions
before Aprils legislative session.
The basic issue is, are the
problems correctable and do they
grow out of the location of the
hospital? he said.
Graham also said he had given only
quick glances at the committee report.
In his resignation letter Martin said,
I feel that I am leaving one problem,
and that is in the area of our relations
with Tallahassee.
The ad hoc legislative committee
clearly presents this problem, which I
hope will soon be solved.



Thursday, Dacambor 5, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

I RECORD REVIEW
lb e Thorn In Mrs. Roses Side

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Raviewar
It appears that theres a shift
occurring in the art forms of our
day almost as if they were
gaining a purpose theyve lacked
for so long. Today, personal
communications issues from the
artists mouth-pen-camera-brush
as its own justification,
entertaining or allowing release
if so wished but never ceasing to
voice someones mind. And less
and less creative time is being
expended to while away some
audiences idle, empty moments
-for, for some reason, todays
artist finds more satisfaction in
making those moments mean
more, in making his audience
feel more.
Time was when a man did this
with a novel, an essay, or a
poem. Today he writes a play,
makes a movie, or cuts a record.
For in order to arrest the
modern mans attention one
must assail his senses to reach his
mind, net him with enveloping
entertainment and then say
something.
This role in movies and plays
is far from new though it is
now more pronounced yet it
surprises us to see it arise in our
music. Theres more to music
now than something to dance or
hum to, for todays
composer-singers have evidently
tired of yesterdays lilting jingles
and thoughtless crooning. And
so, still under the guise of
entertainers, theyve become like
the minstrels of old

Student 'Environment
Exhibited At Gallery

By ROY C. CRAVEN
Director, UF Gallery
This months exhibition at the
University Gallery. is entitled
Environment. This months
offering which premiered
yesterday, is one of the most
unique and creative
presentations we have yet
offered the campus and the
Gainesville public. Even so, 1 will
not be able to describe it here
nor am I sure it is even an
exhibition. We will not know
exactly what it is until it
happens on Wednesday evening,
but I can advise you, dont miss
it.
Those of you who frequent
the Gallery each month and
possibly cross the plaza of the
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts may have had the delightful
surprise this past year of seeing
several projects in the making by
the lower division architectural
design students.
These students have had the
privilege of working out these
experimental problems of
three-dimensional space, or, if
you prefer, environmental space,
under the fertile and imaginative
direction of Professors John
Mcae and Pete Peterson and
several other fine design
instructors in the Department of
Architecture.
In these exercises, for
example, one group of students
built a cubistic pagoda of
cardboard which evolved the
pedestrian into a towering space
two stories high. Another
assembled huge hags of clear
vinyl and, with fans, inflated
them into transparent caverns and

Page 19

commenting on the world,
sharing their loneliness/fear/
hope, giving love new words and
a new emphasis.
Music s new position in ideas
and emotion had many authors
Bob Dylan, John Lennon,
Paul Simon, Donovan, Rod
McKuen, John Sebastion, and
John Phillips for a few and
even more voices. Each of these
movers has gleaned from his
musical heritage what he could
use and added his own verve to
build something more.
And the ranks of the musical
poet are swelling, adding new
talents as they emerge. One such
newcomer is the subject of this
review Biff Rose, whose first
album, The Thom In Mrs.
Roses Side, has just been
released by Tetragrammaton
Records. No doubt youve never
heard of him, for as yet hes still
as obscure as the label he records
for. This is regrettable, for as he
says of himself in his liner notes:
I dont know why Im not rich
and famous, last month alone I
logged over 400 hours of
meditation.
Its easy to see by scanning a
few more of these notes that
he actually has put considerable
thought into his words.
America the Ugliful
Oh! Ugliful for racial skies
And ample chance for pain
Your purpose mounts in tragedy
Through all ill-gotten gain
America! America!

chambers through which human
beings might walk. Other
students challenged the viewer
by involving him in further
transformed spaces and all were
immersed in an emulsion of
high fidelity sound.
Obviously, all this must be
experienced and it was with this
in mind that the Gallery invited
these inventive young designers
of the Department of
Architecture to take on the total
cube of the Gallerys space and
transform it into a large
integrated Environment. They
brought their visual materials,
their sounds, plus the action and
color of projected images into a
new assemblage where the
spectator again will be
challenged by becoming an
actual part of the scene.
This exhibition will be on
view through Sunday, December
20
GIVE US YOUR OLD
CLOTHING AND
WELL GIVE YOU A
$ 1 00
ALLOWANCE ON A
PURCHASE OF A
SIMILAR ITEM FROM
OUR WIDE STOCK OF
MEN'S WEAR
MEN'S DEPT.
1620 W. UNIV.AVE.
UNI V. PLAZA

RD REVIEW

God shed his wrath on thee
B And frowned upon your ground
Because you claimed that you were
Free
The most important years of a
Mans life are between the
Ages of One and Ninety-One.
The straight people in the world
Belong in straight jackets.
I hope I soon out grow the
vain-conceits
that bring me to your doorstep
begging love
That manifest in cliche-ridden
poems
and elemental rhymes
That fit...
Like ...
Glove...
Enough from the notes. The
price of the album is for the
record inside, and Rose has as
much and more to offer there.
To wit, a song about a southern
mother who tries to limit her
child to old thoughts and ideas
but fails so to all you
mothers that I love so, trust
your babies and let em grow.
In another selection he
recites (if thats the word)
Joseph Newmans Paradise
Almost Lost, a poem
concerning the time before all
men were queered by
apple-eating ladies, and before
Pepsodent or Lux, Sal Hepatica
or ducks, the time when two

A mans razor
isnt made
for a woman's body.
A womans body needs a woman's like a beauty salon. r"
shaver. A Lady Norelco 15L. It manicures, pedicures, mas-
A shaver thats comfortable for sages, applies facial creams, buffs iflSjft
a woman. and files nails, and stimulates your tFJF
A shaver that has two shaving scalp and muscles. |
edges. One for legs and one for un- But In another way, It's more L-v I
derarms. than a beauty parlor.
A shaver that shaves under- It also shaves your legs and /tRS/I fj
arms as close or closer than a blade underarms.
in 2 out of 3 shaves as tested in an j/ t
independent laboratory. (As does the /IM/idA/)* w
Beauty Sachet 25LS on the right.) f fUTGrW
The Beauty Sachet 25LS is just the close, fast, comfortable ladles' shaver
1968 North American Philips Company, Inc., 100 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10017

protozoa (bip bip)
accidentally learned to hug
and an angry God demanded
toll yet I take a certain pride
in that ancestral groom and
bride who, in some ways
unsatisfied, made hell on earth a
pleasure.
And in still another cut Rose
tells of Buzz the Fuzz, a cop
who falls for Alice D., a hippie
gal who drew a crowd 'cause
her inner piece was much too
loud love is so sensational
when you fall in love with eyes
dilational.
But perhaps the best
ingredients in Roses creation are
the occasional bright spots
that appear in his other songs.
For instance:
Fear is in your head
So forget your head
And youll be free.
I must tell the lie that a man
Must learn to kill to defend
What he thinks is right
The murderer shows himself in
many forms;
I make him live in you and me.
happy people dont go round
thrown rocks, thrown stones,
calln names, breakn bones...
they just sit and groove
too happy to move ...
theyve accepted Lifes
complexities

theyre contented within their
own particular,
own unusual exintricities.
Thus its apparent that, like his
predecessors, Biff Rose
definitely has something to say.
The way he says it coming on
in a style that manages to pool
the unlikely talents of Arlo
Guthrie (Alices Restaurant)
and Tom Leher (The Vatican
Rag) may turn off some
listeners, but then the voice and
style of Bob Dylan would
probably switch em off too.
Like both Guthrie and Leher he
often utliizes satire.
His voice is no more
melodic than is Guthries, but
somehow this doesnt seem to
matter. His accompaniment, like
Lehers is always a piano (which
he plays himself), which is
strange in this age of guitars and
electronics, but that doesnt
matter either. Youll be caught
up by his words the rest is for
decoration.
MuiiiHiiiiiimmiiiimimimiHmmiMUMwimmi
ORANGES |
$2 a bushel I
U-Pic-Em I
MODEL HOMES I
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. So. on 441
I



Page 20

I, Thu Florida Alligator, Ttwrarfay, DBBBtMRr S, 1988

12-oz. Com OLD MILWAUKEE . Limit 1 6 Pok with $5.00 or More
Pure hose Eluding Cigarettes
BEER OO*
FLOUR 5 49'/ COFFEE A
Beans 4/sl. Corn can #
No. 303 Con STOWLY TRENCH STYLE GREEN No. 303 Con STOKEIY 3 Sv. ALASKA
Bern* s/sl.Pms 5/sl. LMt I Cotton of Your Omico with BS.OO or Mon
Na 303 Can STOKEIY CUT WAX No. 303 Con STOKEIY SLICED ***"
Beans 5/$ I. Carrots.... i/$ 1.
QUANTITY WONTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOD THRU DEC. 7
FOLGER S TOMATO CATSUP 5/sl.
COFFEE FiUIT COCKTAIL 5/sl.
iHI V A I SLICED PEACHES 4/sl.
W 4V VWHITE POTATOES.... 6/$ 1.
PORK A BEAMS 7/sl.
11-ox. CRACKW'OpOO CHEESE 4 BACON 24-OJ. TROPICAL STRAWBERRY B/C
CIIIIVC o/ftA< DDBCEBIfCC n VMIm Bl DMIw 4/f Is
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PAPER TOWiLS u CQ, 1
MAYONNAISE 39* %M J M J/
FACIAL TISSUE.... 4/sl.
. 1
44 o* STOKEIY TOMATO No. Can VAN CAMP'S VIENNA SUPEHIAHB ORAM "A" FRESH ALL RtWTi PS A MOOS
Juice 4/sl* Sausage 5/sl. EC EC
Stew 2/89' Asparagus3/sl. tIU J 99^
Lmii'Z..4/si. loots. ...s/si. gggr|Fiiyeii#^ -^
8e0i..:...3/Sl. ML.... 4/Sl. DETERGENT 39'
||psp£' I' | Ijpi !jjji m
_ ______



QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOO THRU DEC. 7
_ WINN.DIIIK (TONGS. INC.-CONVNtONT-1((a
USDA CHOKE WD MAND CORN FED BEEF
Premium Round Steak.. 98*
| Canned HAMS Asirloin Steak.... 109I 09
V A i t J w Delmonicos T
Rib Roast -98*
mb. w o MANO AU MEAT STEW Os
GROUND CHUCK ..$1.99
4Wh4ffclflruili* BEEF RIBS or STRIPS
GROUND 8EEF....5- $1.99 A whole r whole med
USOA CHOICE W O WAND CORN FED BONELESS TOP m BEEF RIBS Bweiess H. Y. STRIP m
ROUND STEAK u sl*l9b *?.' teak h. y. stmp'siteak.jr V
nwwnv * inn SWISS STEAK $1.09 V Cfi,tttf*3SP $1 -*/
CHUCK STEAK 69< Ift MX
USOA CHOICE WO WAND COEN FED STEAK
PORTERHOUSE $1.29
Tr m m W-0 WAND LEAN BEEF W-D WAND KEF
OUfSTUK .11 10 SHORT R185..-49* GR. R0UND....98*
7" STEW 3 QQ< BEEF STEW 89*
RUMP ROAST $1.19
USOA CHOICE WO BEANO COEN FED BONELESS TOP
ROUND ROAST *SI #l9 maid ice milk
W *** V "" SUPERBRAND SHERBET OR JBfew
ROUND RdAST | Craam JRSN
chuck roast.. 59< vroam^^pf
POTATOES FROZEN FOOD
1 A |A JBEEF STEAKETTES 88*
V IU V BIACKEYE PEAS 2/sl.
MIX VEGETABLES 2/sl.
MORTON OE OCOMA
SKT_ 10 W Grapefruit 5-59* *l*7 PINNERS .....39*
Spies 5a W Avotados 4/sl. MEAT PIES S/sl.
Fele Beans 2 49< Onions 3 33' CREAM PIES 3/sl.
Oranges....s 49* Apples 2 39' PUMPKIN PIES 3/Sl.
___
HIP Blnw IDfiipl EnyliiS |
Sfeokctte,
"~~~ i^ i IMF -f **

Thunday, Dwamfcar 5, IMS. Tha Fieri* AMfrtor.

Page 21



. The Florida Alligator, Thu reday. December 5.1968

Page 22

British Grad Finds Home In Gainesville

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Faatura Writar
You were born in Shanghai.
Then moved to Hong Kong.
Your mother is Chinese, your
father Irish funny your last
name doesnt sound Irish, Mr.
Silvey.
You studied in England,
married an English girl and
wound up in British Honduras.
How did you ever come to
Gainesville?
Bill Silvey is one of many
students at UF specializing in a
particular field of study. In this
case it is tropical agriculture.
Silvey said his father worked
for the British Agriculture
Department in Hong Kong.
We left Shanghai in 1952
after the Japanese occupation
and Communist takeover. I went
to high school in Hong Kong and
got a scholarship to study in
England.
They made us work on a
farm. The administration called
this agriculture apprenticeship
but it was glorified labor,*
Silvey said.
Silvey lives in the Flavet
apartments with his wife and
sons, Sean, 3, who was born in
British Honduras, and Patrick,
16 months, born in Gainesville.
Mrs. Silvey majored in
physical education at a London
college 56 miles from London.
When asked how she met her
husband, she said, I went to an
all girls college. We had to
import men and I met Bill at a
dance.
Little Theatre
Gives Plays
The Gainesville Little Theatre,
4039 N.W. 16th Blvd., will hold
its autumn studio night at 8
pm, Friday, December 6th. A
one act play presented by
members of The Florida Players
will be followed by refreshments
and a discussion of the play.
Tryouts for GLTs third play
of the 1968-69 season, The
Subject Was Roses, directed by
Craig Hartley, will be held at 8
pm, Sunday, December 8 and
Monday, December 9.
The cast consists of a 50-year
old man, his wife, and their son
who has just returned from the
war. Production dates are
January 23, 24, 25, 30, 31, and
Feb.l.
NEED ZIPPY
CIS
CLASSIFIEDS

On the city of Gainesville,
Mrs. Silvey said, Compared to
British Honduras, its the height
of civilization.
Silvey is doing research in
tropical science and soils.
A friend in British Honduras
recommended coming here since
the UF has a center for tropical
agriculture. I was offered an
assistantship with the soils
department.
Last year the UF sent a group
of scientists, headed by Dr. J.
Gamble, to do a study of soil in
Panama as the federal
government was interested in
building a se>level canal. Silvey
was the one student chosen to
travel with Dr. Gamble.
I got material for my
dissertation, Silvey said, I am
studying the uptake of zinc in
tropical grass and legume.
Mrs. Silvey, who is expecting
her third child early next year
commented on the differences in
life between Gainesville and.
British Honduras. What
Americans consider basic are

M
Two reasons for joining Du Pont, and three for quitting.

yk Du Pont offers open-end opportunity. You dont
go into a training program. You go to work-in a
series of growth jobs that broaden your base for
professional progress and help you find the specific field
you want to grow in. We call it planned mobility.
Du Pont works at the outer limits. Sure, every everybody
body everybody claims they do the far-out research. But
Pont is a world leader in research with the
money and the engineering capability to translate ideas
into commercial products. If you have a profitable idea,
we have what it takes to make it work; and we have a
special bonus plan to reward you for it. So Du Pont
people grow, personally ana professionally. Even men
who leave Du Pont often do so because of the profes professional
sional professional growth they experienced at Du Pont.
An Equal Opportunity Employer (M/F)
College Relations

LURED BY TROPICAL AGRICULTURE

luxuries there, she said,
everything in British Honduras
is imported. Expenses are
terribly high. Thats one reason
we left. Bill gets more here as a
research assistant than working
as a British government officer.
Both have traveled quite
extensively. Theyve been to
Egypt, Bombay, Spain, Mexico.
The Carribbean Islands are just
fantastic, Silvey said.
Young people in England
travel abroad quite a lot, Mrs.
Silvey said, especially on ski
trips to Southern France or
Switzerland.
Except for a slight accent,
theyve become with it.
I learned to speak like
everyone else, Mrs. Silvey said,
otherwise Id be lost. One of
my friends told me Youd
better learn to speak the way I
do.* I was talking about nappies
and such.
Mrs. Silvey, who is also
president of the Agriculture
Dames Club, said, When we did
our skits for new members, we

had to change some of the
words. I kept calling a garbage
can a dust bin.
Still so British they were
asked about their feeling
towards the Beatles. Silvey said,
I liked them before they
became affluent.
Mrs. Silvey said, When they
were making their move up they
represented the working class.
Now that they have money,
theyve gone overboard.
The kids of the sos, Silvey
said, found music away out of
the poor cities. The Beatles shot
out of Liverpool and became
ambassadors of Britian. But,
with their drug kick, the attitude
has changed.
They no longer represent
British youth, Mrs. Silvey said.
After earning his Ph.D. the
Silveys plan to live in New
Zealand, where Silveys parents
live. They havent seen the
children yet. If New Zealand
isnt satisfactory, theyll go to
Australia where hell work in the
tropics.

<0 They go to universities, to teachrecognized
U authorities in their profession.
They go into space, or other government projects.
X) And they go to our competitors, who are smart
enough to know where to look for the top men.
We dont like to lose men, and we dont lose many. But
when you hire the best, then help them to get better,
your people are bound to be sought after.
'a***
Du Pont Company
Room 6686, Wilmington. DE 19898
Id like your latest information on opportunities at
Du Pont for graduates with degrees in
Name
University
Degree Graduation Date
Address
City State Zip

Silvey is also a member of the
soccer club. You must
remember, he said, that soccer
in England is football. Im just
learning about American
football.
It was interesting to note Mrs.
Silveys amazement when she
talked about getting credit at
local stores.
When I told the credit office
at Sears that we paid cash for
our car and some appliances
they seemed reluctant to give us
credit. It seems the more money
you owe the easier it is to get
credit. They eventually gave us a
credit card. Our bank in British
Honduras never bothered to
answer their letters about our
credit.
On the subject of married
students, Mrs. Silvey said, In
England when students marry
the door swings one way. Here
parents help their children if
they can. Weve seen both rich
and poor. But in England, once
they marry, theyre on their
own.



Thursday, December 5, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

|cijtioBonj^£Qus|
A m f
| What's amatter little fella. Ain't you never seen no\
\ college student afore?" f
FSU Dedication Set
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Florida State Universitys $4.6 million
chemistry graduate instruction and research building will be dedicated
Friday.
The building dedication coincides with the Southeastern meeting of
the American Chemical Society which is expected to bring 1,000
chemists here Wednesday.

TYPICAI, TENANT AT TYPICAL TENANT AT
TH OSZ OTHEfc APARTMENTS UNIVERSITY GARDENS
APARTMENTS
~ University Gardens Trace
708SW16THAVE PK 376 1£2-
T : r.

Page 23

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Features Editor
Its that Xmas-time-of-the Xmas-time-of-theyear
year Xmas-time-of-theyear thing once again and, in
good standing and excellent
accordance with the Alligators
policy of generosity and
benevolence, your friendly
college daily is planning to give
away valuable and precious gifts
to some of the more noteworthy
people here and there.
Jack Dawkins will receive a
complete collection of Dave
Gardner albums and an
autographed photo of George
Wallace.
Harold Aldrich gets a lifetime
subscription to the National
Enquirer.
Nick Arroyo will be gifted
with a book entitled
Photography for the Beginner
and a brand new Polaroid Big
Swinger.
The Alligator plans to give
to LBJ the Nobel Peace Prize
and will give the First Lady a
lifetime subscription to Beauty
Secrets magazine.
Jimmey Bailey will receive a
gift certificate which will enable
him to appear on The Dating
Game where he will have a
chance to win a weekend date
with Diana Ross and the
Supremes. If Jimmey wins this
big one, he and the girls will
spend an all-expense paid
weekend in Watts.
The Alligator will give
big-timer Larry Jordan a Black
Panther motorcycle jacket, a
five-day interview with novelist
James Baldwin and 500 Dixie


myresams

Boy fire Firecrackers.
The Alligator staff will be
presented with a large yellow
plaque with the words: You
Are Just Great! You Are Truly
Sensational!
David (Raving) Miller will find
yuletide joy in his gift: a solid
mahogany plaque with the word
Humility engraved in 14 karat
gold.
The Alligator will give
Chief of Police Audie Schuler
and W.D. Joiner a pound of grass
apiece. It will be sent

Winter Weather
Means Car Care

According to Ralph Carrico,
Ch r ysler Corporation service
representative for Florida and
Southern Georgia, Gainesville
winter weather cant hurt area
cars.
Sub-zero temperature is the
only time your car needs added
protection, Carrico said.
However, Carrico did
recommend certain measures to
be taken for winter car care in
the Gainesville area.
Anti-freeze should not only
be used in the winter, but all
year round, as it is necessary for
the cooling system of the car
and its anti-corrosive additives
guard your engine against rust,
Carrico said.
A lighter weight oil is only
necessary in sub-zero weather

anonymously through the mail
in a plain brown wrapper and
will be signed simply We all
love you.
And finally, in accordance
with our policy of giving the gift
that best suits the person, the
paper will gift the city of
Gainesville with a marble slab to
be erected next to City Hall.
Engraved on the marble will be
the words: The World Is a
Circus, and Gay-ness-ville Is Its
Sideshow of Freaks.

which I hope we (in Gainesville)
dont have to be concerned
about, Carrico said.
The colder weather should
have no bearing on the air
pressure you have in your tires,
Carrico said. He suggested
checking the cars drivers
manual for instructions on the
specific air pressure tires should
contain.
Cars should be waxed in the
winter months expecially since
frost conditions effect any
exposed metal subject to rust,
Carrico said. I recommend that
a car be waxed every 6 months
\ dth a paste wax.
Convertible and vinyl tops
require special care during the
cold weather.



Page 24

l. The Florida AHkptor. Thuraday, Paaaiwhar 5,1968

LED BY 6-10 WADDELL
Gator Frosh Take On Miami-Dade Tonight

Floridas freshman basketball
team opens its home season
Thursday when they host Miami
Dade Junior College at 8:00
pjiL in Florida Gymnasium.
The talent-rich Baby Gators
are expected to field their finest
team since Neal Walk was a
freshman in 1965. The Gators
feature excellent heighth,
strength and good outside
shooting.
GARY WADDELL
... 6-foot-10 starter

First Games Show
Basketball Upsets
$
With the 1968-69 college basketball season less than a week
underway, the upset bug is already biting where it hurts.
Fifth-ranked Kansas fell victim to a hot-shooting spurt by
Wisconsin early in the second half Tuesday night, trimmed a
nine-point deficit to two points but never could regain the lead and
the Badgers won, 67-62.
Villanova, the nations ninth-ranked team, was pressed but
managed to defeat Princeton 64-54 with a flurry of points in the final
three minutes.
Second-ranked North Carolina defeated Oregon for the second
straight night 106-73, fourth-ranked Notre Dame outbattled Kings
Coil 84-54 and seventh-ranked Davidson brushed aside Furman
1C iu other games involving the Top 10.
item Methodist, a pre-season favorite in the Southwest
Conference, lost its second game after Georgia Tech broke open a
52-52 tie with a wild scoring spree that gave the Yellow Jackets a
15-point lead and an eventual 87-59 victory.
In other key games, Michigan State opened its season with a 90-84
triumph over Southwestern Louisiana, Spencer Haywood scored 37
points and grabbed 24 rebounds to lead Detroit to a 106-99 overtime
victory over Western Michigan, and Ohio University rallied in the
second half to beat Indiana 80-70.
4
Kansas and Wisconsin played to a 30-30 halftime tie, but Jim
Johnson and Chuck Nagle shot the Badgers into their lead. Olympian
Jo-Jo White led the Jayhawk climb to /within a 59-57 deficit, but that
was the closest Kansas got.
Charlie Scott another Olympic star, scored 28 points to lead North
Carolina to its victory Over Oregon, while Notre Dame used the
formula of superior height and shooting to upend Kings College.
Davidson held Furman scoreless the first five minutes and
combined a tight defense with even scoring that saw four Wildcats in
double figures, headed by the 20 points of Doug Cook. Villanovas
Johnny Jones was the high scorer in the Villanova-Princeton game
with 30 points, including 20 in the last half.
IRNIVAL OF RACING
7th & SUN. DEC Bth
ATES OPEN 8 A.M.
AONO STARTS 12:30 P.M.
Mfihdtofeo
LLE, FLA. -3% Mi. North of Airport

Leading the list of Gators is
6-10 Gary Waddell from
Lexington, Ky., and 6-8 Dan
Boe from Rice Lake, Wisconsin.
Waddell will start at center and
Boe will get the call at forward.
Both boys have looked
exceptionally well in pre-season
drills.
The shooter for the Baby
Gators is expected to be Cliff
Cox, a 6-6, 180-pounder from
BPmvr
CLIFF COX
... ex-Deland star

Deland. Cox had a brilliant high
school career and was the
leading freshman scorer in
scrimmages against the varsity.
Darryl Ceravolo and Harold
Kelley will get the starting nod
at guard. Ceravolo is a 5-8,
150-pounder playmaker from
West Palm Beach and Kelley is a
6-2, 175-pounder from
Pensacola.

Lyons Earns Top Scoring Title

BIRMINGHAM (UPI)
Kentuckys Dicky Lyons won
the Southeastern Conference
scoring title the hard way-by
sitting out the tail end of the
season. Lyons gathered in 11
touchdowns in seven games
before being injured in the
eighth against Vanderbilt. But
his 66 point total proved too
much for Auburn placekicker
John Riley, who finished five
points back in second place.
Kickers Jim McCullough of
Georgia and Tennessees Karl
Kremser finished third and
fourth in the scoring race. Ole
Miss punter Julian Fagan came
on strong at the seasons end to
nip Georgias Spike Jones for the
punting title. Fagan, last years
runner up, claimed a 41.6 yard
average per boot. Conn Canale
of Mississippi State edged out
Tennessees Herman Weaver for
third spot.
Georgias Jake Scott,
considered by many the finest
defensive man in the league,

IN A BIND ]
I over Christmas J
I presents J
W again this year? B
J THE CAMPUS SHOP I
fi and BOOKSTORE 1
m has the perfect gift for M
M everyone on your list. m
R Come in and see our I
W display of gift books. Qfl
Â¥ We have hundreds of
I titles to surprise and ¥ J
1 please all age groups,
and YOUR BUDGET.

Scooter Houston, a 6-2,
190-pounder from Lake City is
slated to see plenty of action for
the Gators. Houston led his prep
team to the State Class A
semi-finals.
Rounding out the Baby
Gators is Kevin Rinehart from
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Jim
Below from Winter Park, Tim
Dominey from Vienna, Georgia,

walked off with the
interceptions and punt returns
titles. He veftirned 10
interceptions for 175 yards and
two touchdowns over the
season. Runner up Bill Young
of Tennessee had nine kickoffs
to his credit for 53 yards total
return yardage.

THMONGMIDGET
SEE THEM TODAY AT
AUTO STABLE
19 S W sth TERR 372-1345

and Roger Jones from
Edgewater.
Dominey, a 6-1,170-pounder
has been sidelined most of the
pre-season practice drills due to
a knee injury.
Following the Miami-Dade
game the Baby Gators will travel
with the varsity December 16 to
meet the Alabama freshmen.

In the punt return department
Scott handled 35 for an average
return of 12.6 yards including
one that went all the way for a
touchdown. Vanderbilts Doug
Mathews averaged 11.8 yards in
returning 30 punts, two for
scores.



ThurKtoy, December 5,1968, The Florida AUiptor,

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ALL-AMERICAN HOMEMAKER

For a change, this picture was
not taken by the Alligator's
finest, Nick Arroyo. It might be
because Nick was just finishing
up college when this picture was
taken back when Guy Dennis
Lienhard Tops
In Georgia
Cage Action
By United Press International
Robert The Lienhard began
his crusade Tuesday night to
lead Georgia out of the
basketball wilderness.
The 6-foot-8 junior center
from Brooklyn scored 29 points
and grabbed 32 rebounds in
leading the Bulldogs to a 107-67
slaughter of little Sewanee.
Guard Jerry Epling gave
Lienhard 27 point support and
reserve Tom Brennan, called by
coach Ken Rosemond the best
sixth man in the league,
contributed 17 points.
The contest seemed to verify
observations that Georgia is
ready to battle Kentucky,
Vanderbilt and Tennessee for
supremacy in the Southeastern
Conference after years of
bottom rung mediocrity.
In the only other game
played by a major Southeast
team Tuesday night, Georgia
Tech trounced Southern
Methodist 87-59 with the
Jackets sophomore sensation
Rich Yunkus getting 26 points.
Tech broke open a tight ball
game with a hot shooting streak
in the final 10 minutes and
coasted to victory that evened
its record at 1-1.
Fish Story
The Portuguese codfishing
is the worlds largest, says the
National Geographic.

Page 25

was a senior at Ward High
School. Supposedly the events
surrounding the shot of an
All-American homemaker were
that this was Senior Slave Day.
Anyway, it looked interesting.

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And wherever you find a congenial crowd, you'll
find Coca-Cola. For Coca-Cola has the refresh refreshing
ing refreshing taste you never get tired of. Thats why things
after Coke.
IgAINESVILLE COCA COLA
HHIMBMMI bomuw, company

IN SEC STATS
Bulldogs Take Home All

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI)
- Georgia ripped off 232 yards
on the ground in the 47-8 defeat
of Georgia Tech and took home
the Southeastern Conferences
rushing offense title.
The Bulldogs also won the
total offense and total defense
crowns.
Georgias final game upped
its rushing average to 198.8,
enough to vault LSU at 196.2.
Other frontrunners were Florida,
176.1; Tennessee, 151.7, and
Vanderbilt, 130.4.
On the other side of the
rushing coin, Alabamas tight
defense held opponents to an
average 84.9 yards per game to
Yarbrough
Signs For
Tampa Bowl
TAMPA (UPI) Another
All-American will play in the All
America All-Star bowl game here
Jan. 4.
The signing of All-American
Georgia tackle Bill Stanfill was
announced Tuesday, along with
three others. Stanfill and
University of Florida tight end
Jim Yarbrough will play for the
South.
Army fullback Bill Jarvis and
Penn State tackle Dave Bradley
will be on the opposing North
squad.
GATOR ADS SELL

finish first in that category.
State rival Auburn was second
with an 87.8 average. Tennessee
was third at 93.3 followed by
Georgia, 98.8, and LSU, 109.6.
Mississippi States heavy
passing attack earned them the
passing offense crown with a
204.7 average. Georgia picked
up second most yardage through
the air 192.9. Other
aerial-minded teams were
Tennessee, 186.1* Alabama,
180.2, and Auburn, 167.5.
The Commodores of
Vanderbilt combined a strong
pass rush with an alert secondary
to grab the passing defense title.
Vandys' opponents managed

JjJH f §
St? "4 St the are you up a R. 1
I llllj tree about Christmas? Mfe 1
11l Christmas giving you a Hfc 1
lli headache? Hf| 3
11111 e^ax dont let gift-giving @§j| 1
1 Sill problems spoil your holiday. |||fe 1
1 outstanding collection of desirable |Hj I
Ia I gifts for your Him or Her on |gp
1 ll|l y our list and wrapped with a |HR I
1 fi! P re tty bow at no extra cost to UK I
I|K : : you. Wm (
1 H And you may charge to your |Bp I
Istudent1 student account and pay when HB I
1 ||B y u Teturn a f ter the holidays .. Ip 3
Merry Christmas
|f|U from the Hff I
IJR Plenty Free Parking R .. |
S SR* at Rear of Store j W\"

only an average of 129 J y
through the air. Georgia rar :e t
second with a 136.3 ave u
followed by Horida, 14
Kentucky, 152.6, and Alabt
153.8.
In total offense, Georgia
combined running and passing
for an average 391.7 yards per
game. The Bulldogs far
outdistanced runner-up LSU at
350.7. Roup out the top
five were iennessee, 337.8;
Alabama, 305.5, and Mississippi
State, 301.5.
Georgia was also total
defense leader allowing
opponents 235.1 yards per f une
on the ground and passing.



Page 26

L_Thy Florida AUigtor, Thunctay, ITwnibw B. 1968

Gator Seniors
Take Final Bow

Beginning today, the AUigator
will salute Floridas graduating
footbaU players all 19 of
them.

Jp. vm*'
_3mi Al 9 * I ! 4
Si iBH : Hi
ll iRB *; %
V 188 V M
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wmrwf

Honors: 1966 SEC Sophomore
of the Year, 1966 Leading
Rusher in SEC, 1966
AU-SEC, 1967 AU-SEC, 1967
2nd Team All-America
(Sporting News, Football
News, American Football
Coaches), 1968 AU-SEC,
1968 AU-America (Sporting
News, FootbaU News).
Statistics: Holds Florida career
records for most runs from
scrimmage (541), most net
yards rushing (2373), most
TDs rushing (23). Second
only to Heisman Trophy

>^Ma|Jfe'"' IP* ~sy |f Jr ''SPfpHgw*
W JIH Sfi?
Kjf Bf

Honors: 1966 All-SEC
sophomore team, 1967
All-SEC, 1968 All-SEC, Most
Outstanding Offensive
Lineman in SEC in 1968
coaches poll, 1968 Ist team
all-America for UPI, New

LARRY SMITH

. GUY DENNIS
ALL-AMERICAN-1968

See More Pictures Page 2 7

To start off this page,
Floridas two top players of the
year in honors are featured.
They are Guy Dennis and Larry

winner Steve Spurrier in total
offense with 2514 yards'
gained on 2373 rushing and
141 passing. Caught 50 passes
for 607 yards and five TDs.
Holds school record for most
TDs scored with 28. Fourth
leading pass receiver in school
history.
Holds Orange Bowl records
for longest TD run (94
yards), most net yards
rushing (187) and average 1
gain per carry (8.1), all
coming in Gators 27-12
victory over Georgia Tech in
1967.

York Daily News, Offensive
Captain in 1968.
Statistics: Highest grading
offensive lineman in school
history (93.7%).

CORRECTIVE MEASURES COMING

Bartlett: Little Teamwork

Coach Tommy Bartlett, the
Little General of University of
Florida basketball, is worried
about his troops.
Right now we have a team
with too many individuals and
too little teamwork, Bartlett
says. We cant win on
individual effort alone against
the type of teams we will be
facing.
Bartlett is not at a loss to
explain what has happened, but
he does intend to take corrective
measures.
I believe the intense
competition we have had for
several spots on the starting
team has led to a situation where
players are operating as
individuals and not fitting
smoothly into the team
pattern, he says.
Bartlett, whose club opens its
season against JacksonviUe
University Friday night in the
first round of the JacksonviUe

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Civitan Basketball Classic, has
chosen his first seven players and
is seeking the eighth man to
round out his club.
The starters are sophomores
Todd Lalich of JacksonvUle and
Ed Lukco of Warren, Ohio,
junior Andy Owens of Tampa
and seniors Neal Walk of Miami
Beach and Mike Leatherwood of
Pensacola.
Lalich is 6-4 and averaged
25.4 points per game for the
freshmen last year, Lukco was
held out of action last year
foUowing a knee injury, Owens
hit for 14.2 points per game
while earning a spot on the SEC
all-sophomore team, Walk, team
captain, led the nation in
rebounding with 19.8 per game
and was 10th in scoring with
26.5 while earning AU-America
honors last year and
Leatherwood averaged 5.2 and
led the team in assists with 81
last season.
Behind this five are seniors

Richard Vasquez of Houston,
Texas, and Mike McGinnis of
ZephyrhiUs, both of whom saw
action last year and lettered.
We need to come up with
that eighth man to round out
the group and give usthe depth
we need against the calibre
opposition we must face, says
Bartlett.
Although there are many
possibilities for this spot, no
player has come to the forefront
enough to be worked into this
role, which amounts to virtually
being a first-stringer under
Bartletts system of play.
The eighth man will come
from a group which includes 6-5
sophomore Robert Agee of
Sparta, Tenn., 5-11 junior Tony
Duva of Fort Lauderdale, 6-3
senior Kurt Feazel of Harrisburg,
Illinois, 6-2 sophomore Nick
Fotiou of Paterson, N.J., and 6-1
senior Boyd Welsch of
GainesviUe.



Thur*d*V# Dwmtar 5,1968, Th* Florida Alliftm,

A Victory Ends Four Years Os Football

PAft 26
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MIKE HEALEY
Mike Healey comes from
Jacksonville, where he played
halfback for Englewood High
School.
Now, he plays tackle. He
started twice last year, but
hasnt been so lucky this year,
having been injured much of the
season.
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STEVE ELY
Steve Ely comes from Tampa,
where he played at Tampa Plaint.
Ely rates as a top-notch
scholar off the playing field.
Last year, he won the Matherly
trophy for the top average on
the team -a 3.76 in Engineering.
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EDDIE FOSTER
Eddie Foster plays defensive
tackle, and comes to Florida
from Decatur, Ga.
This year, Foster found
himself playing the second spot
through the season, generally
behind Jim Hadley, and so, has
seen little action in his final
year. ;

Page 27

BILL DORSEY
Honors: Defensive Captain in
1968,2nd Team All-SEC.
Statistics: Leading tackier
among Gator linemen last two
seasons with an average of eight
per game. In Florida system of
points for defensive excellence
he led linemen last two years.
Three-year starter at defensive
guard and tackle.
IHHK
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H A J
DAVE BARNHART
Dave Barnhart hails from
West Palm Beach, where he
played at Palm Beach High
School.
Dave has played second to a
pair of great Gators at center;
once to All-American Bill Carr,
and this year to Kim Helton.
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1
TbM CHRISTIAN
Rushed for 713 yards on 168
carries during his career and
scored five TDs. Caught 13
passes for 102 yards.
Fourth-leading rusher in SEC
this year with 112 carries for
509 yards, 4.5 average.

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BILL GAISFORD
Gaisford is from Ft.
Lauderdale, 565 where he
played for Ft. Lauderdale High
School.
Played flanker and defensive
comer, intercepted four passes
during his career returning one
which set up a score against Air
Force this season. Recovered
two fumbles.
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JIM YARBROUGH
Big Jim Yarbrough is from
Arcadia, Fla, where he played
for DeSoto County High School.
Honors: 2nd team afl-SEC
1967
Statistics: Caught 51 passes
for 685 yards and six TDs during
his career. He is the third leading
pass receiver in Florida history.



Page 28

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, Paaambar 5,1968

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