Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 51

BBIAN GOODHEIItf
O'CONNELL ON KANALI INCIDENT
... "students must work for better climate'

Intrastate Pickets
Decry Conviction
By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
In protest of judicial discrimination in the sentencing of politically
active individuals, about 20 state and campus radicals joined forces
Tuesday afternoon at the Alachua County Court House for the second
of a series of state protests.
The first was held Monday at Raiford State Penitentiary.
Members of the local branch of the Southern Students Organizing
Committee (SSOC) and of the state-wide Junta of Militant
Organizations (JOMO) were specifically protesting the arrest of Andre
Shellman, a St. Petersburg JOMO officer, who was found guilty on a
breaking and entering charge and sentenced to 10 years in prison.
Because of the arrest of activists like Carol Thomas and Jack
Dawkins, we find it necessary to carry it all over the state, said
Charles Fulwood; JOMO minister of reformation in St. Petersburg.
Mrs. Thomas, wife of a UF professor and leader of the Gainesville
civil rights movement, is presently serving a sentence for contempt of
court. A warrant is out for Dawkins who jumped bond during the same
contempt case.

The
t /. ' £
Florida Alligator

University of Florida Gainesville

URGES PROSECUTION OF MILITANTS
Crackdown Proposal
Goes To Committee

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writar
The Faculty Senate Tuesday
sent to committee two
controversial resolutions dealing
with student demonstrations,
and broke tradition by allowing
the press to attend the meeting.
One of the resolutions,
sponsored by agriculture
professor Dr. John Greenman,
urges the administration to use
any and all available resources to
quell student disruptions. The
other, introduced by political
science professor Dr. Gladys
Kammerer and Dr. Raymond
Fahien, chairman of the
chemical engineering
department, calls for a guarantee
of free speech and academic
freedom.
UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell, conducting the
meeting, said at the outset a
senate rule bars the press from
its sessions. Then, University
College Dean Franklin Doty
moved .for the rule to be
suspended for that meeting, and

Coed Refuses A ffi davit,
Rape Suspects Released

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writar
Five UF students who were arrested on rape
charges early Tuesday were released the same
afternoon when the alleged victim, a 19 year old UF
coed, refused to press charges.
The students were arrested at their S.W. 16th
Avenue apartment building after the coed reported
to police that she had been raped by several males
at the above address.
The coed told police the crime took place
between 11:30 p.m. Monday and 3:30 a.m.
Tuesday. She named the five who were

9L
i\ B I B If k
? B; B I ;ij; ll
NICK ARROYO
TWO ST. PETE JOMO MINISTERS TALK TO ALLIGATOR REPORTER ;
... George Washington Lumumba, minister of defense (I.) ; Charles Fullwood, minister of reformation (r.)

his motion passed. Other
outsiders were permitted to stay,
too, in another departure from
tradition.
An Alligator reporter and
photographer, two Student
Government officials, and about
ten* other students were in
attendance.
The resolutions about student
demonstrations were sent to the
senate ad hoc committee for
study, as a result of a motion
from economics professor Dr.
Clement Donovan, which was
carried by a moderate margin.
The move came over the
objections of several professors,
including Dr. Kammerer and an
unidentified professor who
claimed Greenman is the
chairman of the committee
which would consider the
Greenman resolution, and all
the members are on his side.
Actually, Dr. John F. Baxter,
professor of chemistry, is
chairman of the committee, and
he retorted, I am my own
man.

subsequently arrested and said three more males
were involved.
The students, ranging in age from 19 to 22, were
released immediately when the coed refused to sign
an affidavit before the county judge.
Gainesville Police Chief W.D. Joiner could release
no other details on the incident since there will be
no prosecution.
He said there would be an investigation on the
part of UF officials, but that his office would not
become involved in the case unless additional
information warrants further investigation.
The dean of Mens office had no comment to
make on the incident when contacted Tuesday
afternoon.

AiMrta't
Numbtr I
Collet
Daily

Wednesday, December 4, 1968

He was asked by Ernest Jones,
professor of law, whether the
committee will hear reports
from those who think the
Greenman resolution should be
defeated.'*
The committee has already
finished most deliberations on
the resolutions, Baxter replied,
because I did not know the
resolutions would be on the
senates active agenda.
Besides, it is customary to bar
non-members from committee
meetings, he said, because of
the size of the room.
The controversial Greenman
resolution, which claims the UF
is vulnerable to uprisings by
militant students, calls for the
administration to vent the full
force of the Code of Student
Conduct and criminal
prosecution on such students.
The resolution provoked
angry reaction from several
student leaders Monday, who
claimed the proposal calls for a
(SEE 'CRACKDOWN' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, Thm Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, Dacamfaar 4.1988

Daley, Police Chief Deny Police Riots In Chicago

See Editorial Page 8
CHICAGO (UPI) Mayor Richard J.
Daley and Police Supt. James B. Conlisk
Jr. Tuesday denied police rioted while
combatting demonstrators during the
Democratic national convention.
Conlisk, in his first public reaction to
the so-called Walker Report, said in a
news conference that he rejects Mr.
Walkers conslusions that the police
were the rioters of convention week. To
speak of a police riot* is to distort the

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MERRY CHRISTMAS
Santa Claus arrived on campus early Tuesday afternoon to
highlight a Christmas party at the SAE fraternity house for children of
Flavett Village. The youngsters were treated to cookies, punch and
presents by the jolly merry-maker from the North Pole.
Crackdown Proposal
Goes To Committee

police state and advocates
double jeopardy.
In other business at the senate
meeting Tuesday, O'Connell
called upon all UF students to
be friendly and courteous to
black students, so there will not
be another incident like what
happened to Fred S. Kanali, a
black student who fled the UF
two weeks ago because of
community hostility.
He laid the blame for abuses
to black students on students

THE FLORIDA ALUOAtOR la the official state! newspaper f the University of Florida
sad Is pffUM ftp* teas weekly except dutaf June, July aad Aagaat when It Is ptottabed
auml ~iphlj. tel te| state! holidays aad anus periods. Editorials represent only the
opiates of their asters. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Halts
Union Bril at. Uriasislty of Florida, Galnssvtllo, Florida, SMOI. The Alligator is eaterod
as Stead class matter at the United States Post Offion at Gainesville, Florida, SMOI.
SutMcrtoUon rate it S 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the ngnt to regelate the typographical toon of all adver advertlssmaats
tlssmaats advertlssmaats aad to revise or tan away copy etdoh tt oonsiders objeettonable.
At Florida Alligator toll not consider adjustment! of payment for any advertisement
Into Tin tjypfSt errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Adverttota
ttota Adverttota yr~i within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
sot ho rnsjioneltile for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement schedated
to ran several times. Mottoes tor correctloa mast be given before nest Insertion.
. .... naswm

history of those days in August," he
said.
Daley drifted his position from that
of Sunday, when he called the report of
the government task force excellent
with some reservations.
In a news conference Tuesday, Daley
denied police rioting.
There wasnt any police rioting
during the convention," he said. I take
exception to the entire summary. The
report itself is complete. The only thing
lacking is substantiation of the charges

and student-aged persons.
I talked with another black
student recently, he said, and
he told me that while the faculty
and administration were good to
him, the students were not.
This made me heartsick, he
said, because there is nothing I
can do about it. It is the
responsibility of every student
and student organization to
work to create a better climate
on this campus for minorities.
Not only black students, but
some white students from other
countries have also been forced
to leave the UF, O'Connell said.

STUDENTS CLUBBED
Demonstrators, Police
Clash In San Francisco

(See Editorial, Page 8)
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
Club-swinging police and
demonstrators spitting
obscenities clashed Tuesday at
San Francisco State College as
classes proceeded under the Firm
rule of acting President SJ.
Hay aka wa.
Three youth were bloodied in
one encounter with police.
Another was clubbed into
submission after leading officers
on a half mile chase.
Ten militants, including two

Tree Lighting Tonight
The annual Mortar Board Christmas tree lighting will be held
tonight at 10 on the grounds at the University Auditorium.
President Stephen C. OConnell will deliver a Christmas message to
the students before the tree ceremony. The message is sponsored by
the University Religious Association.
Christmas Carols will fill the air as the University Choir leads
students is songs of the season.
Refreshments will be served.

FASHIONS!!
Just in time for the Holidays! \
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EVERYTHING-1
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Dresses, Sportsuits, Ensembles, j
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VISIT OUR PSYCHEDELIC TUNNEL!!
See the New Styles and Fabrics!!! j
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made in the summary, he said.
The mayor denied, as charged in the
report, that his controversial order of
shoot to kill arsonists and maim
looters" after the April West Side riots
infludenced police actions during the
convention.
That order had nothing to do with
it, he said. We have had a lot of
parades and demonstrations since then
with no trouble."
He also denied reports that he had
been at odds with the Justice

girls, were seized to bring to 17
the number of arrests since
classes reopened Monday under
get-tough regulations proclaimed
by Hayakawa.
The little English professor
was selected as the third
president this year by state
college trustees in a move to
quell sporadic uproar at the
18,000 student campus.
Militants went on strike Nov. 6
and subsequently forced the
resignation of Dr. Robert R.
Smith as president.
A group of 40 demonstrators

Department on the question of how to
handle the threatened demonstrations.
Conhsk said he had read the entire
345-page Rights in Conflict report
and that his disagreement with Daniel
Walker, head of the study team, should
not be interpreted as condoning any
misconduct by any police officer.
If Mr. Walker, after his investigation,
has any additional evidence against
specific police officers, he has the
responsibility to produce it, Conlisk
said.

pounding on garbage cans and
using a bullhorn in violation of
Hayakawas regulations was
surprised by a squad of 30
officers. As the dissidents
attempted to flee in all
directions, the dub-wielding
officers subdued eight youths
and two girls in swift fashion.
The campus was only sparsely
populated at the time when a
police van arrived later to take
away the dissidents, other
demonstrators gathered around,
chanting strike, strike and
pigs off campus.
You ought to be shot,
shouted one youth at an officer,
who turned and demanded: Is
that a threat?
A larger group of
demonstrators attempted to
disrupt classes again outside the
same building. As officers
marched to the area, lookouts
warned the demonstrators.
Run, run, here they come,
shouted the lookouts. Pigs are
coming. Oink, oink.



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Wedneeday

Page 3



Page 4

l. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, December 4,1968

OConnell Taps
3 Administrators
Alligator Services
UF President Stephen C. OConnell recently named two alumni
and a educator from Michigan State University to key administrative
positions.
Dr. Robert F. Lanzillotti, chairman of the economics department
at Michigan State, was named dean of the College of Business
Administration, effective Julv 1.
Fred H. Cantrell, now vice president of the first National Bank in
Gainesville, a UF graduate, has been named dean of university
relations and development. He will assume his duties Dec. 15.
The new director of physical planning is Walter J. Matherly,
currently manager of systems and programming at Duke University,
whose appointment is effective Jan. 1.
We are extremely fortunate to obtain the services of these three
men at a time when the universitys role is continuing to be more
diversified and demanding, OConnell said.
Lanzillotti will replace Dean Donald Hart, who resigned last August
to take a teaching position at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Dr. John
McFerrin will continue as acting dean until July 1.
The addition of Dr. Lanzillotti as dean of our business college
gives us a qualified and capable individual to direct one of our fastest
growing academic programs, OConnell said.
Lanzillotti received his bachelors and masters degrees from
American University and his Ph.D. in economics at the University of
California. He was on the economics faculty at Washington State
University until his appointment as professor and chairman of
economics at Michigan State.
He is a member of the American Economic Association and Phi
Beta Kappa. He has published five books and 21 monographs, articles
and papers.
Cantrell will replace Alan J. Robertson who resigned in August to
become special assistant to President Joseph Fordyce at Santa Fe
Junior College.
Cantrell received his bachelors degree in business administration at
the UF in 1940 and then entered the U.S. Army. He retired from the
Army in 1963 with the rank of colonel and was awarded the Legion
of Merit and the Silver and Bronze Stars with Oak Leaf Clusters.
Dean Cantrell will give us leadership in the areas of seeking
private support, as well as strengthening relationships with the many
publics we have our students, faculty, staff, alumni, state officials,
and the citizens of Florida, said OConnell.
Matherly received his bachelors degree form UFs College of Arts
and Sciences in English, history and economics, and his masters
degree in economics from Duke. He worked as an economist at*the
Research Triangle Institute in North Carolina for two years before
assuming his present post in 1966.
He has written seven papers dealing with budgeting techniques, and
is the principal investigator for an Educational Facilities Laboratory
project, Computor-Aided Planning for Colleges and Universities,
that will be completed this month.
Mr. Matherlys role will match the function of our construction
program with our future building needs, OConnell said. He will
also be responsible for the coordination so available space and how
efficiently we utilize it.
Ro Mo has a a
- a Stocking Special
REG. $17.95 NOW $13.88
.(Hi |'' r
V.. j
iiliiys
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I cTJL sh£s | 376-7657

fN book EXCHANGE
SG Helps UF Students
Buy Lower, Sell Higher

Student Government will again this year
sponsor a book exchange, allowing students to
sell their books for more and buy them for
less.
Glenn Bryan, who is heading up the exchange,
said the plan eliminates the middle man.
Students sell their books at the same price
another student buys it at.
Bryan said any student may bring a book to
the sale site, the Reitz Union colonnade,
Thursday or Friday from 11 a.m.4 p.m.
Books may also be placed up for sale during
those hours all next week.

W HATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN GIGANTIC COP-OUTS:
After much soul-searching, I
have decided I have no time
today to write this stupid
column with finals impending. If
I get any remarks about this
being the best column Ive
written all year, I will be hurt.
Whoever pays me around this
joint can deduct my pay
accordingly.
LATIN AMERICAN
COLLOQUIUM: Student
Rebellion in Latin America in
the Light of European
Experience. Talk by Dr.
Stanislav Andreski. Latin
American Colloquium Room,
College Library, 8 p.m.
BUS INESS ADMINISTRA ADMINISTRATION
TION ADMINISTRATION DAMES: Meeting tonight
at home of Dr. and Mrs. John H.
Faricy, 1510 NW 30 St., 8 pjn.
WESTMINISTER
FELLOWSHIP: Room 123,
Reitz Union, 7:30 pjn.
SAILING CLUB: Union
Room 363,7:30 p.m.
LATIN AMERICAN CLUB:
Union Auditorium, 8 pjn.
CHRISTMAS ON CAMPUS:
University Auditorium, 10 p.m.

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B 1 PiTO ** Chkk *". Cliwr frta
M \ COUNTRY DINNER ... 89* m
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H ion n.w. iihi t acim. fSf
Aer,w *! G*i*tvill H!|k scHol |JI

I Sisve/mat& #1
I PRE-CHRISTMAS I
I A MOST TIMELY CLEARANCE I
I IN OUR LADIES DEPARTMENT I
I DRESSES AND KNITS I
Igroups of i /q I
I SPORTSWEAR */ I
I OFF I
I OPEN lIL 9:00 PM STARTING THUR I
I Ladies Dept I
225 W UNV AVE Mezzanine Floor J

When students bring a book in, Bryan said,
they will tell the sale attendant the price they ar
asking. A receipt for the price asked will be
issued to the student and a duplicate will be
placed inside the book.
A student wishing to buy the book will pay
the attendant the price requested. The student
selling the book may return anytime within the
next two weeks and receive the money. If his
book was not sold, it will be returned to him.
The exchange will continue during finals
week, two days before classes resume in January
and the first week of classes.



Veterans Added To List Os Gator Boosters

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
I thought the stadium would
rattle apart.**
"Wait *tfl next year!**
These were typical reactions
after Saturdays big Gator win
over Miami. Almost anyone on
campus could have made them
and in aO likelihood probably
did at one time or another.
But these particular
statements weren't made by
students or faculty or happy
alumni. They were made by
some quite untypical Gator fans.
But still fans nevertheless.

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BRIAN GOODHEIM
GROUND LEVEL VIEW
.. McCleskey saw Gators romp Miami
K Union Boord m
CHRISTMAS |
/f Mr 5r

They are members of a
growing list of Gator boosters at
Gainesville's Veterans
Administration hospital on
Archer Road.
How did they become Gator
boosters?
It wasn't easy.
First a little background. For
each of the four home games
this season the UF Veterans
Club invited eight hospital
patients to sit in its block.
The chib purchased date
tickets through Miles Wilkins,
Student Body secretary of
athletics.
But because the club was
denied money on the current

Student Government budget, the
tickets had to be paid for from
donations, dues and existing
funds, former club president
Jim Hollis says.
The club approached Joseph
Kelley, VA hospital director of
voluntary services, with the
invitation to the games.
The patients reacted
enthusiastically to the invitation,
Kelley says.
Since the VA hospital came
to Gainesville,** he said, no real
opportunity had arisen for this
type of activity."
Os the 32 tickets the club
provided, 27 were used by the
VA patients. The five not used
because of vacancies were turned
in. A few patients were
fortunate enough to attend more
than one game, Hollis said.
The game provided quite a
lift for the patients; there is no
question about the benefit,"
Kelley said.
Most of the 27 patients who
attended the games have been
discharged from the hospital.
Only five could be rounded up
recently to talk about their
outing at the games.
One patient who had a
chance to get a ground level view
of Saturdays game was Clinton
McCleskey, a wheel chair
confined veteran of World War II
from Waycross, Ga., and a
Touchdown Club member there.

"It took a sick mind and a frail body
to write my kind of book."
mfl I ft I I ] I
1 I I [i] \mT ]
"Fortunately, I possess two of each!'

When THE INSTANT BUTTON BOOK
ripped off sales of 14 copies in Seal
River, Maine and 22 in Bladder,
Arkansas I knew that it wouldn't be
long before the literary public would
be screaming for more. Hence, my v
second book of hilarious button
sayings, which after much hair
searching and soul pulling I decided to
entitle SON OF THE INSTANT
BUTTON BOOK.
Each button saying is printed on
pressure sensitive paper with a
tenacious, sticky backing. You get a
blank button to stick them on, or you
can stick them on any non-protesting
object. Some of the sayings will make

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BRIAN GOODHEIM
VETS RELAX AFTER BIG GATOR WIN
... Goodwin, Kostelnik, Griffin, and Doty Congratulate IIF Team.

The winnins touchdown was
.scored right in front of me!'
McCleskey, who had a sideline
spot next to the cheerleaders,
said.
Besides McCleskey, Vincent
Kostelnik, Winter Park, James
Doty, Jacksonville, James
Goodwin, Piedmont, Ala., and
Elliot Griffin, Orlando, all had
many congratulations to make
on the Gator win.
The VA hospital draws
patients from not just the state
but from all over the South,
Kelley said.
Kelley had personal thanks
for Hollis who he said was
instrumental in getting this
done.

WNWiMday, Pwintir A I*BB. The Florida ABlpter,

you angry. Some will make you laugh.
All will make you sick if you eat
them. None will grow hair.
You can pick up both books for a
dollar each at some book stores.
Others may throw you out.
DAVID MARTIN
Author and All-Around Nice Guy
Published by Day lark Press; distributed
by Doubleday & Company, Inc.
I DOUBLEDAY

The coordination was
excellent/* he said.
Hollis said no definite plans
have been made for next year
because of lack of funds.
{ oyniauUD SndA
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ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE

Page 5



Page 6

The

Accent Names
Two Winners
Accent Symposium
announced Tuesday that Neal
Drake lUC, and Dehnar Cain
2UC, are the winners of the
Accent essay contest held last
November.
Drake won the freshman
division and Cain won the all
campus division. Each will
receive $25 for their winning
essay.

Students Get Flu Vaccine

UF students lined up this
week with open mouths and
bared arms in a test study aimed
at preventing a campus epidemic
of Hong Kong flu.
Students were encouraged by
Dr. Wilmer J. Coggins, director
of student health, and Dr.
Robert H. Waldman, assistant
professor of medicine and
microbiology, to participate in
the immunization program.
Two methods of
administering the new Hong
Kong flu vaccine were used: the
standard injection and a new,
painless aerosol spray first
utilized by Dr. Waldman in a flu
field study last year at Florida
State Prison at Raiford.

Heart Research Film
Premiers Thursday
Highway to Healthy Hearts, a film dealing with highlights of
heart research, premieres Thursday at the UF Health Center
Auditorium.
John Thome, instructor in the College of Journalism and
Communications, produced the film with the cooperation of the
Alachua County Heart Division. A grant from the Florida Heart
Association financed the production.
Scheduled for public showing at 4 p jil, the film demonstrates that
heart research also is conducted outside the laboratory, such as in
areas of engineering, mathematics, electronics and veterinary science.
Assisting in the production were Ken Brown, chief photographer in
the Department of Medical Photography, who was medical
cinematographer for the film; Marilyn Maple, history research
assistant for the Florida State Traveling Museum, writer; Dr. Jape
Taylor, professor in the Department of Medicine, and Dr. Gerold
Schiebler, professor and chairman of the Department of Pediatrics,
consultants. The premiere is open to the public.
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FRENCH FRIES ,VEG SALAD
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DROPOUTS HOWARO POST
/jSk /Sin ipyifs (eMP-fh

Purpose of the study is to
determine the effectiveness of
the two immunization
techniques. The physicians also
hope to determine if the
standard flu vaccine also
protects against other strains of
influenza, such as the new Hong
Kong strain, or whether each
new flu strain requires a new
vaccine.
A small portion of students in
the study will receive a harmless
saline solution. While this will
not provide protection against
the flu, it will enable physicians
to determine the effectiveness of
the vaccines used.
The volunteer students will
be randomly divided into five

groups. These groups will receive
Hong Kong vaccine by injection,
regular flu vaccine by quay, or
saline injection. No one will
know to which group he
belongs.
Both physicians stressed that
students receiving flu
immunization, are less likely to
miss class' or lose study time
because of the flu, and will be
contributing greatly toward
medical knowledge of vaccines.
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Italians Demonstrate In Protest Os Police

ROME (UPI) A nationwide
wave of street demonstrations
and strikes swept Italy Tuesday
from Sicily to Venice. Tens of
thousands protested the police
killing of two Sicilian strikers
Monday.
Bitter reaction to the incident
at Avola, Sicily the bloodiest
street violence since
Communist-led riots eight years
ago overshadowed the efforts

Marines Close Ring Around
Communists Near Da Nang

SAIGON (UPI) American
Marines Tuesday closed a ring
around a Communist force
entrenched in concealed bunkers
and holes south of Da Nang. A
prisoner said the Red troops had
orders to fight to the death.
About 3,000 Marines
searched for the Communist
unit, which a North Vietnamese
prisoner said numbered 240
well-armed men.
The search brought the
two-week-old Operation Mead
River 13 miles south of Da Nang
near a climax, Marine spokesmen
said. The purpose of the sweep
was to root out Communist
forces which have dominated the
area for years, and the
spokesmen said 400 Communists
had been killed and scores
captured since the drive began.
As the Marines continued
their operation, Hanoi radio
Tuesday claimed a pilotless UJS.

II IS mens dept. |J
jj Wishes you to join in giving Ki
fftf) used dothing to the needy.
Bring in your used shirts
(sport, knit, dress) or some old PS
trousers (dress, casual) and
well give you an allowance of B
SI.OO I
g>'
toward the purchase of a similar kl
item from our wide selection of
mens wear. Bring in as many P
items as you wish, regardless of
their condition, to receive your ||
one dollar allowance. (si
The used clothing will be I
donated to worthy non-profit jSf
organizations.
OFFER GOOD TIL DEC 13th B
jz&lfopl
B 1620 WEST UNIVERSITY Wt
B UNIVERSITY PLAZA V/
03| wKP)M [HisSt WSSBk

of Premier-designate Mariano
Rumor to form a coalition
government.
Bombs exploded Tuesday
outside police barracks in Pisa
and a city government building
in Genoa, shattering windows.
More than 20,000
demonstrators marched through
downtown Rome with
police-murderers placards
while port workers in Venice

reconnaissance plane was shot
down in Yen Bai Province
northwest of the North
Vietnamese capital. The
broadcast said it was the ninth
American plane downed over the
North since the Nov. 1 bombing
hah.
i m fcThe U.S. command has
acknowledged the loss of three
planes.
In the South, Communist
gunners shot down a U.S. Army
HUI helicopter 66 miles
northwest of Saigon in Tah Ninh
Province, wounding the two
crewmen. It was the 944th
American helicopter downed in
South Vietnam.
In raids Monday night and
Tuesday, U.S. 852 bombers
dropped hundreds of tons of
bombs in Tay Ninh, Binh Duong
and Kien Phong provinces
around Saigon. They struck at
Communist infiltration routes.

idled nearly SO ships with a
24-hour sympathy strike.
All of Sicily was paralyzed by
a general strike supported by the
islands three major labor
unions, whose members closed
factories, offices and sulphur
mines. Farm workers set up new
roadblocks outside Avola with
felled trees, stones and tractors.
Two striking farm workers

Troops of the U.S. 199th
Light Infantry Brigade turned
up a munitions cache 16 miles
southwest of the capital.
Spokesmen said the infantrymen
were led to the cache by a
detainee and discovered 124
rocket grenades and 100
boosters.
UPI correspondent Raymond
Wilkinson reported Marines
operating south of Da Nang took
the North Vietnamese prisoner
during a firefight Tuesday. He
said the prisoner told
interrogators 70 of the 240
Communist troops still in the
area were wounded but that
they had orders to fight to the
death.

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were shot to death Monday and
52 other persons were injured
when police tried to remove a
roadblock. Officials said strikers
pelted police with rocks and
bottles and were driven off only
by pistol lire.
Forty-seven of those injured
were police, officials said.
President Giuseppe Saragat
ordered a full investigation into
the shootings. Local landowners
granted the farm workers a 10
per cent raise in pay and agreed
to discuss other demands in an
effort to cool off the situation,
reported tense throughout
Sicily.

at ntfitSfi?^
AUJO STABIE
19 S W sth TERR 372-1345

Wadnwday, Dwmbir 4,1968, The Florida Altltor.

Libor unions called a
nationwide farm strike for
Wednesday. Another one million
workers were scheduled to strike
Thursday in Rome and
surrounding towns.
If you must
M sell out...
use
Gator
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Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, December 4,1968

Page 8

Th Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Dave Doucette
-o i 4 Managing Editor
Daye Reddjck James Cook
Aiii/fiifQii Assignments Editor_ News Editor

V fBHOr
> nsiuKV>

[Staff Writings l '"='!. ..
Kinky Film Wont Do
By Robert Sistrunk

If you dont have the
patience of Job and the
coordination of a juggler, dont
bother to develop your own
film.
Six hours and five rolls of
film it took me to get a good
development. (This is not to
mention continuous frustration

Alligator Inquizitor
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Well, I bring unfortunate news today. I decided
Thanksgiving weekend that I shall be going into the army next
month. Not to fight, I will be playing in a band. But this means
that this is my last week of writing. For the Alligator. Which
also means that there will be no INQUIZITORIUM. And Im
sorry. But in my case this has to be. And like, in the words of
Dick Martin, the life you save my be your Rowan.
Todays questions:
1. Who were the 4 panelists on the Ive Got a Secret show
and who was the moderator?
2. Who is representing the United States, North
Vietnam, South Vietnam, and the National Liberation Front at
the Paris Peace Talks?
3. a) What is the color of the walls surrounding the
elevator doors on the first four floors of the Reitz Union?
b) One of the most popular spots in the Union is the
Music Listening Room-Browsing Library on the second floor.
Can you remember the color of the rug in this location?
4. Can you name five of the original Mousketeers?
5. What is the name of Roscoe Sweenys little sister in the
Buz Sawyer comic strip?
6. Would it be right to say that Pamme Brewer was
forbearing?
Yesterdays answers:
1) Sissy, Buffy, Jody 2) Zapruder 3) Fourteen books of
the Old Testament, taken from the Septuagint but not found in
Hebrew, now excluded from most authorized versions of the
Bible. 4) Janet Leigh, Psycho; James Cagney in Public Enemy
5)904
Take a picture of Nick Arroyo today. ..
WM AV.V.V.V.WWM%N%W.V.V, MW.V.V.%VAV* .V.V.V.W. .W.VIV.V.V.

and a near nervous breakdown.)
I began my darkroom
experience by kinking my
practice roll of film. (This means
I couldnt get the film on the
roller properly.)
Kinking your film wont do.
This assures you of ruining at
least two negatives.

7W *o make peaceful revolution impossible mill make violent revolution inevitable. I
I ... John F. Kennedy |

EDITORIAL
Curb The Police

The Chicago riots May have marked the
beginning of a dangerous trend in the United
States.
Since last August and with increasing
regularity, young protestors and police have
taken to the streets in serious and bloody
combat.
And the implications are impossible to
ignore.
If the United States stands in danger of
tendencies toward the police state, then
those tendencies must be resisted
conscientiously by every American,
regardless of partisanship, as the worst of all
possible fates.
If the police are acting on the demands of
representative officials, then those officials
must be severely censured and if necessary,
removed by their constituents.
And if the police are acting on a mandate
of the people of the United States, then
that mandate must be ignored and a
thorough soul-searching conducted by the
people themselves.
Because, whatever conceivable
justification can be made for the
ill-considered and deplorable actions of the
nation's largest police forces, they are totally
opposed to the best interests of a democratic
society.

After I found out I could not
get the practice roll on the roller
with the light on, I decided to
try it in the dark with an
exposed roll. (After all, I
couldnt do any worse.)
Well, I did do worse. Time
after time 1 got my film kinked
until at last 1 left it kinked and
put it into the developing tank.
The difficult part was over
but the tedious work was yet to
come. It began when I poured
the developing chemical into my
tank.
Every minute for fifteen
minutes I had to agitate the
solution. (This is a trial on the
nervous system.)
When the developing solution
had done its work it was time to
fill my tank with hypo. (What
hypo is I do not know but this
was the next step.)
While the hypo was in the
tank I stood around for ten
minutes to agitate
occasionally the solution.
The whirlpool bath came next.
This lasted for three minutes and
then 1 was ready to take a look
at my developed negatives.
Forget it!! They were
terrible. Because 1 had krinkled
my film, several exposures were
completely ruined. The
remaining negatives were sadly
over-developed.
So, four rolls of film and five
hours I labored until at last I
developed a roll properly.
Why did I go on? I obviously
lacked both the patience of Job
and the coordination of a
juggler. The answer is simple. I
am taking a photography course.

rjT* JgMjgL '*
x VinTr^
qK. ~iu .jff y
Gee, You Don't Look Like A Dove"
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are thoae of the editors or of
the waiter of ihe article and not those of the Univerritv of Florida.

While violent actions are highly
reprehensible among private citizens, within
the ranks of those who are sworn to uphold
the law, violent over-reactions are
intolerable.
Nothing can justify the tear-gassing and
indiscriminate clubbing of young
schoolchildren. No cause is sufficient for the
harassing and beating of news reporters. No
imaginable degree of verbal abuse, rock or
even defecation-throwing can account for
the massive injuries suffered by Chicago
demonstrators.
An increasing number of Americans,
young and old alike, feel that they are being
disenfranchised, trampled under foot. Their
feelings are not without justification.
Numerous programs set up for their relief
have backfired, an unpopular war has
declared the rule of force a reality. Those
caught up in a flood of anger and frustration
have nowhere to go but to the streets. Many
of them dont know what they are looking
for but only that they desperately need to
find it. 1
And until they do, a generation of
comfortable Americans must realize that the
need is real.
And that the cry must not be stifled in
blood.



Speaking Out ==^==^^^^=^=========^========
Voluntary PE Yes But Miller No!
By Douglas Shachtman

Compulsory PE is admittedly not fair to the
student when it is offered without credit, but the
problem is to give the course credit, not to eliminate
it.
1 enjoyed David Millers letter of tribute to one
of the most outstanding athletes of his time, himself
(imagine, 93rd percentile in the 9th grade physical
fitness tests AND a softball batting championship).
Unfortunately his letter was irrelevant and
erroneous in regard to the issue of compulsory PE.
PE is not aimed at the varsity or active athletes
who exercise enough to keep their bodies in order,
but rather at those persons who are consistently
tired, unable to carry on any continuous activity
without becoming fatigued, and who are more

OPEN FORUM:
Aimhmi ViMwt
-There is mo hope for the complacent man.

Abrams Warns Os Pit Then Fails In

MR. EDITOR:
Michael Abrams, in his
attempt to indict Mr. Alper for a
colossal non-sequitor, has
betrayed his own lack of logic.
Mr. Alper in his article spent
a great deal of time to tell us we
think too much. Mr. Abrams
wasted his time saying let us
think first and act if and only if
our thoughts are clear and we
know what we are going to do.
Mr. Alper says that thoughts are
not enough and that thoughtful
action is the next step.
Apparently Mr. Abrams takes
the same position that thought
should precede action, for he
writes as previously quoted, let
us think first..
If Mr. Alper created a
non-sequitor, then Mr. Abrams
has fallen prey. Both share the
same view.
Abrams mentions thought for
thoughts sake. To my own
mind, there is nothing more
pleasant than thought simply for
the sake of thought. I like a cool
autumn morning, a clear running
creek, a fine spinning reel, a big
bass in the waiting, and lots of
time to think away the lazy
afternoons.
Mr. Abrams, do you mean to
say that you like the thought of
a cool autumn morning . .?
To declare a love of thought and
then enumerate things which

Movie Was Abortive Attempt At Reality

MR. EDITOR:
I too saw that strange
haunting experience, Secret
Ceremony, and its true that Mia
Farrow does a good acting job.
But the first moments, when
Mia sidles up to Elizabeth Taylor
and cries for us, get the movie
off to a boringly good start.
But after a revolting eating
scene, Elizabeth Taylor has all
the appropriate emotional
reactions to have been Mias real
mother in an amnesiac state

bring you joy such as a big bass
in the waiting is simply
incongruous.
On the other hand, if you do
mean to say, I like (the thought
of) a cool autumn morning you
have failed to understand Mr.
Alper. Thought as you exhalt it
in your article (i.e., the thought

Sounds Like A Syllabus

MR. EDITOR:
The spectre of capitalism
hunts out every last vestige of
humanity and leaves in its place
a plethora of tin commodities.
No, this is not a quote frotn
the American Institutions
syllabus. It is a quote of Lee
Hilliker (Alligator, 11/25/68).
Which of capitalisms tin
commodities are so
contemptible and inhuman? The
cigarette lighter? The stereo?
The automobile? The electronic
computer? The jet airliner? The
skyline of New York City? The
dramatically extended life
expectancy? The political
freedom?
If you are in doubt about the
inseparability of capitalism and
political freedom, check your

unable to face facts; this pattern
is reversed later in the movie
one wonders why the movies
makers didnt decide first, then
begin filming.
But Elizabeth T. isnt
confident enough in her
excellent portrayal of herself as
a pig to let it go without using
all the shock value gutter
vocabulary she can find
except one: she uses friggin
which rings false in her mouth.
But both women have
inexplicable shrewish outbursts

susceptible to sickness due to their lack of physical
conditioning.
By taking PE, inactive students get some of their
needed exercise and an opportunity to learn some
enjoyable methods of getting exercise such as
tennis, handball, volleyball, etc. For students who
normally get enough exercise, this is just another
chance for them to get some (Mr. Millers belief that
this 4 hours per week is wasted is not valid; he
probably spends much more time than that
dreaming up his daily letters to the Alligator).
Compulsory PE should be changed, but not by
eliminating it. Instead I suggest: 1) PE should be
given credit on one of the pass-fail systems.
2) Non-active PE courses such as bait-casting, which

of an autumn morning, etc.) is
quite different from thought as
Mr. Alper meant to mean it, that
is, thought as applied to reason
in governing behavior. It is
commonly referred to as
thinking, Mr. Abrams, something
you might have neglected to do.
WILLIAM BECK, 2UC

history and your definitions. All
your life you have heard
capitalism damned from
Sunday school through public
school to university classroom.
You have probably never heard a
defense of capitalism, except,
perhaps, that it seems to be
practical. But capitalism is
moral, as well as practical.
In fact, it is the only
politico-economic system which
subjugates might to right, i.e.,
which subjugates the power of
government to ethical principles.
Capitalism is based on the
inviolate supremacy of
individual rights; government
exists for- and only for- the
protection of individual rights.
If you care and dare to know
what capitalism means and if
you want to see a rational
validation and moral

at each other (Well, they were
crazy may explain any behavior
to a clinical psychologist, but a
work of art requires a certain
unity which in turn requires
something intelligible in its every
element but there was no
pattern to this nastiness; no
particular behavior of one
elicited the screams of the
other).
But the only sympathy we
can be expected to have for Liz
would be in response to h*r
genuine desire to help the girl

Something Strange
Happening At UF

MR. EDITOR:
DAMN! What the hell is going
on around here? Ever since the
quarter started, there has been a
great amount of breast beating
and agonizing about the problem
of parking on campus.
Thousands of words have been
written and a lot of people have
said a great deal in alleged
seriousness.
So it would seem that even
the dimmest bulb among us
would realize that we art in sad
need of increased parking
facilities. At least one would
suspect so anyway.
Well, let me tell you

justification of capitalism, see
Capitalism: the Unknown Ideal
by Ayn Rand.
R.E. OSTEEN, 7EG
Dispassion
In 'Thing 1
MR. EDITOR:
Thank you, Mr. Bachman, for
your enlightened, objective
discussion of DIXIE that
appeared in the November 26,
1968 issue of the Campus
Thing. I should hope it has set
an example of the dispassionate
discourse appropriate to a
university.
BEN MOON, 7JM

(the movie has her confess this
to a priest) which her avarice
and neurotic dependency belies.
But, aside from the two
abortive attempts to represent
anything resembling a real
human value, the whole movie
was an Elysian Field for the
gutter school of art: Incest,
lesbianism, threats of male
homosexuality, mean petty
thievery, two psychotics and
three neurotics, whoredom,
sexual promiscuity, murder,
suicide, verbal torture scenes.

Wadnaaday, Dacambar 4,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

have no beneficial aspects should be ended, except
possibly for B-Meds. 3) Finally, each PE student
should be required to read AEROBICS by Air Force
Doctor Kenneth H. Cooper.
It is an easily read book which explains how
really valuable the right type of exercise is to
everyone (especially those persons with tough,
demanding academic schedules). Dr. Cooper
specifically defines what is meant by poor, fair and
good condition, and tells how almost anyone can
stay in good condition in less than 1 hour per week
once they have gotten in condition.
Physical exercise is needed much more than most
people realize. That is why an educational
worthwhile exercise program should be compulsory.

something friends, that vicious
cabal consisting of the Plants
and Grounds Organization,
Building Maintenance, and the
Campus Police, have with the
stroke of a brush, REDUCED
our on-campus parking by an
estimated 70-80 cars. Now that
takes a lot of brains!
I am referring to the
EX-parking area across the road
from East Hall in the Tolbert
Area. In the past it was possible
to park approximately 25 cars
along the road without blocking
any of the driveways or causing
anybody any grief. It is safe to
assume that there was at least a
triple turn over during the day
because of various schedules.
But now this whole area has
been plastered with no parking
signs and the police are devoting
a great deal of time to keeping
cars away from there. It also
seems rather curious that the
police should suddenly become
interested in that area exactly
one day after the big paintout
was done.
In short it seems to be a hell
of away to help with the
parking space shortage. It sure
gives me a good feeling to see
how everybody is pitching in to
help solve the problem.
PAUL SUNDBERG, 4EG
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers' names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

and imitation rape.
But the moral tacked on at
the end was incomprehensible
how is one to make cream by
paddling around in his life, and
who wants to climb out and
walk away, anyway?
Bftkthe thought tingled in my
mind that a movie is the worst
waste of time and most
disgusting example of the
toilet-bowl school of avant garde
Ive ever seen.
DARCY MEEKER, 2UC

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE §
1967 Honda Scrambler 90. Hal mat
incl. $195. Saa at Pinehurst Park, Lot
132 after 5 p.m. (A-st-45-p)
Mobil* home tot 100 ft. x 100 ft
Septic tank, gas, telephone & power
pole. Pay equity and taka over
payments, $29/mo., water Incl. Ph.
378-6392. (A-3t-49-p)
FOR SALE: BMW R6O 196/-only
a little over 3000 ml. Call 372-4625.
(A-st-45-c)
Selmer Eb alto saxaphone $175. Call
376-0155 after 3:00 p.m. (A-3t-49-p)
35mm Camera Petri single lens reflex,
telephoto lens, filters, camera box,
$175. Call 378-7441. LOFTY pile, free from soil Is the
carpet cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-50-lt-c)
Schwinn 10 speed racer 2 years old.
New tires, S4O. Call Duane after 6,
376-6983. (A-3t-50-p)
1967 Triumph 650 cc excellent
condition helmet included. Call
Cheryl at 392-7603 after 5:00 p.m.
(A-3t-50-p)
Honda 90 1966 C2OO Model. Make
an offer. Call 372-9427 or 376-9208
between 5 and 7 or at noon. Ask for
Mike Moore. (A-2t-50-p)
ANTIQUES UNIQUE ageless
gifts to cheer a heart or home. 1791
NE 23 Blvd. Closed Monday.
(A-2t-50-p)
1968 Honda 125 Scrambler, yellow.
Less than 1500 miles. $330. Call
378-8993. (A-3t-50-p)
For Sale: everything, large lighted
bar, barlights, mlsc. apt. decorations,
rugs, some furniture, dishes, post &
pans, portable TV everything for
$lOOl Ph. 372-6443. (A-3t-50-p)
1967 HONDA 450. 43 hp, very fast,
good condition, priced to sell fast,
$550. YAMAHA TD-1B production
road racer, 35 hp 130 mph, new
Dunlop triangles, $450 with fairing,
Call Jon 372-9370. (A-3t-50-p)
Honda 305 Super Hawk. Excellent
condition, must see to appreciate.
1966 model, never abused, no need
for worry, $450 or best offer. Call
376-1819. (A-3t-50-p)
8x36 mobile home with Bxls
cabana, air conditioned, completely
furnished, 2 bedrooms, close to
campus, SISOO or best offer. Call
372-0690. (A-3t-50-p)
Cheapl Reliable! Your very own
bike, 26 in. black english racer, 2
weeks old. A SSO value going for
$35. Dont hassle with parking any
more. Call Bob, 378-4204.
(A-3t-50-p)
FOR RENT
xsv.vx-xx'x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-vox
Furnished downstairs apt., 2 Br., Air
conditioned. Call after 5:30,
378-7845. (B-48-ts-c)
Studio apt. suitable for 1 or 2,
utilities included, pool, ¥t block from
campus. 1225. S.W. Ist Ave. Apt.
329. Call 378-8060. (B-st-47-p)
Modem 2 bedroom, air condition,
heating unfurnished. Available
December 30. $165 per month.
Landmark Apts. Call Achey
372-6535. (B-15t-38-p)
Sublet Jan. 1. 2 Br. furnished apt. 1
blk. frorr. campus at 1119 S.W. 7th
Ave. or call Henri 378-7696 after 11
a.m. One or more persons.
(B-4t-48-p)
To sublease one bedroom poolside
apartment Landmark Phase 11, Jan.
1. Qym, rec room, and sauna. Call
Ayn or Jennifer, 372-1662.
(B-4t-48-p)
Sublet 1 BR apt. Frederick Gardens.
$l2O per mo. Rent paid thru Jan. 1.
Apt. furnished & AC. Call after 3
p.m., 372-5948. (B-4t-49-p)
Moving Into frat house, must sublet
my space in 4-man poolside apt. In
Tanglewood, starting Jan.
$47.50/mo. plus utl. You keep my
security deposits Mark, 372-8041.
(B-st-49-p) f
Must sublet 1 br. Landmark Phase II
apt. for 2nd qtr. AC pool,
dishwasher. Call 378-8992.
(B-4t-49-P)
Take over lease on spacious 1 br. apt.
AC wood paneled, enclosed patio,
quiet surroundings. $lO5 mo. Village
34 Apts. Call 376-7491. (B-3t-49-p)
Must sublet: 2 BR furnished (or
unfurnished) apt. at the Summit
House Rent paid to Jan. Ist. Move
In immediately 376-9688.
(B-4t-49-c)
Private room, one block from old law
school. Central heat and AC, linens,
maid service and kitchen privileges.
Call 372-6263. (B-3t-50-p)
1 Br. furnished apt., central heat and
AC. 300 block NW 14th St. 2 Br.
sum. house, SW 34th St. area. 2 Br.
unfurn. house, SW 34th area. Call
372-6263. (B-3t-50-p)
Sublease 2 Br. Village Park apt.
starting Winter Quarter. Call
372-5792 or come by no. 14.
(B-3t-50-p)
Must sublet 2 Br. Landmark Apt.
January 1. AC, pool, dishwasher, Call
372-6409. (B-3t-50-p)

f FOR RENT I
Sublease 2 br. apt., University
Gardens, at low 12 mo. lease rate.
Available Dec. 20. Call 376-1404
evenings. (B-3t-50-p)
A beautiful 2 bedroom unfurnished
brick dap lex apartment $ 90/mo., no
lease required, best apt. buy In
Gainesville. Call 372-5817.
(B-3t-50-p)
College Terrace ad), to unlv. lease
available Dec. 15 to June 15. Ramp
parking, pool, AC, elevator, s34sqt.
single, or $375 double occ. Utilities
included. Ph. 378-2221. (B-3t-50-p)
MALE roommate. OWN ROOM In
spacious house. Must see to
appreciate. Short walk to campus.
SSO/mo. 37F-6072. (B-3t-50-p)
Sublet one bedroom Frederick Apt.,
Jan. June or Jan. Aug.
Furnished, faces pool. Call 378-8993.
(B-3t-50-p)
Sublease College Terrace apt. for 1 or
2 persons. block from campus
376-9889. (B-3t-50-p)
All panelled 2 bdrm. furnished house.
Central heat. Sunken living room.
Just redecorated. Convenient to
campus. Available on or before Jan.
1. $l5O for 3, $l6O for 4, Call Mrs.
Albertson at Town & Country
Realty. 376-4664. (B-3t-50-p)
| WANTED f
Female roommate needed for fourth
In 2 br apt. beginning Jan. Call
378-0609. (C-2t-49-p)
Female roommate needed for Winter
or Winter & Spring Quarter. Call
Lauren at 378-4376 after 5. One
bedroom apt. at Tanglewood.
(C-4t-49-p)
Male roommate to share new 12 wide
mobile home. Private bedroom. $35
plus utilities. Pinehurst Park, Lot
132, after 5 p.m. (C-st-45-p)
1 or 2 Female Roommates for 2
bedroom mobile home. Prl. room, 5
min. from campus. Rent 105.50 mo.
plus utilities. Call 378-3522 for
information. (C-st-47-p)
Studious male roommate to share
two bedroom apartment with three
others. Summit House. Call
372-6959. (C-6t-48-p)
3rd Roommate to share 2 bedroom
Olympia apartment for winter or
remainder of year. Phone 378-7909
after 4:30. $ 40/mo. (C-st-49-p)
Female roommate to share apt. with
3 other girls In Gatortown for next 2
quarters. Call 372-0784. (C-3t-49-p)
Wanted: fourth girt to share Village
Park apt. beginning January 1. Call
376-7491. (C-3t-49-p)
1 coed for luxury 2 bedroom 2 bath
Camelot Apartment starting Winter
Quarter. Pool, sauna, fireplace,
dishwasher. Call 378-9694.
(C-41-49-P)
Female roommate wanted for Jan.
Private room, AC, washer & dryer, 3
blocks from campus. $37.50/mo.
378-3291, 376-3582. (C-2t-49-p)
Two female roommates to share
2-bedroom apt. AC, walking distance
to campus. SIOO a quarter. Call
today 378-5532 and ask for Fran.
(C-3t-49-p)
One female roommate for 16th ave.
apartment starting in January. Share
with three other girls. Call 378-2017
or 378-0426 after 5:00 p.m.
(C-3t-50-p)
Female roommate to share University
Apt. 1513 NW sth Ave. no. 39. Call
376-0968 or visit. (C-2t-50-p)
Roommate wanted January Ist to
share two-bedroom apartment with
one girl. Call 376-0962. (C-50-3t-p)
Really want to stay here 2 bdrms.,
AC, TV, need 2 coed roommates,
$43/mo. Call Liz, 378-6608.
(C-3t-50-p)
Need 2 female roommates to share
bedroom in 2 bedroom apt. in
Landmark apts. On pool, call
378-3378. (C-3t-50-p)
One female roommate to sublet 2 br.
FQ apt. starting January. Call Rita,
Betty or Gall. 378-0279. (C-st-45-p)
Prof, woman, grad student tor 2 br.
lux. apt. K-21, own room. Summit
House. $77.50 mo., now to Aug. 5
on Wed., Thurs., Sat. a.m., all Sun.
(C-2t-50-p)
Male roommate wanted to share apt.
with one other, Jan. June. $45/mo.
and Vi utilities. AC & near campus.
1513 N.W. sth Ave. Apt. 56.
378-0661. (C-3t-49-p)
One male roommate needed to share
two bedroom apt. with two others.
Call 378-5748 for money-saving
details, K-l, Summit House.
(C-3t-50-p)
Male roommate to share modern two
bedroom apartment with two others.
Call 372-6648 for information.
(C-3t-50-p)
One or two male roommates to share
new 3 br. house. No deposit. Grad
student preferred. Call Steve at
378-7648 and leave name and
number. (C-3t-50-p)
Two male roommates needed at
Village Park for Winter Quarter.
Phone 376-9529. (C*3t-50-py

The

Page 10

I WA^
Male roommate, spacious poolside
apt. In Williamsburg Village. Call
376-0362 between 5-7 p.m.
(C-3t-50-p)
Must sublet apL in 'Landmark.
Available starting Winter Quarter. It
is a one bedroom facing the pool.
Price is $140.00 monthly. Contact
manager. (C-3t-50-p)
I want nice apt. to subrent for
visiting parents Dec. 22-25. No
cooking. Call 378-9834 after 6 p.m.
(C-50-lt-p)
COMMERCIAL ART student to
design letterhead, logo and brochure.
Experience preferred, 372-0893 after
7 p.m. (C-3t-50-p)
f HELP WANTED ]{
Listeners wanted: Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson.
Unlv. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-c)
Part time waitresses. Noon hours or
evenings. Arranged to your schedule.
Apply King's Food Host, 1802 W.
Unlv. Ave. or 1430 SW 13th St.
(E-47-ts-c)
Part time grill help. Noon hours or
evenings. Arranged to your schedule.
Apply Kings Food Host, 1802 W.
Unlv. Ave. (E-47-ts-c)
AD V maJ6rs = Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nation's 12th largest college dally.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person, Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
Like movies? Want to review for the'
Alligator? Turn in a review of any
movie In town the day after II opens
to the entertainment editor* desk,
third floor Reit? Union. We Ws)'call
you. (E-tf-3S-Aeo
DELIVERY BOYS: Apply In pwson
1029 W. Univ. Ave. LARRYS
PORE-BOY. (E-St-48-p)
Student employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. national parks. Booklet
tells where and how to apply. Send
$1 to Arnold Agency, 206 East Main
Rexburg, Idaho, 83440. Money back
guarantee. (E-7t-50-p)
Girls want to work . choose own
hours. If Interested Call 378-9476.
(E-2t-50-p)
Men need to work call 378-0526.
Part time or full time. High income.
(E-10t-50-p)
| AUTOS §
61 radio
excellent tires. S4OO. 372-5189.
(G-3t-49-p)
1966 VW sedan, R&H, push out rear
windows, & complete service records.
Perfect condition. 1350. 378-8956
after 5 p.m. (G-st-49-p)
1966 MGB Good condition
convertible w/Boot and tonneau top
good tires only $1625 call 392-1681
for Jim Moody 2-5 p.m.)G-3t-49-p)
For sale: Fiat 1100 4 dr. sedan. Good
student trans. One owner Call after
six. 378-7061. (G-3t-49-p)
65 Corvair auto 140 hp 4 single bbls
convt. auto. Call 372-7659 after 6
p.m. (G-4t-49-p)
64 Buick Skylark con., radio, heater,
power steering, power brake,
excellent condition, $995 or Karman
Ghla radio, heater, only $449. Call
378-4814. (G-3t-50-p)
62 MGA MKII 1600, white w/black
top, tonneau, radio, spare included.
Very good condition. Best offer
accepted. Call 372-5792 or come by
14 VP apt. (G-50-3t-p)
1:50
flip 3*50
I TOUIK SIIIATRA 1 I
IRAQMEL WELCH ae J
| enpstouav
By Bk* *.
I The Taper Lionl
I 4* isabratto
li get creamed! |

I AUTOS J
1964 Fairlane Ranch Wagon Small
equity and take over payments. Must
sell leaving U.S. this week.
378-6440. (G-2t-50-p)
Rover 90, leather and mahogany
Interior, R&H, $595. Call 376-0640.
(G-3t-50-p)
Triumph Spitfire 1963. Radio and
heater. Navy blue. Excellent
condition. S7OO or best offer. Call
378-8057 or 372-9303. (G-3t-50-C)
1960 TR-3 red, new seats, tonneau &
windows, R&H, priced to sell
quickly. Phone 372-7418.
(G-3t-50-p)
I PERSONAL I
ffyawx Mll waeoaqxoswMWpawwK
LAST CHANCE TO RESERVE
YOUR NEW YEARS IN NEW
YORK spot for $l6O, call 392-1655
or stop by Rm. 310 Union NY in
N.Y. (J-st-49-c)
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250,
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
I Inin-
Mr. Michael Leclercq please call the
Seminole office about your portrait
proofs 392-1681* between 2-5 p.m.
(J-3t-29-c)
RECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europe*
most.famous campuses. For info, call
392-1655 or come by 310 UniOrf.
My thanks go to tnose memoers or
Sigma Chi, TEP and PKP for their
help on the afternoon of 24
November. RAM, (j-lt-50-p)
UHeAga]
I -wow I

MARVIN I ; I
I'DAIUT pi iyvl POINT AT Sels + 930
|1 ruim PLAW 11 albert rnney hi
lWf thru" IjoinoHtyi
I
J 9 ;J
THE DIRECTOR- THE STUDIO BOSS- THE STRANGE WOMAN-
Overnight, he can He was known for She rules the
make or destroy his clean pictures mansion where
a sex-goddess. and his dirty deals. Lylah lives!
METRO GOLDWYN MAYER PRESENTS
Vjyjl AN ASSOOATES AND ALDRICH COMPAQ PRQQUCTION
STARRING
KIM NOVAKPETER FINCH-ERNEST BORGNINE
PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY
ROBERT ALDRICH i \ iTvrviotf>K
j m

M M M 'll 1
jj PERSONAL I
YOU ASKED US TO LET YOU
KNOW
Theyre here. Ponchos and ruanas
handwovan in Colombia in brilliant
beautiful colon. 100 % wool. S2O-25
AT THE SPANISH MAIN SOS W.
University Ave. (J-3t-49-p)
Join Gainesvilles nicest minority
insist on the very best and -enjoy
spudnuts the big donut thats
better. Spudnut Donut Shop A Snack
Bar. 1017 W. University. Open til 7.
Call 372-3100 for your next party or
meeting order, 30 delicious varieties
and Free Delivery. (J-3t-50-p)
1964 Grad lt was great while It
lasted. The time lapse has brought no
hard feelings. If you'd like a buddy
over the holidays give me a call. 1965
grad. (J-3t-50-p)
Those Interested in receiving
CREDIT for TRAVELING ABROAD
come to meeting Thurs., Dec. 5, 7:30
p.m. Rm. 118 J.W.R.U. (J-2t-50-p)
To whoever took my notes from Ist
floor, Main Library, 11 p.m. Sunday:
Please return to Library main desk or
call 378-9381 for ransom. (J-lt-50-p)
IsTAKTS TNUMDAV
Ci wHEB
eodni! Mr 3 iUUk^t



Would ou Believe A Coed Fraternity?

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
A coed fraternity? Shades of open housing? The
first has been established at Stanford University.
Lambda Nu invited 20 girls into the house, an
article in Parade, a Sunday supplement, reported
Sunday.
The majority of 20 UF Greeks polled Monday
wouldnt want the system changed in their houses.
Its a coed dorm with a fraternity tag on it,
Joseph Sahl of Phi Gamma Delta said.
At Stanford, in the Lambda Nu house, the girls
and boys live in separate wings, but may visit each
other as often as they Idee in their rooms.
There are two resident assistants to oversee the
house.
The members were enthusiastic and felt it to be a
success.
One girl was quoted, It gives me an opportunity
to know boys as people.
We have no secret initiation rites, no secret
handclasps or bloodpledges or any of that

Voluntary Class Attendance
Proposals Anticipated Today

Proposals for voluntary class
attendance may be considered
this afternoon by the Academic
Regulations Committee.
Original proposals for making
attendance optional for each
student were submitted this
summer to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell by the
Action Conference.
It was referred to the Council
of Deans which made some
modifications. The modified
proposals are in effect the same
proposals made by the Action
Conference except they have a
more positive approach, Roy L.
Lassiter, associate dean of
academic affairs said.
The council makes it clear
that students are expected to
attend class regularly.
Gentry Topic
Os SSOC
Teach-In
Lavon Gentry will be the
subject of a Southern Students
Organizing Committee (SSOC)
teach-in today at 2:30 on the
Plaza of the Americas.
Gentry was arrested Aug. 10
for posting Bust the Draft
leaflets on UF buildings. His
rial, on a municipal charge of
defacing a state building is
pending in city court.
Speakers on the program
include Clyde Ellis, student
senator: John Sugg, editor of the
Crocodile and Gentry. Also
"v.ted are James Millikan,
professor of philosophy; Sidney
ourard, professor of psychology
an d John Kaufman, biology
professor.
U F President Stephen C.
Connell was invited but will
1 Una ble to attend because of
Prior commitments.
r~
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE imports
sales^bsvke sales^bsvkerepairs
repairs sales^bsvkerepairs
<*ani IMPORTS
LSOI Kj ft*., Avu. JBBum

However the instructor
should not use their grading
functions to force attendance, it
contends.
Failure to attend class
should not result in failure of a
course unless the student has not
met the bona fide requirements
of the class the councils report
said.
Nor should any student be
dropped by an instructor for any
reason unless he interferes with
the academic progress of the
class, the report continues.
Surprise quizes were
discouraged. But if the course
requires it as a legitimate
teaching technique the teacher
must make it kppwn at the

f- WayneeitzUnionJ.WayneeitzUnionJ.WayneeitzUnionJ.VVayneeitzUnionJ.l
af!
SUMMER §
I
i |£/LVor come by Km. 310 UNION I
I^eitaUnkmJ.WeyneeitzUnionJ.WayneeftrUnionJ.WayneeitiUnkmJ.Wwynel
msmrn
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
W/A..*wmv*vW.vw.v.'Mi*>>>>
Wanna have fun? UF graduate is now
'nterviewing for travel companion to
US West and South America.
378-0293 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
(J-3t-50-p)
LET IT BE KNOWN YOU ARE FOR
PEACE. Stamp on PEACE with a
PEACE SYMBOL rubber stamp.
Good for use on books, stationary
and skin. Reproduces well half dollar
size, $2.25 postpaid. WEAR PEACE
SYMBOL SWEATSHIRT in black,
navy. grey. it. blue. S.M.L. *4.50
postpaid. Both from E & E, 369
Crescent Ave. Buffalo, NY.,14214.
fJ-lt-50-p)
;.yiV.v//AV/.VAV/AW/Xv-v'-X ""'W' "y
LOST FOUND §
Lost-gold bulova watch with scarab
band call 392-7869 Reward.
|L-3t-49-Pl
Lost 1 pair prescription dark glasses
with wire frames and dark blue vinal
case. REWARD. Call Lou Tally
392-8021 Tim. 320 North
fL-3*49*p> - "

GREEKS HERE OBJECT

adolescent mumbo jumbo. We simply ask each
member to contribute something to our living group
. Charles Murias, Lambda Nu president said.
Steve Aptheker, of Tau Kappa Epsilon didn't
think it would detract from the idea of a fraternity.
If they are enjoying themselves, and if they are
doing service few the community, why not?
You have the same thing over in die French
Quarter ... I think it would be fun, John Allison,
Delta Tau Delta, said.
Some of the advantages or problems anticipated
were conflicts over dates and possible jealousy, the
control of visiting hours, and distractions from
studying.
On the other hand it would make the guys live a
little cleaner and have more obligations Dick
Spain, Kappa Sigma, who was in favor of it, said.
But a lot of guys wouldnt want it here, he said.
Alumni, and administration were also cited as
possible deterrents.
I dont think the alumni in general would go for
it, we get complaints as it is if there is a girl here

beginning of the term.
If these proposals are
approved, they will be in effect
for the whole university, Lassiter
said. The only exceptions to the
attendance policy would be
special lab classes, etc. he said.
At the present time the
attendance policy is up to the
individual departments, or its
instructors.
The meeting will be held at 2
pjn. in Anderson 201.
RAME HAM STYUST I
31RW.UNIV.AVE.
20% dbcMMt Rh
Mil* MIIIMA
ww cwpwi
P< 372-6540 I

VV/*Vr V rr rfAA.cc ** wtmwwmwtrw
.v.%x*!WNWV*v.v///.vvw.wx:'>>v.-. a
LOST A FOUND 1
Anyone finding or knowing
where abouts of grey suede handbag
taken from art ed. studio Mon. night,
please call Cheryl Kramer, 376-0114
prescrip, pills & IDs deso. needed.
(L-3t-49-p)
SERVICES I
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street, 378-7330.
(M-10-ts-c)
My office is small. My business s
new. Parking s terrible BUT you'll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to G'~ynouitd
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-ts-18-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Can M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489,

Wednesday, Dtembtr 4,1968. TV Florida Alligator. I

when the house mother isn't," Mike Smodish. Chi
Phi, said.
Manny James, former IFC president, didn't think
it was feasible on the UF campus in the near future.
The administration won't agree to it. and it's
not in keeping with the traditional image or the
purpose of the fraternityhe said.
1 like the idea, but it doesn't sound like a frat, I
would like to see the secret initiation rites
included" David Knowles of Phi Kappa Psi. said,
addiqg that his fraternity's rites were held in a
church and there was no hazing."
It will detract from the fraternity, especially
those with long standing rituals, these rituals are
part of a fraternity," Sahl said.
"It would change the whole fraternity system,
and I like it the way it is" Jim Wilkerson, Theta Chi.
said.
Almost all of those interviewed, however,
thought it was a good idea on the whole and would
like to see it tried, but not under the name of a
fraternity now on campus.

§11!!
tajiEsJ
GALLEY I
' THE GREATEST A
SEAFOOD & CHICKEN
TO TAKE OUT
CANT TAKE A
BREAK ?
THEN LET US DELIVER,
* 309 H.W. 13th ST. 231 N.W. 10th AVE. 4
372-6311 372-3546

Page 11



Page 12

!, Th* Florida Alligator, Wadnotday, Docambor 4,1968

Dump Stompers Stumble
On Bricks. Bikes, Cats (?)

By DOUG CASE
Alligator Staff Writer
The American dump is a wonderful place to
stomp around in search of rare treasures.
Rules for dumping are not written but they are
well understood by dumpers. Claims are staked out
like frontier homesteads and when a dumper is
through he vacates his claim for someone else.
Treasures found range from TV sets that can be
repaired for less than $lO to broken slabs of marble
that the industrious individual can turn into a
priceless patio or a homemade candy slab.

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Features Editor.
You could hear them talking
in between songs. The songs
were real loud and there was
about maybe 10 or 15 or maybe
16 or 17 or 1,000 seconds
between each song and if you
listened selectively and
industriously you could hear
them. The songs were about love
and people leaving other people
or people confused or drunk or
sad or pleading or dead or
making love or war or things like
they have in songs in bars.
He was coming on with this
thing and she eating it up but
realizing what it was and
knowing and they both playing
this thing in between songs.
They were playing things
between things and they were
touching each other and finally
he whispered into her ear (after
moving her hair) and she nodded
and he got up to go to the
bathroom and she asked for her
purse which was behind the bar.
The song stopped as he joined
her and she was handed her
purse too and then she looked at
the bartender and at her
would-be lover and shrugged her
shoulders and said 1 don't know
why Im doing this and as they
walk past where youre sitting
you think in echoes and it's I
don't know why Im doing this.
She's too something to realize
her words are something but you
know.
At the next bar you sit alone
brooding over a beer and
wondering about things and
staring at a jar of hot pickled
sausages when a drunk walks in.
He is maybe 40 or maybe 100
and he is cold and drunk and a
red.
The bartender who looks like
a friendly frog asks him what he
wants and he mumbles back beer
. . bring me beer. How much
have you had. sir, asks the frog,
and the reds mind tumbles
around for a moment and he
grumbles two and a half quarts
and the frog says I'm sorry, sir. I
can't serve you any more, sir,
you've had enough for now, sir,
you don't know why you're
doing this.
You study your reflect ion in
the mirror and watch those hot
pickled sausages and glance
occasionally at the boiled eggs.
The red gives the frog a dime
and asks call nn friend I can't
drive I have to get hack home io


lxnpssGuns

my wife and the frog dials and
the red asks you for a cigarette.
You light it for him and look
into his eyes and decide
definitely that he knows why
hes doing this for better than

WHEW!
Whew. Richie Havens own ultimate expression, encompassing all
meaning, all knowing. A characteristic of his live concerts. Practically
a copyrighted part of his personality.
Whew. The only word to describe the creative energy, the consummate
effort expended in the preparation and production of this awesome new
2-record album.
Whew. The only word that sums up the reaction to Richard P. Havens,
1983long awaited and available at last on
* FORECAST)
v.rA- For C .st r- ci. s:n ;f V-troocd.%,- Va,- r !>- Delu/r- Double Fold. FTS-3047-2

Occasionally one can fall upon scrap lumber that
will include full size sheets of plywood someone has
discarded. One student built a work bench, tool
shed, and bicycle shelter out of one weekends
collection of discarded lumber. Another is building
a bar-b-q out of used brick.
But dumping is not without its pitfalls. The other
weekend a young family's dumping expedition
turned into trouble. The young girls in the family
found a half-starved kitten less than two weeks old.
It would have been a hard father that said no to
the foundling.

the girl at the other place. Yes,
knows why hes doing this for,
he does,-he really does. You go
home satisfied and happy but
most of all you are sad and you
dont know why.

'^\Pc
JH /. *.*
Hk||t
gy.
--< '*V-'i. ;-; " /; / far.- £
HI
9L
PRIZE OF THE AMERICAN DUMP
... now it's Daddy's headache.
GOT A SICK CAR
BRING IT TO US, OUR 5 SKILLED MECHANICS
HAVE OVER 80 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Youll drive safer with our brake and
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Touch Os The Fatherland Comes To UF

By ANNE FREEDMAN
AltigrtorSttffWriMr
Enter the gaslighted, medieval
I style beer garden, complete with
1 nioat.
Cross the drawbridge, open
I the heavy wooden doors.
You have entered the world
I of the Rathskeller.
The Grand Opening of the
combination coffee-house, night
I dub, and German Inn tavern**
I is set for Jan. 17 and 18.
The Rathskeller has been
I created in the East Wing of the
I Main Cafeteria, across from the
Old Union and Murphree Area.
Dark, beamy and cozy, the
Rathskeller has been designed
to get people together, to talk,
to get to know one another,**
Joe Hilliard, chairman, said.
Opening night features Your
Fathers Mustache,** a Dixie-land
jazz group from New York.
A smiling, peasant-attired
coed Fraulein greets each
visitor to the Rat**. She escorts
the guest to a group of tables
and introduces him to everyone
with whom he will be sitting.
The purpose of Rathskeller
is to get rid of the stodgy feeling
on campus that keeps people
from saying hi. People arent
really against meeting each other
- theyre just afraid to make the
first move. We*ll be that first
step, Hilliard said.
Deep mahogany beams and
walls adorned with tapestry, a
special Rathskeller coat-of-arms,
swords, shields and other
medieval relics complete the
taverns image. The Rathskellers
chances of serving beer are
pretty good, Hilliard said, but
the final decision is still in the
hands of administration and
state officials.
Hilliard stressed that serving
beer was only to act as a social
catalyst to draw out graduate
students and faculty.
Open day and night, the
Rathskeller will serve three
moderately-priced German-style
meals a day, replacing the
services of the main cafeteria.
The food is fantastic and
authentically German, Hilliard
remarked.
Regularly featured will be
delicatessen sandwiches, pastries,
knockwurst, potato salad,
non-alcoholic mixed drinks ( a la
coffee-house), soups and entrees.
Meal plan participants will be
able to eat at the Rathskeller.
We wanted faculty and
students to get together and
why not at lunch? Everybody
has to eat, and the Rathskeller is
convenient to classes, Hilliard
said.
Classes and other groups will
be able to make reservations and
meet and eat over lunch with
their professors.
By night, the Rat does not
pull up the carpet there isnt
one but it does pull the tables
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closer together and it dims the
lights.
The lighting and sound
systems were carefully planned
so that both the audience and
the entertainers could make the
best possible use of them.
The lights can be dimmed to
almost any degree desired.
And the sound from the
entertainers is the same all the
way around the room
regardless of where one is seated.
We wanted the people near
the stage to be able to carry on a
conversation without being
drowned out by the music and
the people in the back to be able
to hear if they wanted to, just as
well as those up front, Hilliard
said.
The Rats capacity is about
300 people.
Diversity is the keyword to
the Rathskellers entertainment.
Thekat is on the Florida
Coffee House Circuit, a group of
professional entertainers who
play to campuses and night spots
across the state. Folk, jazz,

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RATHSKELLER OPENS JAN. 17-18

country, folk-rocK, and
psychedelic music and
comedians are included in the
circuits acts.
Drawing heavily from student
and faculty talent, also, Hilliard
urged anybody with
quality-type talent, to audition.
Were equipped to handle
any type of performance,
Hilliard said.
The Rathskellers six-piece
stage can be turned into a U
or a T or any shape necessary
to accommodate either single
performers or groups.
Hard rock will be the only
type of music not featured at
die Rat.
It doesnt fit in with the
philosophy of the Rathskeller
of getting people to talk to each
other. There are plenty of other
places to go and dance, Hilliard
said.
The opening next month
climaxes more than a years
planning by Hilliard and the

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other members of the
Rathskeller committee.
Cooperation between the

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Wednesday, December 4, IMS. The Florida ANipaor, I

committee, Student Government
and the administration has been
excellent, Hilliard said.

Page 13



Page 14

The

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GUESS WHO CAN CAME TO DINNER?

Fraternity men served a picnic lunch to over 200
underprivileged youngsters at SAMSON's first

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TRYING FOR A RIBBON
This youngster from Newberry competed for a
gold ribbon in one of the eight track and field
events. A touch football game and folk singing
concluded the activities.

Junior Olympics. Serving from the left are Harry
Murphy, Ed Nufer and Danny Haber.

SAMSON
Going
Strong

. II 1 I [ ||S£p|^
;' ***-'' I
I ~ w-.-fr^..

SAMSON volunteers weren't any match for these
two future track stars, who were awarded gold

Photos By Nick Arroyo

W' fIHfV
jb
||lf
i
Danny Yagoda (left) and Don Laderman (right)
gnct arriving participants from Alachua, Newberry,
Waldo and High Springs. Sixty SAMSON volunteers
were at Florida Track for the events.

ribbons for their first and second place finishes.
4r



Gator Cagers Ranked 19th Bv UPI

BySTUCAMEN
UPt Sports Writer
NEW YORK To hardly
anyones surprise, UCLA,
seeking to become the first team

Negro Grid Stars To Sign
Gator Scholarship Bids

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
UF will sign its first Negro
football player to a scholarship
late this month. He will be the
third black scholarship athlete
of any kind for the Gators.
The player is Willie Jackson,
who announced Monday night,
his intention to sign with UF at
the earliest possible date.
The earliest date for signing
players will be Dec. 14,
according to SEC rules. A school
cannot announce that they have
gotten a commitment from any
player until that date. Any
player, however, can announce
his intention to sign at any time
after he has been offered a
scholarship.
Jackson is presently playing
for Valley Forge Millitary

Pancoast Promoted,
Head Offensive Coach

UF head football Coach Ray
Graves promoted offensive
backfield chief Fred Pancoast to
head offensive coach Monday
and announced plans to add
another member to the
three-man offensive coaching
corps.
Pancoast, a 35-year-old
former University of Tampa
halfback and coach who joined
the Gator staff in 1964, will
assume the full offensive
responsibility from Ed Kensler,
who also serves as offensive line
coach.
I plan to give Coach Kensler
some added administrative
duties and have him continue in
the capacity of head line coach,
Graves said. Coach Pancoast
will assume responsibility for the
over-all offense.
The other UF offensive
coach, Bubba McGowan, will
continue directing the receivers.
Graves said an additional
offensive assistant would be
named after the first of the year.
I have complete faith in the
present offensive staff, he said.
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in history to win three
consecutive NCAA
championships, was the
unanimous choice Monday for
the No. 1 spot in United Press
Internationals pre-season college

Academy in Philadelphia. He is a
native of Sarasota, transferring
from Sarasota High School last
year.
At Valley Forge, Jackson, a
halfback, scored 114 points on
17 touchdowns and two
conversions in eight games. Last
week, he was named the most
outstanding player in Greater
Phlladephias high schools.
Jackson averaged more than
seven yards per carry on a basis
of 145, carries. His school went
8-1 for the season.
At least four other black
athletes have been offered
grant-in-aid scholarships to UF
this year. Among them are
Gainesville High School's Eddie
McAshan. McAshan, a
quarterback, has been the object
of a three-year buildup by UF.

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378-1230 Ca) | Day Qr Njte 378-1252
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KENTUCKY THIRD, TOPS SEC

basketball ratings.
The Lew Alcindo-led Bruins
who finished second to Houston
in last seasons final UPI ranking
after losing a regular season
game to the Cougars, were

Reports on his decision to come,
or not to come to UF have
varied widely over the past
month.
Also on the offered list are
Rufus Fergueson of Miami
Killian High, Ray Hawthorne,
halfback from Baker County
High School, and Bill Plumer, a
flanker from Delray Beach
Carver.
Some of these players could
be cut because of senior
placement test scores, which are
the deciding factor on any
players admission. Scores are
not back yet to seniors in all
parts of the state.
Floridas segregation of
football squads came to an end
last year with the signing by
Miami of Ray Bellamy, from
Palmetto, Fla.

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1515 N Main St Phone 376-7581

considered the top team in the
country by all 28 representatives
of the 35 member UPI Coaches
Board who cast pre-season
ballots.
The South and Midwest
predominate the top 20 with six
teams from Dixie listed in the
elite group and five from the
Midwest. The West Coast has
four representatives with three
from the Southwest and two
from the East.
Five coaches from each of the
seven geographical areas of the
nation comprise the UPI Ratings
Board. Each week, they select
the top 10 major college
basketball teams, with points
awarded on a
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis on
votes from first through tOth.

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Whtfciaaday, Daeiwtoar 4,1968, Th# Florida Alligator.

Team
1. UCLA 28
2. North Carolina
3. Kentucky
4. Notre Dame
5. Kansas
6. Houston
7. Davidson
8. New Mexico
9. Villanova
10. Cincinnati
Second 10-11. Purdue; 12. St.
Bonaventure; 13. New Mexico
St.; 14. Ohio St.; 15. tie,
Western Kentucky and Duke;
17. Santa Clara; 18. Southern
California; 19. Florida; 20.
California
Other receiving five or more
points Columbia, Dayton,
LaSalle, Marquette, Tennessee,
Vanderbilt.

Page 15



Page 16

i. Th Florida Alligator, Wednesday, December 4.1968

Peterson: 'We Beat Team Os The Century

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Florida State Coach Bill
Peterson today conceded the
mythical state championship
to the Florida Gators but with
a couple of reservations.
They beat both Florida
State and Miami and on the
statistics youd have to agree,
Peterson said with a smile.
The only thing is that they
didnt win the Southeastern
Conference championship and
we beat the Team of the
Century, he said, referring to
the Seminoles 40-20 win over
powerful Houston last week.
Peterson indicated things may
change in years to come as a
result of Florida States 8-2
record this season and the fact
Scott, Lyons
Picked SEC
Best Players
ATLANTA Jake Scott,
All-America safetyman for the
unbeaten Georgia Bulldogs,
Tuesday was named
Southeastern Conference
defense player of the year by
United Press International.
Earlier, Dicky Lyons,
Kentuckys versatile two-time
conference scoring champion,
was named as the SEC offense
player of the year by UPI.
Scott, a junior from
Arlington, Va., and Lyons, a
senior from Louisville, Ky., were
selected in balloting by
sportswriters and sportscasters
from throughout the Southeast.
Scott, a 6-foot-l, 190-pound
business major, wound up as the
top punt returner and the top
pass interceptor in the SEC
while Lyons, who missed most
of three games, was fourth in
punt returns and second in
kickoff returns.
All-Campus
Team Mostly
Teps, Pi Lams
The intramurals Department
announced the All-Campus
Orange League selections
Tuesday.
Teps Ira Pollack and Rick
Perillo were on the offensive
squad as were TEPs Sam Harris
and Larry Newman. Perillo made
the team for his fourth straight
year.
SAEs Mike Rollyson and
Rick Kirby were both selected
for their outstanding play in
leading the Es to the finals.
Tony Dobies of Pi Lam was
another outstanding offensive
end.
SPE's Mike Smith was the
only representative of a team
that didnt reach the semis.
Pi Lam, Beta, and Pi Kappa
Phi cached placed two men on
the defensive team. Nick
Nicosia, a repeater from last year
and Ron Gottleib represented
the Lammies, Wilkie Schell and
Gary Hames were Beta's
recipients, and Marty Solomon
and Bruce Hicks were named
from Pi Kappa Phi. .Paul
Mittman. TEP linebacker made
the team for his third
consecutive year.
The Blue League all-campus
team will be announced early
next quarter.

STATE CHAMPIONSHIP CONCEDED TO UF

that their Dec. 30 Peach Bowl
game with Louisiana State will
be the Seminoles fourth

SATURDAY, DEC. 28 1 pm -10 pm
Jose Feliciano Country Joe and the Fish
Buffy Sainte Marie Chuck Berry The Infinite
McCoys John Mayalls Bluesbreakers
Booker T. and The M.G.S. Dino Valente*
Fleetwood Mac
SUNDAY, DEC. 29* lpm-10 pm
Steppenwolf Jr. Walker and the All Stars
Butterfield Blues Band Flatt and Scruggs
Marvin Gaye Joni Mitchell The Boxtops
Richie Havens James Cotton Blues Band
H. P. Lovecraft

m 2
I vnufy
1123 West University Ave.
Q l fr s front s /or

pup
FESTIVAL
AT GTJLFSTRFAM PARK
A Thousand Wonders and a Three Cay Ccllaee of Beautiful Music

post-season game in five years.
We are going to be in fine
shape in recruiting this year

MONDAY, DEC. 30 1 pm 10 pm
Jose Feliciano Canned Heat The
Turtles Iron Butterfly The Joe Tex Revue
lan and Sylvia The Grassroots Charles
Lloyd Quartet Sweet Inspirations The
Grateful Dead
PLUS EVERY DAyT
The 1968 Invitational Walking Catfish Derby; The Giant
Ti-Leaf Slide; Hundreds of Arts and Crafts Displays; The
Warm Tropical Sun and a Full Miami Moon; Meditation
Grove; Wandering Musicians; Blue Meanies on Parade;
Things to Buy and Eat; 20 Acres of Hidden Surprises in
Beautiful Gardens; Worlds First Electronic Skydivers;
Stratospheric Balloons; Kaleidoscopic Elephants

because of our record and the
downfall of the other teams in
the state, he said. For the first

time in history the best football
players in Florida are going to
come to Florida State.

!" ""71% DISCOUNT COUPON!
MIAMI POP FESTIVAL
IP.O. BOX 3900 MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
NO. TICKETS SAT., DEC. 28 @ $6.00 Ea. f
NO. TICKETS SUN.. DEC. 29 @ $6.00 Ea. |
NO. TICKETS MON.. DEC. 30 @ $6.00 Ea.
I $6.00 Includes all day admission (tickets at the door. I
if available: $7.00)
1 I have enclosed $ in check or money |B
order payable to Miami Pop Festival.
I understand that the management does not R
_ guarantee delivery on orders postmarked
| later than Dec. 9. 1968. |
h
Address
| City |
State Zip m