Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Thieu Orders
Cease-Fire
SAIGON (UPI) -President Nguyen Van Thieu
Monday ordered South Vietnamese troops to
observe a 24-hour cease-fire beginning Christmas
Eve. The announcement took American officials by
surprise but the UJS. command was expected to
order a similar truce for the holiday.
Thieus declaration was seen by some observers
as an effort to deny the Viet Cong a propaganda
victory at the Paris talks.
The Viet Cong, portraying themselves as the true
peace seekers, scored a propaganda coup in
November, 1966, by first announcing Christmas
cease-fire that year.
The announcement Monday was made by a
spokesman for Thieus office on a regularly
scheduled television newscast. In contrast with the
previous truce declarations made with great
fanfare, the statement was terse and almost matter
of fact.
It said the cease-fire for humitarian reasons,
would go into effect throughout the country at 6
pjn. Dec. 24 and last for 24 hours. Previous truce
communiques have laid down stiff warnings that
allied commanders would react swiftly to any
violations by the Communists. There were no such
warnings this time.

Parking Proposal
Hits Pocketbooks

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Wrhar
Its almost official. UF
students, faculty and staff might
be paying a $lO fee to park on
campus in January.
The Board of Regents
Monday approved UFs new
parking plan during their
meeting at Florida Atlantic
University in Boca Raton.
The plan is now subject to
review by the Regents billing
committee before final okay,
but no hang-ups are expected,
according to Alligator sources.
The plan calls for students to
pay an annual $lO parking decal
fee. In addition, when the plan is
approved, faculty and staff
making more than $4,500 must
pay a basic fee of $lO.
UF employees making below
$4,500 are slated to pay a
regular $5 fee.

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However, because the
academic year is already a
quarter gone, the plan provided
campus drivers pay only
two-thirds of the regular fee.
According to the plan,
faculty and staff earning
between $4,500 and $7,800
have the option to pay an extra
$lO for a reserved parking space
on main campus. Those making
above $7,800 will have to pay
sls extra for this privilege.
The fee for additional cars or
lost decals under the plan will be
$2 as are motorscooter decals.
In addition the plan calls for
commercial vehicles parking in
campus zones to have a $lO
decal.
Barring any snags, when the
plan is finally approved students
will not have the option for
reserved spaces but will be
required to park in perimeter
(SEE TARKING' PAGE 3)

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 61, No.

BEFORE FACULTY SENATE TODAY
Crack-Down Urged
On Militant Action

See Editorial, Page 6
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
v 2 a V v
A proposal calling for
the UF administration to
apply the full force of
the Code of Student
Conduct and criminal
prosecution to militant
students, will be brought
before the Faculty Senate
meeting today at 3:30 p.m.
in McCarty auditorium.
The proposal, which is
sponsored by Dr. John
Greenman, professor of
agricultural economics, urges
the administration to quell
disturbances by all means that
are available when a crisis
occurs.
Claiming the UF has become
vulnerable to militant minorities
who engage in direct, illegal,
and violent actions, the
proposal states that appeals to
resolve conflicts through legal,
orderly procedures seem
ineffective.
Therefore, the administration
should use any and all available
resources to control militant
minority groups that cause a
disruption of the orderly
processes and functioning of the
University, states the
resolution.
Immediate reaction to
Greenmans resolution came
from several student leaders
Monday, who labeled the
proposal alarmist,
degrading, irrelevant and
paranoic.
He is calling for a police
state on this campus, said
Clyde Ellis, chairman of the
Student Senates Student Rights
Committee. The resolutions
purpose is to intimidate the
students, and it calls for double
(SEE 'CRACK-DOWN' PAGE 2)

America's Number 1 College Daily

i
University of Florida, Gainesville

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TOM KENNEDY
THEY WANT YOUR BLOOD
v
A blood sample is taken from Joy Rector, lUC, participating in a
volunteer influenza study conducted on the UF campus. The study
will determine the effectiveness of two different types of
immunization as well as whether the standard flu vaccine protects
against Hong Kong flu and other strains of flu. Students wishing to
volunteer for the study may come to Hume Hall today from 3-7 p.m.
HUAC Witness
Hlmplicates Daley
See Related Story, Page 4
WASHINGTON (UPI) A protest leader testified Monday that
demonstrators tried to avoid violence during the Democratic National
Convention in hopes people of "all classes and races'* would join the
street marches.
Thomas E. Hayden, Oakland, Calif., a founder of Students for a
Democratic Society, told the House Committee on Un-American
Activities that Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daleys well-publicized
buildup of police and troops was responsible for "scaring away"
middle class demonstrators he and other protest organizers tried to
recruit.
"See for yourself who transgressed first!" Hayden said, brandishing
a copy of a new report by investigators for the National Commission
of Violence. The report generaly Mamed a "police riot" for most of
the street violence during the August convention.
Hayden, the first witness as the committee resumed its hearings on
, the Chicago demonstrations, also testified that in July, while he was
planning the protests, North Vietnamese diplomats met him in Paris
because "they're always interested in demonstrations in the United
States against the war.
"They're pleased at any sign of activity that the people are coming
to their senses about the war in Vietnam whether it was in Chicago
demonstrations or draft resistance," he said.
(SEE DALEY* RAGE 21

3

JUmmkqr, December # 1968



!, Tha Florida AMgator, Tuasday, Daeambar 3,1968

Page 2

Police Battle Protesting School Lhildren

NEW YORK (UPI) ~
Policemen, provoked by bottles,
cans, sticks, stones and garbage
hurled by students, charged a
crowd of 1,000 protesters in a
troubled Brooklyn* school
district and struck at anyone
within reach.

Daley Implicated
In Chicago Riots
He later told newsmen that although the committee would like to
show some linking up of our movement with the North Vietnamese,
the fact is I went to Paris to help arrange the release of American
prisoners of war from North Vietnam. In his testimony, he said that
while in Paris he also-briefly met W. Averell Harriman, top U.S. peace
negotiator.
The committee is seeking evidence that Communists played a
major role in the demonstrations. Hayden, under questioning by
committee counsel Frank Conley, admitted members of the
Communist party participated. But he spoke scornfully of the
Communist party and said he disagreed with their political
program.
The new session contrasted sharply with the first series of hearings
last October when more than 100 hippies, Yippies and other
protestors marched on the hearing room and were evicted from the
Capitol grounds.
Hayden, 28, was well dressed and mannerly, unlike the gaudily
attired witnesses of October including Yippie leader Abbie Hoffman
who was arrested for wearing a shirt that looked like a U.S. flag.
Hoffman since has been convicted under a new flag defilement law
but has appealed.
Mondays hearing didn't even draw a full house. Security was tight,
with about a dozen policemen inside the room, but the hallways and
hearing room were quiet although Rep. Richard H. Ichord, D-Mo., the
committee chairman, said he was warned that certain people might
try to disrupt the session. Two more days of hearings are planned this
week.
Hayden said he pitied Chicago policemen. He said he believed
Daley ordered the violence. On the street they charged us in a
disciplinary way, he said, contradicting the violence commissions
report that individual officers were to blame.
A lot of abuse has been heaped on the Chicago police, Hayden
said.

Crack-Down Urged

jeopardy, which is expressly
forbidden by the code of
conduct.
Chances the resolution will
pass are quite good, Ellis said.
He claimed Greenman plans to
pack the senate meeting with
professors from the College of
Agriculture, to aid passage of the
proposal.
Greenman was out of town
Monday and could not be
reached for comment.
If the proposal does pass,
Ellis will introduce a measure
censuring the Faculty Senate at
the Student Senate meeting
Tuesday night.
Charles Harris, majority floor
leader of the Student Senate,
called Ellis* plan an excellent
idea** and stated a belief that
Greenman*s proposal gives
blanket approval to any kind of
administrative action in crises,
without defining what a crisis**
is.
Jack Vaughn, president of
the Student Senate, said
Greenmans proposal is
irrelevant to the actual
-

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Early reports said many were
slightly injured, including
children not yet in the teens,
near Junior High School 271 in
the Negro-Puerto Rican Ocean
Hill-Brownsville section of
Brooklyn.
Earlier in the day violence

situation at UF.
It raises mythical horrors
which have never' occured,
added Ellis. They seem to want
to chill free speech on this
campus.
The proposal also includes a
section which asks the Board of
Regents to find out from the
Attorney General of Florida
whether the UF has the
necessary legal power to protect
itself from unwarranted attacks
and seizures.
Action on Greenman*s
proposal will be preceded at the
Faculty Senate meeting by a
resolution supporting free
speech on campus, sponsored by
two professors and approved by
the American Association of
University Professors executive
committee.
It is not known whether ths
proposal is considered a reactions
to Greenmans resolution,
because the sponsors, Dr. Gladys
Kammerer, professor of political
' science, and Dr. Raymond
Fahien, chairman of the
chemical engineering
department, could not be
reached for comment.

exploded at three Brooklyn high
schools when several hundred
students-some of the thousands
who stayed away from
classrooms Monday-poured into
the hallways to hold
demonstrations against makeup
classes scheduled for holidays.
Makeup classes have become
a sore point for youngsters in
the year-long school crisis. They
were scheduled because of time


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PARKING PLACE
Kathy Case, age 6, daughter of Doug Case, 4JNI, took advantage of
Florida's indian summer Sunday and did a little sweeping up. In the
effort, Kathy uncovered something of a rarity in the Gainesville area.
A perking place for her kiddie car.

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lost during the recent 10-weeks
teachers strike, but the Ocean
Hill-Brownsville schools were
kept open diring the strike and
students there feel they should
not have to make up time.
The protesting students had
held a rally in Washington
Square Park in Manhattan, then
returned to Brooklyn by
subway, smashing train windows
and ripping up seats. When

blue-helmeted riot policemen
tried to disperse them they fled
toward the junior high.
When the students regrouped,
shouting hell no, we wont go
and waving banners reading
student strike against racist
teachers, hundreds of police
formed lines a half block from
the school. They came out
swinging when students huded
gutter variety missiles at them.
Reporters saw police strike at
least three preteen-agers. Two
young girls carrying books, who
appeared not to be more than
12, were caught by three police
against a car and were then
repeatedly hit until they
escaped.
Another barrage of missiles
brought a second, successful
charge from police. Almost all
the students were dispersed
within 30 minutes but a few
hundred who remained
continued to bombard passing
police vehicles with stones,
sticks and bottles.
Flagburning
Suspect To
Face Felony
The charge of violation of a
city ordinance has been dropped
against John R. Claxton, 2UC,
accused of desecrating an
American flag following an
on-campus apolitical rally Nov.
5.
City Attorney Allison E.
Folds said Claxton would be
tried under the state statute
governing violations of defacing
an American flag. This charge is
a felony and carries a penalty for
conviction of imprisonment in a
state penitentiary and a fine.
Claxton was originally
scheduled to appear Tuesday in
municipal court. His case will
now be heard by Circuit Court
at a date yet to be set.



Regents May Take Gatorade To Court

By Alligator Sorvicas
BOCA RATON The Board
of Regents might go to court to
try to settle the sticky issue of
who should get the profits from
Gatorade, the thirst quencher
guzzled by athletes.
The governing body of the
states universities and colleges
Monday delayed until its
January meeting taking formal
action on an investigation of
commercial marketing of the
energy-restoring drink. But a
regents spokesman said a suit
will likely go into tourt
following the next meeting.
We probably will file a suit
in circuit court asking for a
declaratory judgment, said
Hendrix Chandler, executive
secretary of the board.
One regent however, did not
seem so certain that the
inevitable route would take the
regents into the courts.
Fred Parker asked the board
to delay action until the January
meeting, saying the delay would
give the board more time to
decide whether it is worthwhile
for the state to take its case to
court in an attempt to win rights
for the university.
It might not be worth
spending maybe $20,000 to get
something that may be worth
only $250, Phil Ashler said.
Ashler, vice chancellor of the
state university system, is taking
part in the regents investigation
Parking Plan
Could Cost
Up To $25
rtow M6C OWE
areas such as the new 912-space
commuter lot behind Hume Hall
on North-South Drive.
But the lot and other
outlying areas such as
dormitories and the new law
complex will be served by a
shuttle bus system with buses
running every 8-10 minutes.
The parking plan and the hike
in fees resulted from a study by
the Traffic Planning Office
headed by Arnold Butt then
campus architect. Butt is now
Department of Architecture
chairman.
The study found that of the
7,000 tickets issued during one
quarter last year most were for
illegal parking on main campus
areas.
This was a result of the lack
of parking spaces on main
campus. At that time there were
only 6,442 spaces for the 14,000
cars authorized to park on
campus.
The construction of new
parking lots was the second
phase in the offices proposal
The first phase is the existing
system of strategically-located
control points at four campus
entrances.
The third phase called for the
establishment of a bus system to
haul commuters to main campus
areas using six buses on a
weekday basis from 7:30 am. to
5:30 p-in.

of the facts surrounding the sale
of the rights by the UF professor
that developed it.
Ashler said he did not know
what the national marketing
rights to Gatorade would be
worth but that he was using
$250 as a figure of speech.
The regents claim the state
should receive royalties from the
sale of the drink, which is being
marketed around the country by
Stokely-Van Camp.
The contention is based on
the fact that the formula for the
drink-which is absorbed into the
bloodstream to replace used
energy much faster than water or
other liquids-was developed by
a UF professor, Dr. James
Robert Cade.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said following the
regents meeting that when Cade
joined the faculty at the
university he signed a contract in
which he agreed to abide by the
policies and regulations of the
Board of Regents. But OConnell
admitted Cade did not sign
another form, a waiver giving up
patent rights to any discoveries
that might be marketable.
What we have here is a legal
question to settle, Chandler
said. What further complicates
the dispute is that HEW
contends the result of Dr. Cades
research is in the public domain
and therefore should be made
available to everyone.
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HEW also claims to have
helped finance the research that
produced Gatorade, a claim that
Cade has said is not correct.
Parker said his committee
met last Monday in Orlando
with attorneys representing
Stokely-Van Camp and the
Gatorade trust, Dr. Cades
incorporated group of associates
who entered into the marketing
agreement with the canning

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firm. Terms of the agreement
have not been revealed.
Parker said the attorneys
categorically denied that either
the UF or the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare
had an interest in Gatorade.
The board member added
that the attorneys were

Tuesday, Daeambsr 3,1968, The Florida ANigator,

surprised to see a copy of our
policy.
The boards official policy is
that any patented discoveries
made by a staff member become
property of the institution,
unless an examining committee
rules otherwise.
Stokely-Van Camp earlier this
year began distributing Gatorade
in several major cities.

Page 3



Page 4

V Tha Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Dooambar 3,1968

Guilty Police May Face 'Severe 1 Action

CHICAGO (UPI) The
director of a federal task force
that found some Chicago
policemen rioted during the
week of the Democratic
National Convention called
Monday for prompt and
severe disciplinary action
against them.
The blue curtain cannot be
permitted to stay down, Daniel
Walker said. The guilty must be
rooted out and disciplined.
Walker, head of the study
team which submitted its report
Sunday to the National
Commission on the Causes and
Prevention of Violence, told a
news conference the report
provides the cold, hard-nosed,
unadulterated facts.
The report, a new bombshell

Kissinger Appointed
Advisor To Nixon

NEW YORK (UPI)
President-elect Richard M.
Nixon appointed Dr. Henry A.
Kissinger, an expert on Western
European affairs, as his main
advisor for national security
policy.
The appointment of
Kissinger, a 45-year-old
German-born Harvard University
professor of government, set the
stage for what the
president-elect called a
Powell Is
Reprieved
NEW YORK (UPI) Adam
Clayton Powell Monday won a
new reprieve from serving a jail
sentence for contempt of court
growing out of an almost
nine-year old libel case.
The appellate division of
State Supreme Court granted a
stay of execution of the
30-to-90-day sentence pending a
hearing Dec. 10 on Powells
appeal. At the same time the
court refused to dismiss an
action seeking Powells
immediate jailing.
Powell was sentenced for his
attempts to avoid paying a
$56,000 libel judgement won by
Mrs. Esther James, a Harlem
widow whom he described on a
local television program in
March 1960 as a bag woman,
or collector of graft for corrupt
police. He later paid the
judgment.
Raymond Rubin, Mrs. James'
attorney, appealed for
revocation of Powells parole
and his immediate jailing.

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FOR RIOTS DURING DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION

in the city where police and
National Guardsmen battled
thousands of antiwar
demonstrators last August,
charged that the weight of
violence was overwhelmingly on
the side of the police.
The 233-page report
acknowledged that the police
faced exceedingly provocative
circumstances, but said that
their" response at times
amounted to a police riot.
Police Supt. James B. Conlisk
refused to comment on the
report Monday. Frank Sullivan,
director of public relations for
the police department, said
Conlisk had read the report but
was studying it.
Joseph J. Lefevour, president
of the Chicago lodge of the

revitalization of the National
Security Council as well as White
House security planning.
In a joint news conference in
the Pierre Hotel, Nixon and
Kissinger said they would seek
to develop long range policy and
contingency plans to prevent
crisis operations.
As Nixon put it: it is our
plan to revitalize the National
Security Council...so we may
not just react...but so we can
have a planned policy in effect.
The president-elect said he
chose Kissinger for what he
described as the first
appointment to the White House
staff in a major policy position
partly because of Kissingers
work on a study of the
transition phase between
administrations and partly
because the foreign affairs
expert never had held a policy
position in government before.
I felt it was time to bring in
someone who had never had that
responsibility, Nixon said. He
added he believes Kissinger
would be able to bring new ideas
and new men into the
administration to do some
creative thinking.
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NEWS
Fraternal Order of Police, said I
the police are going to be hurt
by it (the report) internally. He
said the police did a great job
under pressure.
Mayor Richard J. Daley, who
was accused by the fact-finders
of conditioning police to believe
that violence against

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demonstrators would be
condoned, said Sunday the
report was an excellent study
but criticized its summary as
misleading.
1 do not agree, Walker said
Monday. I do not think the
summary would mislead anyone.
There were a number of
policemen guilty of
indiscriminate violence. That is
the sum of the report.
Walker, a lawyer and
president of the Chicago Crime
Commission, said he did not
know how many policemen
were guilty of such violence.
But he said more than a
handful were involved and the
heart of the matter is police
violence.
Dismissal of a handful of

policemen will not be enough,
he said.
If no action is taken against
them the effect can only be to
discourage the majority of
policemen who acted
responsibly and further weaken
the bond between the police and
the community, Walker said.
Walker said his group made
no recommendations because
that was not part of their
assignment, but he said: Away
must be found to cope with
mass dissent.
I feel very deeply about this
issue, about the right of
constitutional dissent... he
said. It is a vital kind of
confrontation that will happen
again.



Accent Holds
Photo-Poster
Competition
A symposium photo and
poster contest with the theme
The Dimensions of Freedom
is being sponsored by Accent.
Posters and pictures should
be turned in by the January 17
deadline to the Accent office on
the third floor of the Reitz
Union. Photographs must be 8 x
10 or 5 x 7, black and white and
should be interpretations of the
theme.
The judges are two professors
from the photo department, two
professors from the art
department and members of the
Accent executive committee.
Through these contests, we
on Accents executive
committee hope to involve a
great many students in an
exploration into the dimensions
of freedom, said Tom
Demarco, a member of the
committee.
University Photo Supply is
donating the prizes of the photo
contest. A 35mm camera and
case valued at S4O is first prize.
Chestnuts Office Supply is
donating the awards for the
poster contest. A $35 gift
certificate is the grand prize in
the poster category.

New Cheerleading Committee
Considered By Senate Tonight

By ELLEN DUPUY
a |g> - r< ff
Alligator oiarr ffitwr
A larger, more representative
cheerleading selection
committee will be considered
tonight by UF Student Senators.
The new cheerleading charter
has been revised by senate
committees and will be voted on
in its second reading at 7:30
tonight in room 362 Reitz
Union.
The passage of the new
charter will allow at least six
additional persons on the
selection committee including:
the Alligator editor, or his
representative; an elected senate
representative; an elected
representative from the major
political parties; and both
captains of the football team
and the basketball team.
The charter also provides the
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Specializing in
Thesis and Dissertations J
Reductions and
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Open Til 11 PM.
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1 378-1001

DROPOUTS

JS. faoamssm rwky"l ijft I

Computers Role
Being Questioned
A special ad hoc committee of administrative deans and students is
to be appointed by Vice President Frederick Conner to discuss the
elimination of student preference of class hours and calling for
total computor registration.
The committee is being formed at the request of the Council of
Deans following Wednesdays meeting and Councils third discussion
of the proposal.
Introduced by Registrar Richard Whitehead, the proposal offers
student protection of closed sections during registration at the cost of
class hour preference.
The students are not really informed concerning the problem. The
committee will let them see the whole issue, Whitehead said Monday.
Student disapproval of computor registration appeared in a recent
survey taken by the Alligator.
Conner, who is chairman of the Council of Deans, was not available
to comment on the committee he will appoint. However, last week he
expressed his feelings on computer registration by saying there are
numerous pros and cons.
If the proposal were put into effect students would merely tell
their counselor what courses they wished to take and the schedule
would entirely be worked out by computor.
Students who were dissatisfied with (heir schedules would still be
able to go through drop and add procedures, Whitehead said.

opportunity for a girl to become
head cheerleader if elected and
also adds a Student Senator to
the Cheerleading Board of
Directors.
Also on tonights agenda will
be a proposed motion
supporting the resolution passed
by the political science
department deploring the
incidents which led to the
withdrawal of an African
graduate student Nov. 13.
Another resolution will be
put to a vote asking for more
college students on the petition
committee at UF.
Several second readings will
be on the agenda but Charlie
Harris, senate majority leader,
promises the meeting will be
short. Everybody needs to come

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however, so we wont have to
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Thursday night.
Party caucuses will be held at
7:15 pjn.
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BY HOWARD POST

mi gat r I
BfflSrdji~ ADVERTISERS I

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then let us deliver,
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i--

Timday, DtemitMr 3,1968, Th Flortch AMptor,

Page 5



, Th* Florida AHigator, Tuwday, Daeambar 3,1968

Page 6

EDITORIAL

Flush The Proposal

Maybe a better name for the Faculty
Senate would be the Alarmist Society.
Especially if the Senate follows the lead
of Professor John Greenman today and
blows its mind from fear of nonexistent
boogymen disguised as UF students.
Greenman, apparently trembling from the
international wave of student demands for a
meaningful voice in determining their own
destinies, will be on center stage today when
he introduces a resolution calling for
criminal prosecution of militant UF
students.
It is both incredible and disconcerting
that Greenman, a professor of agricultural
economics, actually plans to place such a
ludicrous suggestion in the spotlight of
intellectual scrutiny by some of this
university's finest minds.
Perhaps Greenman has been away from
the UF of late. Perhaps he isnt aware of
whats actually been happening here.
Either that or hes been swept away by
the winds of fantasy and volatile
imagination. Because his resolution-if it is
really intended to apply to the situation on
this campus at this time-borders on the
absurd.
Take a long look at the language of the
resolution:
WHEREAS, educational institutions,
such as the University of Florida, have
become vulnerable to the actions of
minorities who have violated the rights of
the large majority by direct, illegal and
violent actions...
Or try this one:
WHEREAS, appeals for proper
democratic discussions and for legal and
orderly procedures seem ineffective in
meeting such planned disruption and
violence...
And if thats not enough, read just one
more:
And, therefore, the Senate supports the
administration in its forthright and dynamic
efforts to maintain order by all means that
are immediately available when a crisis
occurs... (Emphasis ours.)

Staff Writings

Safe From Centrex?

Its a plot. A giant
conspiracy.
Im not paranoid. Really.
Though first I thought I was. Or
could be. But Im not. Really.
It is a plot.
Centrex is a conspiracy.
I know all about the mean
little old men who thought it up.
They planned it. Plots do
take planning. Especially plots
planned by mean little old men.
It all started at the beginning
of this quarter.
They installed our
telephone. A real one. Not
Centrex.
It was black and it was
beautiful.
Once in a great while it rang.
Mostly we just sat and looked at
it. Our soul phone.
We didnt realize we were
being duped by them.
All the while we were looking
at our blackly beautiful
telephone the mean little old
men were toiling over their test
tubes.
Finally they were finished.
A scientific masterpiece
emerged. Centrex.

Innocently, 1 attempted to
call my apartment.
But they had taken over.
They were everywhere: (
bzzzt . The number you
have dialed is no longer in
service .. bzzzt... the number
you have dialed ...
Impossible! Call the operator,
bzzt ... the number you
have dialed ...
Horrors! They had cut off
our communications line.
I rushed to the office to see if
they had been there too.
People were pulling their hair
out, throwing paper wads,
knocking over furniture, cursing,
ranting and raving. All was
normal.
Until the phone rang. There
was no light to tell which line
the call was on.

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Burin, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
382-1681,392-16820r392-1683. *'
Optafc *Kpr J fa the Florida AMptoeedoo of the editors or oF"
ths writer of th* article and not thorn of the Uaivarritv of Florida.

An uninformed illiterate might possibly
add his stamp of approval to these charges if
this were the Sorbome, or even Columbia.
But this is the University of Florida.
And violent, militant minorities which
have threatened the very existence of the
university itself simply do not exist here.
Maybe they talk a lot. But talk is so
cheap that it doesnt even merit a price tag.
The Faculty Senate instead of even
considering this scathing indictment of
student unrest, should be saying a collective,
silent prayer of gratitude.
The Senate, and the rest of the
community should be grateful that the ugly
heads of disruption and violence have been
raised only once here-during the Dow
Chemical protest last spring. Even that,
though, was but a mewling infant of what
could have happened.
The community should be grateful that
the so-called militants have talked much and
acted little.
The community should also be grateful
that very few of its leaders think the way
Greenman thinks.
Because the real tragedy of the resolution
is its intent. Rather than trying to come to
meaningful grips with the festering social
blisters which precipitate militancy, the
resolution urges punishment for students
who might feel forced to use unorthodox
cures for the pain.
The reactionary resolution, like Mayor
Daley and his up-tight Chicago cops, fails to
ask one simple question:
Why? And then: What can be done?
Failure to ask these questions and to
search honestly for their answers is, in our
judgement, a grievous error which no
supposedly intelligent man should make.
That error will become an even greater
travesty if the intellectual leaders of this
community agree with it at todays Senate
meeting.
For that reason, we strongly urge the
Faculty Senate to flush this ill-considered
resolution down the drain-where most
hogwash eventually ends up.

By Carol Sanger

Pick up 81 .., silence.
Pick up 82 ... silence.
Pick up 83 ... silence.
But they were there. On
the line. They had to be.
The phone kept ringing.
Punch a button. Any button!
Make it stop! Still it rang.
Punch. Punch. Ring . ring
Its a plot. I told you!
Centrex is a plot.
But you dont have to believe
me. My doctor doesn't either.
But youll see.
Im safe now. The phone is
gone. I destroyed it. I destroyed
Centrex.
I wanted to keep it. To show
them that I knew. But my
doctor wouldnt let me .
because it had sharp edges.

The Florida Alligator
#"Th price of freedom
is the exercise of* responsibility/ 1
Harold Aldrich v
Dave Doucette
I Managing Editor
VauMklA pave Reddick James Cook
All J{viWWM Assignments Editor News Editor

pStaff Writings! ^
Sign The Petition
And Dont Think
Gayle McElroys

A group of UF students are
preparing a petition to lower the
voting age in Florida from 21 to
18. As informed and well read
college students you are
probably ready to swarm in mass
to support it.
A spokesman for the group
has estimated the need for
200,000 signatures of state
voters in order that the petition
be successful. Urge voters t 0...
SIGN IT because you feel
youre informed at the tender
age of 18. You have profited
under the guidance of UF
professors and faithfully kept up
with current political issues. But
don't tell them you're in a
ninority. Less than 40 per cent
of Americas 18-year-olds are
enrolled in colleges. Forget the
facts, for you feel informed.
The group representative says
that students should become
interested in politics, and for
those who arent, perhaps this (a
lowered voting age) will give
them the incentive to become
so. But he forgets to mention
that in this country, founded on
the principles of a majority
voice, that 18-year-olds enrolled
in college are in a minority of
their age group.
SIGN IT because as the
petition spokesman said,
18-year-olds have the factual
knowledge to vote, but they

{ Alligator Inquizitor ]
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
>
Good morning. Todays column is dedicated to those born under -:
>: the sign of Virgo (August 23 September 23). According to>:
astrologers, Virgos are orderly, methodical and systematic. They are*:
active, proud and intolerant of ignorance. Also, they are loyal,*:
generous, good scholars, affectionate, (they sound like good people)*:
j: clever and successful in business. And remember, as Virgos so goes j;
: the nation! :
: Todays questions: :j
j: 1. What are the three childrens names in the TV show, FAMILY:*
< AFFAIR? 5
: 2* The Warren Commission based much of its report on a film::;
:* made by an amateur. The film showed the assassination, and the*
commission numbered each frame to determine time sequence. Do*
j: y u remerr, ber the name of the man who made the film? £
: 3. What is the Apocrypha? ij
: 4 s the actor, or actress, and what is the picture referred tog
i ? e W: lad y had an extremely rough time of it in her showerv
j: bath in a very successful psychological thriller, b) In this famous
.. gangster film, a bantam-sized dynamo pushed a grapefruit into the *: ;
:; face of Mae Clark.
5. What is Gainesvilles area code? £
$ the Queen of England waves to her people at the airport,:;:
J could this be called a Title Wave? X
j: Yesterdays answers: J:
j: 1. Richard Speck, Percy Foreman 2. The Misfits 3. Forte,
Dc ucci 4 Peace Pa rty 5. Basil St. John, Livright, Hank X
:j ramt your neck orange and blue today. |

need to be given the
responsibility. Students feel
frustrated because their voice is
not heard. But dont tell them
less than 25 per cent of these
frustrated students bothered
to vote in the campus elections
for leaders who would handle
thousands of dollars their
dollars.
SIGN IT because the student
group feels that voting becomes
a habit, and that if it is started
at the age of 18, it stands a
better chance of growing. But
dont cite campus elections as an
example. True, there is a grave
difference b*etween student
elections and those on a state or
national level. But the principle
is the same. Campus leaders
form policies that rule the
students in addition to handling
distribution of student funds.
SIGN IT and cut out a
three-year span in which a
majority of 18-year-olds leave
home and are for the first time
made to think for themselves.
This includes not just college
students, but those who go in
the service, get married or find
jobs. Ignore the transition that
takes place during this span.
Yes, urge the voters to forget
the transition, to forget the
figures, to sign the petition.
For a Florida man needs no
introduction no matter what
age.



. t 9
1 | %§- ql *
' aTHI T -i f
Black Skin Still
A Stigma At UF
MR. EDITOR:
Last week my friend left Gainesville for Indiana. The reason for this
midterm departure was a case of skin trouble commonly known as
ebony skin. On the night of November 10 some young white males
decided to show their superior breeding by spitting on him as he
walked home from a special seminar at the library. It was dark so he
couldn't recognize them, I can only hope they werent UF men.
This boy comes from Kenya but he has spent four yean in the
United States obtaining an undergraduate degree at Millikin University
in Illinois, so that naturally he's acquainted with the racial situation,
yet still he decided to study in the South. He didn't expect miracles
but after serving as a student senator at Millikin 1 fee} he was
somewhat disappointed with Florida, this disappointment turned to
disgust last Sunday week.
Fred Kanali was my first and closest friend at the University of
Florida, he befriended me when I first arrived in Gainesville,
befriended me when I was certainly a burden on him for at this time
not only did I have the flu but also I had no money to even buy a bed
for the night. Fred took care of the situation and as a result made one
raw Australian student happy to know his acquaintance.
You've lost a good man.
BRIAN ODOHERTY

E Little Time To Dream

MR. EDITOR:
Three magic words. Words we
can all do without. To dream of
what the world would be like if
the concepts these words
symbolize were non-existent.
Oh, if only these words were
replaced respectively by
individualism, peace, and love.
But there is precious little
time to dream. For the thought
behind this trio is in action
today, taking the lives of
innocents throughout the world,
just as it has existed for all
millenium. On every continent,
in every country, atrocities are
being committed in the name of
patriotism, by the military, and
thmugh the forces of hate. Just

In order to appear in the Alligator, letters to the editor must
be typed and signed and should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers'names may be withheld from publication for just cause.
The editor reserves the right to edit ail letters in the interest of
space.

gaze at Chicago, for example, in
this country.
Have more people suffered at
the hands of nationalists or
individualists? Are more lives
deliberately taken during war or
peace? Wifl men continue to be
murdered in crdd blood by the
forces of hate or love? In a
society as warped and perverted
as that existing today, these
questions need not be answered.
In the future, when those
holding political authority today
are gone, there is hope. But what
little hope there is when those
who seem destined to be the
leaders in the new great
society are content to follow
along and mimic leaders in
today's sick society.

OKN fOKUM:
Aim mi ViAAwt
"Tfctr* i* no kop* for tit* comptacttU mm."
Out
No Advantage To Alums
By William O.E. Henry-

(EDITOR'S NOTE: William O.E. Henry is the
president of UF Alumni Association.)
It was my pleasant opportunity to join you,
other student leaders and university administrators
at a retreat where views were freely exchanged
about matters of common interest. During the
retreat Student Body President Clyde Taylor stated
that alumni-student relations were at a low ebb. I
invited President Taylor and other students to
advise me why this view was held. The explanations
boiled down to poor communications.
This letter will hopefully communicate alumni
information of general interest to your readers.
At football games students sometimes look at the
West stands and think that they are looking at
alumni. Actually, they are looking at football ticket
purchasers who often are not alumni. If the
purchaser has the highest possible football priority
as an alumnus, he cannot be sitting closer to
mid-field than the 30-yard line. We know you
students have seating problems and sympathize with
you but please keep the foregoing in mind when
judging whether alumni have some special advantage
in football seating.
All alumni are members of the alumni
association. An alumnus is any former student.
Thus, in due course all students become alumni and
members of our association.
The alumni association is the organization which
channels alumni support for the university. It is
perhaps more representative of the alumni than
student government is representative of the student
body. Participation is equally open in both
organizations but greater participation would be
desirable.
A major project of our association is alumni
annual giving. This fund raising project provides
unrestricted funds for the university. These funds
are used primarily for student financial aid and
alumni communications. Alumni have provided
more than one million dollars in student aid. Our

Let's dream on and picture
this new society. Miraculously
the intellectuals and educated
members of society prevailed
and those "destined ones, the
bootlickers of old, the
handkissers at old Alma Mater,
failed to control the mechanisms
of society. There is no more war,
nationalism, or hatred. The
Messiah has arrived.
But like all good dreams
this one must end.. There is
still Vietnam, Biafra and
Chicago. There is still hatred,
bigotry and prejudice. And there
always will be unless oh, it
was only a dream.
ALAN JACOBSON

Force Is Deplorable
And SDS Is Wrong

MR. EDITOR:
Interests inside the university
would like very much to put
Stand Up For
Stars & Bars
MR. EDITOR:
The Concerned Parents
Organization is a local group,
formed in Homestead, Florida,
that is attempting to keep the
confederate flag and the song
Dixie as symbols at South
Dade High in Homestead. They
have appealed to the Florida
State Sdiool Board. Funds are
needed to carry this fight on.
Anyone who is interested in
such a drive, write to Concerned
Parents Organization, Box 203,
Princeton, Florida, 33171.
808 MERVINE, 4JM

TwOay, Ptaniar 3. t
communications explain such things as why
academic admission standards were raised and why a
free exchange of ideas policy will permit Adam
Clayton Powell to be invited to speak on the
campus.
During breaks in the retreat proceedings, at the
request of participants, I said I would recommend
the disbursement of alumni funds to pay application
fees for a limited number of disadvantaged students,
and to help foreign students communicate with
international alumni.
In other than fund raising activities we are
concerned with student recruiting and building
public support. The University of Florida will
continue to be number one in the state as long as
this position is desired by citizens in all parts of
Florida. Our student recruiting is based on the
proposition that attracting top students convinces
citizens the University should be continued as
Florida's number one institution of higher learning.
Out public support program is concerned with the
possibility that new state universities in the urban
areas of Florida may weaken public support for the
University of Florida.
The Florida-Georgia football game in
Jacksonville is said to earn Jacksonville support for
the university. Are students willing for other games
to be played away from Gainesville to win support
from other areas? The retreat persuaded me that the
student leaden sincerely want to improve the
university.
Some students have asserted that the university
belongs to the students and not to the alumni. This
is not so. The university belongs to all of us. It
provides students with an educational opportunity,
and this is a major purpose. But the university also
serves the people of Florida, including alumni,
faculty and administrators in ways too numerous to
list. It is too vital an institution to serve merely the
needs of its transient students.
Your need for brevity compels me to stop at this
point but other means will be developed for the
exchange of views between alumni and students.

pressure on President O'Connell
NOT to allow an organization
such as SDS on our campus,
Obviously, I too deplore the
methods and philosophy of
SDS, and I fine it hard to believe
that you, Mr. Aldrich, can
advocate cleaning up our present
corrupt and decadent status
quo with recognition of an
organization which is always in
support of the corrupt and
decadent. Radical reform may
not be undesirable, but force is
always deplorable.
Any group with a policy of
force, whether currently in use
or latent in the groups code,
deserves no recognition by any
university. Hopefully, President
O'Connell will how and always
turn his back on any such plea
from the SDS, Nazi Chibs,
Youth for Hitler, etc., etc.
JO ANN MYER, 7JM

Page 7



t. The Florida Alligator, Tulay, Dacambar 3,1968

Page 8

'Visiting Scientists Exposure To Excellence

By Alligator Information Sarvieas
The all-American academic
bull session" is a startling
experience for the UFs first
Visiting Scientists.'
Free-for-all discussions,
during and after classes, are the
most striking differences noted
between German and American
chemistry students, according to
Dr. Rolf KJ. Huisgen, Munich
and Dr. Ernst B. Lippert, Berlin.

For Sale: Odd Christmas Gifts

If you are looking for
something unusual for Christmas
gifts, go to the Millhopper
Schools Second Annual
Professional Arts and Crafts
Bazaar.
UF art professors ana
students are the chief
contributors of the art objects,
including paintings, sketches,
collages, pottery, batiks,
woodcuts, leather goods, enamel
and silver jewelry, and
sculptures. Many of these
objects are priced at under $lO.

WHATSHAPPENING
111 1 By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writar
IN THE COMING OF THE FAITHFUL: Would you believe it?
There are probably some on this campus with enough confidence in
their scholastic ability to actually take time out from studying to go
hear the Mens and Womens Glee Club and the University Choir in
the University Auditorium tonight at 8:15.
The three groups will present a CCC tonight. (Christmas Choral
Concert.)
IN DECK THE HALLS WITH BOUGHS OF HOLLY
(HOLLYSI.7S, HALLS-$15 r 364.09, DECK-OPTIONAL): A
Christmas Sale will be held in the Reitz Union Ballroom from 8 a.m.
till 11 p.m. today, the 4th, and the sth.
IN A LOCK OF CHESTERS HAIR, A PHANTOM BRICK FROM
A NON-EXISTENT PARKING LOT, A BLANK COPY OF STEVES
STATEMENT ON RACISM...: Environment is the title of an
experimental space created for the University Gallery by design
students from the Architecture Department. The display will be in
the Gallery until Dec. 15. (Dont expect it to consist of the
aforementioned, though).
AND SPEAKING OF THE AFOREMENTIONED: Some of the
old-standby clubs mentioned in this column several (to say the least)
times in the past meet yet in finals week. The French Club meets at 2
p.m. in room 1508 of the Union; the Tuesday Evening Supper Club
gathers in the University Inn at 7:30; and the Student Senate meets at
6:30 tonight in room 361 of the Union.
IN GREEK-LETTER GOINGS-ON: Omicron Delta Kappa meets in
room 400 of the Union at 7:30 tonight; Delta Sigma Pi meets in room
357 of the union at 7 tonight.

Thinking of newspaper work?
Think of ijtafs'')
FLORIDAS BEST NEWSPAPER
and
Evening Independent

Wo'll be on the UB Campus Tuos Tuosdoy
doy Tuosdoy and Wudnusday, December
9 and 4# to talk ta undorgradu undorgraduata
ata undorgraduata stadants about suntmar
Intarnsbips in naws and
advortising.

Sign up it the School of CoaMwnicatio and Journalism.
Let's get acquainted!

Norm Dussoault
Porsonnol Maitagor

German students are more
reserved. One has difficulty in
starting discussions there. Here,
the problem is to end the
exchange, observes Dr.
Huisgen, an organic chemist
listed in Modern Men of
Science.
The Visiting Scientists
program, inaugurated this fall by
the Department of Chemistry, is
designed to expose the

There will also be a toy craft
room, featuring hand crafted,
creative toys.
The bazaar will be Dec. 7,
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Dec.
8, from 1 pjn. to 6 p.m., at the
Unitarian Fellowship House,
2841 NW 43rd Road.
Dr. Arlan Rosenblooms
collection of African Artifacts
will be exhibited. Rosenbloom,
now with the Dept, of Pediatrics
at J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
obtained this collection while he
was in the Public Health Service
in Cameroon, West Africa.

If you'ru graduating within tha
naxt law months, wa'll ha glad
to discuss pormanont omploy omploymant.
mant. omploymant.

Bob Holman
Timas Managing Editor

universitys students and staff to
scientists from all over the world
potential Nobel Prize
winners, explains Dr. William
M. Jones, department chairman
and originator of the new
program.
Plans call for four or five
visiting professors each year,
exposing students to 20
international authorities in a
four-year stay at the university.

An entrance donation of $.50
is asked. The proceeds will go to
Project: Children to provide
scholarships to enable needy
children to attend nursery
school.
r Get-Tough
Administrator
Confronted
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
Demonstators jeered, jostled and
threw strike leaflets in the face
of acting President S.I.
Hayakawa today as San
Francisco State College
reopened under new, get-tough
rules.
At least two demonstrators
were arrested and a sound truck
operated by activists was
impounded.
The confrontation between
Hayakawa and a group of 50
demonstrators came as classes
reopened for the first time in
nearly three weeks. Sixty
uniformed police were stationed
at classroom buildings under
state of emergency regulations
announced by the five foot, two
inch administrator.
CRANE IMPORTS
Utoumph]
BALES-SERVICE BALES-SERVICERE
RE BALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
9<* E. Vntv. Ave. 373-4373

The German professors
setting the pace teach classes,
conduct seminars and catch up
on writing for major research
projects.
The two agree that science
conferences open the Iron
Curtain.
But when they come to the
Free World, their families must
stay behind to assure a return
trip, adds one.
Dr. Huisgen is described by
Dr. Jones as the man
responsible for the basic research
behind virtually everything you
wear including lipstick and
synthetics. He is on leave from
the Institut fur Oiganisch
Chemie.
A foreign honorary member
of the American Academy of
Arts and Sciences, Dr. Huisgen is
listed in Whos Who in
Germany. He previously taught
at the University of Wisconsin
and Cornell University. He has
been a university teacher in
Germany since 1943.
He is the author of more than
270 research papers in organic
chemistry.

M ) XI # % J Sinci; 1938
I u s goy! Its lively! Its Christmas cocktail |
wear from Franklins. I
I Sweet, saucy little dresses for a romantic 1
I evening Anywhere, U.S.A. And, theyre so
I inexpensive! 1
Come see. I
1 2401 Southwest Thirteenth Street Village Square |
1 OPEN 9:30 6:00 daily §

Dr. Lippert is on leave from
the Technical University 0 f
Berlin. He was the first German
professor invited to Israel as a
visiting professor. He is listed in
Whos Who in Europe.
A secondary phase of the
program will bring top American
scientists to campus for two-day
seminars, with 32 speakers
expected ir; four different major
areas each year.
International scientists will
visit for periods varying from the
full quarter for the German
scientists, to an average of six
weeks.
gOOOOOnnr)BBBB6JLJ|
; mm
WANT
j ADS j



CHRISTMAS OF GIFTS

1969
Seminole
on
Sale
next
quarter
at
THE HUB
and
GENERAL
CLASSROOM
BLDG.

Your next move is
.... onus
* il
v;' M )/ 5-
: '" ' 1
OUR FURNITURE MOVERS ARE READY
TO HELP YOU MOVE FREE OF CHARGE
TO YOUR NEW CAMELOT APARTMENT
HOME.
Eanteiot
(At Westgate)
Ernest Tew Realty
Professional Property Manager
Phone: 378-0296 or

A NOVELTY GIFT
battery p erat£
rf'
Comes complete with batteries
8 Transistors; precision vernier
tuning
The ARISTOCRAT Y2BO $39 95
COUCHS Inc
"Where Service is our most important Product"
*OB M. MAIN M 376-7171

Tuesday, Dacambar 3. 1968, TUB FlovMi AM|MOr.

Page 9



Page 10

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, December 3,1988

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, December 3
International Christmas Sal*, Union
Ballroom, 1:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
La Card* Francois (French Club),
Informal Coffaa Hour, 160 B
Union, 2:00 pjn.
Early Childhood Education, Union
Aud., 3:30 pjn.
Children's Ballot, Tap & Modem
Dance Lenons, C-4 Union, 4:00
pjn.
Bridge Lessons, 150 C Union, 7:00
pjn.
Delta Sigma Pi Mooting, 367, 361
Union, 7:00 pjn.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union, 7:30
pjn.
Supper Club, Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 pjn.
Music Dept: Combined Christmas
Choral Concert, University Aud.,
8:16 pjn.
Tusedav. December 3
La Card* Francois (French Chib),
Informal Coffee Hour, 160 B
Union, 2:00 pjn.
Children's Ballet, T*> ft Modem
Danoa, C-4 Union, 4:00 pjn.
Delta Sipna Pi Moating, 381 Union,
7:00 pjn.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Supper Club, Buffet supper.
University Inn, 7:30 pjn.
Wednesday, December 4
International Christmas Sale, Union
Ballroom, 1:00 9:00 pjn.
Florida Speleological Society, 347
Union, 7:00 pjn.
Fencing Club, Oaaamant Roe. Room,
Florida Gym, 7:00 pjn.
rrm mn y uinivs iwtvung, tiom# ot
Mrs. E. Drayton Holmes, 2619
N.E. 11th Street, 7:30 pjn.
International Circle K, 391 Union,
7:30 pjn.
Benton Engineering Council, C-4
Union
Latin American Colloquium Lecture,
Colloquium Room, College
LRuary, 8:00 pjn.
Christmas on Campus, University
Aud., 10:00 pjn.

Low Interest Rates Still Available eBBuSMiM^BBIiIBIEL
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance --
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement ~ ~-7
loans, and Share loans
Call ext 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION flfe

Thursday, December 5
International Christmas Sale, Union
Bdlroom, 1:00 9:00 pjn.
Children's Ballot, Tap ft Modem
Dance Lessons, C-4 Union, 4:00
pjn.
Program Office, Modem Poetry
Presentation, 122 Union, 4:40
p.m.
Christian Science Meeting, 367
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Football Film, Union Aud., 8:00
pjn.
Friday, December 6
Football Film, 150 C ft D, 12:00
noon
Union Movie, "Psycho", Union Aud.,
5:00,7:00ft9:15 pjn.
Chaos Club, 118 Union, 8:30 pjn.
r mm .iim DmamamS D*a D Aa>na
s OUCIVIQ wIUDf Ddolliulll n OC. n OOlTi,
Florida Gym, 7:00 pjn.
Dean Hale, "Christinas Carol",
University Aud., 7:30 pjn.
Florida Folk Dancing, 214 Florida
Gym, 8:00 pjn.

Why So Excited?

mBffiSFmBF-: .i^ilHl
iiSiMi^^Wiw
.£v3Sb

BLUE BULLETIN

%
Administrative Notices

GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduating, grant of
credit or release of transcript for any
student whoee account with the
University is delinquent.
I.^l
. NATIONAL DEFENSE LOAN
BORROWERS: If you have been
approved for a release of funds from
the National Defense Loan Program
for the Winter Quarter, and have
pro registered for that quarter, your
fee payment can be deducted from
your loan. As soon as you have
finished pre-registering come to the
Student Accounts Office.
NOTICE TO ALL STUDENTS:
The Student Accounts sections is
now accepting Short-term Loan
applications for payment of Winter
Quarter Registration Fees.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES! AND.GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

STATE TEACHERS: General
Loan Scholarship money has
arrived. You may receive it in
the Student Depository from
Mrs. Robinson or Miss Nabers.
:'V -I
' i ;
GRADUATING SENIORS: If you
have a National Defense Student
Loan, you must complete the Exit
interview procedure prior to
graduation in order to kssp your
account current.
TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP
STUDENTS: Scholarship
continuance forms may be
picked up in 124 Norman Hall.
They must be returned by Dec.
20.

WHO KNOWS
It could be one of a thousand things. College is that kind of
life . Excitement, challenge and varied interests.
Why does she. like thousands of others, read the pages of
The Florida Alligator every morning . Looking at its
stories, its photos, its advertising?
v.
Because The Florida Alligator is an important part of her
college life. And an exciting one.

ORANGE & BLUE NOTICES:
Dec. 6 will be the last issue of
the Alligator and the Orange &
Blue Bulletin during the Fall
quarter. Winter quarter
publication will resume Jan. 6,
1969.
Placement Interviews
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
DEC. 4: West Virginia State
Road Commission Civil Engr.,
(8.M.).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
1967 Honda Scrambler 90. Helmet
incl. $195. See at Pinehurst Park, Lot
132 after 5 p.m. (A-st-45-p)
FOR SALE: BMW R6O 1967 only
a little over 3000 mi. Call 372-4625.
(A-st-45-c)
Selmer Eb alto saxaphone $175. Call
376-0155 after 3:00 p.m. (A-3t-49-p)
35mm Camera Petri single lens reflex,
telephoto lens, filters, camera box,
$175. Call 378-7441. (A-3t-49-p)
You saved and slaved for wall to wall
carpet. Keep it new with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-49-c)
Mobile home lot 100 ft. x 100 ft.
Septic tank, gas, telephone & power
pole. Pay equity and take over
payments, $29/mo., water incl. Ph.
378-6392. (A-3t-49-p)
;-.v.>;.%%v.vx*x-X'X-x-x-x*x-x-x.x.v*v.*;-x-x
FOR RENT
Furnished downstairs apt., 2 Br., Air
conditioned. Call after 5:30,
378-7845. (B-48-ts-c)
2 Br. house next to campus; all
necessities plus; $125 month, first
come first served! Phone 378-5405.
(B-st-47-p)
Studio apt. suitable for 1 or 2,
utilities included, pool, to block from
campus. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave. Apt.
329. Call 378-8060. (B-st-47-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Dtadlin* >3£o pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
W KJ n
I l I I | I J
I ini! S£
£f|-! s 1 i S
a t 5
_ 5
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UI W to M
e t t t su
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S a S S 5 W
till
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| ip

FOR RENT |
A 5?
Modem 2 bedroom, air condition,
heating unfurnished. Available
December 30. $165 per month.
Landmark Apts, call Achey
372-6535. (B-15t-38-p)
Sublet Jan. 1. 2 Br. furnished apt. 1
blk. from campus at 1119 S.W. 7th
Ave. or call Henri 378-7696 after 11
a.m. One or more persons.
(B-4t-48-p)
To sublease one bedroom poolside
apartment Landmark Phase 11, Jan.
1. Gym, rec room, and sauna. Call
Ayn or Jennifer, 372-1662.
(B-4t-48-p)
Sublet 1 BR apt. Frederick Gardens.
$l2O per mo. Rent paid thru Jan. 1.
Apt. furnished & AC. Call after 3
p.m., 372-5948. (B-4t-49-p)
Moving into frat house, must sublet
my space in 4-man poolside apt. Mn
T anglewood, starting Jan.
$47.50/mo. plus utl. You keep my
security deposits. Mark, 372-8041.
(B-st-49-p)
Must sublet 1 br. Landmark Phase ll
apt. for 2nd qtr. AC pool,
dishwasher. Call 378-8992.
(B-4t-49-p)
Take over lease on spacious 1 br. apt.
AC wood paneled, enclosed patio,
quiet surroundings. $lO5 mo. Village
34 Apts. Call 376-7491. (B-3t-49-p)

Tueadey. December 3,1968, The Florida Alligator,

| FOR RENT %
%XXSSW*WsX<->X<*XXX%'XX<*>X-X*Xi
Must sublet: 2 BR furnished (or
unfurnished) apt. at the Summit
House Rent paid to Jan. Ist. Mpve
In Immediately 376-9688.
(B-4t-49-c)
WANTED |
iil
Female roommate needed for fourth
in 2 br apt. beginning Jan. Call
378-0609. (C-2t-49-p)
Female roommate needed for Winter
or Winter A Spring Quarter. Call
Lauren at 378-4376 after 5. One
bedroom apt. at Tanglewood.
(C-4t-49-p)
"T 1
2 female roommates to share 2
bedrm. Landmark Apt. beginning
Winter Quarter. Great location. Call
Pris at 378-8438 or Sandy at
392-7659. (C-st-45-p)
Male roommate to share new 12 wide
mobile home. Private bedroom. $35
plus utilities. Pinehurst Park, Lot
132, after 5 p.m. (C-st-45-p)
1 or 2 Female Roommates for 2
bedroom mobile home. Pri. room, 5
min. from campus. Rent 105.50 mo.
plus utilities. Call 378-3522 for
information. (C-st-47-p)
Studious male roommate to share
two bedroom apartment with three
others. Summit House. Call
372-6959. (C-6t-48-p)
Female roommate French Quarter
57. 378-2729, (C-2t-49-p)
3rd Roommate to share 2 bedroom
Olympia apartment for winter or
remainder of year. Phone 378-7909
after 4:30. S4O/mo. (C-st-49-p)
Female roommate to share apt. with
3 other girls in Gatortown for next 2
quarters. Call 372-0784. (C-3t-49-p)
Male roommate wanted to share apt.
with one other, Jan. June. $45/mo.
and to utilities. AC & near campus.
1513 N.W. sth Ave. Apt. 56,
378-0661. (C-3t-49-p)
Two female roommates to share
2-bedroom apt. AC, walking distance
to campus. SIOO a quarter. Call
today 378-5532 and ask for Fran.
(C-3t-49-p)
Wanted: fourth girl to share Village
Park apt. beginning January 1. Call
376-7491. (C-3t-49-p)
1 coed for luxury 2 bedroom 2 bath
Camelot Apartment starting Winter
Quarter. Pool, sauna, fireplace,
dishwasher. Call 378-9694.
(C-41-49-P)
One female roommate for 2 bedroom
French Quarter apt. Call Sharon or
Arlene at 378-9094. (C-lt-49-p)
Female roommate wanted for Jan.
Private room, AC, washer & dryer, 3
blocks from campus. $37.50/mo.
378-3291, 376-3582. (C-2t-49-p)
NNVXV.SVMYX-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-V-N'X-X-X^J
HELP WANTED f
{xx-x-xx+moxmv-w.x-m*v-v.v.v,vx xM
20 men and women part time to
deliver to local area. Must have auto
and know city. Apply 14 E. Univ.
Ave. Upstairs offices 1 and 2.
(E-38-12t-P)
Interviewing for holiday and winter
quarter employment, with some
immediate openings available. Apply
in person, ARBYS RESTAURANT,
1405 S.W. 13th Street. (E-2t-49-c)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harr'et Wilkerson.
Univ. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-C)
Part time waitresses. Noon hours or
evenings. Arranged to your schedule.
Apply King's Food Host, 1802 W,
Univ. Ave. or 1430 SW 13th St, r
(E-47-ts-c)
Part time grill help. Noon hours or
evenings. Arranged to your schedule.
Apply King's Food Host, 1802 W.
Univ. Ave. (E-47-ts-c)
ADV MAJORS = Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nation's 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person, Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
Like movies? Want to review for the
Alligator? Turn in a review of any
movie in town the day after it opens
to the entertainment editors desk,
third floor Reitz Union. We will call
you. (E-tf-38-ACO
Registered nurse to do occasional
part time convalescent care. Call
376-4216 at about 8:00 a.m. or
10:00 p.m. (E-3t-48-p)
DELIVERY BOYS: Apply in person
1029 W. Univ. Ave. LARRY'S
PORE-BOY. (E-st-48-p)
women Girls: i elephone & survey
work part-time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
Part or full-time work on campus.
Flexible hours. Needed: ID checkers,
and door control help. Must be 21,
apply student activities desk, 3rd
floor,Reitz Union. (E-st-45-c)

Page 11

i AUTOS I j
61 VW bus good condition, radio
excellent tires. S4OO. 372-5189.
(G-3t-49-p)
1966 VW sedan, RBiH, push out rear
windows, & complete service records.
Perfect condition. 1350. 378-8956
after 5 p.m. (G-st-49-p)
1966 MGB Good condition
convertible w/Boot and tonneau top
good tires only $1625 call 392-1681
for Jim Moody 2-5 p.m.)G-3f-49-p)
1963 Chevrolet Impala SS
convertible. Automatic, VB, power
brakes, steering, radio, heater, SBOO.
Incredibly fine shape. 378-0937.
(G-3t-48-p)
For sale: Fiat 1100 4 dr. sedan. Good
student trans. One owner Call after
six. 378-7061. (G-3t-49-p)
65 Corvair auto 140 hp 4 single bbls
convt. auto. Call 372-7659 after 6
p.m. (G-4t-49-p)
f PERSONAL I
I $
YOU ASKED US TO LET YOU
KNOW
They're here. Ponchos and ruanas
handwoven in Colombia in brilliant
beautiful colors. 100 % wool. S2O-25
AT THE SPANISH MAIN 105 W.
University Ave. (J-3t-49-p)
LAST CHANCE TO RESERVE
YOUR NEW YEARS IN NEW
YORK spot for $l6O, call 392-1655
or stop by Rm. 310 Union NY in
N.Y. (J-st-49-c)
Good luck In finals to the great Phi
Sigs. Thanks for being such great
hostesses and friends. Your
temporary guest, Barbara F.
(J-lt-49-p)
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
iJiUn"
THRU TUESDAY
mm GENET'S
mm "THE BALCONY"
mm with Peter Falk
andShelleyVWnters

ffliiawfisirn
JiwjpMgagaa m run in
GAINESVILLE
Ita. Comw to SHALAKO!
* mm
\ _jpfcL r jt ' jfl:' Ipp^^S^vV..
- A1 fl§ln
f AJ ff ill V
r ij i!
I A *" ** jM
I
U§ f J '9B^K'
k if
MwlttoniniimiMtarttllMStMMAM SHOWING
SEAN BRIGITTE STEPHENIJACK I PETER IHONOR IWOOOVIERC 7:00
CONNERY BARDOT BOW) I HAWKNSI VAN EYCKI BLACKMAN I STROOEISVKES 10:50
L_ PLUS 2nd BIQ FEATURE V
SANDRA DEE
GEORGE HAMILTON JK* K^ 1
areinthe J,^
funniest tDC
whodoneit! J kidding! J
IfqjflTV/Jv m
CELESTE HOUI 81l BWBY BCK MUMAWHORT SAH filYtf Hm

| PERSONAL |
RECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
thl Amtrlcan I nternattonai
Academy. Six weeks at EufOprt
most,famous campuses. For info. cm
392*1655 or coma by 310 Unite?.
Bobby, youre beautiful. Found and
lost you at the rally. See you In the
Plaza. (J-st-45-p)
Mr. Michael Leclercq please call the
Seminole office about your portrait
proofs 392*1661 between 2*5 p.m.
(J*3t*29*c)
LOST A FOUND |
Anyone finding or knowing
where-abouts of grey suede handbag
taken from art ed. studio Mon. night,
please call Cheryl Kramer, 376-0114
prescrip, pills A ID's desp. needed.
(L-3t-49*p)
Lost-gold bulova watch with scarab
band call 392-7869 Reward.
(L-3t-49-p)
Lost 1 pair prescription dark glasses
with wire frames and dark blue vlnal
case. REWARD. Call Lou Tally
392-8021 Trm. 320 North
(L-34-49-P)
I SERVICES |
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric service
603 SE Second Street, 378*7330.
(M-10-ts-C)
I .. .|
t&chntoolor "I
9i3i .{JJJJJJ* WHIBRiIbBH



Page 12

!The Florida Alligator, Tgifdfy, Dooombor 3,1868

c / j| *\
*\ h^L4
f* j 2
$* "&iy £*>/$, isn V that Dean Cosby over there? 2

f Gurgles Bring Dollars

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writer
Gurgle, splash, scratch .
.You will say ...
The tape continues playing
and the people in the room write
down the words that follow the
repeated phrase: You will say.
Its all part of an experiment
labeled underwater listening
under the supervision of the
speech department in the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Each tape is made by divers,
who read a list of words using a
combination of different
microphones and muzzles.
Volunteer students listen and try
to comprehend the tapes.
Rainbow Springs was the site
of the first experiment. Navy
divers, reading word lists, were
submerged in 12 to 15 feet of

JBk
I CHRISTMAS |j

water. The second experiment
was done in a decompression
chamber at the Mine Defense
Laboratory in Panama City.
Listening sessions have been
conducted at the UF since this
September.
Patti Paul, faculty member
and diver, said UF is one of the
foremost labs involved. The
underwater listening sessions are
connected with the English lab
program. Its important for
divers to know they are being
understood clearly, she said.
Volunteers listening to the
tapes are paid $1.50 an hour.
They write down the words they
think the diver has said. At least
ten people are needed per tape,
and no one may be used twice.
The College of Arts and
Sciences doesnt want the

training effect. Once students
have heard one tape theyve
heard all the voices under the
same conditions, but just
different word lists, and a
second listening session wouldnt
be a true measure of the
intelligibility, Mrs. Paul said.
Asbestos
Swaziland, newly
independent African nation, has
the worlds fifth largest asbestos
mines, says the National
Geographic.

Famous Name Reg. sl6 to sl9|
| Elephant Leg Pants I
It PreOpening d[ QjP f
I SPECIAL # v:> I
J I Open Weeknights 2
£ Till 9:00 PM jf
t Room Full of Winter Styles ]|
§ BEnCR DRESSES * f
t HARRIS woolen, orlons, amels, crepes *'
| SEE THEM t
ITO BELIEVE IT!! $795 t
fr A gift to yourself or Vrtll V
S someone you love!! I YOUR CHOICE t
Jt OPEN WEEKNIGHTS Till 9PM 11
** 0 76eDcutd(ftUMt Bovtiqse t
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave. i
CENTRAL CHARGE OR OUR LAY AWAY-] :

Oldest US Sorority
To Colonize In Jan.

Pi Beta Phi, the oldest
national womens sorority in
the United States, will colonize
in January, 1969, as the UFs
fifteenth social sorority.
Rush, bidding, and pledging
will take place Jan. 16-18 during
Panhellenic Councils formal
rush period. Six national
officers, local alumnae, members
of Pi Phis three chapters in
Florida (FSU, Rollins College
and Stetson University) will aid
in conducting rush.
The new pledges will be
initiated in April as charter
members of Florida Delta
chapter. The UF chapter will be
Pi Phis 113th chapter in the
country.
Pi Beta Phi was founded in

ionJ.Wayn*R*itzUnionJ.WaynR*itzUnk>nJ.WynReitzUnionJ.WaynRrtzUnion
| a/vrw tea, Koa. |
I "tnayelwg a&tgpit? |
|
3 'JoaAt |
i
| CALL (39)2-1 655 |
I OR COME BY ROOM 310-UNION |
SVayn*RtitzUnionJ.Wayn*RitzUnionJ.WaynRttzUntOfvJ.WaynRitzUnonj-

ttJflK*'MtMg. Clmtm But
WE HAVE THE BEST SELECTION IN TOWN
MIKES BOOK A TOBACCO SHOP
Open Dally 8 AM Til 9 PM Open Sundays 8 AM Til 2 PM
_ 116 S.E.IST DOWNTOWN 372-4401

1867 at Monmouth College,
Monmouth, 111.
GIVE US YOUR OLD
CLOTHING AND
WELL GIVE YOU A
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Med Center, A Chance To Share Problems

By RANDY BASSETT
I wish I had someone to talk
to about this problem, a
student may say. I cant solve it
by myself.
I feel sorry for Jane X, shes
so confused, another student
may say. But what can I do?
Any student who wants to
discuss his problems, whether
slight or complicated, can find
qualified help through the
Mental Health Service located at
the UF Infirmary.
A division of the Student
Health Services, the Mental
Health Services is one of eleven
services provided by UF to help
students.
We are dealing with a
basically healthy population,
mental health nurse Sallie M.
Jones is quick to point out. We
are here to help students with
problems that upset them.
A student may need to talk
with someone older, someone
not involved in the situation,
she continued. Our role is
preventive mental health,
identifying problems early.
Students who are diagnosed
as mentally ill would be referred
to the J. Hillis Miller Medical
Center for treatment.
Students come voluntarily to
the Mental Health Service. Last
year 878 students were seen for
counseling.
All cases receive individual
attention from the professional
staff of physicians, nurses and
counselors in the fields of
psychiatry, psychology and
social work. Thirteen permanent
staff members are available
under the direction of Dr. E.
Arthur Larson, director of the
Student Mental Health Program.
Individual conferences, group
therapy and marital counseling
are available to students. Last
year 76 per cent of the cases
involving therapy or continued
consultation improved.
Approximately half of all cases
needed this therapy.
Students can come to the
Mental Health Service during its
regular office hours. Staff
members are also available by
telephone 24 hours a day, seven
days a week, if necessary.
Students can share a
problem by telephone, Mrs.
Jones says, and then well
decide if the student should
come in at another time.
There is no set way of
handling the problems, nurse
Jones continued. It depends on
what the student says and how
we evaluate the situation.
The Mental Health Service
has handled cases involving drug
users, among other problems.
According to Mrs. Jones, who
often conducts the initial visits,
confidentiality is always
respected.
*
We discuss the pros and cons
of marijuana, LSD, for example.
We encourage the student to
stop and to work with law
enforcement agencies. But we do
not turn him in. The student
must do this voluntarily.
Only in cases of extreme
danger to the student himself or
if he endangers the lives of
others, does the staff consider
turning him over to the law. This

decision must be made by the
director of the Mental Health
Program.
We have the option of
putting students who are under
the influence of such drugs in
the infirmary to rest and receive
special medical attention, Mrs.
Jones explained. We sometimes
use drugs to counteract these

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drugs or to counteract moods.
The use of drugs by a student
is usually a minor segment of the
whole problem, according to
Mrs. Jones.
The majority of cases handled
at the Mental Health Service last
year were of a different nature
than the problems of taking LSD
or marijuana.

Problems concerning anxiety
about school work, roommate
problems, dating and depression
made up the majority. The
largest category concerned
problems in communicating to
other people, such as parents
and friends.
The Mental Health staff also
provides counseling to

Tuesday, December 3, 1968, The Florida Alligator

organizations on campus;
individuals, such as chaplains
and professors; and to the 10
other services set up to help
students.
Research programs dealing
with the problems of married
students and student stresses are
being conducted also by the
Student Mental Health Program.

Page 13



Page 14

K The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, December 3,1968

RFVWWS
m I mm W Imm m m

'Paper Lion

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
If football is not your bag,
then Paper Lion, now playing
at the Plaza II Theatre, wont
interest you. However, it is
definitely not to be catagorized
for men only. It offers an
inside look at just what it takes
to produce a good pro-football
team and another side of the
members of the Detroit Lions
ball club.
The movie was adapted for
the screen from a book by sports
writer George Plimpton about
his experiences with the Lions.
In the movie, George is assigned
by the editor of Sports
Illustrated the job of writing a
six-part series on the life of a
rookie from training with the
pros to playing in a real game.
Plimpton, of course, is to be
the rookie and he aims at
quarterbacking, no less. This
provides the premise for his
acceptance by the Lions
manager and therein begins the
with the pros. The
camera follows the Lions from
arrival at training camp, through
rigorous calisthenics and
unbelievable physical exertion,
practice scrimmages, and finally
the big day-the first pre-season
game.
The lions definitely have
some talent off the gridiron in
the person of Charles Schmidt,
the manager, and Alex Scarras
and John Gordy, players. Even if
you arent a Lions fan, youll
appreciate the team camaraderie
and professionalism.
What Paper Lion lacks in
story line it more than makes up
for in style. What could have
been presented as completely via
documentary comes across with
more effect because of
finesse. The camera
techniques-flashbacks to other
sports escapades Plimpton had
engaged in, the tremendously
delicate handling of slow motion
at strategic points in the film
and the sequences during the
game with the Cardinals-make
the movie.
For content purposes the
movie shows the most difficult
part of pro ballthe training, the
team work and the men who
have worked long and hard at
their job to obtain abilities and
skills which do not come
overnight. Pro football is more
than a game, its a business that
requires just as much training
and ability as any well paying
job.
For entertainment value
i G4TO*l
I OS
ly S&L | \
#

Paper Lion could provide a
welcome study break with its
warm humor and exciting action
and you will certainly discover
at least two things about pro
ball-those guys are really b-i-g
and even the press box doesnt
relay ALL thats said and done
on the football field.

The Dark Ages
It is entirely possible
That is how History will refer to our time
When the smog hovering over our cities
The dark hunger haunting our tenements
The darker crime stalking our streets
Is remembered.
However History describes our era
We hope it will also
be remembered
As the time when a young girl's heart
Beat a moment of life into a dying man
As the time when primitive peoples
Leaped across centuries of progress
To take their place at
The WorlcLconference table ...
As the tirrfe when Man first struggled to
Close the gap between the
Social and technological sciences.
You don't start clean.
Your Century is partially written.
If your chapter is to carry the torch
That can blaze across the dark corners of our age
You face a job of heroic proportions.
We think you're up to it.
You are our life insurance.
Phoenix ||
Mutual E l
llfE INSURANCE COMPANY B!
MARTTORO. CONNECTICUT BJPJJ

MUSIC FESTIVAL

Hall Os Fame Balloting

The Intercollegiate Music Festival, college
musics national championship competition, will
once again honor one of the top music personalities
when they present their annual Hall of Fame award
at the national finals of the event in St. Louis on
May 22-24.
Ballots are currently in the mail to news media,
music industry personnel and Festival officials. The
music personality who has contributed most
towards providing motivation for the
encouragement of musical excellence by young
performers will be selected for the Festivals Hall of
Fame.
The TWA and Budweiser-sponsored Festival
initiated the Hall of Fame award in 1967 with Stan

Kenton receiving the honor. Duke Ellington won
the 1968 award.
The Intercollegiate Music Festival provides
national competition for collegiate musical groups
and vocalists through six regional competitions and
the big national finals which takes place in Kiel
Opera House.
Current national champions are the University of
Illinois Jazz Band, the Jac Murphy Trio from
Southern Methodist University and the Burgundy
Street Singers from Kansas State University.
Entries from the nations colleges and universities
are being received for the 1969 competition, with
regional contests set to get under was on February
28.



UF Christian Athletes
Ready To Speak Out

By ROCKY DODDRIDGE
Alligator Coriwpondent
One season of contact closes
for Florida football players, but
signals the opening of a season
of another sort of contact for
many of these same gridders.
With time more accessible
second quarter, Christian
Athletes intends to respond to as
many contacts for Gator
speakers as possible.
As Britt Skrivanek explains,
After football season, the
requests for Christian speakers
come pouring into Coach
Graves office. Next quarter
without practices allows us time
to express our Christian
experience in an answer to these
invitations. Skirvanek was
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
secretary last year while he
lettered as a sophomore
defensive end.
Last spring, he and starting
sophomore linebacker Mike
Kelley spoke as a team in

Gators Clobber Frosh

GAINESVILLE (UPI)
Quarterback John Reaves passed
for 289 yards and four
touchdowns as the UF Baby
Gators crushed the rival Florida
State University freshmen 40-7
last Thursday.
Some 8,200 fans watched as
the 6-3, 200-pounder from
Tampa connected on 10 passes,
including scoring bombs of 73
and 65 yards.
The Gator defense aided by
intercepting five FSU passes and
grabbing three fumbles.
FSUs Brian Bengston, son of
Green Bay Packers Coach Phil
Bengston, caught a 78-yard pass
from quarterback Cecil Kent for
the Seminoles only touchdown.
Bengston also snagged six other
passes for a total of 125 yards.
The Gators scored early with
tailback Tommy Durrance
carrying in from the six yard line
with 6:18 left in the first period.
Durrance was the leading ground
gainer of the afternoon, picking
up 88 yards on 23 carries.
The Seminoles came back to
tie it 7-7 with the
Kent-to-Bengston pass with 4:03
left in the first quarter.
A 30-yard pass from Reaves
to Steve Noriega put the Gators
out front to stay with 2:18
remaining in the opening period.
Then with 2:13 remaining in
the second quarter, Reaves hit
John Schnebly with a 15-yarder

Josteas
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Orlando. Skirvanek and Bill Lee
moved around the state
together, greeted by youth
groups, church gatherings, and
other athletic teams. Relates
Lee, It is a great oppourtunity
to go all over the state meeting
people and sharing what Christ
has done in my life. Lee is a
past FCA president.
Jim Yarbrough has accepted
an invitation to speak to a group
of about 50 junior league
athletes in January. Other
participants in this quarters
project are Larry Williamson,
Jim Hadley, Jack Youngblood,
Bill Dorsey, Gary Walker, Donny
Williams, Guy Dennis, and Rock
Doddridge.
Other actives are Jerry
Vinesett, Jim Kelly, Rock
Robinson, and freshmen Randy
Ostrander, Jimmy Barr, Charlie
Hood, Tim Good, and Keith
Gilbert.
Encouraged by active
supporter head coach Ray

that gave the Gators a 19-7 lead
at halftime.
Mid-way of the third period,
Reaves shook off three rushers
and threw a 73-yard bomb to
Durrance and the Gators upped
their lead to 25-7. Then the
Gator defense went to work.
Doug Sorenson intercepted a
Kent pass and returned it to the
Seminole five yard line where
Gator tailback Coleman
Stipanovich carried in for the
fifth Gator score.
With time running out,
Reaves threw a 65-yard scoring
pass to tight end Bill Dowdy.
Reaves and Dowdy connected
on a two-point conversion as the
Gators ended their season with a
3-1 record.
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Graves, several of these men will
attend a six day Christmas
Conference in Atlanta to
strengthen their Christian
growth.
This year, Christian Athletes
has absorbed FCA and American
Athletes in Action, dropped
officerships, and is operating as a
freely responding Huddle Group.
Meetings have been on Monday
nights in Yon Hall.
The project for this quarter
ending was the presenting of a
Bible Phrophecy program to
interested groups. Four
fraternities and a sorority, thus
far, opened their doors to the
program, which has as its
purpose confronting people with
the immediate relevance of the
Bible to our lives, in regard to its
prophecy.
This project will continue
next quarter and any group can
secure it by calling Rock
Doddridge.

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Timday, Dacambar 3, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



i. The Florida Alligator, Tuoaday, Daeamber 3,1968

Page 16

UMs Hendricks Is
UPls Top Lineman

NEW YORK (UPI)
Two-time All-America end Ted
Hendricks of Miami, a 6-8,
220-pound end labeled the mad
stork for his defensive
ferociousness, was named
Monday as United Press
International's lineman of the
year,
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NICK ARROYO
TED HENDRICKS
...UM'i defensive' and kept
Florida on the ground the whole
afternoon, with only 8
completions.
Coliseum To
Get Boost By
Omega Order
By JIM WARD
Alligator CorrMpondent
The Order of Omega has
taken over from the
Inter-Fraternity Council to plan
for a coliseum for the UF.
Jim Devaney, new president
of the Order said that another
concert will be held at Florida
Field this year to raise more
funds for the multimillion dollar
structure.
Long range plans for the
university now (all for a new
auditorium before a new
coliseum. However, this could be
changed," Devaney said.
Efforts are now being made
by the Alumni Association to
raise enough money for the
planning stages of the
multipurpose coliseum to begin.
Approximately one-half million
dollars will be needed to hire an
architect to make plans for the
coliseum.
The coliseum will be used for
swimming, indooor track,
basketball and non-athletic
events such as IFC Frolics and
Student Government
presentations.
UF now has the oldest field
house in use by a Southeastern
Conference team. Capacity of
the Florida gymnasium was
recently reduced from 7,000 to
about because of fire
hazards. This is little more than
25 per cent of the student body.

Hendricks, a senior from
Miami Springs, Fla., received 53
of the 183 votes cast by sports
writers and sportscasters across
the nation.
Ted Kwalick of Penn State,
also an end, was runnerup in the
voting with 36 votes. In all, 33
players were named on ballots.
Behind Hendricks and
Kawlick were Ed White, who
bulwarked Californias touch
defensive line, 15 votes; Bill
StanfQl of Georgia,l2; and Jim
Seymour of Notre Dame, 10.
Miami Head Coach Charlie
Tate says Hendricks if
unbelievable as a defender, a
fine tackier and virtually
unstopable in pursuit of
opposing quarterbacks,
attempting to pass over his
towering two seasons. He also
excelled in the classrooms, as a
physics major.
Kwalick is a 6-4, 230-pound
senior from McKees Rock, Pa.,
who averaged more than 17
yards a reception as an offensive
end in his three years at Penn
State. Kwalick was regarded one
of the Nittany Lions top
blockers and also has seen duty
returning punts.
Kwalick ran back an onside
kick 53 yards for the winning
touchdown in Penn States
28-24 victory over Army this
season.
Betas, Chi Phi
Lead Leagues
Beta Theta Pi moved back
into the Orange League lead as a
correction of a discrepancy in
scoring gave the BETAs a five
point edge over the TEPs.
The BETAs got the extra ten
points by getting a bye in their
tied bracket in football. They
now lead the TEPs 360-355 at
the end of the quarter.
Phi Delt is closest to the two
with 282, 78 points behind the
leader.
The Chi Phis have opened an
88 point lead in the Blue,
League.
The Intramural Department
will need referees for next
quarter's sports activities.
Referees will be needed for
basketball, volleyball, and
tennis.
BLUE LEAGUE STANDINGS
XP 425 TKE 246
PGD 337 AGR 238
DX 321 DSP 224
TX 285 PKPsi 159
DU 257 reP 150
PKT 256
ORANGE LEAGUE STANDINGS
BTP 360 MOP 230
TEP 355 AEP 215
PDT 282 SPE 210
SN 270 LXA 193
PIP 257 DTD 183
SAE 255 KA 170
SX 246 PKA 170
ATO 240 KS 155

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