Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Chicaao Clashes Called A Police Riot

By ROBERT M. ANDREWS
Unhid Pim I liter national
WASHINGTON The
National Commission on
Violence released a report
Sunday charging that the
Chicago street clashes during the
Democratic National Convention
turned into what can only be
called a police riot for which
Mayor Richard J. Daley must
share blame.
An investigators report filed
with the commission said the
citys police were working under
exceedingly provocative
circumstances in coping with
thousands of anti-war
demonstrators, but the weight
of violence was overwhelmingly
on the side of the police.

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 49 University of Florida, Gainesville Monday, December 2, 1968

-
.
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No, you're never sale from the Alligator's eagle
eye photographer, Nick Arroyo. You take the
family out on a little holiday picnic, send the kid
out to play in the swamp and try to engage in a
serious discussion with your mate. Then It comes.

OConnell Isnt Running
For Florida Governorship

UF President Stephen C. OConnell, in spite of
apparent undercurrents of support should he be a
candidate, has no plans to run for governor in 1970.
OConnell admitted Saturday he had been
approached about the possibilities of running for
the states highest elective office but that he was not
considering himself as a candidate.
Ive started over in enough careers, he said.
OConnell resigned in 1967 as chief justice of the
state supreme court to take over the position of
president of the UF, where he served as president of
the student bodv while a law student.

Ulv aiuutm uiAijr muv a i*n f
b w, b
..
--w^AHNlk.' ""' *>4' **'"

VIOLENCE
IN
CHICAGO

The provocation took the
form of obscene epithets, rocks,
sticks, bathroom tiles and even
human excrement hurled at the
police by protesters. The
nature of the response was

America's Number 1 College Daily

The rustle in the bushes, the muffled click, and the
stifled laugh. He's got you again.
Give up Gators. Don't try to hide. Just look up
and smile.

Although the presidents position has sometimes
been shaky through controversy, OConnell
indicated he is not intending to leave as president.
OConnell said the definitely would not run in
1970, though some people see him as a possible
candidate. He had seriously considered running for
governor in the 1960 campaign in which Farris
Bryant was elected.
Has his decision not to run slammed thy door on
political office permanently?
1 think so, OConnell said, but then I never
thought Id be president of the university, so
anything can happen, I suppose.

= |
. .on the part of the police there was enough wild
club swinging, enough cries of hatred, enough
gratuitous beating to make the conclusion inescapable
that individual policemen, and lots of them,
committed violent acts far in excess on the requisite
force for crowd dispersal.** National Commission on
Violence Report.
-

unrestrained and indiscriminate
police violence on many
occasions, particularly at night,
the study said.
The police, it added, had
been conditioned to expect that


violence against the
demonstrators would be
condoned by city officials.
The criticism of the Chicago
police, their superiors and the
city administration headed by

LEAVES UF

Black Student
Cites Hostility

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writar
A black foreign student has left the UF to return to a
northern school because of alleged community hostility
he encountered here.
Fred S. Kanali, an African graduate student in the Department of
Political Science, withdrew from the university Nov. 13 after a
number of personal indignities, including an incident near the UF
when two white youths blocked his path and spat upon him.
Kanalis departure prompted a resolution from the political science
department deploring the incidents which led to his withdrawal.
The department also suggested ways in which UF President

Stephen C. OConnell could
implement goals of equal justice
and equal educational
opportunities at the university.
Prior to his withdrawal,
Kanali told members of the
political science department that
he was pleased with the work
being offered him and with the
attitude of the department, but
that he regarded the general
attitude of the community as
hostile.
Kanali said he had been
refused service at barber shops
catering to students and had
received surly treatment in
eating establishments, either by
customers or by those serving
him.
He said there could be no
guarantee that such indignities
would not be repeated.
In a resolution released
Sunday, the political science
department urged OConnell to
lead the university even further
toward the realization of equal
justice and equal educational
opportunity.
The resolution also proposed
that greater efforts be made to
emphasize the detrimental
(SEE BLACK' PAGE 2)

Daley was contained in a
273-page study which the
commission issued without
comment.
Dr. Milton S. Eisenhower, the
commission chairman, said this
report on Chicago is being
promptly released to the public
because of the widespread
interest in it. He said it was
neither approved nor
disapproved by the commission
because it was submitted only
last weekend and had not been
fully reviewed.
The report was prepared
under contract by 90 full-time
investigators under the direction
of Daniel Walker, a prominent
Chicago lawyer.
(SEE 'CHICAGO' PAGE 12)

VC Defectors
May Testify
In Paris Talk
PARIS (UPI) Allied
diplomats said Sunday they were
hopeful that expanded Vietnam
talks could begin by
mid-December. Saigon reports
said South Vietnam may send a
truth squad of Viet Cong
defectors to Paris to combat
Communist propaganda.
The chief U.S. negotiator, W.
Averell Harriman, flew to the
United States Sunday, and said
he expected to be replaced when
the Nixon administration takes
office in January.
The South Vietnamese
delegation was not expected to
arrive in Paris until the end of
this week, about the same time
Harriman returns from a
Washington mission which will
include talks with President
Johnson, Secretary of State
Dean Rusk and Defense
Secretary Clark M. Clifford.
(SEE 'SAIGON' PAGE 2)

WINNING MARGIN
f
Gator fullback Larry
Smith (33) goal over for the
winning touchdown Saturday
with litfle over two minutes
remaining in the UF-Miami
game.
The score put the Gators
ahead for the first time in the
anernoon wmcn saw me
Miami numcanes enter me
dressing room with a 10*0
naii iime vruiryint i vio viaiors
fought back with two scores
and ended the game ahead
14-10. For more picutras and
the full game story see page
13.
fcidK ARROYO



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Daeambor 2,1968

* ___ v
\Managers Board!
Chairman Quits I
£
j *
£ Dr. Delton L. Scudder, chairman of the Department of $
£ Religion, retired Tuesday as chairman of the Reitz Union Board x
£ of Managers. He held the position for ten years. £
§: £
. 1/
£ Dr. Scudder was replaced by Dr. Michael V. Gannon, x
| assistant professor of religion during a Board meeting election. £
£ John Engjehardt, Student Government Secretary of Finance was :j:
$ elected as temporary vice-chairman. £
I love the Union very much. 1 hope and know you will
make it a friendly and wonderful place, Scudder said before :j:
£ adjournment. £
£ y
:> In his last meeting as chairman, Scudder conducted the >:;
:j: Board on several matters of business including a report by the £
Boards policy committee, which is restructuring the Reitz £
£ Union charter so that the Unions main concern should be to £
V .V
Â¥ serve students. x
£
V .V
In other business, a request was made by Joe Hilliard, $
§ director of the planned Rathskeller night club, for a reduction £
£ in rent for entertainers performing at the Rathskeller who might
£ want to stay at the Union.
V .V
Â¥ >:
X A resolution was passed underwriting the cost of billeting >:
entertainers who perform at the Rathskeller and giving a dated £
£ priority to these performers. £
5
A proposal to appoint Board members to serve on a joint g
committee with SG representatives to investigate the possibility £
of using the third floor roof of the Union for recreational >:
purposes was approved.
v .v
£ Union Director W. E. Rion said suggestions ranging from a :*
£ miniature golf course to a dancing area have been made. £
!! y;
A request to reactivate the subcommittee on space to check £
into requests for more space in the Union and a decision to £
approve a request to allow Gainesville High School to hold their £
£ prom in the Union were also considered. £
£ §
a The final order of business was election of new officers.
'*
£ Before nominations were made, a proposal was passed to £
£ investigate the possibility of students serving as chairman of the £
£ board under the new charter. £:
V.
S' (3 X'
Although this is temporary, I shall exert every effort I can £
to make the Reitz Union a true service to the university £
£ community, Gannon said after his election. His post is
£ considered temporary until the Board can amend the old
£ charter.

Saigon May Send
VC 'Truth Squads

Ambassador Pham Dang Lam,
chief of the South Vietnamese
mission in Paris, was expected to
arrive in Paris from Saigon on
Thursday with instructions from
President Nguyen Van Thieu on
how to handle procedural
arrangements leading to
full-fledge talks between South
Vietnam, North Vietnam, the
United States and the Viet Congs
National liberation Front NLF.
Harriman said Sunday he
could not predict how long it
would take to iron out
procedural questions which
include such matters as the
shape of the conference table,
the wording of name plates and
the order in which diplomats
will speak.
It didnt take us very long
last May to settle the procedural
matters. Harriman said. But

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they may be more complicated
now. This is a broader meeting.'
In Washington, Rusk said
Sunday he hoped the talks
would begin without the
adoption of a formal agenda and
could move quickly to
substantive questions.
A hint of the South
Vietnamese strategy came
Sunday from the Saigon Post, an
English language newspaper
which said the Viet Cong
defectors might accompany the
official negotiating team to
Paris.
The Post said the truth
squad, would be led by Col.
Tran Van Dac, better known by
his alias of Tam Ha, who is one
of the highest ranking Viet Cong
to defect to the South
Vietnamese side.
The Saigon newspaper said
the group would be used to
unmask the NLF.

Black Grad Cites Hostility I

£ BOM Htt OK
character of such incidents for
the general education process,
the African Studies Program in
particular.
The resolution stated the UF,
burdened by the curse of
bigness and impersonality, had
perhaps failed to properly orient
Kanali to the community.
Although pointing to
indications of progress already
attained, the department
resolution further proposed
specific action the university
should take to improve
community race relations:
Positive, imaginative steps
should be taken to encourage
compliance with the universitys
non-discrimination policies in
housing.
2 UF Seniors
Get JM Award
Two UF seniors in the
College of Journalism and
Communications have received
national recognition for their
work in journalism.
Louie Andrews was awarded
third place for newswriting in
the William Randolph Hearst
Foundations monthly contest
for student journalists.
Gail Zeltman won the 1968
national May Miller Carter
Scholarship, given annually by
the national chapter of Alpha
Chi, a national fraternity for
women in advertising.

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, OConnell should use his
leadership in the community to
encourage local businesses not to
discriminate on the basis of race,
color or creed.
The university should
make legal counsel available to
students and faculty who
encounter violations of civil
rights legislation.
Action Conference
proposals concerning black
students should be funded and
instituted immediately.
Glenn A. Farris, foreign
student advisor, said Kanali
contacted him when he
withdrew but did not elaborate
on the circumstances regarding
his decision to leave the UF.
I thought he (Kanali) was
well-oriented and had potential
for being content if not happy,
Farris said.
Kanali graduated from
Millikan University in Decatur,
Illinois before coming to the UF
this fall. He held an assistantship
in the political science
department, was active in the
modem language department

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR. .. W
TaISL THE REFRESHING ONE A \rj
. A

and also received financial 1
support from the Society 0 f I
Friends (Quakers). ~ I
In October he participated in 1
a panel discussion at a social 1
science teachers convention in 1
Jacksonville. I
There are people here from 1
foreign countries who have a lot I
less going for them, Farris said. 1
F arris said other foreign 1
students had experienced similar 1
incidents. 1
Getaneh Assefa, graduate 1
student from Ethiopia, was I
chased by five white college-age 1
men behind a University Avenue 1
restaurant. 1
The men grabbed him, but 1
did not follow when he ran to a
his room. 1
Assefa wrote to the African 1
American Institute in 1
Washington and informed them 1
of the incident. 1
Another such incident 1
occurred last spring when threats I
were made against Professor
Spencer Boyer of the College of I
Law following the murder of
Rev. Martin Luther King. Boyer
left the UF as a result of the
threats.



'T/s The Season Again
Christmas Events Planned

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Its going to be a. Merry Christmas two weeks
for UF students.
Even the rush of finals and Christmas shopping
hasnt deterred the mood of Christmas cheer about
to descend on the UF campus.
The season will get off the ground today with a
tree decorating party in the Reitz Union. University
students, members of the Union Board, other
student organizations, and the Union staff are
invited to decorate two Christmas trees.
The only requirement is to bring an ornament
and members of the party will be allowed to
participate in Christmas cheer in the form of
refreshments, with the company of Les Scott
who will lead in informal singing.
Tuesday night at the University Auditorium at
8:15 pjn. a Christmas choral concert by the
University Choir and Mens and Womens Glee Clubs
will be held.
The Christmas season officially begins at 10 p.m.

UF Second In Country
In Peace Corps Recruits

UF students joining and
returning from Peace Corps duty
in the past year numbered 128,
according to special Peace Corps
coordinator, Sam Hunt.
The total makes UF second
only to the University of Texas
in total recruiting in the South
Hunt said.

Three UF Students
Find Missing r G
Win sl f ooo Reward

The combined efforts of
three UF students suceeded in
finding radio station WGGGs
missing G and won SI,OOO at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday.
Steve Balint, 4BA, located
the slip of paper with a G and
Congratulations You Are the
Winner, in the crack of the
cement block in front of
Apartment 100, Gatortown.
Two days of working on clues
with his pinmate and her brother
narrowed the area to the
apartment, Balint said.
Two to three hundred people
were hunting in the area
surrounding the apartments
starting at midnight Tuesday,
Balint said.
It was like a big all-night
party. A lot of the residents
were out looking or were having

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The coordinator of the
Atlanta office said 80 UF
students, including 47 recruited
recently, are available for
service.
The 80 students are eligible
for training in work for foreign
countries upon completion of
their degree requirements.
Os the 47 new recruits, 10 are

parties, and they invited people
in, Balint said.
The contest began Oct. 26,
when the station reported one of
its Gs had been stolen. The
station then issued a series of
clues that would lead to its
discovery but demanded
return by noon Wednesday.

'
1 NEW York city i
I Dec. 2£>, I9fe>B- Ton. 2, t9t>9 |
1 "§pavL in s^-n
L n J. $165 sb j
'fas*1 370jMm 1
g

Wednesday with the traditional tree-lighting
ceremony in front of the university auditorium with
readings and singings and the message of UF
President Stephen C. OConnell who will speak in
the auditorium.
One of the most popular events on campus is the
annual reading of A Christmas Carol, by
Vice-Presidentof Student Affairs Lester L. Hale.
This event is set for 7:30 p.m. Friday in the
University Auditorium.
Since 1937 Hale has missed only three of the
readings which began in 1929 as a private event for
Sigma Nu fraternity.
The fraternity began sponsoring the event
annually in 1932. It was opened for the public in
1957.
Since then approximately 1,500 persons have
filled the auditorium each year to hear Hales
version of the Christmas classic by Charles Dickens.
Another campus tradition is scheduled for 2
pjn., Dec. 7in the Union Ballroom the Childrens
Christmas Party for youngsters of University
personnel.

working for graduate degrees
and 33 for BA or BS degrees.
Two of this group are in
agriculture, two are in
engineering, and one is in
architecture.
UF now ranks in the upper
fourth of 200 major institutions
involved in the recruiting
program.
Awaiting assignment upon
receiving their degree are 35
graduate students. There are
currently 38 UF volunteers
working in several of the 59
countries requesting volunteers.
The Peace Corps needs more
skilled applicants in electrical,
mechanical, and agricultural
fields and labor unions may be
asked for help in acquiring these
specialists, Hunt said.
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Monday, Deoambar 2,1965, Tha Florida Alligator, l

Page 3



Page 4

Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, Dacambar 2,1968

'Enforced Mediocrity Warns O Connell

By Adaptor Swview
Duplication of facilities
within the State University
System at the expense of
existing institutions is certain
to result in enforced
mediocrity.
That was the warning
sounded Saturday by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
at the seventh annual Legislative
Day program on campus.
OConnell also stressed the
need for revising the system that
permits excessive state control
over purchasing and personnel
adjustments.
He illustrated with slides how
the state is playing a dangerous
game of catch-up with the
professional needs of Florida
because of a lack of funding.
Legislative Day, sponsored by
the UF and the Chamber of
Commerce here, attracted the

USF Student Whistles
FBI Finally Answers

By LESLIE TAYLOR
SPECIAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY
OF SOUTH FLORIDA ORACLE
TAMPA A 19-year-old Miami youth was
apprehended recently by University of South
Florida officials for placing free long distance
telephone calls by whistling into the phone.
Joe The Whistler Engressia, a junior majoring
in electrical engineering, was whistling his way past
electronic circuits and placing calls all over the
United States (and a few places outside it) without
ever touching a dial. He had turned his talent into a
lucrative business charging fellow students a dollar
to call anywhere.
Engressia, totally blind since birth, claims he
discovered the Whistling method at the age of 8,
when he accidentally cut off operators by whistling
into the phone.
The end of Engressias reign as the genius of Beta
Hall (his dormitory) came about as a result of a
misplaced whistle.
I was trying to place a call for a student to Long
Island about Oct. 31, said Engressia. I whistled
wrong and got Montreal by accident. Then I
pretended to be an operator and asked the Montreal
operator to help me dial the correct Long Island
number.
She was suspicious and monitored the call.
Naturally the student I put the call through for
talked extensively about the whiz kid who had
placed his free call. The operator broke in and
managed to get the student to identify himself and
where he was calling from.

Infirmary Pill Policy
May Have Stipulation

A writHh policy for
continued prescription of birth
control pills to unmarried coed
was presented to the UF
Executive Committee last week
by Dr. Wilmer Coggins, director
of student health.
The policy may have an
under 21 age stipulation, said
the president's Administrative
Assistant Mel Sharpe. Coggins,
however refuses to comment on
the issue Sunday.
Sharpe, who says the policy
had never been put down in
"black and white before said,
"The university will continue to
give out the pill based on sound
medical practice, and this is
somethihg that must remain at
the discretion of the physician.
Controversy over the
distribution of birth control pills

majority of State representatives
and senators for a two-day
panoramic look at the
educational picture at the
University, including being
guests at the Florida-Miami
football game.
In cautioning against
duplication, OConnell urged
legislators to consider with
utmost care the wisdom of
further spreading the higher
educational dollars between even
more institutions before the
needs of the existing ones are
reasonably met.
He cited the number of
so-called temporary buildings
of World War II vintage still in
use on the University of Florida
campus, even though many
have long past served their
period of safe usage.
The University president
added: What has not been, but

arose last month when the
Alligator released a three-part
series in which a coed staff
writer and a friend received pill
prescriptions from a school
doctor.
The staffer told the doctor
she had a steady boyfriend and
was afraid of becoming

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Engressia said it couldnt have been too hard for
USF officials to find him because crowds of up to
40 people would follow me around.
Engressia was called before UFS Dean of Men
Charles on Nov. 7 suspended on Nov. 15 on the
grounds he had committed theft.
Vice-president for Student Affairs Herbert
Wunderlich said Engressia was suspended for the
protection of other people and as a contribution
to his (Engressias) growth and education.
Engresias suspension is now pending an appeal
before a faculty-student disciplinary appeal board.
General Telephone special security agent Gene
Mason said the phone company was not going to
prosecute in the case but had turned over all
evidence to F. 8.1.
Mason said he and another General Telephone
employee, Richard Farmer, an equipment engineer,
had discussed with Engressia the possibility of hiring
him if he was cleared by the University. Mason
would not disclose other details of the case.
Ive been studying telephones all my life. I
know all about them, said Engressia Monday. As
a small child I was fascinated with the sounds that
came out of the phone.
Engressia said he obtained telephone manuals
from Southern Bell in Miami and had them read to
him. Hesaidheused to go down to their offices and
do voluntary trouble-shooting.
Mr. and Mrs. Josef Engressia, Miami, said they
are proud of their son.
Were going to stick right by him said Mrs.
Esther Engressia. Anyone who can outsmart a
computer Im with them she said.

needs to be, said is that across
this campus there are unfilled
needs in equipment,
maintenance and personnel that
must be met if we are not to
falter in our forward
progress...
While expressing
understanding of the need for
additional opportunities for
our young people, OConnell
urged that they must not be
provided at the expense of
existing institutions.
To follow this route is
certain to result in enforced
mediocrity at each institution, a
tragedy that this state cannot
afford, he added.
He said, If Florida is to be
first, it will be by careful
planning and design, by
appropriation of adequate funds
for the old as well as the new, by
commitment of all to doing that

pregnant. She did not tell the
doctors of her newspaper article
until after she received the
prescription, which was not
filled.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, who called for the
infirmary policy report on the
issue, was unavailable for
comment.

which is required to do the job,
by hard-nose business decisions
based on what is necessary, not
what is familiar to politics and
community pride.
On the subject of controls,
OConnell noted that a maze of
red tape hampers the
Universitys efforts to establish
new positions, obtain proper
classification or reclassification
of existing positions and make
adjustments in salary ranges for
these positions.
Auditing checks are adequate
to permit proper authority for
the Board of Regents and/or the
universities for these
authorizations and expenditures,
he noted.
Illustrating the magnitude of
the University operation,
OConnell noted that faculty
exceeds 2,000, the staff 5,000
and courses number more than
3,000 in more than 200 fields of
study covering 15 colleges and
the School of Forestry.
In the next biennium, the
University will ask the
Legislature for sl2 million to
be matched by $22 million in
federal funds -for a major
expansion of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center to meet the health
needs of a growing Florida.
Elsewhere the University is
turning out graduates in a
multitude of fields and they
are being gobbled up by a
society which is demanding
more than the University can
provide.
The College of Education
turns out 600 graduates each

The
ptttfoerstitj
mens dept.
Wishes you to join in giving
used dothing to the needy.
Bring in your used shirts
(sport, knit, dress) or some old
trousers (dress, casual) and
well give you an allowance of
$ 1.00
toward the purchase of a similar
item from our wide selection of
mens wear. Bring in as many
items as you wisli, regardless of
their condition, to receive your
one dollar allowance.
The used clothing will be
donated to worthy non-profit
organizations.
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY
UNIVERSITY PLAZA

year. Florida this year will need
11,000 new teachers.
Enrollment in engineering
is 1,591. Each graduate may
choose from 10 job offers. With
adequate staff, the College of
Engineering could double its
enrollment.
I Florida requires about 300
additional doctors each year.
The College of Medicine can
graduate new M.D.s
each year, and with the
University of Miamis 90, can
account for only half the states
yearly need.
Seventy-five nurses will
graduate from the University of
Florida this year, but more than
5,000 vacancies for registered
nurses now exist in Florida.
The supply and demand
imbalance, as cited by
OConnell, continues in all areas.
Also high on the list is an
approved College of Veterinary
Medicine. Florida now produces
no veterinarians.
Other needs that stand in the
way of education and
distinction for UF include:
A new all-purpose coliseum
to replace Florida Gymnasium
(5,500 person safe capacity) as a
convocation and sports center.
A modem natatorium with an
indoor pool to replace the
present Polar Bear outdoor
facility used by the Universitys
swimming team which has won
die SEC championship 13 years
straight and to remove coed
physical education programs
form their twice-condemned
gymnasium.



Physics Chairman To Speak In Europe

By DAVE OSIER
Alliprtor Staff Writar
A UF department chairman is
one of three U.S. educators
attending a 20-country physics
and industry seminar this week
in Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
Dr. Stanley S. Ballard,
physics and astronomy

Science Institute Will Meet

Approximately 100 scientists
will converge on the UF today
for their annual battle of mind
over matter their quest to
conquer the atom.
The scientists, members of
the pencil and paper brigade of
theorists (pure scientists), are
taking part in the Winter
Institute in Quantum Chemistry,
Solid-State Physics and
Quantum Biology.
International in scope and
reputation, the institute is
sponsored jointly by the UF and
the University of Uppsala in
Uppsala, Sweden.
The six-week institute and
the week-long international
symposium on Sanibel Island,
Alumni Head
Chosen For 1970
James Ade of Jacksonville, a
1954 UF business administration
graduate, was chosen 1970
president of the Alumni
Association Saturday.
Ade, who also earned a law
degree from the University in
1959, will succeed Doyle Rogers
of Palm Beach. Rogers takes
over presidency of the
association Jan. 1.

_ T W
*** SPEND *** I
ONE MOMENT
And Sava DOLLARS |
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CHRISTMAS j
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department chairman, left
Sunday for the meeting where
he will make a presentation on
training of optical physicists.
Ballard, president of the
American Association of Physics
Teachers, is a specialist in optics.
Most representatives
attending are European, Ballard
said. I hope to learn more

Jan. 13-18, are supported by a
$40,435 grant from the National
Science Foundation.
Chemists, physicists and
mathematicians from Sweden,
Switzerland, Israel, Brazil,
Canada and 26 states are
receiving a crash course on the
application of quantum theory
to the electronic structure of
atoms and molecules.
Sixteen UF scientists are
taking part.
Included as well is a general
survey of the development of
quantum chemistry, with
emphasis on basic ideas and
general principals and methods.
The course will provide a
consideration in depth of the
modem mathematical research
methods and the conceptual
basis of the quantum theory of
matter.
Capping the course will be
the Sanibel symposium, which
this year honors Dr. Henry
Eyring, graduate school dean of
'Hof CoffM
The inhabitants of some
villages of the High Atlas section
of Morocco spice their morning
coffee with pepper.

about European physics teaching
methods.
Besides the three educators,
the U.S. is representated by
three delegates from industry.
The seminar is sponsored by
the International Commission on
Physics Education of the
International Union of Pure
Applied Physics.

the University of Utah from
1946-67, for his outstanding
contributions to the quantum
theory of atoms and molecules
and to quantum biology.
Because Eyring also has been
one of the pioneers in the theory
of the chemical reaction rates
and the theory of the liquid
state, symposium emphashis will
be on these particular areas.
Traditionally, the first four
weeks of the institute have been
held at the University, with the
last two weeks and the
symposium at Sanibel. This year
only the symposium will be on
Sanibel.
Director of the institute and
symposium is Dr. Per-Olov
Lowdin, professor of chemistry
and physics at the UF and
professor of quantum chemistry
at Uppsala.
Funds Awarded
To Engineers
Four outstanding UF
engineering students have
received a total of $1,550 in
scholarships.
Gary L. Lawson, Richard H.
Olsher, Daniel N. Howse, and
Charles D. Knudsen are
recepients of funds provided by
Rayonnier Scholarships, Union
Camp Corp. and the Engineering
Wives Club of Polk County.
I

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It will consider physicist
training for industry and
government careers.
Ballard has served as an
industrial and government
consultant in addition to his
work in academics.
There is a growing need for
optical physicists because of
space age demands, Ballard
commented.
Ballard is currently a
consultant to the RAND Corp.,
McConnell-Douglas Corp., and
Aerospace Corp., all located in
the greater Los Angeles area.

Boo4a Sag.
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Monday, Daeambai 2.1968, The Florida AMpMor,

E v 1
DR. BALLARD
.. .attends conference

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Monday. % December 2,1968

The Florida Alligator
**TI price of fr low
j~g* flic exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
PlCtflNllft/ Dave Doucette
... Managing Editor
Alt
f Dave Reddick James Cook
y\lk£/U£(M. Assignments Editor News Editor
.***

:The American Dream

Measure Up And Let Others Be Free

Always attendant to modem
commonplaces such as the
burning of an American flag,
questioning of compulsory PE,
or the exposition of a naked
female form, is a seething mob
of halfway equalitarians
groaning to the authorities for
more responsible supervision
and wondering what The
American Dream is coming to.
Bullish, badge-spangled,
gun-rattling despots and
shell-shocked ex-marine
machine-gunners who would
love, LOVE to take a pair of
shears and crop the Bill of
Rights down to a size more

Time For Action In SSOC

By LEE HILLIKER
You sit there basking in the sun of your radical
ideas. You go to the SSOC meetings and rap for
three hours with your radical brothers and sisters.
You speak praisingly of Marx and Marcuse and are
able to discourse eloquently upon their writings and
upon their incisive social analysis. A picture of Che
Guevara adorns your room. Or, if you have pacifist
leanings, Mahatma Ghandi is one of your idols.
The need for complete social and political
restructuring is one of your dominant concerns.
Change is your rallying cry.
Now tell me, brother radicals, just what are you
doing, what action are you taking to bring your
philosophy to life? What concrete proposals have
you made made in order to make manifest your
ideas? Have you forced any issues or even taken a
stand on any? In short, just what have you been
doing for the past eight weeks? Well, Ill tell you.
Not one blasted thing.
Most of you profess radical ideas and yet you
dont seem willing to take any action on them. Ed
Freeman has said that this campus is a great place
for issues. And it is. It would appear that you are
not really interested or committed enough to do
anything. At a recent SSOC meeting a representative
of New Party asked for volunteers to help with the

nearly commensurate to their
dwarfed sense of justice, sputter
and fume over the simple
burning of a dime store flag.
And somewhere beneath the
right wing of these super war
eagles huddles some sunken-eyed
cretinish human goose with a
modified Yul Brynner haircut
just crawling with little jerky
impulses. Just pulsating clusters
of little cretinish things that he
would love to do if he had the
guts.
But he wont do them, at
least not in public. And he
doesnt want anybody else to do
them either, because hes got

boycott of California table grapes in this area.
This is to help the destitute farm workers obtain
a strong enough position so that they might bargain
for decent wages and living conditions. This is
certainly a worthy cause and one commensurate
with your beliefs. How many volunteers came
forward? Two, maybe three. Because of this the
boycott may have no real support in this area.
The meetings are usually a mass of rhetoric with
little concrete relevance as far as life at this
university is concerned. At the same meeting as the
one referred to above, someone finally brought up
the point of relevant issues. Not necessarily one
issue* in particular, just any one at all.
Much arguing ensued, concerned mainly with
unimportant trivialities. Some definite proposals
were put forward, but were for the most part
ignored. The final result was that no action at all
was taken and nothing was decided. Everyone
seemed to lose interest and the meeting broke up.
If Ihe SSOC is to be an effective force for change
on this campus, it must start acting immediately.
Being a Wednesday night radical is not enough.
Full-time committment coupled with deeds is the
word. Take your heads out of the sand people.
Look around. This is your world. You are not going
to change it by sitting at meetings.

EDITORIAL
Racism Alive And Well

Racism is alive and well -at the
University of Florida. . t
In mid-November a black foreign student
from Kenya, Fred S. Kanali, left the
university to return to a northern college.
One easily understands why when he
hears about some of the incidents Kanali
encountered. Like the one when two white
youths of college age stood in his way and
then spit on him.
Or the time the car passed him at night
and whites yelled Hi, nigger.
Or the refusal of the barber shop near the
university to cut his hair.
Or the indefinable incidents that occur
wherever black students go: the cold stares,
the silent disapproval, the smoldering hate.
Kanali got it all, and he got fed up. Any
human being would have.
Kanali wont be coming back, either. For
the rest of his life, he will remember the
night two white punks spit on him. And he
will remember the University of Florida.
The list of similar incidents to other
foreign students, regardless of their color,
and to Black American students is appalling.
We think its time this community, these
people the students, particularly did
something about it. Because every time an
international student or a black student is
snubbed or hated or ignored or any of the
other thousand ways people mistreat other
people, he will not forget it. He will return
in kind.
And he will always have a bitter, bitter
taste in his mouth when he thinks about the
University of Florida.
There are a great many thUgs the
institution itself can do, as the Department
of Political Science pointed out in its

himself convinced that its just
his good common decency and
law-abiding nature that keeps
him from busting loose with all
kinds of hell.
So he wants chains, chains for
everybody. Compulsory this,
compulsory that. ROTC,
physical education. No it isnt
the gung-ho jock. He doesnt
care if anybody else in the world
has formidable biceps. Its that
pack of knock-kneed, future
executive punishment gluttons.
Its the pinched-face goul that
slips his warm-up suit on before
sunrise and pads around the
block three times before law

class.
So nobody needs Michael L.
Bryant, 4LW, to tell them that
they should be compelled to do
anything that he considers good
for them. And they dont need
David Miller to outline the
magnitude of his physical
strength before he gives his
opinion to the contrary. No
Miller, no one cares how many
pounds you can lift and even
without you and your high
school principal, compulsory PE
would still be detestable.
And NOBODY (whether they
think they do or not) needs Arlo
Mitchell and his head full of
clanking swords ami booby traps
and medals and machine guns
and land mines and Sergeant

| Alligator Inquizitor j
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN

Good morning. As we enter the last week of school I am reminded;-:
x Old England and the royal guards of the palace. Did you know that;.;
x before the guards leave their position they do a little ritual which.;
X cons ists of spinning around once (Granny Zeuss told me this). It S;.;
£ called the Turn of the Sentry. £
Todays questions: >
> 1. a) Who was the man who killed the 7 nurses in Chicago?;:;
sb) Who is Earl Rays present lawyer? £
* 2. What was Clark Gables last movie? :£
X 3. a) What is Fabians last name? b) What is Dions last name? £
:: 4. Under what party name did Dick Gregory run? £
5. The following questions refer to the comic strip BRENDA.;,
x STARR: a) What is her true loves nkme? b) What is her editor s:x
£name? c) And what is the name of her red-haired friend? >
£ 6. Could you say that the Sheriff of Nottingham was*,
hood-winked?

£ Wednesdays answers: £
£ 1. Arm 2. University of Florida 3. I wasnt sure 4. Hud x
$5. Thanksgiving 6. Norway
Moo at a well-endowed girl today. ...

resolution on Kanalis withdrawal (see p age
one).
For example, non-discrimination in
housing can be rigidly enforced. Action
Conference proposals concerning
disadvantaged students can be immediately
implemented. Organizations within the
university can officially condemn racism and
earnestly strive to end it.
But all this would still not be enough.
The real job lies in day-to-day human
contact. The major task is one of human
being reaching out for another human being,
hearing his thoughts, understanding his fears
and hopes, sharing his aspirations and
pitfalls, exploring his attitudes, learning of
his life and the lives of his people.
This is humanity at its best.
If you are not in the vicious minority
which hates other men without even
knowing why, if you are in the silent but
inactive majority of students here who
deplores racism and indecency, you can
help.
Simply by reaching out, you can improve
the lot and the feelings of international
students and black students. You can help
the reputation of the university. You can
play a role, no matter how small, in breaking
down the barriers between people of all
races, all cultures, all nationalities.
Take an international student or a black
student to lunch with you. Invite him to
your dorm room, apartment, fraternity
house, or sorority house. Talk to him not
AT him, but TO him. Join hands with him,
and help stamp out racism, prejudice,
misunderstanding, hatred.
There can be no doubt that both of you
will be far richer for the experience.

By Uncle Javerneck

Rock comic books.
And NOBODY, NOBODY
needs any one around that cant
see the human body nude, if not
as being beautiful, then at least
as being a Human body and not
some infernal Communist
invention to take their minds off
really keen things like god and
the flag and Paul Harvey news
commentaries.
No, nobody needs you guys.
And while Im talking to you let
me anticipate your next remark
by saying:
If you cant measure up to
the demands of freedom to be
free and to let others be free
then why dont YOU move to
Russia.



Phone System
Criticized
MR. EDITOR:
Centrex may have rated
Floridas Telephone system
number one publicity-wise, but
have you ever tried to use it?
Call the universitys main
number any afternoon, and if
youre lucky a friendly operator
may answer that is, after
thirty or more rings. And for
more fun, try dialing 392-2176
which information is still passing
off as married student housing.
BRUCE HEEKIN, 2UC

'Old Glory Is Old
MR. EDITOR:
Come out from hiding behind that piece of cloth. Can we not
gaze upon the whole face rather than just the hypnotic eyes and
soothing tongue. We all have scars and scratches but if they are
ignored they will become festered and swollen and consume the
whole body. Why are you afraid to look?
Will you not admit that nothing on earth is perfect?
You conceited beast, consuming everything that falls under
your hypnotic power! Surely you are the most handsome
creature that walks on this earth, neither are you perfect.
Cast off that old battered cloak, let us see your entire
physique. Let us see your bruises and festers so that they can be
healed. The stars are getting old and tarnished; it is time you
rejuvenated your apparel.
Cast off your clothes! Cast them off! Throw them on the
ground!
Bum them! Bum them so you can never hide behind them
again! Let us see your true nature so that you can at last be
perfected.
Old Glory is old, let her rest.
pat mcdermott, 2uc

Rude Employees Jeopardize Attendance

MR. EDITOR:
Attention should be drawn to
the disgusting merry-go-round
that loan, scholarship, and grant
holders are subjected to when

Hope For Sensitivity

MR. EDITOR:
While one hardly anticipates miracles from the normally
drought-ridden pages of the Alligator, he would at least not fruitlessly
hope after some bare faint rudiment of journalistic sensitivity (one
scarcely asks of the Alligator that which he cannot ask of the Times).
But friends, the heights of journalistic absurdity have now been
breached. Yes, and talents atilt and windmills to the breeze cometh
the former editor, Harvey Alper exclaiming on the world and its
hardships.
He might have more thoroughly examined a subject on which he
purports such a unanimous authorship (there is after all a rest to the
world). Statements of the sort so ably pointed out by Lee Hilliker
only serve to typify the rather enormous lethargic insensitivity of the
ex-Alligator editor.
The Alligator might at least cease sponsorship (he was after all
fired, wasnt he?) Talents of that calibre best meet equally meager
demands. And the Alligator after all is of better stuff.
DOUGLAS EDDINGTON, 4AS

Speaking Out

Many of us talk of the need for change at this
school, but do nothing to see our desires for a better
university become actuality. It is unfortunate, but
the majority of this campus is the apathetic, faceless
conformists who will take booze and broads (or
boys) over a chance to voice their views and then
work for them. We see tremendous emotional
response to football riots and panty raids, while
student groups dedicated to justice and seeking a
better, newer, thinking university go begging for
members.
But recently it seems that the student
government and student publications sectors of our
student body have been trying to shake the lethargic
majority out of their hibernation. We see our
campus paper crusading for Lavon Gentry, reducing
marijuana penalties, recognition of SSOC, and
appropriation of much needed funds to several

Strength And Action Bring Reforms

OPEN FORUM:
AdoktmL ViMwt
There is no hope for the complacent man.
;

'GatorAuthor Makes Offer

MR. EDITOR:
As a loyal Gator follower and
as author of Go Gators,
official history of Gator football

they seek to obtain their funds
at the student depository. As if
the tedious procedures of
obtaining release notices,
promissory notes, and an

from 1889, 1 have never quit on
the team. But Im not so sure
about some of the other Florida
fans. My expectations for a
perfect season, a conference title
and high national ranking have
burst too, just as those hopes of
the players.

But they havent quit. Nor
have I. They have my backing all
the way. Which brings up my
point:

When the Gators won, Go
Gators sold. When they went
down, sales stopped, meaning
everyone likes a winner.

At any rate, I have lost over
$5,000 in trying tp tell the
Gator football story. But I am
not bitter, even though I cant
afford such a loss. I believe in
the Gators to the extent that I
want to make an offer:

I have 1,000 copies of the
hardcover book, Go Gators!

unbelievable array of
identification were not
sufficiently disagreeable, the two
persons employed by the
University to assist scholarship
and loan holders at the Hub feel
that insult must be added to
injury by shortly and most
rudely dismissing even the most
simple request for information.
Due to the incomprehensible
reluctance of these persons to
supply facts concerning a state
scholarship awarded me, my
attendance at the UF next
quarter is shrouded in doubt,
simply because of the lack of
funds. I question the fact that
the department which awards
these grants would be pleased to
see the holders snubbed, refused,
and forced to live in a state of
poverty because of the swelled
heads and incivility of two UF
secretaries.
RUTH PORTER HOWARD

departments in dire condition. The Student Senate
has passed resolutions supporting Action
Conference i (President OConnells public relations
fiasco), and condemning certain administrators who
have been blocking implementation of its ideas,
pushing for more relevant curriculum, asking for
voluntary PE, and having students write their own
conduct codes.
But it is really up to us, the rank-and-file
students, to see that our apathy towards these issues
does not lull Tigert into the false security of
thinking that only a small minority truly desire
change. We can prove this untrue by our
involvement and activism, especially with these
issues which effect each one of us in one way or
another.
There are already enough established student
groups for anyones tastes. For the more

on hand. Anyone may have one
by writing to me at Sunshine
Publishing Co., 5740 Walton St.,
Pensacola, Fla. If you care to
send what you think it is worth,
fine. If not, you can have it free.
The book retails for $5.95. But
real Gator fans can have a book
for sl, $2, $3, etc. or for free.
I think the Gator story is
worth telling. Thats why I make
this offer. And I hope Coach
Ray Graves will repeat my offer
on his TV show and that Otis
Boggs will repeat it on the Gator
football network.
Go Gators!
ARTHUR E. COBB,
AUTHOR GO GATORS!

Mandatory Phys. Ed.
MR. EDITOR:
There are a few observations 1 would like to make concerning your
editorial Make PE Voluntary.
Since the thought of six quarters of mandatory physical education
is almost enough to make the student wonder what the UF is trying
to teach him, it is interesting to note that the average student at the
UF compiles over 200 quarter hours by graduation. On a percentage
basis it can be shown that the development of a sound body is
receiving approximately 3% of the students total effort.
You state that students who enroll in a class voluntarily are more
interested in the course and will perform better. Are you insinuating
that interest in physical education is not high? If so please stop by a
required physical education course in handball, soccer, or tennis
sometime. This argument is much better applied to compulsory
ROTC. I believe that this is precisely why physical education MUST
NOT BE MADE VOLUNTARY. It is interesting and it is FUN. There
is of course, no room for fun in the college curriculum. How many
students would sign up for handball if it were not compulsory? Os
these, how many would feel guilty for doing it?
There are many one-time UF freshman who now play handball,
tennis, or golf. I wonder how many of these students would have ever
experienced the feeling of a perfectly executed kill shot, an overhead
smash, or a 2SO yard drive down the middle if they had not been, yes,
forced to do so initially. It seems that people may not always know
what is best for them.
I have not mentioned the physiological benefits of vigorous activity
upon the body. There are many. Development of an efficient,
well-functioning heart and the prevention of excess weight are only
two. When such activity becomes a life-long hobby . this is good.
The emphasis placed on the development of the mind may never be
fully exploited, if a heart attack is suffered at the age of 32 Tennis
anyone?
MURRAY H. ZOLT, 4PE

Monday. Dacambar2.l96B, Tha Florida Alligator,

:By Mike Hittlemaw

establishment-oriented, there is student government,
where more interested, hard-working students are
always needed. But beware of the political
hanky-panky and Blue Key aspirations that have
ruined and corrupted many idealistic students.
For those interested in law, and protecting our
constitutional guarantees, there is the student
ACLU. Every political view, from Nixon to Norman
Thomas, is represented, even the Wallace people are
welcome to join.
It has been proved at other campuses that the
only way to get reform is to show the
administration that there are substantial numbers of
students who will not continue to stand for the
status quo. Through numbers there is strength, but
through apathy there is weakness and continuance
of life as it is. Which do you want?

Nude KKKer
A Staffer?
MR. EDITOR:
After reading about the
courageous Alligator staff
numbers getting locked
(undetected) in the library and
getting birth control pills at the
infirmary and thereby exposing
the outrageous shortcomings of
the University, I was wondering
if the nude masked man in the
Graham area snack bar was still
another bold staff member
proving that a naked individual
can walk into campus cafeterias
and get away with it?
PHILIP K. MORGAN, 2UC
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Dacambar 2,1968

Senate Group
Meets Today
The Senate Excuse
committee will meet today at
3:45 p.m. in the Student
Activities Center.
The committee reviews and
determines the validity of the
excuses of senators who missed
the previous week's Senate
meeting.

Reduction In Voting Age
Urged By Student Groups

A petition to lower the voting
age in Florida from 21 to 18 is
now being prepared by a group
of UF students.
We are working in
conjunction with a number of
students from Florida State,
University of Miami, and, in
fact, a number of other state
colleges, said Bill Sadowski, a
law student.
According to Sadowski, the
plans are to introduce the
petition in the next meeting of
the Florida Legislature under the
initiative condition of the state
constitution, which means that
legislation may be introduced
or enacted directly by the
people of the state.
The voting age of 21 was
recently upheld in Florida, when
the new constitution was passed
by a popular vote of the state.
For awhile the voting age in
the new i constitution was
lowered to 18, but when the
time neared for voting by the
state, the legislature felt that the
constitution, as a whole, would
stand a beter chance of passing,
if the voting age remained at
21, Sadowski said.
This was probably a wise
political decision because many
voters might have based their
decision on the voting age on
their reactions to the Columbia
riots or the Berkeley riots, he

j tfjM i
! ik PEOPLES ;
§§> CAPITALISM ;

Without revolution, the ownership of U.S. industry has quietly 9
passed into the hands of the people, not the Government.
The electric utility industry, for example, is partly owned by
4,000,000 individuals directly... partly owned by 135,000,000
with life insurance (whose insurance companies hold shares
worth $23 billions) ... and partly owned by the millions with
savings accounts. More people have more savingssso billions
invested in electric utilities than in any other U.S. industry.
Thus, your parents (or you) may own part of Floridas four
- investor-owned electric companies. +
Thats peoples capitalism.
In communist countries, the
names the same, but not the game, a
Florida's Electric Companies Taxpaying, Investor-owned p
FLORIDA POWER A LIGHT COMPANY GULF POWER COMPANY
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY J
1 i***********^*******^,^****
f USE nt
j CLASSIFIEDS 1

DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST
{ AtOrfDAYS~")
"'V I ARE ALWAYS I
~~ A J

said.
Now, though, it is time to
be preparing for a petition for a
constitutional amendment, he
said.
The students involved in the
petition from Florida State are
meeting with the secretary of
state to work out the proper
form of the petition.
We plan on utilizing college
students from throughout the
state to distribute the petition,
Sadowski said and it looks as
though we will have good
legislative backing in our
endeavor.
Sadowski said several
legislators had shown active
interest in the petition.
For the petition to pass, we
will need about eight per cent of
those who voted in half of the
congressional districts and eight
per cent of those who voted in
the state as a whole, Sadowski
said. We would guess that we
will need from 180,000 to
200,000 signatures on the
petition.
Sadowski listed a number of
reasons why he felt 18-year-olds
should have the right to vote.
First, I feel that 18-year-olds
have the factual knowledge to
vote, but they need to be given
the responsibility. Students feel
frustrated because their voice is
not heard, so they actively

protest.
Second, students should
become interested in politics,
and for those who arent,
perhaps this will give them the
incentive to become so.
Finally, I feel that voting
becomes a habit, and that if it is
started at the age of 18, it stands
a better chance of growing.
ItlllllllllllllllllHllNlllllllllMlllHlNlinillllNlllttNllg
ORANGES |
$2 a bushel |
U-Pic-Em I
MODEL HOMES I
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. So. on 441
1

r 1013 W. Univ. Ave. k
Si
loppenes iu% off v
The ideal
t Christmas gift
No matter what the female's age, she ll love
a hair piece this Christmas. Pick out a wig
f r or give her a Hide n' Chic gift

Ho Mo h >
Christmas Stocking Special
REG. $17.95 NOW $13.88
if *. *'' rfjf
Vt .: :
.;. ft
v':-
*~*7'' v
<- '* -
A
i|ViTK 1232 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-7657



A CHRISTMAS GlFt' Gifts of Qualify
I "Wf VsZLa f " I
W FREE; 3 INITIAL MONOGRAM r^i t-, 9
Jk LONDON FOG JACKETS AND COATS J, Tjfa f§
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| IF YOURE NOT SURE OF THE SIZE ,WE WILL JBk
W SUPPLY A MONOGRAM GIFT CERTIFICATE TO m
BE USED AFTER CHRISTMAS...NO EXTRA COST. $l2B 8 ftK
M FREE OFFER GOOD THRU DEC. 10th. Forfu whcwy* ... cfjk
U A u give 76* Super Screen Portable TV fHK
JA DIAG. 141 . In. picture //jP Tho WAYNE ZISIO jWn
f COUCHS Inc f
uJk "Where Service is our most important Product"
A 60> N. M/UH H 376-7171
l !Mg9£rsil |j
SKfI
I IN 12350 1



SAMSON
WHAT IS SAMSON?
SAMSON is an organization of University
students interested in helping the underprivi underpriviledged
ledged underpriviledged in Gainesville and its surrounding
communities. SAMSON is based on the be belief
lief belief that there are many students with the
desire and the abilities to assist the local
anti-poverty agencies.
HOW WE WORK:
SAMSON serves as a liaison between
interested students and local anti-poverty
agencies. It informs students about the pro programs
grams programs in need of their talents and, in turn,
lets these agencies know what talent is
available.

CURRICULUM RESOLUTION
BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED BY THE STUDENT SENATE OF THE
STUDENT BODY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA THAT:
Whereas: A relevant, flexible curriculum is of vital importance to any
institution of higher learning.
Whereas: The administration and faculty of the University of Florida are deeply
entrenched in paterns of instruction and curricula offerings designed only to
uphold the status quo, rather to create a feeling of identity in mutual
involvement between the faculty and the individual students; and
Whereas: The University of Floridas patterns of instruction and curricula
offerings are often based on traditional practices which are rigid, inflexible,
and divorced from the primary purpose of promoting increasingly diverse and
varied learning; and
Whereas: The methods of instruction and curricula are often outdated and fail
to keep in pace with the needs of a dynamic society which has changed
greatly from the society in which the origins of our present academic
principles were founded; and
Whereas: The Faculty Senate and the University Curricula Committee have
been concerned only with the status quo and have failed to reflect the voices
and needs of the academic community which it was designed to serve; and
Whereas: The students of the University of Florida have found it impossible to
effect meaningful curricula reform;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED:
That the President of the University of Florida be urged to provide for a
flexible, effective curriculum relevent to the problems and needs of the
students of the University of Florida; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED:
That the President t>f the University of Florids also be urged to take
immediate action to place more students on the University Curricula
Committee, and that these students be given a stronger voice in
recommending change rather than being token representitives of the
Student Body.
The Chairman of the Student Senate Committee on Acadeic affairs shall
be instructed to report on the progress of this resolution at the second
regular meeting of the Winter Quarter, 1969.

Annual Christmas Sale,
Dec. 3,4,§, Second floor Reitz
Unon. 11:00 a.m.*9:oop.m.

/ YMfwX|K
72

-
Campus Crier

DATES TO REMEMBER

Annual Children's Christmas Party,
Dec. 7. Second floor Reitz Union.
1:00 a.m. All children of the
University Community are invited.

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, December 2,1968

Page 10

OTt umi
rm Svlniifl
§f§K& K' 1
Hp*'
' iss!u I p
' ' -> f
There Is a happiness an underprhriledged child seldom
knowsCHILDHOOD! And you can add that happiness
to somebody's life while brightening up your own.

STUDENT REGULATIONS RESOLUTION
r
BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED BY THE STUDENT SENATE OF THE
STUDENT BODY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA THAT:
Whereas: The Faculty Senate and the administration promulgate rules of
student conduct at the University of Florida, and.
Whereas The Faculty Senate is malapprotioned and completely
unrepresentative of the University Community, and,
Whereas: 20,000 students are expected to obey rules which they have no voice
in making, and,
Whereas: Students are increasingly called upon to enforce these rules of
conduct both on a campus-wide basis and in their individual living units, and
Whereas: One of the major purposes of a university is the development of an
individual who can handle himself responsibly, maturely and intelligently in a
free and open society, and,
Whereas: This responsibility, maturity, and sound judgement derive primarily
from the personal exercise of freedom of choice and self government, and
not from conditioned responses to external pressures and restrictions, and,
Whereas: It is a fundamental law of Western Civilization and American
democracy that citizens have the right to determine the rules by which they
live, and,
Whereas: Students at this university are denied any voice in determining the
rules under which they live,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED:
That the Student Senate feels is failing in its function of
teaching students individual responsibility and self government, and,
That the Faculty Senate should relinquish the power of regulating student
conduct and concern itself with problems of academic import.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED:
That the Faculty Senate should relinquish the power of regulating student
conduct and concern itself with problems of academic import.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED:
The Student senate charges the Chairman of the Judiciary Committee
with the responsibility of ascertaining all judicial committees, boards, etc.
which exist on campus have a structure which guarantees the rights of the
accused students and guards against conflict of interest in judiciary
membership and procedure. The Chairman of the Judiciary Committee
shall report back to the Senate on this subject in the first meeting in
January.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED:
That the Student Senate charges the Chairman of the Student Rights
Committee with responsibility for providing for consideration of the
Senate a revision of the Code of Conduct which shall protect the rights of
students while maintaining orger in the academic community. The
chairman shall report back to the Senate in January.

Recieve Credit for your travel in
Europe,
Travel with the American
International Academy. Six weeks at
Europe's most famous campuses. For
info, calf 392-1655 or come by 310
Union.
k w

Sponsored by Student Government.

4
HOW YOU GET INVOLVED:
You can get involved in a program of life lifelong
long lifelong significance through SAMSON if all
the talent you have is a little willgoodwill,
that is. Call Student Government at the Uni University
versity University of Florida and let us know. Student
Government can be reached through the
University's main number (376-3261). If you're
concerned and have an hour or two a week,
we need your help in building a better com community.
munity. community. This is your opportunity to help solve
the most serious problem facing American
youth today.
WHAT WE DO:

Tutor
(Kindergarden through
Twelfth Grade)
Sports
Games
Arts and Crafts
Discussion Groups

New Years In New York,
f your vacation in fun
city. $l6O covers trip, hotel, meals
I ^ erta,n, ent specials. Call
391-1655 or ask at Rm 310 Union.

Adult Education
Hobby Groups
Dancing
Drama
Music
Health Instruction

NOTICES
Budget & Finance
Recent legislation requires that
all organizations requesting
money from the Student Senate
for trips must submit a separate
request for Food (a line item of
the entire request will be
sufficient). The request requires a
2/3 vote of the total membership
of the Senate for passage.
(Note: Budget and Finance
committee meetings are held at
4:30 P.M. on Wednesdays
preceeding a Senate
meeting.)



* G ATO R CLASSIFIEDS*

FOR SALE
A ... ft
1959 BSA 250 CC. New tag and
highway helmet included. SIOO. Call
John at 378-4920. (A-2t-48-p)
Scuba gear complete outfit or part.
Complete $l3O. Olson 717 CB radio
S6O. Mobile antenna $lO. 2
inconvertor sls. Call Bruce
392-7547. (A-3t-47-p)
Cabinet stereogram, table model
sewing machine & 19 in. B/W TV. All
in good condition. 378-6440.
(A-3t-47-p)
ANTIQUES & UNIQUES ageless
gifts to cheer a heart or home. 1791
NE 23 Blvd. Closed Monday.
(A-st-47-p)
1967 Honda Scrambler 90. Helmet
incl. $195. See at Pinehurst Park, Lot
132 after 5 p.m. (A-st-45-p)
FOR SALE: BMW R6O 1967 only
a little over 3000 mi. Call 372-4625.
(A-st-45-c)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading supplies,
custom reloading. HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
Micanopy, 466-3340. (A-ts-49-c)
Selmer Eb alto saxaphone $175. Call
376-0155 after 3:00 p.m. (A-3t-49-p)
35mm Camera Petri single lens reflex,
telephoto lens, filters, camera box,
$175. Call 378-7441. (A-3t-49-p)
FOR RENT
** *
2 Br. house next to campus; all
necessities plus; $125 month, first
come first served! Phone 378-5405.
(B-st-47-p)
Sublease 12 wide, 2 bedroom trailer.
Air conditioning and central heat.
Full kitchen, fully furnished. Rent
paid thru Jan. 1. Details 378-7235.
(B-st-44-p)
Studio apt. suitable for 1 or 2,
utilities included, pool, Vz block from
campus. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave. Apt.
329. Call 378-8060. (B-st-47-p)
Modem 2 bedroom, air condition,
heating unfurnished. Available
December 30. $165 per month.
Landmark Apts. Call Achey
372-6535. (B-15t-38-p)
Furnished downstairs apt., 2 Br., Air
conditioned. Call after 5:30,
378-7845. (B-48-ts-C)
Sub-lease Frederick Garden Apt.
Jan-Aug. 1 Bedroom, fur. Call
378-5172 after 5:00. (B-2t-48-p)
1 Bedroom air conditioned. $lO2 per
month. 1933 NW 4th Ave. Apt. Zeta.
Sublet Dec. 1. Call 378-0584
anytime. (B-2t-48-p)
Sublet Jan. 1. 2 Br. furnished apt. 1
blk. from campus at 1119 S.W. 7th
Ave. or call Henri 378-7696 after 11
a.m. One or more persons.
(B-4t-48-p)
To sublease one bedroom poolside
apartment Landmark Phase 11, Jan.
1. Gym, rec room, and sauna. Call
Ayn or Jennifer, 372-1662.
(B-4t-48-p)
Moving into frat house, must sublet
my space in 4-man poolside apt. in
Tanglewood, starting Jan.
$47.50/mo. plus utl. You keep my
security deposits. Mark, 372-8041.
(B-st-49-p)
Must sublet 1 br. Landmark F>hase II
apt. for 2nd qtr. AC pool,
dishwasher. Call 378-8992.
(B-4t-49-p)
Take over lease on spacious 1 br. apt.
AC wood paneled, enclosed patio,
quiet surroundings. $lO5 mo. Village
34 Apts. Call 376-7491. (B-3t-49-p)
WANTED
*. V
Wanted: one coed roommate to si.
2 bedroom apt. in Landma.
beginning Winter Quarter. Call
Debbie, 378-8033 anytime.
(C-4t-45-p)
2 female roommates to share 2
bedrm. Landmark Apt. beginning
Winter Quarter. Great location. Call
Pris at 378-8438 or Sandy at
392-7659. (C-st-45-p)
Wanted: 3 female roommates for 2
bedroom townhouse. Williamsburg
Apt. Poolside. Prefer graduate
students or over 21. Call Jackie
378-3345. (C-st-44-p)
Do your thing to free this university.
Send original art, creative writing,
essays to CROCODILE, Box 13157,
Unlv. Station. Call 376-5044.
(C-st-44-p)
Fourth female roommate needed
from Jan to June. Furnished 2
bedroom apt. at Village Park. Rent
Paid thru Dec. Call Janet 376-3107.
(C^43-7t-p)

WANTED I
eV .V'
Male roommate to share new 12 wide
mobile home. Private bedroom. $35
plus utilities. Pinehurst Park, Lot
132, after 5 p.m. (C-st-45-p)
1 or 2 Female Roommates for 2
bedroom mobile home. Pri. room, 5
min. from campus. Rent 105.50 mo.
Plus utilities. Call 378-3522 for
information. (C-st-47-p)
WANTED: Two female roommates
winter quarter or winter and spring.
$41.25 monthly. Little noise but still
a fun place to live. Call 378-0987.
(C-3t-47-c)
Studious male roommate to share
two bedroom apartment with three
others. Summit House. Call
372-6959. (C-6t-48-p)
Female roommate French Quarter
57. 378-2729. (C-2t-49-p)
3rd Roommate to share 2 bedroom
Olympia apartment for winter or
remainder of yean Phone 378-7909
after 4:30. S4O/mo. (C-st-49-p)
Female roommate to share apt. with
3 other girls in Gatortown for next 2
quarters. Call 372-0784. (C-3t-49-p)
Male roommate wanted to share apt.
with one other., Jan. June. $45/mo.
and ¥z utilities. AC & near campus.
1513 N.W. sth Ave. Apt. 56,
378-0661. (C-3t-49-p)
One female roommate to sublet 2 BR
FQ apt. starting January. Call Rita,
Betty or Gail. 378-8970. (C-st-45-p)
Two female roommates to share
2-bedroom apt. AC, walking distance
to campus. SIOO a quarter. Call
today 378-5532 and ask for Fran.
(C-3t-49-p)
Wanted: fourth girl to share Village
Park apt. beginning January 1. Call
376-7491. (C-3t-49-p)
1 coed for luxury 2 bedroom 2 bath
Camelot Apartment starting Winter
Quarter. Pool, sauna, fireplace,
dishwasher. Call 378-9694.
(C-41-49-P)
One female roommate for 2 bedroom
French Quarter apt. Call Sharon or
Arlene at 378-9094. (C-lt-49-p)
Housewife will iron in your home or
mine, free repairs, Call before ten
p.m. 372-5269. (C-47-4t-p)
Female roommate wanted for Jan.
Private room, AC, washer & dryer, 3
blocks from campus. $37.50/mo.
378-3291, 376-3582. (C-2t-49-p)
Coed wanted to share Poolside
French Quarter Apt. no. 103. All
luxuries included. Move in now or
January. December rent paid. Call
378-7988. (C-3t-47-p)
HELP WANTED |
'/wXvWy+WVWN/NVvIWV-W.WMW
Highly qualified secretary for
builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent Job. Many
company benefits. $450 month
starting salary. Only thoroughly
qualified people need apply. Phone
376-9950 days or 378-2000 evenings.
(E-49-ts-c)
20 men and women part time to
deliver to local area. Must have auto
and know city. Apply 14 E. Unlv.
Ave. Upstairs offices 1 and 2.
(E-38-12t-p)
Interviewing for holiday and winter
quarter employment, with some
immediate openings available. Apply
in person, ARBYS RESTAURANT,
1405 S.W. 13th Street. (E-2t-49-c)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson.
Unlv. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-c)
Part time waitresses. Noon hours or
evenings. Arranged to your schedule.
Apply Kings Food Host, 1802 W.
Unlv. Ave. or 1430 SW 13th St.
(E-47-ts-c)
Part time grill help. Noon hours or
evenings. Arranged to your schedule.
Apply King's Food Host, 1802 W.
Univ. Ave. (E-47-ts-c)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nations 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person, Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
Like movies? Want to review for the
Alligator? Turn in a review of any
movie In town the day after it opens
to the entertainment editor** desk,
third floor Reitz Union. We will call
you. (E-tf-38-ACO
'N-V.
Collection Clerk 111 $4,000 per year.
Call Mrs. Hogg, 2-0393. Campus
Credit Union for appointment.
(E-44-ts-c) _____
Part or full-time work on campus.
Flexible hours. Needed: ? checkers,
and door control help. Must be 21,
apply student activities desk, 3rd
floor,Reitz Union. (E-st-45-c)

Monday, December 2,1968, The Florida Alligator,

i HELP WANTED |
X-x-;-:-:->x*x-x-x.x;xx*x-:*x-x.xx-x;vx*xfti
Registered nurse to do occasional
part time convalescent care. Call
376-4216 at about 8:00 a.m. or
10:00 p.m. (E-3t-48-p)
DELIVERY BOYS: Apply in person
1029 W. Unlv. Ave. LARRYS
PORE-BOY. (E-st-48-p)
Women Girls: Telephone & survey
work part-time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
Student Cashier Wanted, 11:45
1:45 Monday through Friday, Health
Center. $1.50 per hour plus lunch.
Phone 392-3701, Mrs. Cassiato.
(E-48-10t-c)
| AUTOS |
1964 Fairlane station wagon, very
clean, runs well. Priced to sell.
378-6440. (G-3t-47-p)
64 MGB Ecstatic driving, mldnite
blue, wire wheels, R&H, new tires,
for the enthusiast on a budget,
$1145. 378-6917. Handled with
TLC. (G-4t-nc-45)
61 vw bus good condition, radio
excellent tires. S4OO. 372-5189.
(G-3t-49-p)
1966 VW sedan, R&H, push out rear
windows, & complete service records.
Perfect condition. 1350. 378-8956
after 5 p.m. (G-st-49-p)
1966 MGB Good condition
convertible w/Boot and tonneau top
good tires only $1625 call 392-1681
for Jim Moody 2-5 p.m.)G-3t-49-p)
1963 Chevrolet Impala SS
convertible. Automatic, VB, power
brakes, steering, radio, heater, SBOO.
Incredibly fine shape. 378-0937.
(G-3t-48-p)
PERSONAL |
ft v
Wfl-Kwawii wtfWXWXWffIWMR
RECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europe's
most famous campuses. For infe. call
392-1655 or come by 310 Union.
(J-l Bt-36-c_j
3 2nd year Med. students desire a
co-ed to cook week day evening
meals. Terms to be arranged. Call
376-0285 after 10 p.m. (J-st-44-p)
Pottery, photos, pictures and posters.
Many unique and unusual items at
Michel Delving. 1623 W. University.
Nice. (J-st-44-p)
NEW YEARS IN NEW YORK Spend
part of your vacation In fun city.
$l6O covers trip, hotel, meals and
entertainment specials. Call 392-1655
or ask at Rm. 310 Union. (J-st-44-p)
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
Un*""
Bobby, youre beautiful. Found and
lost you at the rally. See you in the
Plaza. (J-st-45-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT you'll be
glad you came. Buy your next eye
glasses at university opticians 526 SW
4th Ave. Next to Greyhound Bus
Station 378-4480. (M-18-ts-p)
r FTRAMIi S KATRaT
iRAQUEL WELCH
|l JQ The'PaperUrol
I is about to
Jjg get creamed!

Page 11

| PERSONAL |
YOU ASKED US TO LET YOU
KNOW
Theyre here. Ponchos and ruanas
handwoven in Colombia in brilliant
beautiful colors. 100 % wool. S2O-25
AT THE SPANISH MAIN 105 W.
University Ave. (J-3t-49-p)
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proofs 392-1681* between 2-5 p.m.
(J-3t-29-c)
Anyone finding or knowing
where-abouts of grey suede handbag
taken from art ed. studio Mon. night,
please call Cheryl Kramer, 376-0114
prescrip, pills & ID'S desp. needed.
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Lost-gold bulova watch with scarab
band call 392-7869 Reward.
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case. REWARD. Call M>u Tally
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satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus. Call
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glasses. Room 124 McCarty Hall.
(L-47-3t-nc)
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Page 12

\, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, Paeambar 2,1968

Chicago Police Blamed For Summer Violence

The Walker study of the
convention disorders, completed
in 53 days, was based on 20,000
pages of eyewitness statements,
180 hours of movie film, more
then 12,000 still photographs,
personal interviews and official
National Guard and police
records.
Walkers staff concluded that
the clearing of demonstrators
from Lincoln Park in the citys
North Side in accordance with
an 11 p.m. curfew forced a
police confrontation with the
dissenters and led directly to
intense violence Sunday night
through Tuesday night of
convention week in late August.
Demonstrators attacked too.
And they posed difficult
problems for police as they
persisted in marching through
the streets, blocking traffic and
intersections, the report said.
But it was the police who
forced them out of the park and
into the neighborhood. And on
the part of the police there was
enough wild club swinging,
enough cries of hatred, enough
gratuitous beating to make the
conclusion inescapable that
individual policemen, and lots of
them, committed violent acts far
in excess of the requisite force
for crowd dispersal or arrest.
To read dispassionately the
hundreds of statements
describing at first hand the
events of Sunday and Monday
nights, Aug. 25 and 26, is to
become convinced of the
presence of what can only be
called a police riot.
The violence, it said,
stemmed from threats to the
city both serious and absurd
and from the citys massive
response, which ranged from the
callup of 6,000 National
Guardsmen and the airlift of
6,000 regular Army troops to
the stationing of plainclothes
policewomen in the ladies
washrooms at the Convention
Hall.
The likelihood of violence,
the report continued, was
further enhanced by Daleys
widely publicized order after the
April shooting to shoot to kill
arsonists and shoot to maim
looters.
The police were generally
credited with restraint in
handling the first riots but
Mayor Daley rebuked the
superintendent of police, it
said. The shooting order,
although later modified,
'undoubtedly had an effect,
the report added.
The effect on police became
apparent several weeks later, it
said, when they attacked
demonstrators, bystanders and
newsmen during a peace march
m the Chicago Civic Center.
There were published
criticisms but the citys
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response was to ignore the police
violence, it said.
The report said a minority of
the citys 12,000-man police
force was responsible for the
convention-week violence? Yet,
it commented, there has been
no public condemnation of these
violators of sound police
procedures and common
decency by either their
commanding officers or city,
officials.
The document was liberally
sprinkled with four-letter words
used by police and
demonstrators alike, in a rare if
not unprecedented publication
of such obscenities in a
government document.
The study team said it quoted
the words with considerable
reluctance but said that
extremely obscene language
was a contributing factor to the
violence described in this report,
and its frequency and intensity
were such that to omit it would
inevitably understate the effect
it had.
The report graphically
described as the television
networks did not or could not
the verbal taunts and physical
filth which the protesters hurled
at the police, as well as the
equally obscene responses of
some of the officers.
The investigators noted
published accounts that
demonstrators used rocks,
bricks, sticks, cans, bags
containing urine, feces and paint
or ink, golf balls impaled with
nails, knives, pieces of wood or
shoes with imbedded razors,
oven cleaner spray, acid,
Molotov cocktails and daurt guns.
They said they found no
eyewitness evidence that
Molotov cocktails or dart guns
were used against police, and
that there was very little use
of the filled bags, golf balls with
nails or imbedded razors. Police
records indicated that no one
arrested had oven cleaner or acid
in his possession, and only a few
statements reviewed referred to
their use.
On Wednesday, the night of
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Vice President Hubert H.
Humphreys nomination, There
is no doubt that police discipline
broke during the melee, the
Walker report said. At one point,
the deputy police
superintendent was pulling
club-swinging officers off
demonstrators, shouting: Stop
damn it, stop. For Christs sakes,
stop.
The report stressed that it
was wrong and dangerous to
characterize the demonstrators
as entirely of one type, whether
hippie-yippie, new left,
anarchist or youthful political
dissenters.
There was a great mixture,
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including some Comunists and
revolutionaries, it said, but the
vast majority of the
demonstrators were intent on
expressing by peaceful means
their dissent either from society
generally or from the
administrations policies in
Vietnam.
But while it is clear that
most of the protesters in
Chicago had no intention of
initiating violence, this is not to
say that they did not expect it
to develop, the report said.
It saw the expression of
dissent as one of the most

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serious problems facing modern
democratic government, and said
the challenge of events in
Chicago was how to keep
peaceful assembly from
becoming a contradiction in
terms.
The violence in Chicago was
the more shocking, the report
said, because it was often
inflicted upon persons who had
broken no law, disobeyed no
order, made no threat, who
were peaceful demonstrators,
onlookers or merely residents of
the areas where attacks took
place.



UF Surprises Miami In Season Finale

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
The year of frustration for the Gators came to an
end Saturday.
It has been a tough season, one that began with
great expectations that never materialized.
Finally an upset, 14-10, of Miami gave everyone
the excitement they had been demanding all season.
UF came back in the second half, something they
hadnt done all season.
Down 10-0 at the half, it looked like the same
scene Florida fans had been experiencing all season.
The Gators took the ball on the first offensive set
of plays and with Tom Kennell at quarterback,
moved down to the UM 28 yard line. On third and
nine Ted Hendricks, All-American defensive end
threw Kennell for an 18 yard loss. That ended the
drive and gave Miami the ball which they proceeded
to move down to the Gator 10 yard line. From
there Miami put three points on the board with a 27
yard field goal.
In the second quarter Miami moved 54 yards on
a pass from quarterback Dave Olivo to flanker Ray
Bellamy. Vince Opalsky took the ball over from the
UF two yard line for the score.
On die kickoff Brian Hipp took the ball and
headed up the middle of the field. It was wide open,
but typical of Gator luck, Hipp fell.
At the end of the half the Gators went from their
10 to the Miami 25 and then missed a 33 yard field
goal.
The Gators went into the dressing room with
better morale than they had all season.
UFs defense held the Hurricanes all during the
second half. Miami got 18 yards on the ground in

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NICK ARROYO r . nw.n
TANNEN INTERCEPTION
.. Tannen takas one away from jr TNf lIMVIIf \
Miami flanker Ray Bellamy to f OVftHAUIiD SmcM i
stop a Hurricane drive. ; i # CA
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WALKER SCORES
... Sophomore running back
Gary Walker scores first for the
Gators on a one yard plunge.

the second half and 88 in the air.
The boys knew they could run at Miami and get
away with it, Coach Ray Graves said. Each
individual knew he could get his job done and they
went out there and put out their greatest effort.
Miami had a weakness and UF keyed on it. The
Gators kept away from Hendricks and hit the
weaker right side of Miamis defensive line.
Larry Smith, Tom Christian, Jerry Vinesett and
Gary Walker followed the blocking of All-American
Guy Dennis and company down to the Miami one
yard line, but the referee said Christian didnt score
OR a one yard plunge.
Comerback Steve Tannen took a punt after
Miami failed to move the ball and ran it back 25
yards. The Gators didnt run at that weak side this
time and had to give up the ball.
Miami got the ball but Mark Ely playing tight on
a pass by Olivo came up with an interception and
got to the Miami two yard line before he was driven
out-of-bounds.
Walker went up the middle for the TD. The
Gators were back in the game.
Smith, who was injured going into the game,
reinjured his shoulder and arch, he was wearing a
special plate in his shoe. Smith had run for about 90
yards, playing only part time, when he came in
during a timeout with the ball on the UM six yard
line.
Smith took the handoff from Eckdahl, ran into
one of his own men, headed for the outside,
sidestepped one Hurricane and beat another one
into the end zone.
Jack Youngbloods kick made it 14-10.
Time ran out with the Gators in possession after
holding Miami in a last minute effort to score.

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NICK ARROYO
VICTORY CIGAR
... Coach Graves is carried off the field on the shoulders of Jim
Yarbrough and Jim Hadley; ha stopped to shake hands with Miami
Coach Charlie Tata.
inL*'' nflKpi ifmr
B|M|i 11111 Imwl r 'W V
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SMITH CARRIES
... Smith finds an opening and heads upfield behind solid blocking on
his way to a total 96 yards rushing, proving his credentials should
include All-American.
^____

Monday, Daatmbm 2. 1988, The Florida AMeetor,

Page 13



Page 14

._Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Decamber 2, 1968,

f Viewing Sports
I NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor

It was after the football
game, and the crowd of writers
left Charlie Tate and started
looking for Ted Hendricks.
Ted was just coming out of
the shower. He groaned once,
wrapped the towel around
himself, and spread his 6 ft.-8 in.
frame against a locker, and
prepared for the barrage of
questions.
Hi there, Ted, Im from the
Sun. Were you expecting any
problems from Tom Kennell?
How doejjt feel to be ;an
All-American %un? Getting to
be kind of huh?
Well, uh, t watched him the
first two plays ...
You really knocked the crap
out of Kennell on that pass
ptey.
Well, I knew where he was
going, and no one was defending

Damn nice job, Ted. Damn
nice.
Thanks, Coach.
Ted Hendricks. A young man
who is easily the most
outstanding defensive player of
the decade. The Mad Stork of
Miamis football squad.
It seems that Teds whole life
has been spent on the football
field. Optimist football led to a
three-year stint on Hialeah
Highs football squad, where he
was offense, defense and
captain.
College, and Ted Hendricks
came to within a day of coming
to Florida. He wound up at
Miami.
But Ted Hendricks is also a
person. He showed it Saturday.
He had won the defensive game
for Miami, while the offense lost
the game.
Ted is a three-timer
All-American, the first in UM
history. He terrorizes
quarterbacks, taunts linemen,
and idles would-be pass
receivers.
He plays football because he
likes it, but he is looking for a
chance to get back on offense
someday.
I knew that when I came to
Miami, I would wind up on
defense. I had no bones about it,
but every spring, Id always look
to see if there was an opening as
a pass receiver.
This spring, Coach Tate put
me out as a tight end. That
lasted about two weeks, then I
never heard another thing about
it. I guess Coach was just trying
to make me happy.
The squeeze for space around
Ted became tighter. By this
time, he had on underwear and a
shirt, and was fiddling with the
knot in his tie.
Hey Ted, what kind of
offers you getting from the
pros?
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Excuse me, please. Tea, that
was a great effort on your part.
Im very proud of you.
Thanks, Dad.
Ted, are you looking
forward to the All-American
game?
Hendricks wiggled his toes.
They looked like hands.
Dont I know you from
somewhere?
You should. I live around
the comer from you.
Ted Hendricks buys his shoes
special. You have to when you
wear a size 13.
Im not sure what happened
to us in that game. We swept the
board in the first half, and then
lost.
Os course, Im going to stick
up for the team. The only
explanation I can offer is that
when youre ahead, you dont
put out as much. We handed
them a touchdown, and they
earned one. We also stopped
one.
To rationalize, Miami won
in everything except the score.
That of course, is sour grapes,
but what else can you say?
Ted Hendricks uses words
like rationalize. He doesnt
throw them around, but uses
them if they fit the need.
He answers questions without
a host of obscenities. He doesnt
look like a killer. He just looks
like a tall student.
The shoes and socks are on,
and Hendricks begins examining
a cut in his arm. His thoughts are
still on the idea of being a pass
receiver.
In away, Hendricks is already
a receiver. He intercepts enough
passes to be considered in
competition for Miamis
most-passes-caught record.
He has only scored one
touchdown. That was last year,
and it ranks as one of his
greatest moments.
Ill guess Ill go pro if anyone
wants me. I still want to get a
crack at receiving.
Hendricks likes to compare
him self to Jim Yarbrough,
Floridas own 6 ft.-8 in. end.
Yarbrough, however, plays
offense.
He got the break. I didnt.
Ted was getting ready to
leave. He was about to meet his
sister, who is a freshman at
Florida State.
I guess thats the last time
for the newsmen. He grinned,
Oh yeah, besides a bowl game.
Ted walked out of the locker
room to face his fans.
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NICK ARROYO
HENDRICKS AGAIN
... Miami All-American Ted
Hendricks smothers Gator
Eckdahl on a pass attempt
Hendricks gave UF a tough time
Saturday until the Gators started
running away from his side.

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Dixie Football Ends With Surprises

By DAVID MOFFIT
United Press Internationel
ATLANTA -The 1968
college football season here in
the South ended just like it
began-one dadgum surprise after
another.
Cases in point: Florida State
jumped off to a 25-0 halftime
lead and shocked llth-ranked
Houston 40-20; winless
Mississippi State tied Ole Miss
17-17; UF, coming from behind
in the closing minutes, upset
Miami 14-10; and 7th-ranked
Tennessee barely edged
Vanderbilt 10-7.
Among the not-so-surprising
this final weekend of the regular
season; 4th-ranked Georgia,

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NCAA Golf Champs
... UF's NCAA golf champions were honored at half time Saturday
during the Miami game. Starting from the left they are: Wendell
Coffee, John Sale, Richard Spears, All-American John Darr,
All-American Steve Melnyk and Coach Buster Bishop.

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wrapping up its first unbeaten
season in 22 years, crushed
Georgia Tech 47-8; Alabama
beat Auburn 24-16; Virginia
Tech trounced Virginia Military
55-6; and Memphis State,
winning the Missouri Valley title
in its first try, beat Louisville
43-14.
Junior quarterback Bill
Cappleman passed for 351 yards
and four touchdowns Friday
night to lead Florida State past
Houston, the nations No. 1
team on offense. That gave
Cappleman, a second stringer at
the start of the season, a passing
total of 2,410 yards and 25
touchdowns. Ron Sellers caught
14 of those passes to wind up
with 86 receptions for the
season.

FSU 40-HQUSTQN 20. UF 14- UM 10

Mississippi State quarterback
Tommy Pharr, the leading passer
and over-all yardage gainer in the
Southeastern Conference, threw
two touchdown passes to spark
the tie with Ole Miss. The Rebels
scored last, with four minutes to
play, but were afraid to gamble
on the two-point play that could
have won the game.
Injured Larry Smith scored
the Gators winning touchdown
with 2:38 left to play; and it
took a third-period field goal by
Karl Kresmer to snap a 7-7 tie
and give the Vols their victory
over Vanderbilt which still
wound up with its first winning
campaign since 1959.
Georgia, led by sophomore
quarterback Mike Cavan, scored
17 points in the first period and
had little trouble running up the
largest score the Bulldogs have
posted against Georgia Tech in
their 75-year-old series.
Alabamas Mike Hall was
great at linebacker as usual
Saturday as he intercepted two
passes and was in on 16 tackles.
But the 225-pound senior also
played offensive end against
Auburn-throwing the block that
enabled Ed Morgan to score his
second touchdown of the game;
and scoring the Crimson Tides
third touchdown with a pass
reception.
Now its on to the bowls for
nine of Dixies best. Heres the
post-season schedule for
Southern teams:
Dec. 14 Mississippi 6-3-1 vs.
Virginia Tech 7-3, Liberty Bowl,
Memphis;

Dec. 27 Richmond 7-3 vs.
Ohio University 10-0, Tangerine
Bowl, Orlando, Fla.;
Dec. 28 Alabama 8-2 vs.
Missouri 7-3, Gator Bowl,
Jacksonville, Fla., and Auburn
6-4 vs. Arizona 8-2, Sun Bowl,
El Paso, Tex.;

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Monday, December 2, IMS, The Florida ANieator,

Dec. 30 Florida State 8-2 vs.
Louisiana State 7-3 Peach Bowl,
Atlanta;
Jan. 1-Georgia 8-0-2 vs.
Arkansas 9-1, Sugar Bowl, New
Orleans, and Tennessee 8-1-1 vs.
Texas 8-1-1, Cotton Bowl,
Dallas.

Page 15



Pa> 18. The Florida Alligator, Monday, Daeambar 2,1968
HATS OFF TO Wr
GENERAL MOTORS <§r
THEY OUT SOLD US AGAIN
IN OCTOBER. WHY THE COMPARISON?
BECAUSE DATSUN IS
ENOUGH TO HAVE Ini A YCD &L A \AiCCIf
MADE ALFRED P.SLOANF LM T CK Os in Wttl\
GASP IN ADMIRATION. I
WHO WAS ALFRED P. I Mi. MHHIHBK TIICCnAV CDFTIAI -,
ONE OF TOE I jgs£H|Bp; IUOUAT
A TRULY GREAT MAN. I BPERCH-A-PLENTY
Al the perch you can eat.
w*rlar I W*J\m Dining room only.
EXCHIENT SERVICE I J 00
Biimished Announcing
Chcstiuit Vj and Cola-flavorecl
Burnished Chestnut is a hand-antiqued new Nup/jBB AAorlc JF/v
leather, in rich warm brown, which
handsomely accents the mens-wear fabrics of
the day. You'll be adding a smart footnote to fIHHBfeHHNfIHIHHH
your wardrobe when you come in and select a
pair of our Jarman "Burnished Chestnut
shoes. Larry Sm,th and Mark Ely, both outstanding players from the WL_ | a # £
Tampa area, ended the season as co-Players of the Week as a result of 1118 CHrIHK OV
their superb performances in Saturday's thrilling win over Miami.
Smith, who carried the ball on 546 different occasions during his MAaa
three year career and who amassed 2,473 yards in the process, gave IIQW
football fans one last look at his awesome ability as he rushed for 96
* attempts, caught three passes for 51 more, and ended the jffby
antastic 6-yard touchdown run around left end. Iwi
nior defensive back, pro Jto be the backbone of Coach
harges, as he intercepted two passes, one of which set up a lavCMyiKHP
when he picked it off at the Miami 35 and raced to their m
In addition, Ely made several fine tackles during the
best one coming after Miami receiver Ray Bellamy hauled
Olivo pass and raced the Gator four where Ely flattened
ninated this week were guard Guy Dennis, linebacker
- and offensive backs Jerry Vinesett and Gary Walker.
itchtll t |P
who knock each other over i
and knock each other out in
the process, now tastes like cola.
Cola-flavored Gatorade
is formulated for all people. Even
(I*in HO people whose idea of athletics If JjjSr
jp ly.yy something like miniature
golf, horseshoe pitching, or
carryinghome the Sunday paper.
Cola-flavored Gatorade works
exactly like the Gatorade
. athletes drink. But it tastes like
Jarman S lustrous new leather puts you the cola peopledrink. Available
right in style wherever soft drink., re ld.

Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Daeambar 2,1968