Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61. No. 46

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THE LOVERS
Debria Brown (Carmen) and Thomas O'Leary (Don Jose) starred in
the Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater production of "Carmen" Friday
night. (See review, page 13.)
University Problems
Discussed At Retreat

Nearly 50 UF administrative,
faculty and student leaders
gathered at Crystal River Friday
and Saturday and discussed a
broad range of problems facing
the university.
High on the list of topics
during the annual Presidents
Retreat was the Student Code of
Conduct and the Honor System.
Discussion also included
revision of the Faculty Senate,
the La von Gentry case, the case
of the student who recently
burned an American flag on
campus, the controversy
surrounding the Reitz Union,
the infirmarys policy of

I Unwed Mothers Face Many Lonely Decisions

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second of a
three part series on the plight of unwed mothers.
Much of the reiearch for the series was conducted
by Alligator Staffer Marfyn Rubin in Miami during
the summer.)
By MARLYN RUBIN
Alligator Staff Writsr
The plight of the unwed future mother boils
down to almost a routine, First comes the dread
words from the doctor. This is followed by shock
and the total disbelief of the reality she feared.
Then comes prayer.
Please Dear God...please let me start my
period and I promise it will never happen again...
Next comes the acceptance of the situation.
Shes pregnant! But what to do?
There are several alternatives. She must decide to
confide in her perents or friends. After the initial
shock perents have been known to rally solidly

Florida Alligator

prescribing birth control pills to
UF coeds and about a dozen
other specific problems.
In trying to analyze some of
the basic problems of the
community, the leaders
repeatedly pointed to a wide
communication gap between
administrators, faculty and
students.
The purpose of the annual
retreat is not necessarily to find
solutions to all the problems
reviewed, but merely to air
various points of view, noted UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
in his opening remarks to the
retreat.

University of Florida, Gainesville

BY CHARLES EVERS

Nonviolent Progress
Seen For Negroes

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Charles Evers, brother of slain
civil rights worker Medgar Evers,
told a near capacity crowd in
University Auditorium Thursday
night Negroes were not going to
let anyone turn the clock
back.
I think we have a very bright
future, Evers said. "Were going
to continue working for whats
right and were going to
continue to move forward.
The Mississippi NAACP field
secretary added that the Negro's
fight would be won
non-violently.
Evers first gained national
attention when his brother,
Medgar, was slain by a sniper
five years ago. Evers succeeded
him as NAACP field secretary.
Since then he has been
responsible for voter registration
and election follow-up campaigns
which have produced changes in
Mississippis state government.
Evers said his speech here was
part of an effort aimed at
reaching young people.
lf we can go and talk to the
young people, maybe we can get
them to understand what its all
about, he said.
Evers spoke out against "hate
mongers" of both races. He said
it was foolish for Negroes to
result to force because "whites
control all the weapons of
destruction."
America was discovered for
all of our people, he said, Im
not gonna let any racist-black or
white-push me into a comer and
say that America was not made
for me.
The reason why white
America cant understand whats
wrong with the Negro is because
they have never been a Negro.
Youve got to understand

\ll ifjc; i< >i

DEPTH REPORT

behind the girl, see her through the ordeal and help
her adjust to a return to her normal life.
But there are also cases that tell of parents who
have turned their daughter into the streets,
completely disowning her with no acceptance of the
realities of the situation.
The unwed mother to be can stay in her own
home town, which is difficult under any
circumstances. She can travel away from home to
stay with relatives and friends. She can enter a home
for unwed mothers.
But whatever she decides, she can receive help
from the State Welfare Department. During the 12
months before June, 1968, the Miami District

The

why Stokely (Carmichael) and
Rap (Brown) think like they do.
Youre lucky, America, that we
dont have 22 million Stokleys
and Raps.
Evers ended his speech with a
plea for unity: 'Together/' he
said, "we can make America the
greatest and safest country in
the world for all of us to live

in." (SEE'EVERS'PAGE 2)
_ <,
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I II
ill
TOM KENNEDY
CHARLES EVERS
...deplores 'hate mongers'
.._.______ m m m m m m fl

m
Welfare Department received requests from 65 girls
under 21,
The youngest girl who has come to us was 11,
but there were a few 12-, 13- and 14-year-olds. The
17-19-year-old is the most usual age group seteking
help,*' explains Barbara Schroeder, supervisor of the
Special Services Program of the Child Welfare
Division of the State Welfare Department.
Usually a girl telephones the department, which
is the main referral service for unwed mothers. An
appointment is made for an interview and the girl is
urged to bring her mother. The counselor tells them
about available services, both public and private,
and plans are evaluated and suggested alternatives
are made. There is no distinction made in counseling
regarding race, color, creed or nationality.
If the girl is in the early or middle part of
pregnancy, the usual suggestion is a confidential
living arrangement. Most, however, go to maternity
(SEE UNWED* PAGE 2)
....it***

Amtrica's
Number I
Colbga
Daily

Monday, November 25, 1968

During the question and
answer period, Evers gave his
opinion on a variety of
questions.
He called the recent
Democratic Convention the
most Democratic ever, inside.
Evers said white youths outside
the convention were exposed to



Page 2

* The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 25,1968

Unwed Mother Seeks Understanding I

homes. If funds are not available, the agency takes
care of the bills and arranges for long term or partial
repayment when the girl resumes normal life after
the child is bom.
There were 12 cases during the past year of older
women, divorcees or widows, and these cases are
handled a little differently. Most such women are
living independently from their family and
confidential living arrangements are not necessary,
yet we do offer counseling and guidance,'* said
Mrs. Schroeder.
But for the women under 21 we recommend a
maternity home dose enough for her parents to visit
and be near when the baby is delivered."
This doesn't always work out, and some girls
choose to live with relatives or friends. These are the
cases on which there are no available statistics and
some authorities estimate them to be double the
275,000 recorded figure.;
Mrs. Schroeder points out the advantage of the
maternity home.
There is continuous case-work help, but most
important the unwed expectant mother realizes that
she is not alone in her situation. She is not
completely isolated and finds comfort in the
knowledge that other girls have duplicated her
mistake and self-incrimination is not as severe.
The girl meets others in the same situation, but is
this a one-time situation for most girls? "Yes," say

'' A&p*' && m
Jill|^^m^^^BS : :i. V ly \m 1 Wj
m i g| w JP
W 4ll§| HA ~ iJa 11
i fl f ;T kfl
lIIM fPjy -M* g
Fifnj ; fj a jfl
CARMEN
Debria Brown, star of the Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater's
production of "Carmen", hits a high note in the opera's presentation
here Friday night. See review on page 13.
*J U U otfloUl student newspaper at the University of Florida
and U published five flats weekly except durln* June, July and August when It Is published
*y*~T***! y **** durtn atwtant holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Ualon Building, Urtvarsity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator lx entered
M- Mnnml -cla jatter at Jha United States Port Office at GalnesvUle, Florida, 32601.
,Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or S3.SO per quarter/?
Worida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone at all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectloimble.
The Florida Alligator win not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertlslag
tlslag Advertlslag Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
act be responsible tor more than one Incorrect Insertion at an advertisement
to run several Mines. Notices tor correction must be given before next Insertion.

\ I I iL r nl (> r
L. >

DEPTH REPORT

most of the caseworkers, "but we have had a few
repeaters. Some girls never learn."
Most homes for unwed mothers have planned
days and activities for the girls, for time goes slowly
during the waiting. A UF coed remembered her
time in a state home for unwed mothers.
I was handed a booklet of instructions when I
checked in. This included things like lights out at
11:05 p jn. and the dos and donts. We took turns
preparing different parts of the meals, helped with
the cleaning, did our own laundry and ironing. It
was worse than living in a dorm.
There were courses offered and some of the
high school girls could earn credits for subjects. The
rest of Us learned things like typing, shorthand,
knitting, sewing, sketching and flower arrangements.
"We were told not to discuss our circumstances
or exchange addresses with each other, and advised
not to strike up lasting friendships. This was hard in
away because you grow very dose to a person at a
time when you are reaching out for understanding
rather than being condemned. A girl in your
predicament is the best person to be with when you
are trying to stifle the overwhelming guilt feelings.
For some girls it was their first time away from
home, and they were sick about it. I really felt sorry

AFTER STUDENT PROTEST

Egypt Universities Closed

CAIRO (UPI) Student
unrest spread Sunday to
Alexandria and U.A.R.
Education Minister Hilmi Murad
ordered all universities and other
institutes of higher learning
throughout Egypt closed until
further notice to avoid any
clashes.
Murads order came after
students marched through the
streets of Alexandria to

Evers Deplores r Hatemongers l

BOM M m T
the kind of treatment Negroes
had been receiving for a long
time.
Evers said President-elect
Richard Nixon does not have a
mandate from Negro Americans.
According to Evers, 99 per cent
of the Negro ballots were cast
against Nixon.
"But he's the President now
and I'll respect him as President.

" J
- iwamriseoMTiMEiStt H
Iff SHXKEYS i
M! Jo 'N the sum :

for those kids. The older girls, we were about 19,
sort of looked after the others.
The maternity homes vary in facilities. The
Florence Crittendon Home for Unwed Mothers is
located in South Dade County. It has the look of a
large rambling home set on a wooded street. Before
a girl is accepted by the Crittendon Home, which
has branches in other states, she completes an
application and a medical summary to make sure
she will fit into the program and will benefit from
the experience. Once accepted, she moves into the
home three months before the baby is due.
But once the unwed expectant mother has made
all of the preliminary arrangements, she still must
face the decision which is probably the most
important of her young life. Should she give up the
child for kloption or keep it and raise it herself?
AQ of the anguish of telling her parents, either
facing or hiding from society are small compared to
the giant decision now facing the unwed mother. If
she decides to keep the baby, plans must be made
for care and support and the mother must be
prepared for societys reaction.
If the child is to be placed for adoption,
arrangements must be made with either the State
Welfare Department or the Childrens Home
Society, ethnic organizations which are equipped to
make these arrangements or independent adoption
agencies.
NEXT: Mbkina The Decision.

demonstrate support for
colleagues in the Nile Delta town
of Mansour, where four persons
were killed and scores injured in
student demonstrations last
week.
Police in Alexandria on the
Mediterranean, Egypt's main
seaport and naval base, dispersed
the student marchers. There was
no report of violence.
The cause of growing student

He's got to prove to us that he is
a President of all the people."
Evers received a cool response
when he advocated
death-without trialfor anyone
who kills another human being.
Evers said mandatory death
would eliminate the wave of
killings and assassinations
sweeping the country.
He compared Black militants
to white extremists. I consider
them (Black militants) the same
as I consider the extremes in
your groups, he said.

unrest has not be disclosed.
The_ demonstrations in
Mansour began quietly on
Wednesday, but got out of hand
on Thursday when students and
other elements marched on
the towns security department
and began throwing stones.
About 1,000 police
reinforcements were rushed in
from Cairo to disperse the
demonstrations, detaining 27 of
the students for interrogation.

Youve got your nuts and
weve got some nuts too.
Evers dismissed the Black
Panther Party and their
advocacy of violence as a
joke.
Any militant group, white
or black, will go only as far as
society lets it go, he said.
Violence is wrong. I have no
respect for anyone who goes out
and takes the law into his own
hands, because the only way we
are going to win is
non-violently.



De Gaulles Solutions
To Cost All Frenchmen

See related story page 4
PARIS (UPI) Charles de
Gaulle Sunday night had harsh
words for all and kind words for
none.
Except for his political
lieutenants, few Frenchmen
were likely to be happy about
what their president said in his
10-minute radio address to the
nation which announced a new
austerity program.
Clinging to his pride and
reasserting his determination to
maintain the value of his franc,
the 78-year-old leader
proclaimed flatly that both
latter-day revolutionaries and
financial speculators were
responsible for Frances current
problems.
He then went on to explain
that solutions to those
problems would cost every man,
woman and child in the nation.
Students who triggered the
May-June disorders probably
will be furious. Not only did De
Gaulle blame their rebellion for
beginning the crisis, he
announced the government
would cut expenditures of the
state-run education system.
French workers will be none
too pleased either.
The workers already have
seen the wage irjcreases won by
joining the student rebellion
eroded by inflation and will
regard the new belt-tightening
skeptically.

South Vietnamese Plan
Release Os 140 Viet Cona

SAIGON (UPI) The South
Vietnamese government
announced Sunday it will release
140 Viet Cong prisoners Nov. 30
in a delayed goodwill gesture
that marks the largest prisoner
release of the war.
The government originally
had announced in mid-October
it would release the Viet Cong
Oct. 31, the day President
Johnson ordered a halt in the
bombing of North Vietnam. No
reason was given for the delay
past that date.
In announcing the Nov. 30
date, a government spokesman
said that 40 North Vietnamese
soldiers would remain in
captivity because Hanoi
apparently refuses to make the
acceptance gesture that would
underscore it has troops fighting
in the south.
We will be unable to set

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The French Communist
newspaper LHumanite, widely
read in factories across France,
UpJ
NEWS

CUBANS STRIKE TWICE

Air Pirates Busy
MIAMI (UPI) A Pan American jet bound from New York to
Puerto Rico with 103 persons aboard was commandeered to Cuba by
three gunmen Sunday in the second such hijacking in 18 hours. A
total of 190 persons were aboard the forced flights.
The latest act of air piracy took place about noon as the Pan Am
jet clipper, the Mayflower, droned southward over the Atlantic off
the coast of the Carolinas.
There are three armed Cubans aboard and we arc diverting to
Cuba, the pilot of the Pan American flight radioed the New York
control tower.
The big clipper ship, a Boeing 707 loaded with 96 passengers and a
crew of 7, touched down at Havana Airport at 2:18 p.m. EST, just 10
minutes after another plane landed in Miami with passengers from an
Eastern Airlines 727 which was hijacked over Kentucky Saturday
evening on a flight from Chicago to Miami.
The Eastern Air Lines jet was still being held in Havana late
Sunday, but U.S. officials said they were expecting it to be released
shortly. A State Department official said every effort would also be
made to get the Pan American passengers back immcdiatly so they
would not have to spend the night in Havana.

them free because Hanoi refuses
to acknowledge our offer, the
spokesman said. The Hanoi
govemmenl docs not want lo
admit it has troops fighting in
the south.
He said Saigon had been
trying to release the Norlli
Vietnamese, all recovering from
war wounds, through the
International Control

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launched the counterattack in its
Monday morning edition. It
headlined: He accuses the
workers of being responsible for
the crisis.
De Gaulle also slapped the
wrists of the nation's wealthy
investors. He charged them with
putting their own interests
before those of France and
reimposed the exchange controls
that had been lifted in
September.

Commission or the International
Red Cross.
The 140 Viet Cong will be sei
tree in simultaneous ceremonies
in downtown Saigon, Plciku and
Da Nang, I lie announcements
said.
Officials sa id all the Viet
Cong had chosen lo remain in
Ihc south allhough offered the
choice of altempling lo enter
North Vietnam.

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Monday, November 25,1968. The Florida AMfrtor, I

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 25,1968

FRANC FALL WOULD HURT U.S.
Crisis Hurts All Over

By JAN SCHMALENBERGER
A I|; A ff
m tima tor oilll writer
The United States and Great Britain would hurt
the most if the French currency were to be
devaluated, says a UF economics professor.
Dale B. Truett, assistant protessor of economics,
explained if the franc were devalued, French goods
would become cheaper than those produced in the
U.S. and Great Britain. Therefore there would be
more demand for French goods and less demand for
ours and this would obviously hurt our economy.
The effects of devaluation are hard to predict,
he said. It depends on how the French handle the
situation after the devaluation.
If you don't get at the fundamental causes, it
(devaluation) just won't do any good/' he
continued. 'The economy must be managed very
carefully after devaluation/'
Charles de Gaulle, president of France,
announced he would not devaluate the currency. It
had been widely assumed by financial experts the
French would devalue the franc by a small
amount-between 10 and 15 per cent.
De Gaulle made the announcement after a
three-day meeting of monetary officials in Bonn.
New credits totalling $2 billion were made available
at this time.
With these credits the French will be able to
intervene, or buy back their own francs on the
international money market, Truett said. This will
create more demand for the francs, and lessen the
need for devaluation.
'Too many francs are held by people other than
the French/' Truett said. Pressure by the Germans
might cause the franc to depreciate/'
Truett said French goods are too expensive and
these goods are not being purchased at home or
abroad because goods from other nations can be
bought more cheaply.
The French are importing more than they are

Grape Pickers Friends
Meet To Join Forces
New Party members will meet tonight at 8 in room 347 of the
Reitz Union.
A committee to be known as Gainesville Friends of the California
Grapeworkers will be formed to gain community support of the
gnpeworkers* strike.
The committee plans to talk to store managers concerning the
strike and to present teach-ins to inform the university community
about the situation.
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Room 235 Reitz Union
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exporting, and the francs are being held by other
nations, primarily Germany.
If the French cant create more demand for their
currency, its value will be depreciated. Germany and
other nations will exchange the francs for less than
the current (official) exchange rate. The value of the
francs would be less, although there would have
been no official devaluation.
Faced with this situation De Gaulle has two
alternatives, according to Truett.
The price could go down for the number of
francs asked for the goods (domestic price level in
France goes down), he said, or devaluation-the
price would be the same but now for a dollar I
would give you more francs than previously.
De Gaulle has chosen to try the first alternative.
I might tend to agree with De Gaulle that
devaluation is not the remedy, Truett said. It will
ease some pressure for awhile, but the underlying
causes of the current pressure do not lie in the
exchange rate but in the French economy.
There has been an aura of cooperation" in
Europe because of the Common Market, Truett
said. Members of the Common Market are interested
in keeping Europe's economy sound.
He said Germany has agreed to have some export
taxes, which would make their products more
expensive and would discourage French merchants
from buying so many German goods.
However, if France was forced to devaluate its
currency it would not affect the Germans as much
as the U.S. and Britain. Truett said Germany has
been doing so well in international trade they are
now worried about inflation.
If Frances goods became chaper because their
currency was worth less, French goods would be
more attractive than those of other nations. It
would eliminate Germanys problems of inflation,
but could hurt the other nations.
Truett said the French would have to be careful
not to raise prices on their goods if they devaluated
the franc, as this would create the same situation as
before devaluation.

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Photographers Recalled
For Seminole Pictures

Because the demand of senior
and Greek pictures on the last
day of shooting for Seminole
pictures, photographers have
agreed to return for make-up
pictures the week of Jan. 13,
Jim Moody, Seminole editor,
announced Friday.
All seniors and Greeks who
havent had their picture taken
for the Seminole yet, are urged
to come back the week of Jan.
13, he said.
Appointments will be taken
for Greek blocks, but
independents do not need
appointments, Moody said. This

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Children Os Jail Inmates
Face 'Empty Christmas

Theyre still family people, even though theyre
in jail. Theyve still got children who are going to
cry Christmas morning because their daddys in jail
and cant get them anything, said Edward
MacClellan, Director of the Inmate and Community
Service project at the Alachua County jail.
Right now, one of the biggest problems they
face is an empty Christmas for their kids, he said.
MacClellan has set up a crafts shop for the
inmates where they can make presents for their
children. But we need donations of repairable
items they can fix up for presents, he said.
Used or broken toys, dolls, tools or clothes of
any kind can be repaired and turned into Christmas
presents by the inmates.
The inmates themselves are in need of toilet

AWS Retreat Concentrates
On Pass-Fail, Newsletter

The Association of Women
Students locked itself into
seclusion Thursday night for
three hours of brainstorming and
discussion which the
representatives termed the
most productive retreat weve
ever had.
AWS must organize itself
and the women students of the
UF to center on concrete issues
of importance to them and the
university in general, Joan
Schaffel, AWS President, told
the group of about 50
representatives.
AWS discussed the various
projects with which they might
involve themselves this year.
Among those discussed were a
campaign to abolish freshman
curfew and to establish

Harry likes to
stay right on top
of tilings.
Bl >
jfl t ';.
stop

dormitory autonomy in regard
to open house regulations and
hours.
Working for a pass-fail
system, certain study rooms to
be open 24 hours, and a
motorpool for service projects
which require transportation
were also considered.
AWS will look into the

UF Journalism Fraternity
Names Seven Members
Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalism fraternity has initiated
seven members, five students and two professionals.
Named were students Stanley Saunders, Paul Gladnick, Paul
Ashdown, Ken Anderson and James Dicks and professionals James E.
Couch and William Grove.
Couch is a journalism professor and Grove is news director for
Jacksonvilles WJXT-TV.

articles ranging from combs to toothbrushes, said
MacClellan.
If they dont bring them with them, they dont
get them. Inmates also need warm clothing of any
kind.
An employee at the jail reports that inmates are
working in the yards in short sleeved shirts without
sweaters or coats..
Donations should be made by the first week of
December so that the inmates will have time to
repair them. Donations may be left in the large
cardboard crate on the ground floor of the Reitz
Union or in the area office of the Yulee dormitory.
For large items, phone the sheriffs office at
378-1641 to arrange a special pick up.

possibility of establishing a
check cashing policy at the guest
desk of the J. Wayne Reitz
Union and of starting a weekly
AWS bulletin to inform women
students of the activities open
for them.
Assistant Dean of Women
Loyce Katz and Bill Sadowsky
were guest speakers.

| Blue Key Honorary
j Taps 32 Members
Florida Blue Key leadership honorary tapped 32 new J
members Saturday night.
The new members were tapped for their participation in
either student activities, organizations, or athletics.
$ New members are John Mica, Bill Wack, Allan Casey, :
Thomas Cone, Ed DuPont, Frank Harrison, Ric Katz, Robert :
Mandell, Gregory Mathews, Harold Aldrich, Steven Melynk,
* Michael Moore, John Morton and Bruce Bokor. i
j: Also, Lawrence Nixon, John OShea, Richard Saloman, Jake
Schickel, Larry Smith, Bill Sparkman, Fred Taylor, Lee Terry, :
j Jeff Weathers, Russell Wicker, Dale Willingham, Steve Zack, Bill ;
$ Zewadski, Bob Buck, Bill Sadowski, Armistead Neely, Philip :
$ Burnett, and Jack Homer.
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The last wing of our Came lot Apartments has
just bean completed. These two bedroom
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Our furniture movers are ready to help you
move, free of charge, to your new Camelot
Apartment Home.
Ernest Tew Realty, Inc. I
Professional Property Managers.
Phone: 378-0296 or 376-6461

Monday, November 25, 1968,The Florida Alligator

Page 5



K Tha Florida AMpaor, Monday. Novombar 25,1968

Page 6

UF Debaters
To Attend 3
Tournaments
The UF varsity debate squad
is competing in three
tournaments during the week of
Thanksgiving. Wake Forest
University, Loyola College of
Baltimore, and Georgetown
University will host tournaments
to be attended by Florida
debaters Gregg Mathews, Steve
Rosin, Ralph Glatfelter, and
David Byron.
Wake Forest University is
hosting the Dixie Classic Debate
Tournament on Sunday,
Monday, and Tuesday,
November 24-26. About sixty
teams will represent fifty schools
at Wake Forest.
The Loyola National
Invitational Debate Tournament,
to be held on Wednesday and
Thursday, November 27 and 28,
is next on Florida's schedule.
Only sixteen schools were
invited to this tournament, two
schools from each national
debate district Schools were
selected on the basis of their
past records at certain
tournaments, including the
National Debate Tournament
Emory University and the
University of Florida represent
the Southeastern debate district.
Loyolas tournament is by far
the most difficult tournament of
the three, and is one of the most
challenging tournaments in the
country. There are no
preliminary rounds; all rounds
but the first are sudden-death
competition. With this pattern
of eliminations, the tournament
follows the same scheme as the
National Invitational Basketball
Tournament.
The eight winners of the first
round at Loyola are placed in a
sudden-death championship
bracket to determine the first
and second place teams; the
eight losing teams of the first
round go into sudden-death
eliminations for third and fourth
place honors. The first place
team, then, will be undefeated;
the second place team will have
lost only the last round; the
third place team will have lost
only the first round, and the
fourth place team will have lost
the first and last rounds.
From Baltimore, the Florida
squad goes to Washington, D.C.,
to compete in the Cherry
Blossom Debate Tournament
hosted by Georgetown
University, on Friday, Saturday,
and Sunday, November 29 and
30, and December 1. Two
hundred teams will represent
150 schools at Georgetown.
The schedule for the
Georgetown tournament is the
same as that of Wake Forest
University, with eight
preliminary rounds and four
sudden-death rounds.
Semifinalists at both of these
tournaments will receive
inviations to Michigan States
Tournament of Champions, to
beheld in April.
This years intercollegiate
debate topic is: Resolved: That
Executive Control of United
States Foreign Policy Should Be
Significantly Curtailed.

DROPOUTS
{ what Washed)a pctioHar*..!
| up, samdT? /-who needs I

UF Master Pupil Works Shown

Art professor Hiram Williams has a good case of nerves going this
week.
The normally easy-going artist who displays his work in major
galleries over the nation has just returned from New York City where
he attended the opening of his one-man show in the Lee Nordness
Galleries.
But it is not his own show that is the cause of his jitters. Also
displayed in the same galleries are one or more examples of the work
of selected artists who have studied with Williams during the past 10
years of his teaching career.
According to art buffs, the display of work by teacher and students
simultaneously in the same gallery is a unique honor. In fact, none can
remember it happening before.
Evidently Williams has little cause to worry about the shows.
Although they opened only last week, the critical acclaim already has
been excellent. Dean Albert Christ-Janer of the Pratt Institute School
of Art told Williams when viewing the exhibits that he knew of no
other art department which could produce work of this calibre.
The exhibits remain in the Nordness Galleries through Nov. 30.
W illiams has taught art for the past 10 years, beginning at the
University of Texas and later at UCLA. He has been with the UF since
1960. In 1963, he wrote a book, Notes to a Young Painter, now in
its second edition.
He was chosen a major painter by the American Federation of
Arts and his art is in numerous galleries, including The Museum of
Modern Art, the Whitney Museum and the Nordness Gallery of New
York City, the Ringling Museum in Sarasota, the Allentown (Pa.)
Museum of Art and other national exhibitions.
His current show includes 14 paintings and a series of drawings.
The work of his current and former students displays both painting
and sculpture.
Among the exhibiting artists in his students show are: Dwight
Reike and Gail Baum of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; James Sajovic,

Housing Staff Poll Planned I

The Resident Staff Board,
composed of dorm resident
advisers and section advisers,
plans to poll staff members and
students to determine what
needs improving in the dorms.
Board Chairman Bob Buck
said the surveys wilL be to
evaluate room furnishings and
the general physical maintenance
of the dorms. Staff members are
being polled now, and students
will be surveyed next quarter.
This year, for the first time,
some womens dorms have
section advisers, who serve
more as advisers than
disciplinarians, Buck noted.
S.A.s are in Graham, Hume,
Tolbert, and Rawlings Hall. Most

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are undergraduates, and all are
unpaid.
They should be paid, said
Buck. I think Housing could
find some way to pay them. It
would improve the quality of
the counseling.
The board will be working on
guidelines for the student staff,
to develop their roles.
Also, the board plans to
study the area judiciaries, in
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instructor in architecture; Robert O. Beach, chairman of medical
illustrations; Leonard Weinbaum, medical illustrator and Gaines
Patterson, teaching resources illustrator; all of the University of
Florida staff.
UF students represented are: Gregory Morton, Dominick Tesiorere,
Ronald Chesser,W illiam Massey, and Sally Curtis.
Other former students of Williams in the show are: Paul Fullerton
and Abby Drue, now at the University of Illinois; Clement Penrose,
Pennsylvania State University; Michael Stack, University of Illinois at
Normal, 111.; William Stephens, Appalachian University, Boone, N.C.;
Raymond Stephenelli, Ocala and William Shirley, local artist.
The students exhibit will be changed mid-way to include the work
of other University students Jeffery Dunn, Michael Hitchcock,
Arnold Padula, Charles Le Masters, Betty Rothaus, Robert Tieman,
Lewis Harris, and Dino Lazzo.
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NICK ARROYO
A LITTLE HIGHER PLEASE
Lewis Rothlein and Joy Chutz star in Successful Life of Three,"
one of four one-act plays presented by the Florida Players. The plays,
presented Friday and Saturday have been held over and will be
offered again tonight and Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Constans Theatre.

W HATS
HAPPENING
By OAVIO CHAFIN
Staff Writer
IN ART FOR ARTS SAKE
AND THE C EH
DEPARTMENT: lUCs can
come a little closer to aceing
that final by going to see Florida
Players presentation of an
evening of four one-act plays in
the Constans theater tonight and
Tuesday night at 8.
The four plays are The Long
Goodbye, The Man With a
Flower in His Mouth,
Escurial, and The Successful
Life of Three. The last play
stars that un-American
grape-hater, Lewis Rothlein.
AND SPEAKING OF
GRAPES: Students for New
Party meet tonight at 8 in room
347 of the Reitz Union to
discuss this seedy problem.
IN SNAPPING THE
CISTERS: That happens in
room 123 of the Union tonight
at 7 when the girls in Florida
Cicerones meet there for a
general meeting and for a
Seminole picture-taking session.
IN SDSLESS-SSOC: As all
those who read the Florida
Agitator know, SSOC sacked
SDS last week. As a
consequence, just plain old
SSOC meets tonight in room
357 of the Union tonight at 7.
IN INSPIRING
INDEPENDENTS: Interhall
Council meets tonight at 7 in
room 122 of the Union.
IN GREEK-LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Panhellenic
Judiciary Council meets in room
118 of the Union tonight at 8;
Tau Beta Phi gathers jn room
355 and 356 of the Union at
7:30 tonight; Gamma Beta Phi
slips into room 363 of the Union
tonight at 7:15.

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Arabs Were Right,
Speaker Tells Club

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Grave injustices have been
committed against the Arabs and
amends have never been made,
said Dr. Muhammed Hallaj in a
talk sponsored by the Arab club.
Hallaj is an assistant professor
of political science at
Jacksonville University and did
graduate work at UF. He lived in
Palestine until he was 22. He
moved to America in 1954.
l cant really blame the
Americans or any other people
for being overwhelmingly on the
other side because the Arabs
have never presented their side,
Hallaj said.
He called the resolution of
1947 which deckled Jerusalem a
total failure because the
conflict has become even more
severe, the Jewish problem still
exists, and now the
involvement of the super
powers have made the situation
potentially disastrous.
A grave injustice has been
committed against the Arabs,
the perpetrators of the injustice
refuse to recognize it, and they
are committed to the expansion
of their ill gotten gains Hallaj
said in answer to why the
conflict still exists today.
One of the main injustices
was the denial of self
determination to the Arabs, he
said.
They were promised
independence by the British if
they rebelled against Turkey,
but France and Britain
negotiated secretly to split the
Middle East during WWI, he
stated.
When the Arabs evnlieiflv

'McNamara Finance Plan
To Be Considered Here

The McNamara plan of
accounting which saved the
Department of Defense millions
of dollars when introduced in
1961, is being considered for use
at UF and at other universities in
the state.
Program Planning Budget
System is the project title
which is still in the planning
stage and is not expected to be
operational until 1973, William
E. Elmore, UF vice president for
business affairs, said.
UF and other universities in
Florida submit program planning
on Jam. 17 to the State Qrector
of Planning at Tallahassee.
The new accounting system
features: a record of UF
requirements in procurement
planning; choice of most urgent

asked for the U.S., but refused
EH tain and France to teach
them self-government under the
mandate, they were assigned
Britain and France anyway, he
said.
People forget that Arabs
antagonism to the U.S. is
recent, Hallaj said.
When lands were allocated
under the resolution of 1947,10
per cent of the land was owned
by the Jews, but 54 per cent of
the land, which was the most
fertile, was allocated to the
Jews, Hallaj said.
Hallaj pinned the cause of
these actions on the
emotionalism of the time. In
1947 concentration camps were
still in the minds of the people
he said.
In looking at Palestine
through the haze of tears the
Arabs were forgotten, he said.
The Anglo American
committee was set up in 1946 to
investigate the situation, and he
quoted a member of the
committee named Crum as
writing that based on the
merits of the problem that Arab
position is unanswerable.
But the committee felt the
tremendous suffering of the
Jews and decided that just about
anything they wanted they
should have it continued Hallaj.
As a further aggravation to
the conflict, Hallaj went on to
explain the expansionist theories
of political Zionism.

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goals; choice of alternate goals at
least cost; determine if needs
have been met and forecast
yearly costs.
Elmore says this system will
help UF to prepare requests for
funds to legislators at
Tallahassee.
Further instructions from
Chester Ferguson, chairman of

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Monday, Novambar 25,1065, Tha Florida Alligator,

the Board of Regents, and the
State Accounting Office revision
of practices are items holding
the program up at this point,
Elmore said.
In August of 1965, President
Lyndon Johnson issued a
directive ordering all federal
agencies to follow programmed
budgeting.

Page 7



Page 8

I, Tlw Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 25,1968

EDITORIAL

Let SDS On Campus

The local chapter of Students for a
Democratic Society should be brought on
campus.
In an unexpected move earlier this fall,
the local group of leftist radicals requested
the university to grant the chapter
recognition as an official student
organization.
The issue has been in limbo ever since,
awaiting the appointment of members to the
university committee on student
organizations, which must weigh the
question and make a recommendation to
President Stephen C. OConnell.

The committee is now formed and is
expected to meet soon to decide the campus
fate of the radical oiganization.
We think the committee should grant the
request.
And we hope the president will add his
stamp of approval to the request, despite the
pressures which most definitely will be
exerted upon him by interests outside the
university.
Our suggestion that SDS (which,
incidentally, recently decided to drop SDS
from its name, retaining the name Southern
Student Organizing Committee) be
permitted to join the ranks of recognized
student organizations stems from no great
sympathy with its philosophies.
As a matter of fact, we stand with most
of the rest of the university
community and society, too in
deploring the methods SDS frequently
chooses in attainment of its goals.
We cannot, however, uniformly condemn
all the goals the radical oiganization seeks.
After all, radical reform is not, in itself,
undesirable in every instance.
Particularly when the status quo is
corrupt and decadent.
But the goal of reform and the methods
used to achieve it are quite distinct entities.
Too often, other chapters of SDS in America
have turned to violence as justified means.
And the local chapter carries with it that
stigma of violence and disruption.
It is important to recognize, though, that

Staff Writings l

Mr. Harvey Alper, in the most
recent edition of his column
Tilting Windmills' is indeed
doing just that. He makes certain
broad generalizations and
assumptions which, in fact, have
no basis in reality. Mr. Alper is
invalidly projecting his own
feelings and beliefs as those of a
generation.
As the most blatant example,
he asserts that this generation
has no need and no cause for
worry because it has had all its
economic needs satisfied. It is
true that we do have it relatively
easy financially speaking. We
need not be apprehensive about
where our next meal is coming
from.
However, Mr. Alper makes
the tragic mistake, as do too
many others, of equating
economic security with
psychological and spiritual
well-being. He assumes that since
we are well-off materially we
we at ease. . our fears and
hopes are artificial." No enemy
Malles our land seeking our lives.
Yet he mys this while draft

Enemies Are Around Every Corner

age males live with the fear of
being shipped off to Asia to die.
The spectre of capitalism hunts
out every last vestige of
humanity and leaves in its place
a plethora of tin commodities.
Our universities have become
factories for turning out good,
safe, unthinking middle class
citizens. Racism pervades the
land of the free. Our fellow
human beings are starving,
physically and intellectually, in
our midst. No enemies?
In the past six years, three
national leaders have been
assassinated. Violence is
everywhere in evidence, from
the theater to the football field.
The pressure to conform is great,
and individuality is suppressed.
We are told what we may or may
not read. No enemies?
We are regarded as sick by the
older generation, Mr. Alper
contends, because we do not
have to worry and can thus
spend our time in thinking and
introspection. It is true that
some of us do spend a great deal

national SDS policy may or may not be the
policy of the local group. Arid it is a fact
that the local group has never used violence
to seek change.
True, they have threatened violence.
They have employed disruption (Dow
Chemical protest). But they have never
actually been violent.
In addition to the fact that UFs radicals
do not even begin to approach other such
oiganizations in translating radical theories
into destructive actions, there is another,
perhaps more pertinent reason SSOC should
be allowed on campus.
Too frequently, the deeply-rooted urge to
decimate any system grows out of a lack of
understanding of what makes that system
work. Lack of understanding breeds
contempt and fear, which in turn beget
destruction.
But another and more difficult to
define motivation for overthrow of a
system is derived from the system itself.
America is in such a situation now.
When people are led to believe that the
system is amenable to change and access to
the channels for change are then denied
them, frustration and impotent rage is the
expected result.
If denied the opportunity to participate
in constructive change people who want
reform are compelled either to discard their
hopes or to wrench from the system the
right to be heard. This is happening in
America with the blacks, the poor, the
young.
And it is happening at the University of
Florida.
Given official recognition and a legitimate
voice at the tables of policy and
command in short, given access to the
accepted channels of constructive
change SSOC will not be forced to
consider the alternatives of violence or
disruption.
They have, quietly and respectfully,
requested the university to give them that
chance.
The university should not now turn its
back on the plea.

of time thinking. But this does
not stem from the fact that
there is nothing to worry about.
On the contrary, we think
because there are so many
problems to be solved.
Mr. Alper then puts forward
his own diagnosis of our
sickness." Whatever sickness
we mutually possess comes not
from thinking but from a future
to act." On the contrary, there
has been some action by those
of our generation. It is our
actions that have brought the
storm of invective and hate upon
our heads. In trying to create a
mote humane society we are
cursed and sometimes beaten for
not conforming to the
status-quo.
We acted at the convention
Chicago and got our heaus
busted for it. We act by staging
marches, sit-ins, and protests and
writing and yelling at the tops of
our voices that we're
suffocating. Our ones fall on
deaf ears.
No Mr. Alper, for some of us

The Florida Alligator
# Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
... Managing Editor
Ail
jr Dave Reddick James Cook
Assignments Editor News Editor
.^ m yyyyysyssyyyssssssyyysysyysssss.< { Alligator Inquizitorj
§ By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
v V
* i received an irate letter from a certain Flenny Dill, age :
seven, who complained that I neglect children in my column.
j: So, to Flenny, and all other children who have felt left out, I a
§ dedicate the following childrens poem: Yes, off the wall old :j:
£ Humpty fell/In one swift easy motion./The kings men came, x
I picked up the shell,/and listened to the ocean! §
Gads. Todays questions: S
1. Who is the little baseball-loving girl in the PEANUTS :j:
comic strip? :jj
2. How many orbits did John Glenn make on his historic ;S
journey? U s
3. What is the official university number (Centrex) for §
Student Information? Can you get it on weekends? Why not? |
4. What were the names of Shari Lewis 2 puppets?
5. These questions deal with James Bond:
a) In the book, what kind of car did he own? b) What was his
favorite drink? c) What kind of cigarettes did he smoke? d) Who
sang Goldfinger?
6. Who said, The worst thing that can happen to a pannesan j
cheese, is to bedegrated?
Answers to Friday:
1. baseball and glove (and it was the cooler, not the hot box) |
J 2. fifth, Tippit, Healy 3. Commander Whitehead 4. Rxrcrdale, j
: Andrews, Cooper, Mantle, Lodge, Jones, Midge S. Jesse Umih
: Put a hoo-hah in your mouth today.
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida unriar the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial. Business Advertising offices in Room 330, Reiti Uniae. Brians
392-1*81,392-1682 or 392-1683.
Optoioas expressed in the Florida AUfcator are Hums of trie addon or of
the mkm of the article and not those of the Uahsrritr of Fkxfcte.

action is not at fault. The fault
lies with those who refuse to
hear us and heed our warnings

By Lee Hillike

And it lies with those who refuse
to recognize the validity and the
very existence of our actions.



Speaking Out*

EDITORS NOTE: John Kaufman is an
associate professor of Biological Science at the UF.
Add one more to the list of objectors to the
Universitys continuing policy of selective law
enforcement. As a concerned faculty member who
wishes our university well, I believe that we are
asking for great trouble, not a great university, when
we fail to treat all men impartially.
Lavon Gentry still awaits trial in city court for an
offense committed by others with impunity
countless times before and after his arrest. Another
student is arrested right out of a campus meeting on
a John Doe warrant and the administration
discreetly turns its back. On the other hand, a
fraternity nimble which has to be quelled with Mace
is quietly turned over to the Interfratemity Council.
And a football player arrested for shoplifting has
his trial conveniently postponed until after the
season, thus preserving his eligibility to represent us
all on the field of honor. The administrations
reluctance to make relevant statements on these
affairs only intensifies our feeling that the obvious
and odious conclusions are justified.

Raid Rooters
Lose More
Than Panties
MR. EDITOR:
We would like to bring to
your attention a most distressing
situation regarding the after
effects of the recent panty raid.
There were excessive disciplinary
repercussions in many womens
dorms. Innocent people were
punished for activities which
took place in their rooms while
they were absent.
Several girls congregated in
one room and actively joined in
the fun while one of the rooms
occupants was gone.
Subsequently a baggy-eyed dorm
official surprised the girls. She
later issued offense slips to both
of the rooms occupants while
the other gleeful participants
escaped notice completely.
This incident was repeated
numerous times throughout the
dorms. The punishments meted
out were ridiculously out pf
proportion with the crime
one year probation and a
restricted weekend. One
wonders about the
corresponding action taken
against the male participants.
Incongruously, the police chief
seemed to think it was good
fun.
DISAPPOINTED
AFFICIONADOS
Thanks
Gators
TO UF STUDENTS:
This is a short note to let you
know how much I appreciated
the tremendous weekend that I
spent on your campus during
Operation Appreciation.
Within a month I will be back
in Vietnam with the infantry. It
is hard to explain but the
weekend that I spent at UF has
reassured me of the support that
our troops in Vietnam have in
the United States. I am sure that
I will think back upon that
weekend many times in the
coming months and get renewed
courage in the things I must do.
Thank you again for the
wonderful and inspirational
weekend that you arranged for
me to have.
LT. REGGIE MOORE
FORT BRAGG, N.C.

Will Violence Erupt Here?

OPEN FORUM:
\
Afhiia mi Vla& wt
There is no hope for the complacent man /

You Need The Exercise

MR. EDITOR:
Your latest editorial to
abolish compulsory PE must be
answered. The argument in favor
of academic credit is completely
valid and extremely meritorious.
But I find no equal justification
for the arguments against PE
being compulsory. The analogy
to ROTC is thoroughly
inappropriate as there is
considerable questioning with
respect to the positive value
gained from forced military
training.
This is not true of PE and its
essential benefits of physical
health and future recreation

Os Course You Realize This Is Only Temporary

Is it any wonder that the students and faculty
who care about impartial justice become disgusted?
Do you really expect us to believe that Mr. Gentry
would have been dealt with so harshly if he was a
dean shaven, buttoned-down type, putting up SG or
frat frolic posters? If so, you insult our intelligence.
If not, you are acting with a cynical disregard for
fair play.
Do you honestly believe that the protection of
the University community demanded such drastic
handling of Mr. Gentry? Frankly, I would prefer
stringent protection from rioters and shoplifters
rather than from poster pasters, regardless of their
physical appearance or political beliefs. But the
latter two items seem to have a peculiar importance.
You can polish your image endlessly, Mr.
President, by convening Action Conferences
(wheres the Action?), and by attending dorm
dinners and intramural football games. But just one
incident like the Gentry case puts the lie to an
administration that punishes people according to
who they are, not what they do, and which either
has not the courage to admit and rectify its

possibilities. If anything, most
college students lament the fact
that they are unable to squeeze
more physical exercise into their
busy schedules, realizing the
resulting improvement in terms
of stamina and alertness.*
To say that the University
can require no courses of its
students ignores the wisdom of
past experience and substitutes
the inexperienced guesswork of
the incoming student. This is not
to say the student should have
no voice. Quite the contrary.
Students should constantly and
critically examine required
courses.

But they should demand a
compulsory course be made
voluntary only when it has value
or merit to but a small minority
of the student body. This is
clearly not the case with
compulsory PE. The University
has made a well reasoned
judgment in requiring physical
education of its students.
Its only shortcoming is that it
fails to compensate students for
the time pent by assigning
academic credit hours to it.
Required courses indeed will
always carry a stigma. But this
must not deter educators from
making a commitment to certain
courses as being absolutely
essential for the education of an
enlightened and healthy
graduate.
MICHAEL L. BRYANT, 4LW
Dr. Riker
Responds
MR. EDITOR:
We The Inmates of Thomas
E would like to publicly thank
Dr. H. Riker of university
housing for his consideration in
answer to our letter of problems
in Thursdays Alligator.
Dr. Riker saw fit to come to
our dorm and listen to our
problems. He carefully explained
to us the circumstances involved.
Then he brought about some
prompt relief to those problems
that could be quickly corrected.
Were happy to know that
there are people in the
universitys administration that
wear white hats. Thank you, Dr.
Riker.
THE INMATES OF THOMAS E

Monday, Novombar 25.1968, Tha Florida ANiprtor, I

<=By John A. Kaufman'

mistakes, or just does not care about justice and fair
play.
If you really want to lead us, Mr. President, if
you sincerely want our respect and cooperation,
please begin by withdrawing the charges against Mr.
Gentry and returning his case to campus where it
belongs, and where it can be dealt with according to
the Student Code of Conduct.
Or you can play it cool, maintain a careful
silence, and wait for the storm to blow over. After
all, it is really not much of a blow this time just a
few crank letters, an editorial or two, all soon
forgotten. But someday it may happen here, as it
has elsewhere, that long smoldering resentment over
repeated injustices will break forth in violence and
disruption. I hope not.
If and when that day comes, however, and you
are wondering Why?, try to remember the
pleadings of the cranks who wrote letters and
editorials. They were warning you as friends, not
threatening you as enemies. The message, however,
was the same.

Othello Was
Unenjoyable
MR. EDITOR:
A review of Othello in the
Alligator presented the curious
concept that the production was
a nearly flawless performance
while The only possible flaw in
the performance was the
sound. This seems a
contradiction, for the review of
a play should include all aspects
of the production. Poor
acoustics would necessarily
result in a less than flawless
performance (even when the
author is the Great Bard
himself).
One should allow that a
production by a national
company of a Shakespeare play
conceivably could be
unenjoyable. Othello fit this
description for those seated in
the rear who found it very
difficult to understand any of
the dialogue.
The tinny sounding music
employed only added to the
totally unrealistic effect. The
acting was good, but only to
those in the $2.50 seats. If a
play is to be flawless, it
should at least be audible to the
groundlings in the SI.OO seats.
JULES CAVALIER, 4AS
Lock-In
Ridiculous
MR. EDITOR:
The Alligator's experiment of
having two staffers locked in the
undergraduate library to prove
the security system deficient
borders on the ridiculous. If the
security measures weren't
deficient, $2,000 worth of
stereo equipment wouldnt have
been stolen last month.
DAVID KAMINSKY, 2UC
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator. Monday. Novambar 25.1968

Page 10

VVySfe MAffiSeffiSG MENU MAGIC
MAYONNAISE stock-up
HELLMANN'S DEEP SOUTH ..NOW!
-49 ?
1 THANKSGIVING DAY
Limit 1 Mayonnaise Your Choice With $5 00 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes
MAID CRANBERRY
AlirE O /90< PINEBREEZE
JfIVViDMMMtMIMtZ/ MkW GRADE "A" MEDIUM ALL WHITE FLORIDA
No. 300 Con OCEAN SPRAY CRANBERRY I H
sauce 2/3V f FRESH EGGS i
PUMPKIN 2/25* V *) si J
POTATOES 4/SI. A I
I.. ttOf MfUNG ... Hni kuu .mw..
Ml m lb Inn DANISH *SSOIICD No SOS Cu. THANK YOU WHOU GIASS
Cake Mixes 4/sl. Cookies 99* Crabapple 33*
l3o t DIXIE DARLING mb PfSTIVAt W# W
I 0 io. tSMVAL Mo, OCEAN SPRAY CRANBERRY
!n*'9* 4/sl. Fruit Cake 99' Orange Relish 39
ZSOCt ARROW Mot THANK YOU t. W
fc ~ No ft Con SUNSHINE
PfP er Napkins 29* Apple Rings 37' Spiced Peaches 45
Aluminum Foil 49* Red Pears 33* Stuffing 33*
VICTORY MARASCHINO
CHERRIES 3/sl.
No Con TH IfTY MAID
f LeSueur Peas S BART pears... 3/si.
V A *1 IW U,TDR,NKS 4 /*'-
le REACHES 4/sl.
340 .MitcrATc. cm. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOD THRU NOVEMBER 27
3 Quort MUSCATEL, DRY SHERRY A PORT winn oiiik stores. i*c.-copyright-*
Angelo Wines 79*
Asparagus 49< g§T COFFEE
Niblets Corn 5/sl. Wk £s* 1
Marshmallows 2/49* 1 CAN j y V
Hair Spray 49*
ETO.VtI.Uf IT4MM j fKpy ra.VtuiTsT* \ WwSIUW i FRQf TO.ytiiJstAMM i vfiJTsfjKM j|[jJ| J} vlSXSill j
Ground Beef mcatioaf Shrimpburgers II Chocolate Eclairs |:BiSp a £S"S ; lil Ls 2 :
i, § H ov 17 t y, " U W V 17 3 GOOP eooo thu nov 27 ; oooot oos, Onion Rings
12-oi. TORRIDO 18" ALCOA HEAVY DUTY 8-ot SUPERoi* 1 1
Diaper Sweet Hot Pe PPers . 33 ? Aluminum Foil . 65 ? Sweetner 77 1
39 Hot Sauce .... 25* Utility Bags .... 21* Olive Oil 19*
One Gallon STA-PUF 200-Ct. Pkg. HUDSON FAMILY 2-Lb. MAHATMA LONG GRAIN
Softener Paper Napkins . 35* Whole Green Beans 27* Extra Fancy Rice 39*
s r\f-\ 4-Roll Pkg HUDSON No. 303 Con SUPERFINE
L22 1 Toilet Tissue .. 55 c Limagrands .... 23 f Sliced Sweet Pickles 41*
STOREAT 3428 w7uNIVAVrOPENSUNIOAMTO7PM^ "**



FRESH PORK SALE
ROUND STEAK 98 pork hams 59*
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN PED VZ CARVE OVEN-READY
DIR DA ACT OR/ pork roast 49*
GR. BEEF 5 a *1" EWEBhm...r PORK 101115 w
COPELAND HOT OR MILD BAG m g%l
FRESH PORK SAUSAGE 59* MORTON MINCE MEAT
COOKED HAM... SM9 CURED HAMS B9* |\ I ¥%
dips:::::::::...3/$i. cream cheese .& w rIMIDKIII PIGS A
PIMENTO CHEESE..S9* SUCED BACON 49* I MIM|M%IBB -W J
BISCUITS 3/19* HAMS .352.99 A A
FANCY GOLDEN MMtAM YCUOW
C0RN....10 49' ONIONS 3 a
TOMATOES W APPLES.-5 49'
ORANGES 5 a 59* CELERY 1/3V frozen food
berries...3/si. Orange Juice 6/sl.
PECANS.... $1.79 GRAPES LB 5 9-oj. DtXIANA REGULAR CUT BEANS OR 16oz. TASTE O' SEA
French Beans... 5/>l. Perch Fillet 39
ASTOR GREEN ij,
Cut Corn 5/sl. Fry Petotoes....3/sl.
n. *-. jars** w FSi'fS:::::..j/si.
M Meat Dinners 39* Brussel Sprouts....29
m IA J Beef Steaketts 99* Corn-On-Cob 2/sl.
111 Mir JLV Margarine 4/sl. Green Peas 5/sl.
j our j # p 35* Chop Broccoli... 5/sl.
*/itch fritos .. A Superfine Onions . 25* CatJFood 10* Chips 25* Spray Starch
Boid Hominy . 2/25- Oven Cleaner .... 79- Wt Cocktail .... 31- _s2__
Dog Yummies . 29-Coconut Bore . 39- Fabric Finish
- Keebler Grommy's 49- Greenbean i __jH j _J=*
~ s 2, SaK .' '#. -*> ;* > ~ . , < I # .... .

Monday, November 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE §
GREAT DANE PUPS akc Excellent
Watchdogs SBS and up St. Petersburg
Gainesville call 378-9661 after 5 p.m.
(A-st-42-p)
1967 Norton P-11, 750 cc, under
5000 miles. Excellent cond. S9OO.
FAST. Ph. 376-9832 after 6.
(A-st-44-p)
Honda SSO well cared for, helmet,
tools, new tire, book rack. $175. Call
376-4184 after 5. (A-st-42-p)
1964 Corvair Monza. Excellent
condition., R & H, Automatic
transmission, $650 firm. Call
Micanopy 466-3300 or 466-3288 and
ask for Mrs. Bryan. (A-43-st-p)
Used golf clubs. Big inventory
reduction sale at Country Club pro
shop. Special one set 1968
MacGregor $l5O. Sets from $35. Call
372-0961. (A-st-44-p)
1966 Suzuki 80. Excellent, 3000 mi.
Helmet included. Asking S2OO. Call
372-9260. (A-3t-44-p)
1966 MOBILE HOME 10x44. 1 br.,
ac, heat, set up on shady lot. Jan.
occupancy, call 378-6477 after 5:30
p.m. or see at Lot J 6 Town and
Country. (A-st-44-p)
CAMPER Cab-over topper for
Datsun pick-up truck. Must sale,
$275 or best offer. Call Rich at
466-3123 anytime. (A-3t-44-p)
Complete darkroom professional.
Omega B 8 enlarger 2V4X2W* format.
Lights, trays, and pro easel. Best bid
over S2OO. Call after 6 p.m.
378-9171. (A-2t-44-p)
TENOR SAX: Conn artist model. In
good shape. 378-5112. (A-2t-44-p)
1967 Honda S9O. Just tuned. 5500
miles. S2OO or best offer. Call
378-6042. (A-3t-44-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies.
Custom Reloading. HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340. (A-lt-tf-p)
1967 Austin Healey 3000, 17000
miles, head rests, wire wheels,
overdrive, radio heater, $250 and
assume payments. 378-2162.
(A-st-43-p)
1968 Yamaha 350 well cared for.
Helmet included. Call 372-0148 after
4. (A-st-41-p)
FOR SALE: BMW R6O 1967 only
a little over 3000 mi. Call 372-4625.
(A-st-45-c)
FIVE TICKETS TO MIAMI GAME.
Call 392-9387. Cheap. (A-2t-45-c)
68 Honda 305 Superhawk; excellent
condition, great transportation, fast.
Helmet, bubble shield, tools. Must
sell. Call today: 495-2580 or
495-2374. (A-3t-45-p)
FOR SALE: 4 Reserved seat tickets
MIAMI GAME. Call Bob Edwards
at 376-8144. (A-lt-45-p)
1967 Honda Scrambler 90. Helmet
incl. $195. See at Pinehurst Park, Lot
32 after 5 p.m. (A-st-45-p)
66 Honda 50. Auto clutch, excellent
condition. Helmet included, sl2£.
Call 376-1704 after 6:30 p.m. Ask
for Paul. (A-2t-45-p)
Never used anything like it," say
users of Blue Lustre for cleaning
carpet. Rent electric shampooed
SI.OO Lowry Furniture
(A-lt-45-c) T
GUN: Winchester 22 cal. Like new, 6
months old, only $45.00. Also
motorcycle carrying rack, $20.00.
Call 378-8688 after 5 p.m.
(A-2t-45-p)
FOR RENT |
Spacious air conditioned one
bedroom apartment available in
mid-Dec. Rent payed to Jan. 1. Great
location, many extras. Call 378-9277.
(B-43-st-p)

I ROBBIE'S I
The Best In
M' Au&^M OYSanderichea
[COLOR TV & BILLIARDS]
11718 W. University Ave.|
[ f On The Gold Coast I

FOR RENT $
>: >
MUST SUB-LET: 2 Bedrm Furnished
Apt. at the Summit House. Rent paid
to Dec Ist move in immediately.
Call 376-9688 between 9:00 a.m. &
6:00 p.m. (B-10t-36-C)
Sublet one bedrm. furn. apt. Two
blocks from campus. Available to one
or two coeds Dec. 20 at S6O mo. Call
372-9727 after 11 p.m. (B-3t-44-p)
Sublease 12 wide, 2 bedroom trailer.
Air conditioning and central heat.
Fuii kitchen, fully furnished. Rent
paid thru Jan. 1. Details 378-7235.
(B-st-44-p)
Must sublet two bedroom Gatortown
apt., Jan. to June. Call 378-0308.
(B-3t-44-p)
Modern 2 bedroom, air condition,
heating unfurnished. Available
December 30. $165 per month.
Landmark Apts. Call Achey
372-6535. (B-15t-38-p)
Takeover lease on 2 bedroom Village
Park apt. beginning next quarter.
Rent paid until January 1. Call
378-9788 anytime. (L-st-44-p)
WANTED §
ft. ... ... ¥
A male roommate to share a two
bedroom apt with two others. $41.66
per month, directly behind Norman,
1125 S.W 7 Ave, anytime after 4
p.m. (C-st-42-p)
2 Male roommates to share 2 br.-2
bath Gator-Town apt. beginning
winter quarter. Phone John or Bob
378-8657. (C-43-st-p)
Mae roommate to share new 12 wide
mobile home. Private bedroom. $35
plus utilities. Pinehurst Park, Lot 132
after 5 p.m. (C-st-45-p)
Wanted: one coed roommate to share
2 bedroom apt. in Landmark
beginning Winter Quarter. Call
Debbie, 378-8033 anytime.
(C-4t-45-p)
One female roommate to sublet 2
bdrm. FQ apt. starting January. Call
Rita, Betty or Gail, 378-0279.
(C-st-45-p)
2 female roommates to share 2
bedrm. Landmark Apt. beginning
Winter Quarter. Great location. Call
Pris at 378-8438 or Sandy at
392-7659. (C-st-45-p)
2 senior girls want 1 or 2 bedroom
house or apt. with good kitchen for
next two quarters. Call Barbara:
378-7232 after 3. (C-3t-45-p)
Roommate getting married must
sublet 2 bedroom AC apt. close to
campus. Call 378-6608, (C-3t-44-p)
Wanted: 3 female roommates for 2
bedroom townhouse. Williamsburg
Apt. Poolside. Prefer graduate
students or over 21. Call Jackie
378-3345. (C-st-44-p)
Do your thing to free this university.
Send original art, creative writing,
essays to CROCODILE, Box 13157,
Univ. Station. Call 376-5044.
(C-st-44-p)
Memberships available for Triangle
F lying Club. Low cost flying with
premium equipment. Cherokee 180
oval Nav-Com, ADF, Auto-pilot, call
378-2431 for further information.
(C-4t-44-p)
*. £
Now or Jan. 1 Mar., female to
share new 2 bdrm. mobile home, AC,
central heat, tv, etc., $45/mo. & V*
Utilities. 378-5230. (C-st-44-p)
Female roommate wanted for 1 bdrm
apt. near campus. Occupancy Dec. 1.
378-9444 Please keep trying if no
one answers. Cathy and Marsha.
(C-43-4t-p)
Fourth female roommate needed
from Jan to June. Furnished 2
bedroom apt. at Village Park. Rent
paid thru Dec. Call Janet 376-3107.
(C*43-7t-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 25,1968

WANTED
2 girls want ride far north as possible
Dec. 22 or 23. Will share expenses.
Call Kathy 372-5189. (C-st-44-p)
HELP WANTED i
% v
~ y
Collection Clerk 111 $4,000 per year.
Call Mrs. Hogg, 2-0393. Campus
Credit Union for appointment.
(E-44-ts-c)
Hey! Need a job? If you can operate
sound or light equipment we want
you for regular evening work. Apply
at Student Activities Desk, 3rd Floor,
Reitz Union. (E-43-st-c)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nations 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person, Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
Like movies? Want to review for the
Alligator? Turn in a review of any
movie in town the day after it opens
to the entertainment editors desk,
third floor Reitz Union. We will call
you. (E-tf-38-ACO
Women Girls: Telephone & survey
work part-time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t^31-p)
WANTED: Experienced waitress,
night shift. Jerrys Restaurant North.
1505 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
(E-37-10t-c)
20 men and women part time to
deliver to local area. Must have auto
and know city. Apply 14 E. Univ.
Ave. Upstairs offices 1 and 2.
(E-38-10t-p)
Responsible students needed for
managerial work on campus. Night
hours, regular work. Apply at
Student Activities Desk, 3rd floor,
Reitz Union. (E-43-st-p)
WANTED: Carhops night shift.
Apply Jerrys Restaurant North.
1505 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
(E-37-10t-c)
Part or full-time work on campus.
Flexible hours. Needed: ID checkers,
and door control help. Must be 21,
apply student activities desk, 3rd
floor,Reitz Union. (E-st-45-c)
1w;%\wv.v..: > :.;.x.:.:.>v.v.-.v..Av..;.: | AUTOS |
'V*:*x*x x-:-v-v.
Porsche 900 series owners 1 set new
raybestos racing pads, 2 marchal
headlamps, Porsche wood steering
wheel, rubber bumper guards.
378-5112. (G-2t-44-p)
64 MGB Ecstatic driving, midnite
blue, wire wheels, R&H, new tires,
for the enthusiast on a budget,
$1145. 378-6917. Handled with
TLC. (G-4t-nc-45)
* enMP THRU*
* Mfll WED.*
e-f-* kla kL vL* fcta S.L
I-'---i.-^
| ire 704
3:35
i
THE
BOSTON VH
STRANGLER meSSne I
RrfEowEVDS
Alice B.ltoKiasf
| SUGGESTED FOB MATURE AUDIENCES I I
I

v.-.-x-.-iv.-iv.-.-.-x-xxx-X'X-x-x-v.vv
AUTOS
>
1960 TR-3, red, excellent cond. New
seats, tonneau, & windows, good top.
Call Bob, 372-7418, S6OO.
(G-3t-45-p)
| LOST A FOUND |
Vicki identification bracelet found
on Theta Chi lawn. Claim at
372-9283 or 378-0280 and identify
second name on bracelet. (L-3t-44-p)
REWARD: Dark brown wallet.
Initials SLB. Irreplacable
identification. Please contact Stu
Berkley 392-8710 or Box 20-344
Hume West. (L-43-st-p)
Lost: black wallet, all IDs. Reward
for return. Please call Bob Russo,
378-6042, Apt. 28, Williamsburg
Apts. (L-3t-45-p)
'*X'X*x # x! # yv*v%v*%%*w x*x # x*y*''vvv/*
PERSONAL
For FUN and credit tour Europe
June 16 July 20. Leysin, Rome,
Brussels, Paris, London. JET over
CRUISE back NY. Age 17-21. $750
total no hidden costs. Call Mrs.
Esposito 376-4284 now! (J-st-44-p)
NEW YEARS IN NEW YORK Spend
part of your vacation in fun city.
$l6O covers trip, hotel, meals and
entertainment specials. Call 392-1655
or ask at Rm. 310 Union. (J-st-44-p)

LOOK FOR THIS
SIGN IN THE WINDOW
qSJJ wp
iN GW^
PATRONIZE
GATOR ADVERTISERS

f PERSONAL
Â¥ $
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
Uni""
Mature, responsible male wanted to
share Landmark Apt. Beginning Jan.
$45 mo. plus utilities. 378-6973 after
5 p.m. (J-43-st-p)
SAVE money . dont sacrifice
quality. Try ZIF all purpose cleaner
. if you have somethinq to clean Zif
wifi clean it better & cheaper than
anything else or your money
BACK. Call 378-8787 for free
demonstration. (J-43-2t-p)
3 2nd year Med. students desire a
co-ed to cook week day evening
meals. Terms to be arranged. Call
376-0285 after 10 p.m. (J-st-44-p)
Pottery, photos, pictures and posters.
Many unique and unusual items at
Michel Delving. 1623 W. University.
Nice. (J-st-44-p)
Free beautiful gray and white male
cat, house broken. Must get rid of
immediately. Call 392-9432 or come
to rm. 132, Jennings, anytime.
(J-3t-44-p)
|N.W. ll* ST. 372-952! I
Relax!
a movie!
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
A MARTIN MANULIS Produciton
Duffy E^i
STARP-NG AMES I llilifliiljlS
COBURN
MASON FOX [HW
AND i ~ ~1
" U Wnm# M TECHNICOLOR [<|J|
YORK
ALSO AT 9:00
"ANZIO"
ROBERT MITCHUM



- - '..v.v.m.m:*
CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL |
x $
$lOO reward for information laading
to the recovery of guns taken from
apt. 126 Landmark Sat. night and
conviction of guilty person(s). Call
376-5694. (J-4t-44-p)
KECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europes
most famous campuses. For info, call
392-1655 or come by 310 Union.
fj-18t-36-cT
We think the Brothers and Pledges of
Phi Kappa Tau are the greatest! Our
thanks for Wednesday night. Love,
LSOTL (J-lt-45-p)
Bobby, youre beautiful. Found and
lost you at the rally. See you in the
Plaza. (J-st-45-p)
Dear Ben, thank you for a most
wonderful year. Be ready for G.G.s
tonight. With all my love,
(J-lt-45-p)
Dear Lambda Chi Alpha: Just to
keep things cricket (J-lt-44-p)
HELP! I need a ride to and from
California over Xmas vacation. Any
assistance appreciated. 376-7402.
(J-Jt-45-p)
Janet: no matter what ever happens,
we will always love you. Big Brother
and the Holding Company.
(J-lt-45-p)
$ SERVICES
* $
Experienced typist. Reasonable rates.
Telephone 376-0406. fM-st-44-p)
GERMAN LESSONS and/or tutoring
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(M-3t-44-p)
Trouble solving problems in ESM
301, EE 301, MS 301-4, PS 215-6?
For fully explained solutions, mail
self-addressed, stamped envelope,
problems plus 25c per pblm to Max
Drew, 1225-418 SW First Ave. 1 day
service. (M-2t-45-p)
Looking
Used Car?
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autos
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My office is small. My business is
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526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus station. 378-4480. (M-18-ts-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-lt-45-p)
[movie audiencel
*******QU|D E*******
A SERVICE OF FILM-MAKERS
AND THEATERS.
These ratings apply to films
released after Nov. 1,1968
THIS SEAL
in ads indicates the film was
submitted and approved under
file Motion Picture Code
of Self-Regulation.
[jjO Suggested for GENERAL
audiences.
@ Suggested for MATURE
audiencee (parental discre discretion
tion discretion advised).
RESTRICTED Paraona
under 16 not admitted, un unless
less unless accompanied by parent
or adult guardian.
(x) Persons under 16 not ad admitted.
mitted. admitted. This age restriction
may be higher in certain
areas. Check theater or
advertising.
Printed as a public service
by this newspaper.

ENTER THE
plttitocrstt]!
FOOTBALL CONTEST j
PRIZE: $25 n Men's or Ladies' Wear ||
EXTRA $lO if winner is a girl
Place an X" in the box of the team you think will
win Saturday, Nov. 30 Estimate total y&ds to be
gained by Florida, which will be the tie breaker.
Home Team Visiting Team
- *1 A QAM a D AUBURN
c| L nmrl! A MIAMI
C1 FLA STATE G HOUSTON
a SOUTHERN CAL NOTRE DAME
OKLAHOMAST OKLAHOMA
n rPORPIA r GEORGIA TECH'
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a2T? N coll d HOLY cross
ARMY o mawu
n BAYLOR rice
ARIZONA KlUt
AKI UI>IA 0 ARIZONA STATE
Gained by FLORIDA I I
Winner's Signature Must Agree With
Signature On Entry Blank.
Entries must be deposited in the "U" Shop by Fri.,
Nov. 29 In case of tie, prizes will be divided equally
among winners.
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
m Inttwraitg iMjnp
1620 West University Avenue university plaza
SIGNATURE
ADDRESS -
CITY STATF.
ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSON

'Carmen -- Lively Success

By MEDA NEIMAN
Alligator Reviewer
The Goldovsky Grand Opera
Theater provides talented young
singers with opportunities to
gain the performing experience
essential to their future success.
Considering the limitations of
performing inf a gymnasium on
folding tables, the Company
brought off Bizets renowned
opera Carmen with lively
success.
Carmen, as interpreted by
Negro opera star, Lfebria Brown
was quite an assertive character,
reminding one of the proverbial
army sergeant. However she
HHjb JR
DEBRIA BROWN

GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA

knew her part wefl and sang with
sincerity and enthusiasm.
Don Jose, Carmens
soldier-lover, was aptly
portrayed as the jealous country
boy by tenor Thomas OLeary,
who is making his debut in this
role.
The most authentic character
portrayal was by bass Harvey
Hicks who played the part of
Escamillo, the toreador, dashing,
daring, irresistible.

Homecoming 6B
',->- .*'-. &
JfijM ;; '>' '"£" -V- i-.... >--'-V : ><&..- -?. .' .' ' ":' '.,! -'BIB-'
S#
bpPvl m
Color
I
V
, Beauty
b BBRbBBBI
Wfflm wni *'
| : /^B
M Excitement
Remember
Reserve Your
1969 Seminole
Now
Five Dollars For
X Years Memories
8-4 P.M. Weekdays
Room 330, Reitz Union

Monday, November 26,1668, The Florida Alligator,

Goldovsky began his musical
career during the Russian
Revolution of 1917. Today he is
identified as opera's most
articulate champion and most
enterprising producer.
The basic creed of the
Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater
(a unified and homogeneous
musical and theatrical style) was
amply demonstrated as they
performed Carmen for the UF
Friday night.

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligbcor, Monday, November 25,1968

ORANGE AND BLUE GAME TUESDAY
Three Lettermen Lead Cagers

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UF returns to the basketball courts this season
with less heighth and experience but more speed
and better shooters.
Gator fans can get a preview look at the UF
Cagemen by attending the Dollars for Scholars
Orange and Blue game. It will be Tuesday night at
7:45 in Florida Gym.donations will be taken at the
door $1 for adults, $.25 for students.
The Gators lost three men at the end of last
season, Gary McElroy, David Miller and Mike
Rollyson. McElroy and Miller, at 6-foot-7, were
both starters while Rollyson was the Gators
number six man.
If the Gators are going to improve on their 15-10
record of last season they are going to have to get
fine performances out of newcomers Ed Lukco,
Todd Lalich and Nick Fotiou, who all have shots at
starting positions.
We expect to have a good basketball team this
season, one capable of beating the best, Head
Coach Tommy Bartlett said. How good we will be
depends on the play of our newcomers and our
shooting consistency.
Injuries and sickness has slowed the pre-season
practice sofar, but aJiealthy squad is expected for

COACH TOMMY BARTLETT
Coach Bartlett has compiled a 37-14 record in two seasons at the
Gator cage helm. He came here from an extremely successful career as Httl
a small college head coach and assistant coach at Tennessee.
Bartlett, 38, graduated from Tennessee where he was captain of the
Vols basketball and tennis teams his senior year. ED
BOYD I 14 years of coaching, dubs with which Bartlett has been LUKCO
WELSCH associated have compiled an 185-55 record. J|
m mv* '6B3 s fan rv /£ -/ j jf a
' FKOSH CAGE TEAM
... seated, Lto R: Coach Jim McCachren, Roger Jones, Jim Below, Darryl Ceravolo, Kevin Rinehart Hal
Kelley, Coach Tommy Bartlett, standing, L to R: Coach Dick Davis, Scooter Houston, Cliff Cox. Gary
Waddell, Dan Boe, Frank Wattenbarger, Student Assistant Dave Miller.

Tough SEC Schedule Faces Frosh

By RONNIE DOYLE
Alligator Sports Writer
UFs Freshmen basketball
team soon enters the toughest
freshman schedule in Florida
istory.
In the past we have only
played one other Southeastern
Conference freshman team
Georgia, said Freshman Coach
Jim McCachren. But this year
we have added Vanderbilt,
Tennessee, Kentucky and
Alabama.
These additions to the
schedule will not only allow us
to see the frosh players from the

other SEC schools, but it will
also give our boys a chance to
play in some of the bigger
gymnasiums in the South,
McCachren added. This way
they will not be overwhelmed by
the crowds and the noise when
they play on the varsity as
sophomores.
We feel like this years 23
game schedule will be the
toughest schedule in Florida
history and perhaps the hardest
schedule for a freshmen team in
the nation, Varsity Head Coach
Tommy Bartlett said.

the season opener in Jacksonville at the Florida
Roundball Classic on Dec. 6 and 7.
Boyd Welsch, Mike McGinnis and Kurt Feazel,
veterans returning to the team, are competing with
the three newcomers for the two positions open.
All-American Neal Walk will be starting at center
and will be much stronger at 6-foot-10,240 pounds.
Walk is jumping higher this year and should improve
on his record 19.8 rebounds per game of last season.
Our main strength will definitely be in the
return of All-American Neal Walk, Bartlett said.
Neal wants to have a great senior year and has
worked very hard. It will be hard for him to
improve on his excellent statistics of last year but
we feel he will be a first team All-America.
Also back for another season are starters Andy
Ownes, forward, and Mike Leatherwood, guard.
Owens is a good offensive player and is working
hard to improve his rebounding and defense.
Leatherwood. the team quarterback, is an

Freshmen have been
practicing with the varsity since
October IS.
This years freshmen team is
led by seven scholarship boys.
Tallest of these is 610 Gary
Waddell from Lexington, Ky.
Gary has been improving
day by day, said McCachren.
With the help of Neal Walk and
Andy Owens, hes learning some
new moves and a lot of little
things a good college player
needs to know.
Playing center in the Baby
Gators 1-3-1 offense is 6*B Dan
Boe from Rice Lake, Wis.

This boy is really a fine
rebounder. Last year in high
school, he grabbed 52 rebounds
in one game, McCachren said.
The wing men are Clifford
Cox, 66, from Deland and
Scooter Houston, a local boy
from Lake City. Both of these
boys are good outside shooters
and good ball handlers according
to McCachren.
Point man and playmaker for
the squad is 5*9 Daryl Ceravolo
from West Palm Beach.
Also on scholarship are Tim
Dominey from Vienna, Ga. and

experienced playmaker who has improved his
shooting.
We will be playing quite a few boys early in the
season to find out who our best are, Bartlett said.
But after that we will play according to the
situation, either five men or ten depending on how
it works out.
The Southeastern Conference has improved, it
will be a stronger league with more balance. It has
been rated the strongest conference overall in the
nation.
Vanderbilt and Kentucky are co-favorites for die
championship. They will be chased by a strong
Georgia team a better Auburn team and Tennessee,
always strong will be up that. LSU, centered
around Pete Maravkh, should be better and
Mississippi State has its entire starting team
returning.
As usual our Southeastern Conference schedule
will be a rugged one, Bartlett said. Kentucky,
Vanderbilt, Tennessee and Georgia should be the
front runners, but any team in our league,can beat
you.
The Gators must play every SEC team twice plus
Boston College, a post-season tournament visitor
every year, Wisconsin and Northwestern, Big Ten
powers, and Bucknell, Furman and West Virginia, all
have experienced squads with winning records last
year.

Hal Kelley from Pensacola. Both
have had early season injuries
and have not been able to
practice as much as the other
players.
Not on scholarship, but
adding solid depth to the squad
are Jim Below, Roger Jones,
Kevin Rinehart and Robert
Ronne.
At present, all of the boys
need a lot of improvement on
defense, particularly
man-to-man, McCachren said,
but we hope to be ready by our
first game.



By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Conwpondont
p>
Ira Pollack quarterbacked the TEP football team to its
22 consecutive victory and fourth straight championship
with a 32-13 win over SAE Thursday afternoon.
v v. ;
TOMKENNEDY
POLLACK ROLLS
... TEP quarterback rolls out and runs for one of four TD's.

Delay Exams
For Liberty
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UPI) The
Liberty Bowl selection
committee announced Sunday
that Virginia Tech would return
for its second appearance in the
post-season classic-this time
against the University of
Mississippi.
Bowl general manager A.F.
Bud Dudley, said Virginia
Tech President T. Marshall Hahn
Jr. accepted the bowl invitation.
We are with this
fine recognition of the high level
of success achieved by our
football team and coaching staff
and welcome the national
exposure participation in the
Liberty Bond will bring to the
university and its athletic
program, Hahn said.
VPI, located at Blacksburg,
Va., i has compiled a 6-3 record
for the season with a final game
to play against Virginia Military-
Institute Thanksgiving Day.
The nationally-televised
Liberty Bowl will be played in
Memphis Memorial Stadium
Dec. 14.
VPI dropped a Liberty Bowl
game 14-7 to Miami in 1966, the
second year the bond was played
here.
We are very pleased to have
Virgina Tech in our bowl
again, Dudley said. They are
highly regarded with big wins
over Florida State, West Virginia
and South Carolina.
Tech this season has also
defeated Wake Forest with losses
to Alabama, Kansas State and
Miami.
Hahn said the faculty and
students had already voted to
change examination schedules so
that the Liberty Bowl invitation
could be accepted immediatly.
The Air Force Academy team
would be in the midst of
examinations and had decided
not to consider bowl games.

TEP Glides Past SAE, 32-13

THE TROUT.
You are about to be hooked.
With a special kind of bait: a special kind of music. The kind of music
that says hand-wrought rather than mass-produced. The kind of
music that can only be created by genuine musicians saying
what they really think in their own musical idiom.
The Trout. They go after your mind and surround it with
their songs. Songs which skip cruddy, contemporary hangup
syndromes and talk about universal, timeless things. Like love
and desolation and places and moods and understanding.
Songs which conjure up images
IBB* jffyl.
MGM
records
MGM Records is a division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.

TEPS LEAD ORANGE LEAGUE

Pollack, playing in his third
year, threw for three TDs and
ran for one more. The only
other TIP score was on a 10
yard run by Rick Perillo.
The TEPs moved to a 14-0
early lead as Pollack hit Dmny
Melker on a 10 yard scoring pass
and then ran one in for the
second score.
SAE came back with a
scoring toss from Quarterback
Ed Cimino to Rick Kirby. Mike
Rollysons diving catch for the
extra point narrowed the score
to 14-7 at the half.
After an SAE punt at the
opening of the second half,
Pollack hit Perillo on a 40 yard
bomb to open the gap to 20-7. It
was Perillos eighth TD grab of
the year.
The SAEs, however, struck
back quickly as they marched
down the field and scored on a
30 yard pass to Kirby. The Es
missed the point after and the
score remained 20-13.
Pollack once again brought
his team back and they scored

on a *broken play* run by
Perillo. This drive was kept alive
by a crucial third -and-five bullet
catch by SteveUhlfelder.
IT"'
A
Hh H|||l
gotcha"
... Paul Mitman, TEP, grabs the
rag of an SAE to thwart the SAE
drive.

Monday, Novombar 25,1988, THo Florida AlNprtor,

Last TEP score came on a
long bomb to Larry Newman
which covered 40 yards.
While SAE spent the
afternoon trying to defense
Perillo, TEPs glamour receiver,
Pollack threaded the needle to
his other ends.
In a manner that
characterized the TEP season,
not a pass was dropped and
Pollack threw only three bad
passes all day.
The TEPs have now moved
into the lead for the Presidents
Cup as first quarter activity has
come to an end. The TEPs lead
Beta by only five points but
both frats have opened a 60
point lead over the rest of the
league.
The BETAS won swimming,
went to the semis of volleyball
and won two football games
enroute to 350 points. Five
points in swimming and
championships in football and
volleyball have given the TEPs
the five point edge.

Page 15



Page 16

(TKa Cinrldo A Mt A a* j at- m 4AOA
f lal rlOflua AllvyolOr, Fnofvoy # ivOVVfTID6f

IFrosh Lead 1
Harriers To I
I State Title II
A Cross Country squad
dominated by freshmen came
back from Tampa with the state
champion title Saturday.
UF captured five of the first
ten places, yet gave up the front
spot to Florida State.
Finishing second for UF was
freshman lack Nason, with a
time of 21:26. He finished half a
minute behind FSUs '( e*n
Minser.
Florida freshmen also took
third and fourth places. John
Brown came in third, with a
time of 21:33, and Roy
Benjamin finished fourth, a
second behind Brown at 21:34.
Nick Caswell, also a
freshman, took eighth place on a
time of 22:04. Finishing tenth
was junior John Parker. Ken
Burnsed and Steve Atkinson
finished 11th and 13th.
Florida States entries
finished first, seventh, 12th,
14th, 16th, and 18th. Only the
top five finishers from each
school are figured into the
scoring.
South Florida harriers took
the fifth, sixth, ninth, 15th,
19th, and 20th places. A lone
Miami runner finished 17th in
the meet.
Point totals from the meet
gave Florida the winning low
total of 27, as compared with 50
for FSU, and 53forUSF.
Asm
. #< JB. JBBf
iMB|Bp- iPH
'JFj JjjM
JACK NASON
finishes second
Miami Quote
A prominently known
University of Miami football
player was reached for comment
late Sunday on the upcoming
UF-UM game.
I didnt know we even had a
game this weekend, well if we do
and its against Florida, then at
least Ill have a good dessert for
my Thanksgiving dinner.
MAULDINS
AUTO
GLASS
Foot attention to inauranw
Wms for cars, truck* and
FREE ESTIMATES
323 N.W. 6th ST.
376-2568
East Side ACL Depot

Pi Lams
MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
and
STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Corraapondant
Pi Lambda Phi pledges
downed the Tau Epsilon Phi
pledges, 25-19, in a game that
was decided in a sudden death
period Sunday.
The score was tied 19-19
when time ran out. TEP won the
toss of the coin and elected to
take possession for the ball, first
team to score wins.
. *' o
This is the third time the
game has been decided by a
sudden death play-off, Pi Lam
winning two and TEP one.
Pi Lam has won the pledge
game three years in a row.
More than 500 spectators
cheered until the final play in
this traditional rivalry between
TEP and Pi Lam.
On the third play of sudden
death, a pass from TEP
quarterback Mike Moransky was
intercepted by Richard
Rivenbark, who scampered 30
yards for the winning
touchdown.
Pi Lam scored first on the old
flea-flicker play. Little 5-foot-6
Bobby Shack took the pitchout
from Etarry Myerson and raced
30 yards for the score.
Greg Eppelman took a 25
yard pass from TEP quarterback
Bart Block and the score was
7-6. The TD drive consisted of
two plays.
j-
Pi Lam quarterback Charles
Greek Stampelos led the team
down to the TEP 15 yard line.
Stampelos faked a pass and then
ran for the touchdown.
The first half ended with Pi
Lam leading 13-7.
The second half began with
TEP moving in for another score
on three plays, then holding the
Pi Lams and going ahead on
another five plays, 19-13.
TEP scores came on a 25 yard
pass to Phil Albert and a 10 yajxL yajxLpas
pas yajxLpas to Barry Goldwater. (
With three minutes leftto
play Pi Lam moved to the TEP 5
yard line on a series of short
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IN ANNUAL PLEDGE GAME

'Nose Out Teps, 2s-19

passes to Robert Walkholder,
Myerson and Steve Rokeach. Pi
Lam scored on a 5 yard toss to
Hf / Iht
WINNING TD
Rivenbark returns
interception for winning TP.

4E)VOtKSWAGf H Os XMCmCA, INC.
W, .. M
: ; : M/v/s.v?s. v.
\ \\vCv. §f 'mm i|
Finally.

Now you can do what you
never did before in a Volks Volkswagen:
wagen: Volkswagen:
Nothing.
Yup. Weve gone and put a
fully-automatic transmission in a
Volkswagen.
In fact, we put it in two Volks Volkswagens
wagens Volkswagens (as an option). The Fast Fastback.
back. Fastback. And Squareback.
So now you can-drive any anywhere
where anywhere in a VW without having
to shift for yourself.
Just put the lever in 3. (What
everyone efse calls DRIVE.) And
drive. Like you would any reg regular
ular regular car.
Except with our automatic,

MILLER-BROWN
4222 NW 13th ST. | 'O'
ONE MILE NORTH OF THE MALL Motors, n C.

Phil Borsja, but failed to get the
winning extra point.
TEP took over and completed
...
y '" L (Li '4-;!^Mb^!^6fl
's***- A .\ *"
wail
FIRST TD
. . Speedy Shack scampers
down the sidelines for the first
Pi Lam score.

youll have to do one you
don't do with someone elses
automatic:
Stay away from gas stations
more often.
Because youll need gas less
often. One gallon takes you not
10 miles. Or 15.
But 25 miles.
So now you can do what you
aftvays did before in a Volks Volkswagen:
wagen: Volkswagen:
Save money. Automatically.

a 45 yard pass to Goldwater
before throwing two incomplete
passes as time ran out.
Pi Lam defense was stubborn
all afternoon holding TEP on the
short plays and coming up with
four interceptions, while the
TEP safeties constantly
prevented Pi Lam from
connecting on the bomb.
The game was not marred by
personal fouls as it had been in
the past. At the end of the game
Pi Lam President Allen Soden
and TEP President Barry Maltei
met at mid-field and shook
hands.
Titairs
, / Your Gooocotor V
| OVERHAULED Sdocml 'i
U£so 1
INCUMt
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ALACHUA COUNTY
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MON.-TRI. AM.7SM SAT. TIL S PM
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