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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
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Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
9
'Gator Go May Move Off Campus

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator oun wmer
. Negotiations for the ownership
rights to Gator Go, a fortified,
high-protein milk drink
presently sold only on the UF
campus, are now being
conducted with an Atlanta firm.
And, say the two professors
who worked jointly to develop
the drink, no controversy over
ownership rights is expected if
the rights should be sold to a
firm outside the university, in
contrast to the discussion that
arose over the rights of Gatorade
this fall.
Dr. Everett L. Fouts,

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 41

BY STUDENT SENATE
Voluntary PE
To See Vote
By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writer
A Student Government resolution to make Physical Education a
voluntary subject and assign academic credit hours to it will go before
the Judiciary Council and Student Senate Tuesday night.
Physical Education had been a required course for graduation at
UF for most of its history. No academic credit had been assigned the
course although it is required for graduation. The SG resolution, if
passed, would reverse this system.
Secretary of Student Activities Bruce Harlan wrote the resolution
with support of Student Government. Harlan said he felt the
resolution. would be adopted by the Senate, but might meet
opposition from other committees.
Harlan listed several reasons for the resolution. His main point was
the amount of time students at PE class without receiving credit.
I dont think the benefits of the program are sufficient, Harlan
said. Increasing academic pressure and the amount of credit hours
needed for graduation were another of Harlans reasons for making
the resolution. Harlan said he hoped the resolution would result in a
better P.E. Program.
The resolution will go from the Senate to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell for consideration and possibly to Action Conference for
approval. OConnell will make the final decision, Harlan said.
Dean Dennis K. Stanley of the College of Physical Education and
Health said he had heard nothing of the resolutionand preferred to
make no comment until he reviewed it completely.
Dean Franklin A. Doty of University College said he had heard of
the proposal. Doty said that Harlan had asked him for his opinion.
I feel Physical Education is necessary for all young people from
18 to 20, but I would agree with giving credit to the course, Doty
said.
Chairman of the Action Conference, Dr. Hal G. Lewis, said he
didnt want to make any statement, but felt P.E. was important and
was hopeful students would stay enrolled in the course.
Dr. Corbin Carnell, chairman of the Cmricuhim Task Force of
Action Conference, said his committee was working on a proposal to
be presented in January concerning Physical Education.
Carnell said Major Russel Ramsey, assistant professor of Army
ROTC and ex-Chairman of the Action Conference, has done extensive
research on the subject. Ramseys information will be used in the
Action Conference proposal Carnell said.
I have felt for a long time that credit should be given for Physical
Education, Carnell said. He declined to make any statement on the
resolutions plan to make Physical Education voluntary. Ramsey could
not be reached.
Harlan said he expected the resolution to meet with some
opposition, but thought it would be accepted partially if not in its
original form.
If the resolution were passed Harlan said from 15 to 20 members
of the College of Physical Education and Health would be cut back.
Halan declined to say where he got the figures, but said they were
fairly reliable. He said these figures would be correct if P.E. was
made voluntary and given no credit. He said mandatory P.E. with
credit would probably not cut the staff back as much.

r
A 11 < )?*

professor of dairy science, said
he saw no possibility of
discussion over Gator Go should
the rights be sold, stating he
expected Gator Go to be on
the general market before too
long.
Dr. Robert Cade, associate
professor of medicine and the
developer of Gatorade, said
should there be any financial
return, some of it will go to the

The
Florida Alligator

DEPTH REPORT

University of Florida, Gainesville

university.
I dont know what rights
there are to Gator Go, Cade
said, but I think the university
surely has an interest in it.
One of the things that few
people appreciate, Cade
continued, is that a lot of work
goes into something before it
goes on the market. One thing
that is of great importance is the
development of the idea once

H \.M
BRIAN GOODHEIM
. RETURNING HEROES

About 200 UF students wait at the Gainesville
Municipal Airport for a certain flight from
Lexington. The returning heroes were UF Gators,
victorious over the University of Kentucky by a

Samford Speakers Carry
Gator Debate Invitational

The University of Floridas
First Annual Gator Invitational
Debate Tournament, Junior,
with 36 teams representing
thirty colleges and universities
from seven states, turned out to
be one of the largest junior
tournaments in the South. The

w, jg V 3
1 1 i|ll||f 111
.
H
RANDY BASSETT
TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR JIM BROOKS (L)
.. .hands trophy to UF novice David Byron (R)

the idea is there.
The dairy science
department, which is producing
Gator Go now, played a major
role in its development. The
university should have some
access to any rights to Gator Go,
if there are any, because the
dairy science department played
such a big part in its creation,
he said.
Gator Go is a high-protein,
high-carbohydrate,
vitamin-enriched milk drink
developed jointly by Fouts and
Cade in the last year. It is
similar, Cade said, to products
now on the market such as
Carnation Instant Breakfast.

Gator Tournament, Junior, came
to a pink champagne-splattered
finish on Saturday afternoon,
November 16.
The championship round was
won by Samford Universitys
affirmative team, the only
undefeated affirmative team in

score of 1614. The Gators were cheered by the
warmth of both the reception and the night air as
they stepped off the airliner.

But Gator Go is better
nutritionally, it should sell for
less and I personally think it
tastes better, Cade said.
According to Cade,
negotiations are now under way
with Dari-Tech, a company
based in Atlanta, with the
company taking over the
production of Gator Go if any
agreement is reached.
The Boad of Regents win
soon be presented with a
request that we be permitted to
submit this to commercial
application,Touts said.
Gator Go is not intended to
be the same as Gatorade, which
(SEE SALES PAGE 2)

Monday, November 18, 1968

the tournament. They defeated
Middle Tennessee State
Universitys negative team, 4-1.
Samford debaters Barbara Davis
and Dana Arnold were awarded
a silver champagne bucket,
complete with pink champagne,
for their fine performance at the
Gator tournament. Middle
Tennessee State debaters Ken
Darrell and M. A. Norman
received the runner-up
championship trophy.
The University of Floridas
novice squad distinguished itself
(SEE SAMFORD' PAGE 2)
Bloc Seating
Deadline
Today is the deadline for
students to turn in brown fee
cards for bloc seating for the
Miami-UF game Nov. 30.
Cards must be turned in
by 3:30 pan. and tickets will
be issued on Wednesday.

America's
Number I
Collage
Daily



Page 2

l, Th> Florida Alligator, Monday, Novwnbf 18,1968

B
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Michael Levin (i) and Manu Tupou (r) star as
lago and Othello respectively as the National
Shakespeare Company goes on stage tonight at the

Samford Speakers Carry
Gator Debate Invitational

f BOHMgfIK^I
at the Gator Tournament,
Junior. The four-man team of
Bess Roberts, Dee Scarr, David
Byron, and Gloria Mikula ranked
fourth in that division. Bess
Roberts and Dee Scarr tied for
first place non-championship
affirmative team on the basis of
won-loss records, and David
Byron and Gloria Mikula,
debating negative, tied for third
place in that division.
Awards for the best record
for combined affirmative and
negative teams went to the
following schools: Ist
place Samford University
(12-0); 2nd place Middle
Tennessee State University
(11-1); 3rd place Wake Forest
University (10-2).
Trophies in the
non-championship affirmative
division went to: Ist
place-Wake Forest (5-1, 286
pts.), 2nd place University of
Florida (5-1, 285 pts.), 3rd
place Middle Tennessee State
University (5-1,280 pts.).
In the non-championship
negative division, trophies went
to: Ist place Emory
University (6-0, 300 pts.). An
unfortunate error in tabulating
results prevented Emory from
rightfully participating in the
championship round against
Samford. 2nd place Samford
University (6-0, 255 pts.); 3rd
place University of Georgia

Md ? r^? l ? D^, ALL y ATOR the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
aemi i TT?? Tsf 1 dUrtf *** Juljr d Au u t whM 11 U P*Mlsbed
XUhTi&JflJ*22l ho l^ JW * Vrtod*. Editorials represent only the
offlclii opinion* of thilr tutbors. Addrwi *** r r t k n mfonm to tbt Florldt All in tor Haiti
VBU "* Un4wr lt y Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. T** Alligator Is entered
as HSBH clsss matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Flarl*, 22601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.'
tlJlTmni? T r f m ** lllfhl * r fu!a * ** typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectloimble.
Worlds Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
i r r r* ou ttwurtlon unless notice U given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (l) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not he responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

OTHELLO

(5-1,279 pts.).
Os the 144 debaters in the
tournament, top individual
performers were: Ist
place Melissa Maxcy, Emory
University; 2nd place Richard
Friend, Emory University; 3rd
place Lee Greer, Middle
Tennessee State University; 4th
place Bess Roberts, University
of Florida; sth place Rusty
Stout, Wake Forest University;
6th place M. A. Norman,
Middle Tennessee State
University; 7th place John
Cooper, Wake Forest University;
Bth place Kenn Darrell,
Middle Tennessee State
University; 9th place Jim
McGee, University of Georgia,
10th place Jean Holman,
Wake Forest University. Florida
debaters Dee Scarr and David
Byron were among those
awarded certificates for
outstanding speaking.
Bess Roberts and Dee Scarr,
debating affirmative for Florida,
defeated Rollins College, St.
Johns River Junior College,
Valdosta State College, Union
University, and the University of
Georgia. UFs negative team of
David Byron and Glorida Mikula
defeated Valdosta State College,
St. Johns River Junior College,
Union University, St. Petersburg
Junior College, and Wingate,
College. Both Florida teams had
5-1 won-loss records, losing only
to Samford University, the top
4-man squad in the Gator

University Auditorium.
The production, "Othello", is scheduled for 8
p.m. by the Union Fine Arts Committee.

Tournament, Junior.
James T. Brooks, Jr.,
tournament director,
complimented the students who
volunteered to keep time in the
tournament and the campus
police force for their
cooperation. A special note of
thanks goes to Colonel Graham
of the Registrars Office and the
Baptist Student Center for
making available the facilities
used for the tournament.

WATCH FOR
GATOR
GIRLS

STREirS CHRISTMAS
LAYAWAY RARGAINS
\
Schwinn Bicycles
RALEIGH o-
Bicycies
- DUNLET Bicycles
FROM $31.95 & up
From the smallest member of vour family ...
the bicycle suited for you STRpTt-c LARGEST STREITS has
CHRISTMAS EVE !. *o p.n,.
STREITS
B B W. UNIV. AVE
SALES 376-26737

SalesOn New Drink
May Go Off Campus

|T BON Pi6t owe J
was developed as a drink to
provide quick energy during
periods of exertion. Gator Go
was designed to be taken before
periods of exertion because it
helps the muscles store up
carbohydrates to keep a players
endurance up. It is also a
body-building food, whereas
Gatorade s not.
The popular notion that
milk is bad for an athlete to
drink before exertion has proved
to be false because no athlete
has ever suffered any ill effects
from drinking Gator Go before a
game or work-out, Cade said.
Cade cited Jack Card, a UF
linebacker in 1964-65-66 and
now a coach for the junior
varsity squad at Gainesville High
School, who began using Gator
Go as a pre-game meal and food
supplement for his players.
He displayed great courage
by doing it, because there are
old shibboleths about drinking
milk before exercise, Cade said.
It took courage to prove the
old wives tales wrong.
He deserves some credit for
it, because none of the rest of us
were risking our jobs, but he
was, Cade said. He was risking

WINNJAMMER
STEAK HOUSE
STEAKS SEAFOOD SANDWICHES
520 Southwest 2nd Avenue Phone 376-9265
Cocktail Lounge
1A DINING ROOM SERVING
a.m. to a.m. 11a.m. to 12 midnight
Dancing
OCEANS OF FREE PARKING
CLOSED ON SUNDAYS

his job to prove that it could be
used right before a game
because if any of his boys had
gotten sick halfway through the
first quarter, he would have been
the one who would have been
fired.
That was of great
importance in the development
of Gator Go, too.
Gatorade, which has been
used by the UF football squad
for several years, came into the
public eye this fall when it was
reported the UF was enjoying no
profits from the sale of the
drink.
In addition, the Department
of Health, Education and
Welfare (HEW) claimed
ownership of the rights, claiming
it had financed the research
leading to the development of
Gatorade.
Cade and several associates
sold the rights to Gatorade more
than a year ago.
A study is now being
conducted by the Board of
Regents to determine who
actually holds the rights to
Gatorade.
In my opinion, it (the claim
by HEW) is not true, Cade said,
at least I dont feel its true in
the case of Gatorade and I know
it isnt true with Gator Go.



Journalism Day Features
Chicago Tribune Editor

William Anderson, city editor of the Chicago Tribune, heads a list
of newspaper men and women speaking today during the College of
Journalism and Communications Journalism Day. All sessions will
be held in the Reitz Union ballroom, second floor.
Anderson, who has been with the Tribune for 13 years, the last
two as city editor, will speak at the Florida Press Association
luncheon in the Reitz Unon ballroom. His subject will be, What is
News?
In past years, Journalism Day has been part of a three day program
concerning the various facets of communication. Journalism Dean
John Paul Jones explained the new one-day format as a result of the
UF switch to the quarter system.
Three days at one time is a great dial to take out of one quarter,
Jones said.
A panel discussion on how metropolitan newspapers can better
serve the public through regional editions will begin the day-long
program at 9:15 a.m.
Robert Howard, editor and Kenneth Guthrie, state editor of the
Orlando Sentinel will be featured speakers.
Other members of the Sentinel news staff will present a panel
discussion at 10:10 a.m. on the challenges of newspaper work.
Sentinel staff members in the program will be Norman Wolfe,
editorial director; Dorothy Chapman, womens editor; Jim McDonald,
executive sports editor and Andrew Hickman, chief photographer.
Milt Kelly, executive editor of the Fort Lauderdale News, will
speak on the question, Can a Chain Newspaper Be Autonomous?
During the afternoon, there will be two sessions on Data
Communications for Newspapers-Today and Tomorrow, presented
by American Telephone and Telegraph Corp. The slide and film
program will be shown at 2:30 and 3:30 p.m.
Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalism honorary, will initiate five
students, faculty member William Couch and Bill Grove of WJXT
television in Jacksonville at a banquet tonight at 6:30 p.m.
Grove, who will be the featured speaker, has been director of news
and public affairs since 1952.
Part of his professional background includes the pioneering of
in-depth documentaries for television, investigative reporting, program
flexibility and competing staffs for news gathering.
Grove has won for WJXT the regional EMMY for television news.
He is a member of the Florida United Press and Florida Associated
Press Broadcasters Association.
The Sigma Delta Chi banquet is open to students, faculty and staff.
Cost is $2.50.
Initiation of new members will be held at 5:30 p.m. All SDX
members are invited to attend both banquet and initiation.

'Florida Coed Editor
Selected For 1969

The editor of the 1969
Florida Coed will be Denise
Valiante, 2UC, from Miami.
This booklet is published
annually by the Association of
Women Students (AWS) as a
campus guide for coeds. Miss
Valiante expects the publication
to take on an entirely new look.
We will try to include an
interest for every Florida coed,
and not just for new students,
she said. We hope the booklet

f Comrades, Gator Ads WILL Sell 111
j- m^m * mmm mmm mmm mm ,m
> STCfIK SHAK i
J Wfif |
f| Student Special
(With The Coupon)
jj I
r Our Regular 88t Steakburger |
? Luncheon And Any 15< Drink I
H|l { $1.03 Value Only 85( plus tax
1: v Steak n Shake I
S. W. 13th St. Gainesville I

can be something which will be
used all year and not merely
remain on the shelf.
Coeds with experience in
business, advertising or finance
are needed to work as
Advertising Manager and on the
business staff, Miss Valiante said.
Anyone with an interest in
writing or layout is also
needed, she stressed.
She may be contacted at
376-9835.

I GATOR
GIRLS

MAULDINS
AUTO
GLASS
Ft attention to insurance
claims for can, trucks and
FREE ESTIMATES
323 N.W. 6th ST.
376-2558
East Side ACL Depot
YOU MET HIM!
WATCH
REPAIRING
ALSO SPECIAL ORDER
JEWELRY WORK AND
BEAD STRINGING
RX-UP NOW FOR
CHRISTMAS
JIM LENTZ, 903 N.W.6th St
WATCHMAKER 378-9323

[ Albert says, Score with the Gators... Use Gator Ads 111
CCATI mills* IN THE MALL
FEATURING: OUR SHOPPERS SPECIALS
Italian Foods \ dP "Pasta Fazool"
Specialty Sandwiches OW J *.***
Delicious Salad. W fi Ham and Chee on
Domestic and S' Sesame Roll 85
Impor,ed 4 OlarmUtrUafl\ 5£5r...,.
Wine and Beer \ **' v#d with tossed ialqd and crock-
CONGENIAL (fade* c( gating 3 The "Submarine'... .75
"a meal in itself"
CONTINENTAL \ S S upw Motboll.r . .73
ATMOSPHERE *| . ft an old favorite
nt! Cascr..... i .00
CLOSED SUNDAYS ES? W h ,ossed alad rol,o d

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
'The Student s Friend
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N.- Main St. Phone 376-7581

IJMU/ s
Ibh mil* .:m
LLJVm TjzhirZ
lip Hm
Mon., Nov. 18; Tues. Nov. 19; Wed. Nov. 20
| TOP COATS OR I
loVERCOATS 89< each!
I (SAVE UP TO 86C) 1
We haven't forgotten the children
CHILDRENS CLOTHES
1/2 of REGULAR PRICE
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Beautifully Laundered and Finished
RIP'S ONE HOUR DRY CLEANING
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1603 S.W. 13th Straat 3444 Watt Univarsity Avanus
1150 N.E. 16th Avenue

Monday. Novambar IS, 1968, Tha Florida AlHnator.

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 18,1968

FALLS $15,000 SHORT

United Fund Underfunded

The UFs United Fund
campaign fell $15,000 short of
its $55,000 goal according to
L.K. Cannon, executive director
of the Alachua County fund.
Although the drive was slated
to end Nov. 1, it has been
extended to the later part of
November, possibly the 20th,
Cannon said.
Cannon cited personnel losses
to political campaigns as the
extensions reason.
The universitys exact
contribution is not known at
this time, said UF Chairman
Dr. George M. Harper, since
some contributions are coming
in late. But we know it will be a
bit over $40,000.
Roughly $37,500 was
contributed by the UF last year.
Whether the university drive
will continue with the countys
drive is yet to be detefmined.
When we get a more
conclusive picture of what we
have, Ill confer with Cannon,
Harper said.
Although the 14 charities
under the United Fund cannot
hold additional drives, the Heart
and Cancer campaigns will be
held later this year.
We tried to get all charities
under one umbrella, Cannon
said, but we cant even support
WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writar
IN THE MASTER AND THE
MOOR: Shakespeares story of
the tragic African, Othello,
will be presented in the
University Auditorium tonight
at 8 by the National Shakespeare
Company.
IN DRIVING FORCES: The
SDS-SSOC has a steering
Committee meeting tonight at 7
in room 357 of the Reitz Union.
IN PAPEfI TIGERS: UF
celebrates (?) Journalism Day
today, and wouldnt you know
it the day starts with a coffee
break. The beanjuice and
registration will be in the East
Gallery of the Union today
beginning at 8 a.m.
IN THOSE WHO ARE
PROBABLY ADEPT AT
MAKING ACID COMMENTS:
The Citrus Club gathers in room
355 of the Union tonight at
7:30.
IN SETTING DORM
NORMS: UFs Interhall meets in
room 363 of the Union tonight
at 7.
IN CAR GATHERINGS:
There will be one of those
tonight when the Gator Amateur
Radio Club enters E and I
building (room 525) to have a
meeting tonight at 8.
IN GREEK-LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Alpha Phi Omega
meets in room 361 of the Union
tonight at 7.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
I 0 f N.MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins. Smirn*

the ones we have.
In the future, Cannon said,
we may hold a separate drive
on campus.
Since the faculty is paid on
an academic-year basis,
September and October are
half-pay months and a lean
time to solicit contributions,
according to one faculty
member.
The United Fund supports

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Bugged by a roommate? Fed up c I
with dorm meals? ¥ '
Escape from the ordinary. < > \\M
Escape in an Olds Cutlass S. 11.
With a Rocket 350 V-8 j | j
your escape will be quick and f v /<- s \1 I!
easy. And economical. j
Or order it up with a console- \ X \ Xv
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get in sync with whats happening. i
Or better yet, go directly to the §
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Cutlass S. The Estapemobile. I / £ X
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\nr^w r 1 \yteMJurj£bm
\ /, i jjJ 111 JIfJ if
Cutlass S: nB 1
*be Escapemobile uM
from Oldsmobile ""
WtKK Os tCELI£NCt
by college students.

the Boys Clubs of Gainesville,
the Salvation Army, Boy Scouts,'
Girl Scouts, American Red
Cross, Association for Retarded
Children, Y.M.C.A., Bell Nursery
school, Mental Health,
Childrens Home Society,
Goodwill Industries, the
Arthritis Foundation, U. 5.0.,
and Travelers Aid.
All are local charities.

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New IFC Officers Elected
During Week-End Retreat

Steve Zack, member of Alpha
Epsilon Pi fraternity, was elected
president of the Interfratemity
Council at the councils retreat
in Daytona Beach last weekend.
Zack will take over the IFC
presidential office in January.
Newly elected executive vice
president is Gerry Abascal,
Lamba Chi Alpha; administrative
vice president is Bob Zeigler,
Kappa Alpha. Secretary for the
new administration is Pete
Marovich, Alpha Gamma Rho.
The office of treasurer will be

UF Pool Dedicated
In Deans Memory
A new olympic-size pool was dedicated Saturday in memory of the
late H. Spurgeon Cherry, former assistant dean of the College of
Health and Physical Education.
Gainesville Recreational Department Director Ray Massey unveiled
a bronze plaque dedicating the new pool to Cherry following a short
ceremony at Westside Park, on N.W. 34th Street.
Cherry, who died of a heart attack earlier this year, served as the
first chairman of the Gainesville Recreational Advisory Board during
the same time he was a UF dean and intramural director.
Cherry graduated from UF in 1935. He returned in 1942 as
assistant football coach and later served as head basketball' coach.
For his work he was awarded one of five Distinguished Service
awards by the Florida Athletic Coaches Association.
Cherry was active in campus affairs and was named a member of
the Action Conference shortly before his death.
iSrii thT jjg]
j^ljop
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PRIZE: $25 in Mens or Ladies Wear I
EXTRA $lO if winner is a girl
Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will
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gained by Florida, which will* be the tie breaker.
Home Team Visiting Team
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S.M.U. vs. QBAYLOR [
OKLAHOMA vs. NEBRASKA
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PENNSYLVANIA vs. 0 DARTMOUTH
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MISSOURI vs. a KANSAS I
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Entries must be deposited in the "U" Shop by Fri.,
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among wfnners.
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
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1620 west University Avenue UNIVERSITY I
SIGNATURE I
ADDRESS I
SHY , STATE
ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO FEB PERSON

filled by Miles Wilkin, Tau
Kappa Epsilon.
Guest speakers at the retreat
were Vice President of Student
Affairs Lester L. Hale; Dr.
Edwin A Larson, head of the UF
Mental Health Center; Dr. Stuart
N. Cahoon, associate professor
of psychiatry; Dr. Meyer H.
Maskin, professor of psychiatry
and Dr. Mary H. McCaulley,
assistant professor of clinical
psychiatry.
Hale spoke on Who Killed

Alma Mater. He told the group
they must get on with the
business of creating a better,
stronger, more viable society
before it is too late.
A discussion panel attempted
to tune in with you all and let
you tune in with us on the
matter of sex, Larson said.
Students participated in
discussion groups on finance and
rush, and a forum on the
functions of pledge class
presidents.
I Bottle Found l
A bottle thrown from the
USS Constitution in 1961 while
the ship was 925 miles east of
Bermuda was recovered by a
Bermudian housewife in 1968.

GATOR
GIRLS ARE
COMING

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niv m& &
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j

Monday, November 18,1968, The Floride Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

'The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 18.1968

SG To Recruit Negroes
For UF In Pilot Program

Student Government should
become more interested in state
and national situations, John
Mica, head of a new SG program
said recently.
Its time Student
Government started focusing on
state, regional and national
problems rather than petty
paper shuffling on the third
floor, Mica said.
Mica will head up a program
to recruit a larger number of
Negro students for UF.
A pilot program will begin
next week in the Jacksonville
area. School officials, guidance
counselors and students will be
contacted about the program.
Visits to high schools will be
scheduled after the Thanksgiving
vacation.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor and his
administrative assistant, Steve
Zack, are backing this program.
It will be financed by the special

ODK Will Tap 12 Members
At Ceremony Today In Plaza

The UF Circle of Omicron
Delta Kappa, mens leadership
and scholarship honorary, will
publicly tap 12 new members
into the Circle at noon today in
the Plaza of the Americas.
Tappes include Richard
Finley, Joseph Godfrey, James
McCurry, Thomas Sherrard,

/)
&((
A
Private
Makes
$102.30
DURING HIS FIRST
MONTH IN THE ARMY
To become a private, get your degree, then
sit around and wait for your draft notice.
After all, in your sth month as a Private,
you may get a raise to $109.50.
f s

projects fund of SG.
The problem of the Negro
student is one of the things the
Action Conference was to
consider. I feel we have waited
long enough on this problem. It
deserves immediate attention, so
Student Government is going
ahead with it on its own, said
Zack.
If the pilot program is
successful in Jacksonville, it will
be extended throughout the
state. SG leaders and volunteers
will go to high schools in the
state to tell Negroes what UF
has to offer them. This part of
the overall program will be
similar to a speakers bureau
which other universities and
colleges have.
Well tell it as it is no
Negroes in fraternities. None
went through sorority rush,
Zack said. We will tell them
why it is to their benefit to
come here and what financial

Steve Ely, Andy Owens, Mac
Steen, Dereck Donley, James
Rouse, Harold Kennedy, Howell
Ferguson and Richard Hord.
They will be initiated into the
national society on Thursday.
Chester A. Ferguson,
chairman of the Board of

assistance is available, he
continued.
Zack said the situation of
losing the better Negro talent to
out-of-state schools is critical.
If we dont tap this Negro
resource pool, we are going to
lose these capable people to
other state universities up
north, Zack said.
Tickets Sold
To Cops Hop
Tickets are on sale for the
Fraternal Order of Police ball, to
be held Saturday from 9 p.m. to
3 a.m. at the Moose Lodge, 1500
N.E. 23rd Blvd.
Tickets are $5.00 per couple
and may be purchased at the
Alachua County Sheriffs
Department, the Florida
Highway Patrol station, and the
university police station.

Regents, will be the guest
speaker at the ODK installation
banquet Thursday night.
Formerly called University
Circle, ODK received a charter
from the national society of
ODK in May.
Members are tapped from five
different areas scholarship,
student government, athletics,
organizations, publications and
the arts.
Academic requirements are
that the tappee be in the upper
35 per cent of his class.
South Lifeless
The ice-desert of Antarctica
sustains less life than any other
desert area investigated on earth.
Looking
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autos
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UF, Gainesville And County
Work On Traffic Problems

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
An aesthetic campus
atmosphere and bussing students
to class are features of a plan to
eliminate parking problems and
traffic congestion at UF. This
was announced at a State Road
Department (SRD) special board
meeting in the Reitz Union on
Friday.
Most funds for road and
parking lot construction at UF
come from the SRD. This was
the boards first meeting at UF
in its 53-year history.
To illustrate the vehicle
parking and traffic control
problem on and off campus at
UF, filmed slides were shown to
SRD board members by Arnold
F. Butt, associate professor and
chairman of Architecture at UF
representing the city of
Gainesville, Alachua County and
UF.
Butt made the following
recommendations:
1. The operation of a six bus
system along two routes which
will originate from large parking
lots traveling to academic areas
on a five-to eight-minute
schedule.
2. Parking spaces for 9,000
student vehicles on the
periphery of the campus.
3. Staff and faculty parking
remaining near academic centers
with the eventual construction
of parking buildings.
4. Maintaining an aesthetic
environment at the center of
campus.
The University of California
at Los Angeles (UCLA) was
referred to by Butt as having
academic structures on campus
Fashion Show
Set Tonight
Hume Hall coeds will present
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show at 7:30 tonight in the
Hume Hall recreation room.
Models will be coeds from
Hume. Their attire has been
furnished by six local dress
shops.
Admission is free and soft
drinks will be served.
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inside a circular drive with
parking and access routes
outside of this area.
This is basically what we are
looking for, Butt said.
However, we would like to
avoid the large amounts of paved
space in the academic area that
is predominarif>ii) UCLA.
The construction of parking
lots and buildings on the
periphery of the campus would,
according to Butt, reduce traffic
flow in the academic areas and
save trees and grassy areas from
destruction.
Butt concluded his
presentation by saying that there
were six ways in which the SRD
could help solve traffic problems
in the near future.
These improvements include:
SW 16th Avenue connected by
primary road to Archer Road,
SW 6th Street connected to SW
16th Avenue, improve SW sth
and Bth Avenues from 13th
Street to connect with the
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proposed new 6th Street,
improve North-South Drive on
campus from Radio Road to
connect with the proposed 16th
Avenue extension, improve SW
23rd Terrace from Archer Road
to Williston Road and evaluate
work that will be needed on NW
17th Street from University
Avenue to Bth Avenue.
The first reaction to Butts
request was by J. Jud Chalmers
of Jacksonville, an SRD board
member who said, These
requests will be taken into
consideration with the 1985
program planning.
This is the first time in
history that Gainesville, Alachua
County and UF have gotten
together on a project, Chalmers
added.
The Chairman of the SRD
Board, Michael O. ONeil from
Miami said, We will point out
to the next legislature the need
for funds for this work.

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Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 18,1968

EDITORIAL
This Way, Please

The Student Senate is revising the charter
of the UF cheering squad, hopefully to
prevent any further incidents similar to the
illegal removal of Cathy licher from the
cheering squad last spring.
Because of the vaguen ss of the charter,
and the ambiguous interpretations it breeds,
Miss Eicher suffered a gauntlet of grijf
during the period of her removal and
reinstatement by the Senate. v
Interpretations of the charter by the head
cheerleader and the proceedings of a meeting
of the Cheering Board of Directors, at which
Miss Eicher was removed, were decided to be
illegal by the Student Senate.
The senate must approve all actions of
the board and during the nearly six-month
time lapse between the boards action and
the Senates reversal Miss Eicher did not
cheer because she thought the board had
final authority.
She eventually won the battle, but lost
the war; and is no longer cheering.
Nothing can be done to rectify the Eicher
incident, but a better charter may ease any
lingering pain suffered by all the involved
parties and prevent any trouble.
We suggest several areas of the charter
that should be revised:
The present Cheering Board of
Directors consists of the Head Cheerleader,
the president of the Student Body (usually
an appointed representative), the president
of the Gator band, and a representative of
the Dean of Student Affairs.
The Student Senate rightfully wants to
control the board because the cheerleaders

By-line

What do you want, I said
startled by the hand that grasped
my shirt in the night.
Come here, he said. You
have failed me, you have failed
our PEOPLE, you have failed
mankind.
But I have kept the faith.
Yes, you have kept the
faith. You have and we have. We
have kept the faith and found,
often to our dismay, that faith
has nothing to do with getting
made.
The questions are, and will
be for some time what are our
needs in a given situation and
how do we get them filled? Our
need isnt for a job. We were

' \ HyiiijauuwiKHdEl
w w
TR {/jfr lg

Kill The Lies With Daggered Words

once 100 per cent employed.
The problem yours and mine
is a lack of power.
We lack power. We do not
lack freedom from sin and
corruption. We lack freedom.
But perhaps, I said,
perhaps if we tore it all up and
started over again, a new man
would appear. Could I write
about that? I asked.
Write about that! he cried.
You with your optimism. You
would substitute optimism for
reality. You would suffer our
PEOPLE to walk into the maze
of life unprepared?
But they are also things of
dry hours and involuntary pain,
I said. Skin wiped over bones

are financed for the most part with student
government funds. However, the board
should be composed of students appointed
by the student body president and approved
by the Senate.
And then the board should have final
authority over matters involving the
cheerleaders. A board whose every move
must be approved by a higher group is
powerless and of no use.
This new cheering board should not
include the head cheerleader to prevent any
conflicts of interest. He should, however, be
an ex-officio member without voting
power.
§ The procedures for removal of any
member of the squad must be made specific.
The present charter says nothing of removal
procedures except that the board may
remove a cheerleader for just cause with
the approval of the Senate.
The exact steps to follow in a removal
should be outlined in the charter to direct
the board. A method of appeal to the Senate
should also be included.
The cheerleaders represent the UF and its
students before more people than any other
student activity. If they are to be truly
representative of the students, and not a
small selective group, the charter must be
revised to keep any small group from
dominating the cheerleaders.
A new charter will lead the way to a
student body cheering squad, not a
cheerleaders cheering squad.

just as we. Whom shall their
redeemer be?
The end, he said.
The end is isnt it. Create.
If not a note, a hole. If not an
overture, a desceration. As
meaningful and as meaningless as
any flower in the Western field.
You, you are the optimist,
1 said, no child has ever defiled
the heroes of the Western Wall.
Cant you see, imbecile. This
is it. This is the urgency: live.
And have your blooming in the
noise of the whirlwind.
But what do we need, 1
asked bewildered and full of
tears, tell me what we need.
The will to survive as a
nation of PEOPLE.
Transcending all artificial
borders, even the Western Wall,
in our climb to the Third
World.
How can this be
accomplished?
By destroying his
myth. By killing his words and
their connotations. LISTEN:
They come into the
neighborhood with the sun An
army of workers carrying
briefcases filled with lies and
stupid grins. Passing out checks
and food stamps, hustling from
one apartment to another so
they can fill their quotas and get
back out before dark.
For they are afraid of the
night. We own the night. We not
only own the night, but we can
take the day and make it a
livable place again. A place
where people can love and
create. A place where children
can be free, and adults will no
longer feel the pangs of
degradation and humiliation.
But we must be
truthbringers, he said.
Your words must not only
speak of action, they must lead

The Florida Alligator
"The price off freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief }
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Dave Reddick James Cook
Assignments Editor News Editor

{ Alligator Inquizitor
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
: your Inquizitor gets all sorts of strange mail. But among his most
constant contributors is signed by a certain Granny Zeuss, who sends
: him true trivial facts. So occasionally Ill print some of her facts. For
instance, did you know that peanuts are not nuts, they are really
: beans? Or that the worlds largest crystal ball is a 106 pound sphere o
j: Burman quartz? Thank you, granny.
i To todays questions:
1. What was Mark Twains real name? Lewis Carrolls? Jasoi
: Straights?
2. ft) Who was Tom Terrifics dog? b) What was Underdog
take-off line?
3. One of P.T. Barnums most famous acts was where he erected
: sign in front of a tent which said This way to the egress, 25 cents.
Do you know what an egress is?
>: 4. Which team came in last this year in the National League? I
;i you cant get that, how about the American League?
y, 5. a) There were five Marx brothers. Can you name four of them
sb) What is Joey Bishops sidekicks name on his nighttime show
l 6. Is it true that Audubon said, Dove is a four letter bird?
j; l. Farenheit equals 9/5 centigrade plus 32 2. Merita Bread, Mr
: Bluster 3. Charles Holley 4. Katherine Anne Porter, Barbar
Tuchman, Rachel Carson 5. Capt. Shuler
Call your girl by another name today.

it. Your words must become like
daggers, broken brew bottles,
bullets and swift razors, cutting
thru the Lords of the Wall and
their pushers.
You must talk to the pimps
and the prostitutes, the
possessed and the dispossed and
aid them in the destruction of
their actions. You must, above
all else, be a part of the
PEOPLE; an energy source for
their life-style. You must create
a life-style for them.
We have accepted too long,
almost without question, the
assertion that their way is right.
At last we are able to
comprehend that our PEOPLE

1 Iffl illipbr

By Mark Time

see nothing in the same frame of
reference as they do. Not only
do we receive and perceive
differently; our reaction is
opposed to that of they.
And this is your task: Write
out of a concept of self. Not
your own thing. But our thing,
our PEOPLES thing. There will
be disappointments and
disagreements, but realize that
these are your actions. And
actions not reactions are a
meaningful response for your
PEOPLE.
Create, he said, if not a
note, a hole. If not an overture,
a descercration. As meaningful
and as meaningless as any flower
in the Western field.



Speaking Out

Publish Better Material Or Else

In its efforts to produce palatable features, the
Alligator staff apparently holds nothing too sacred
or too trivial to be inflated into an ostentatious
spectacular.
Last year, for instance, on the occasion of an
attempted suicide on campus, the Alligator
published a complete' account of the dialogue
between the involved student and his rescuer and, in
addition, the names of both individuals. This
discourtesy undoubtedly made readjustment to
campus life infinitely more difficult for the
would-be victim. Recently you subjected Dr. Kiker
to the same injustice by first publishing a greatly
detailed account of his alleged murder and then by
dragging the issue back into the news this week with
a headline series of character appraisals gleaned
from his collegues which are of no consequence to

OPEN FORUM:
VIAAM t
.
There is ho hope for the complacent mam.

No Filth In Fletcher

MR. EDITOR:
After having read the startling
article in your Nov. 12 edition,
about the presence of filthy
signs on Fletcher Hall, we the
men of Fletcher O examined our
sign. By unanimous vote we
decided that our slogan,
GATORS KICK TIGERS
TAIL was actually much less
vulgar than the thoughts in Mrs.
McClellans mind.
If an apology was necessary
we would most sincerely offer
the effect that Murphree Hall
dwellers engaged in fellatio.
However, since we feel no
apology is in order, please allow
us to make the following
observations the ones Mrs.
McClellan should have made:
1. There are 18 men in
Fletcher O, each bringing with
him honors from his respective
high school.
2. Our rooms are kept neat
and clean as ourselves.
3. We respect the U.S.A. and
the principles upon which it was
founded.
4. We respect other people
and their opinion.
5. And possibly the most
important item is that we do not
think so much of ourselves that
we put ourselves in a position to
judge others on a first
impression basis.

Back Chavez And The Pickers Plight

MR- EDITOR:
What Dean Thornton, with
either incredible naivete" or
outright maliciousness, calls the
whole story about the grape
pickers of California is nothing
more than the anti-labor
ramblings of the National Right
to Work Committee. Every
fact, opinion, and quotation
in Dean Thorntons letter is
from the newsletter of the above
named organization (Sept. 19,
1968). The Agricultural Workers
a front organization for the
California grape planters, who

Mrs. McClellan, we the men
of Fletcher 0 respect your
feelings and extend a welcome
to you and your husband so that
you might judge us by what we
really are. We have all our

Weve Been Poisoned
By Toxins Os Hate
M c DITOR:
In your Nov. 8,1968, issue there was printed a letter responding to
your coverage of the Table Grape Boycott. Referring to
Mexican-Americans, Name Withheld said, this filth they live in is
made by themselves.
For ten years I have been closely associated with the
Mexican-American people. In that interval I have learned to converse
in Spanish, belonged to a Spanish-language Presbyterian congregation,
worked with migrant farm workers and in general have undergone a
long (and continuing!) education in the ways of a people. Much of
this education has come from my wife and her family, for they are
Mexican-Americans.
In these years I have met and come to know many
Mexican-Americans who, though poor, are compulsively neat and
clean. I further know, through long and extensive personal experience,
that Mexican-Americans as a group are no more prone to filth than
any other group. The of Name Withheld is an
unwarranted insult to Mexican-Americans in general and to my wife
and me in particular. Such unfounded accusations have no place in a
University in which rational and compassionate discourse is
fundamental nor in a nation too long accustomed to poisoning itself
with the toxins of prejudice.
SAMUEL B.TRICKEY
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
DEPT, of PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

have failed in their attempts to
stop Cesar Chavez and the
rapidly growing rural labor
movement through such direct
methods as spraying picketing
workers with dangerous
insecticides. This organization
(AWFWA) is supported by
po 1 i ticians such as
Representative Bob Mathias,
whose sincere interest in the
freedom of the working man
is evidenced by his votes against
model cities, the poverty
program, and the food stamp
bill.

anyone. It seems to be a policy of the Alligator to
show the same disregard to students charged with
misdemeanors, regardless of magnitude.
Most recently, the staff has resorted to
sensationalizing relatively inconsequential events
with depth analyses, background reports, and
three-part serials. While the removal of Miss Eicher
from the cheerleading squad may have warrented
mention in the Alligator, it certainly lacked the
substance necessary for a two-part serial as you
aptly demonstrated. Your interview with Jack
Dawkins likewise shows a lack of perspective. While
it is encouraging to learn that Dawkins is alive, we
fear that the editor did not anticipate the very real
possibility of being issued a subpoena whereby he
can be legally forced to disclose Dawkins
whereabouts. The Alligators latest disservice to
students was the officious exposure of the

Homecoming signs and will be
more than happy to have you
examine them for filth.
THE MEN OF FLETCHER 0

In 19S8 the misnamed Right
to Work Law was put before
the voters of the state of
California and was defeated by a
large margin. The idea that a
worker should be forced to pay
dues to his union is no more
insidious than the idea that a
citizen should be forced to pay
taxes to his city, county, state,
and nation.
If tax-paying were
purely voluntary, many citizens
would attempt to gain the
benefits of government without
paying for it; likewise, many

He Was Beaten So That
The Times Could Change

MR. EDITOR:
This is a letter from a friend
who was in Chicago in August
1968 to protest against what he
thought was wrong. It was
marked To be opened only in
the event that I am mistreated or
injured in Chicago.
He was both mistreated and
injured by the Chicago police on
the second day of the
No Bargains
MR. EDITOR:
In response to a letter which
appeared on your editorial page
concerning the plight of the
grape pickers in California.
The assistant dean of the
agricultural school is asking
everyone to support the owners
of Californias vineyards. His
plea rests on the liberty
encompassed by the right to
work.
I must admit that at first
sound the right to work appears
to be at least as dear as the
freedom of speech. But it
crumbles in analysis. In reality
there is no extant freedom of a
single, illiterate, unskilled
worker to bargain with his
employer over the terms of his
labor. The only way a laborer
can remedy his working
conditions is through a labor
organization.
I would hope that the
faculty, staff and students would
support Caesar Chavez and his
efforts to organize the migrant
farm workers of California on
the basis of humanism and a
general sympathy for the
underdog.
Chavez has a helluva way yet
to go.
B.R. PATTERSON, 3LW

workers would attempt to gain
the benefits of unionism without
paying dues. Actually, a union
member has a more direct voice
in the level and use of his dues
than a citizen has in the level
and use of his taxes.
The California grape workers
have been building a union
under extremely adverse
conditions. Last year, Governor
Reagan attempted to break the
grape strike by forcing prisoners
to scab. The planters have used
the entire political and police
structure of the San Joaquin and

Monday, Novambar 18,1968, Tha Florida ANiprtor,

By Kathy Carter

University infirmary's non-policy on the
dispensation of birth control pilk which will almost
certainly seal the fate of the practice. Last
Saturdays Tampa Tribune carried a page one article
on the Alligators latest expose and gave comments
by President OConnell which tend to inoicate that
this non-policy will soon be non-existent.
These features reflect both a lack of sufficient
material to legitimately fill a daily publication and a
lack of responsible discretion on the part of the
Alligator staff. We suggest therefore, that the staff
make the weekly volume of Alligator material more
indicative of the amount and significance of
available news by either publishing biweekly or
halving the length of its daily edition, and that the
editor consider more seriously his responsibilities to
the student body.

Democratic Convention, and the
letter was opened. In it was a
legacy for the warmongers with
two right feet, and it read like
this:
It is too bad I had to get
beaten up in Chicago, but I
sacrificed myself for a reason,
and a good one. I let myself be
dubbed for the guys with
tattoos and six packs. The
Birchen, the American Nazis,
the American Independents, the
Wallaces and the LeMays. The
Ronald Reagans and }' >x
Raffertys. The William
Westmorelands and Robert
McNamaras. The anti-protest
people who fear change. The
college kids who are content to
sit back and let people like
Lyndon Johnson, Hubert
Humphrey and Richard Nixon
run their lives without even
whispering their discontent or
frustration. I got beat up so
those people in Southeast Asia
would not have to die. I got beat
up so the high school kids of the
next few years will be able to go
to college without the fear of
being drafted. I came here
defending democracy while in
Southeast Asia, people my age
are defending imperialism. I was
beat up for America.
My friend does not bum flags
or draft cards. He is above that.
He writes letters to congressmen.
He writes letters to friends. He
writes letters to enemies. He
prays a lot. He also carries signs.
Not signs of hate and war, but
signs of peace and love. He is an
intellectual. He does not drop
bombs, fire rockets, kill women,
and bum babies. Hes not like
that, but some people are .
and theyre the ones who need
the help, Mrs. M.E. G., not us.
MICKEY KAPLAN, lUC

Napa Valleys communities to
thwart the farm workers and
prevent their free assembly.
These workers need your help,
they are asking that you refrain
from buying California table
grapes. Anti-labor individuals
such as Dean Thornton can eat
California grapes until it runs
out his ears, but if those of us
who care will stop buying
grapes, we can help the
California farm workers attain
something more than a
sub-human standard of living.
KIT SIMS TAYLOR, 7AG

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE |
Bolex Bmm Zoom Reflex Movie
Camera. Leather Case. Also Bolex
screen, projector; lights & tripod.
Like new, all only $195. Ph.
376-8707. (A-3t-41-p)
1965 Allstate Vespa good
condition. Call Joe after 7 p.m.
372-5188. (A-2t-41-p)
1965 Lambretta TV 200 motor
scooter. Helmet, luggage rack, tools,
all incl. Must sell, always dependable.
Call Paul at 372-6008. (A-2t-41-p)
1968 Yamaha 350. Well cared for,
helmet included. Call 372-0148 after
4. (A-st-41-p)
Zenith 21 in. console. Late Model.
Good condition, excellent cabinet.
Asking S7O. Call 378-8131 between 7
& 9 p.m. ONLY! (A-3t-41-p)
1967 Yamaha 250 cc very good
mechanical condition. 4000 miles.
Helmet and jacket included. S4OO or
best offer. Call 392-9893. (A-4t-41-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading supplies,
Custom Reloading. HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER.
MICANOPY, 466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)

BARGAIN HUNTERS SPECIAL
EVERY
1 MONDAY NIGHT 6-9 pm ONLY
C Ist GARMENT REG. PRICE
2nd LIKE (^RMENT
SALE 4 OAY s v,a
I l^retiziiigl
Nationally Franchised |
MAKES REGULAR DRY CLEANING OBSOLETE
1104 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. 378-3119
A One-Day Exhibition & Sale of
GRAPHICS
presented by
LONDON GRAFICA ARTS
Publishers of Contemporary Printmakers
More than 400 lithographs, etchings, woodcuts and
screenprints on show, including works jy: PICASSO,
DURER, GOYA, CHAGALL, DAUMIER, GAUGUIN,
CASSAT, TOULOUSE-LAUTREC
Also MANUSCRIPTS AND MAPS
ITEMS FROM $8 to S3OOO
RAMADA INN, Gainesville
Executive Board Room
Tuesday, November 19
9 am 5 pm (125 W. University)

FOR SALE |
3bdrm, 2bath, dng & utility rms,
screened porch, air-c. unit, tool shed,
washer, refrig, carpeted, sll3 a mo,
SISOO down, 1611 NE 19th Lane,
372-2722, near elem & jr-hi.
(A-10t-32-p)
Atlas sound columns plus shurg
mixer with reverb. $l5O or best
offer, 392-9808 (A-st-40-p)
Must Sell Bargain Leaving U.S. Two
Knights 3030 A speakers 3 ways
speaker system like new call after 6
p.m. 378-88641 (A-st-40-p)
Surfboard. Short, fantastic 7 4
Tri-Plane by Hobie Surfboards --
must be seen. One soul, slightly used,
for sale or trade. Call 392-9551.
(A-st-40-p)
Sears port, typewriter forecast 12",
pica type, less than yr. old, good
condition, SSO or best offer. Call
Janis Eggart 372-1212 (A-3t-4-p)
HONDA 250 SCRAMBLER. Good
condition, never abused. Ideal for
campus/woods/short trips. $250.
(Im broke) 376-1859. (A-3t-39-p)

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 18,1968

Page 10

| FOR SALE §
1964 Lambretta runs great. Luggage
rack. S9O. Call 378-8072. (A-St-39-p)
FOR RENT |
Takeover lease immediately on 2
bedroom Village Park apartment.
Rent paid til Dec. 1. Call 372-5792.
(B-st-41-p)
Modem 2 bedroom, air condition,
heating unfurnished. Available
December 30. $165 per month.
Landmark Apts. Call Achey
372-6535. (B-15t-38-p)
Apartment to share with male. Furn.,
air-cond. s.w. 16th ave. available In
mid Dec. Call 3789277 (B-3t-39-p)
Need to sub-let 2 bedrm. furnished
apt. at University Gardens. Rent paid
to Dec. 10. Move in any time in Dec.
Cali 378-7188 after 8:00 p.m. any
night. (B-3t-39-p)
*
CAMELOT APAR IMENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
X'WXWV'SNwWWK'WWWX-V.'W'K'J
WANTED
Female roommate French Quarter
38. Winter Quarter. Poolside. One
bedroom. Call anytime. Pat Quarles.
378-6974. (C-st-39-p)
Roommates wanted 1 block from
campus. Call Sharon 372-7054.
(C-3t-39-p)
Drummer for rock group. Call
392-9808 (C-40-3t-p)
2 girls to share 3 br/2 bath house.
Beautifully furnished, carpeted,
central//AC. Available Jan. 2. Ph.
378-6679 after 6 p.m.(C-10t-34-p)
SHOWING 7:00 AND 10:25 I
a
STARRING
Elvis Presley
&OU7 to-
Live a Little I
Levs A Little
fl. and METROCOLOR II
I Tony Anthony I

COME AS LATE AS 7:25 andSEE
I W.C. HODS .wo l*i
"NEVER GIVE o, f/
k SUCKER AN J£&L\
PLUS AT 4:00&7:35
AT THE 11
SUN |
TUES 12 /^ NS IlnfF 1968 FILM §
i ucj OF UOfi FESTIVAL WlNNFirc

J.>!AWiVWbV.%VA%V.v.vavaw.w ----- g
HELP WANTED
Like movies? Want to review for the
Alligator? Turn in a review of any
movie in town the day after it opens
to the entertainment editor's desk,
third floor Reitz Union. We will call
you. (E-tf-38-ACO
Ladies earn extra cash. Cali for an
appointment. Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, Friday at 378-3185 from
10-12 A.M. and 1-4 P.M. (E-7t-36-p)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nations 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person. Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
Women Girls: Telephone & survey
work part-time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
WANTED: Experienced waitress,
night shift. Jerrys Restaurant North.
* 1505 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
(E-37-10t-c)
20 men and women part time to
deliver to local area. Must have auto
and know city. Apply 14 E. Univ.
Ave. Upstairs offices 1 and 2.
(E-38-10t-p)
WANTED: Carhops night shift.
Apply Jerry's Restaurant North.
1505 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
1 (E-37-10t-c)
AUTOS |
.ftww.v.itf-sws B'w w
1967 Volkswagen 16,500 miles clean.
Includes S2OO worth of extras.
$1550. Need to sell one car. Call
378-5381, ext. 347 or 372-1583
evenings. (G-2t-41-p)
64 MGB Ecstatic driving midnite
blue, wire wheels R&H new tires, for
the enthusiast on a budget $1175
378-6917 handled with TLC
(G-6t-39-p)
Transportation special 59 Rambler
wagon SIOO 378-7648. (G-st-38-p)
GAINESVILLES LOWEST PRICED
USED CARS drive slowly on SOUTH
main st. Look for the small DATSUN
sign. BIG savings, courteous men and
women to answer your questions.
Godding & Clark motors 1012 south
main street (G-st-37-c)
PERSONAL |
s ?
Free kittens 7 wks old litter trained 3
I females call after six 3786713
student (J-3t-39-p)
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. Juna
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
Uni<">n
RECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europes
most famous campuses. For info, call
392-1655 or come by 310 Union.
(J-18t-36-c)
I i MO STEIGER
I ACAMMy AWARD WINNER 6:30
U M BEST ACTOR 7 07
A* ll( msmi
TECHNICOLOR REMKX SEN
I M w way tb mm a mgr I
I~~* ELIZABETH TAYLOR I
1 920 RICHARD BURTOnB
I EVA MARIE SAINTB

Use our handy
mall In order
form.

PERSONAL
? \
r _. |n 111 I'MTlXm
Phi Sig would like to thank the rest
of Panthelienk for a really fantastic fantasticsorority
sorority fantasticsorority sing on Tuesday night!
(J-2t-40-p)
Gatorade sales drop 511$ as
aftereffects become known Bulldog
punch sales soar Mark and John
(J-2t-40-p)
WIN the WDVH '69 FORD
MUSTANG FAST BACK, valued at
$3,004. Here is a clue; THE
"WITCHITA LINEMAN COULD
HEAR A SOUND IF HE STOOD
DOWN ON THE GROUND. ALL
CLUES broadcast on WDVH are
posted at all WDVH MISSION NOT
IMPOSSIBLE sponsors. WDVH 980
on your dial. (J-2t 40-C)
Ticket info, and Hairy Tea Tour
reservations for Miami Pop Festival is
now available at Discount Records.
1230 W. Univ. Ave. 372-2728.
(J-st-41-p)
Juan Montes: Queda Vd. Retado el
martes 19, 4 p.m. en un juego de
handball. Lleve raquetas y bolas y
no se vuelva a correr. Camilo.
(J-lt-41-p)
i LOST A FOUND |
Lost Sat. Nov. 9 LadySgotdl Benrus
watch; stretch band. Very
sentimental. Please call 392-9042 or
drop note to box 16-008
Yulee.(L-3t-39-p)
REWARD: Silver lighter initials
RUE. 378-4642 Apt. 45 Colonial
Manor. (L-2t-41-p)
FOUND-GIRLS gold identfication
Rings-lrritials LSC Call 378-2712
(L-3t-40-p)
SERVICES
Volkswagen repairs factory trained
specialist 12 years exp. Quality
service at fair prices. Gainesville
Machine Shop. Please call 376-0710
1224 S. Main. (M-7t-38-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus station 378-4480. (M-18-ts-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-lt-41-p)
FINE JEWELRY order now for
Xmas. 18 K gold items (watches,
rings, charms, medals, etc.) Diamonds
& Pearls also. Call 378-6498.
(M-st-37-p)
Articulos de joyeria. Oro 18 K G Ran
surtido de medallas, escapularios,
aretes, dijes, anillos. Diamantes y
perlas cultivadas. Relojes Ultramar.
Llame al 378-6498. (M-st-37-p)
TRIP TO THE BAHAMAS A Break
in the study Drudgery $73.00 covers coversflight,
flight, coversflight, room, meals & social events.
Nov. 28-Dec. 1. call 392-1655, Rm.
310 Union (M-3t-39-p)
2nd WEEK!
?| --- Y
i7B iai4 hmmr I
1
I
STRANGLBWBffI
1 "W;' Clo Mm .Jy
: 5 TpmLS) VeeiMMMMk
nua.iSmSsr
SUGGESTED FOW MATURE AUDIENCES I I
I B



I By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
Harold Fine, well-to-do
thirty-five year old lawyer,
decides to marry his mistress of
two years Joyce. Its a simple
decision which makes Joyce
ecstatic, his mother a nuisance,
and brings him in contact again
with his way out hippie brother
Herbie.
And, of course thats when he
meets Nancy- his way out
hippie friend who cooks
brownies that are all together
and nice. Sound confusing?
Well read on.
After eating the grass-filled
brownies Harold tumes on to
the beautiful life. He walks out
on Joyce ( at the most
inopportune moment, youll see)
joins Nancy and the full hippie
life and for a while things are
beautiful.
However, free love
especially for Nancy and
communal living just arent his
bag so its back to Joyce, but
only for awhile!
And, things go on and on.
But, its a Peter Sellers movie,
its a wild romp of comic genius,
and you forgive the movie
anything even the complex
plot (which I have not begun,
and neither will 1 attempt to
explain in its entireity, nor its
sub-plots). You must see it to
believe it!
Leigh Taylor-Young,
publicized as the brightest
young star to hit the screen
(another one?) in this movie
comes off as something less than
exciting even though she
undresses.
Shes the typical off-beat
turned on kid who thinks
everything is groovy and whose
vocabulary is over-populated by
the word beautiful! However,
she does have a very photogenic
face.
This movie, now playing at
the Plaza Theatre, is light and
frivolous, but it is thoroughly
enjoyable. Non-offensive,
laugh-filled, and generally a
happy mood, I Love You, Alice
B. Toklas is a good evenings
entertainment,
iWnP
1 ; V;
INTRODUCING
...Leigh Taylor-Young
**&*** U
g Tour GwMratM- X
| OVERHAULED Soodal |
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
wmmt m avc. nmim

m
(PS. In case youve been
wondering through this entire
review Alice B. Toklas is the
author of a cookbook suggesting
the recipe for the tumed-on
brownies.)

I ROBBIES I
Best In
j^andwichea
XOLOR TV & BILLIARDSI
1718 W. University Ave.l
*On The Gold Coast 1 I
gISISISiSiBISISISISISISISISIiIIISIBISiSb
I SPECIAL NOTICE J |
To all students and university personnel j|
DISCOUNT
S /j. Off Our Low-low Prices I
5 FOOD TASTES MUCH BETTER AT 5
i
||§ CAFETERIAS DraDA U 2
5 YrJm 111:30 AM 2:00 PM
VSn 14:30 PM 8:00 PM g
S vbk GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER S
(Just Four Minutes From Campus)
Hsisisiwisisisisisisisiswisisisisit
COUPON^"*^"^.
Kentucky I
RE*. I t RAT. OFF.
fried £Hidc
3 Pieces Chicken, Cole Slow, I
fl M mirmi Ft* *V\ / Mashed Potatoes with Gravy
y BSnxxr mvunu msjajjt / and Rolls.
Jru§KS i _|
" OUR~RFG | OUR REG.
$1.25 DINNER I $1.25 DINNER I
QQ ( QQ C I
UV TODAY| W W today!
r**^^!^vH3!hS?!37?s4^|
I 2 Locations n 4 St- 372-3449 I
LmmhBRING COUPONmmhmmmJ

k - y mt mt\\
\\ mt\\ -'-'i k #yp ' K
PETER SELLERS

GOT A SICK CAR
BRING IT TO US, OUR 5 SKILLED MECHANICS
HAVE OVER 80 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Youll drive safer with our erase and
tune-up service, too.
Were the student's friend, so stop in
and save money.
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIALIST
1031 So. Rflia Pltoae 376*7771
| GREEKS ""I
I and I
GRADS
I Pictures for the Seminole will be taken November 4*22 in I
Room 346 of the Student Union. Appointments must be made 1
in advance, between the hours of 12 and 5. and must
correspond to the weekly schedule below. Beginning October
I 28, phone the Union, extension 2832 for an appointment. The 1
1 attire for the pictures is dark coat and tie for the males, and 1
1 dark round-neck sweaters for the females. Pictures will be shot 1
I from 12-5 and 6-9 p.m. S
I DO NOT CAU. BEFORE 12PM I
I NOVEMBER 4-8 1
1 Alpha Chi Omega I
( Alpha Delta Pi f
1 T Alpha Epsilon Phi
I AM prospective graduates, last Alpha Epsilon Pi 1
names beginning Alpha Gamma Rho
Jh Alpha Omicron Pi
9 WB Alpha Tau Omega
V# Beta Theta Pi
I i mm Chi Omega m
1 Chi Phi 1
1 Delta Chi 1
I NOVEMBER 11-15 1
1 Delta Delta Delta 1
I Delta Gamma 1
I Delta Phi Epsilon All prospective graduates, last 1
I Delta Sigma Phi namss beginning I
Delta Tau Delta _ _
Delta Upsilon Kl
Kappa Alpha
Kappa Alpha Theta I
X Kappa Delta 1
Kappa Sigma
X Lambda Chi Alpha I
I NOVEMBER 18-22 1
I Phi Delta Theta 1
I Phi Epsilon Pi I
I Phi Gamma. Delta I
X Phi Kappa Psi 1
% Phi Kappa Tau
1 Phi Mu I
I Phi Sigma Sigma X
I AH proepective greduetes, last Pi Kappa Alpha
namss beginning Pi Kappa Phi
Pi Lambda Phi
I WK W Sigma Alpha Epsilon I
Sigma Chi
Sigma Kappa
I Sigma Nu
I Sigma Phi Epsflon |
I Tau Epalon Phi i
1 Tau Kappa Epsilon
I Theta Chi |
i Zeta Tau Alpha I

MM e Mil. 1Q TkM BUelflU A l>}

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 18,1968

Page 12

| Campus Crttr
Bizets Carmen, the finest product
ijjjaSSlSfsL. PP u^ar French opera in modern history. Since introduction the Paris public
at the Opera Comique on of March,
prodigious number of performances in every opera house of the world,
|S| and in the United States it has now surpassed every other opera in number
of
Much of the operas success is due to the best libretto in all opera, by Meilhac
-? and Halevy, as well as to the enchanting rhythms and melodies which have
almost become a part of our folk music. Often called the perfect opera, it boasts
| several colorful and three-dimensional leading characters as well as several
i minor roles which are sketched with complete credibility. It is also good theater
throughout, and the music underlines the dramatic situations at every turn,
IL even suggesting the vivacious colors of its Spanish setting.
Performed originally as an opera comique, that is, with spoken dialogue,
Boris Goldovsky returns to that concept for this production of Bizet s Carmen.
Florida Gym Reitz Union Box Office:
i | n/i Air Students: $2.00, $1.25, SI.OO
November 22, 3*15 p*m. Faculty, g.p.: $2.50, $1.50, $1.25

NOTICES:

Student Senate Replacements

All organizations requesting
funds through the Budget and
Finance Committee (whether a
special request or the annual
budget) shall supply the
following information to the
Secretary of the Committee:
1. Name of the requesting
organization;
2. N umber of active
members in the
organization;
3. Number of active
members of the
organization to receive the
funds being requested;
4. Amount of funds, if any,
budgeted to the
organization the previous
quarter and the previous
academic year;

5. Toial amount of funds
received as special requests
by the organization lo that
date in the current quarter
and in the current
academic year
(Note: All special requests must
be in at least three weeks before
the money is needed.)

Gator Weekend Committee of the
Union Board will meet 7:00-8:30
p.m., Monday Nov. 18, in room
118 Reitz Union. We are looking
for responsible people willing to
work.. .all are invited.

DATES TO REMEMBER

Tuesday Nov. 19. SAVANT meeting,
Reitz Union, room 357, at 3:45
p.m.
AIESEC meetein, J.W. Reitz Union,
room 150 C. Monday Nov.l, 7:30
p.m.

Students desiring to serve on the
Student Senate should pick up
applications from the secretary
in the Student Government
offices, room 305 Reitz Union
As Senate seats become vacant
completed application forms and
personal interviews will be used
to choose replacement members.

Annual Christmas Sale Dec. 3,4,5.
Second floor of Reitz Union.
11:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Notice

Preference will bo given to
students with experience end a
desire to serve the entire student
body Questions should be
addressed to Senate President
Pro-Terri Jack Vaughn, Majority
Floor Leader Charles Harris, or
Minority Floor Leader Scott
Holloway

Annual Childrens Christmas Party,
Dec. 7. Second floor of Reitz
Union, 2:00 p.m. All children of
the University Community are
invited.



Cross Co In Pain

(EDITORS NOTE: Today UFs cross country team travels to
Birmingham for the SEC meet. After weeks of grueling training track
coach Jimmy Hawk Carnes has picked the top seven runners from a
group that originally numbered over 30.
By CALDWELL TUMEC
and
DON HALE
Alligator Spacial Writers
A cross-country race is not usually very exciting to watch. The
runners follow a four mile course and finish in a funnel-shaped chute
which eliminates the possibility of a tie.
But for those who know, a more apt description of this distance
run is simply a portrait in pain.
Says nationally ranked Gator half-miler Bob Lang: You never
know how long four miles is until you run a cross country race over a
course youve never seen before.
Cross-country is usually considered a conditioning sport which
allows track runners a chance to get in many miles of training before
the regular track season begins. But being run over long distances
(usually four, but sometimes as much as eight or ten miles) makes it
much more of a distance man s sport. Even half-milers and milers are
at some disadvantage.
The fact that this year s top seven runners (seven is a full team)
include four freshmen, all of whom are considered distance men
rather than half-milers, is some indication of the type of runner who
does best in this fall sport.
Johnnie Brown, Jack Nason, Roy Benjamin, and Nick Caswell are
all considered by track coach Jimmy Hawk Carnes to be milers or
three-mflers. The upperclassmen, Ken Bumsed, John Parker, and Steve
Atkinson are in the half-miler class.

? 9
NICK CASWELL
A freshman from New York,
Nick is the fourth freshman on
the team. He claims that he loves
running in snow, but his showing
this year indicates that he does
just as well in sunny Florida. He
has run the course in 20:59 and
with his stride (hes 6-3) could
be a top distance runner.

JACK NASON
A freshman from Orlando,
Jack Is simply the best high
school distance runner ever
developed in Florida. His 4:13
mile and 9:25 two-mile state
records attest to his tremendous
potential. He was also the state
cross country champion. Jack
became a living legend in UF
track annals when he missed the
team bus and rode his Honda td
a dual meet with Auburn ... in
Fine Mountain, Ga.

ROY BENJAMIN
A freshman from Brandon,
Roy holds credentials in the mile
and two-mile with times of 4:24
and 9:55. Roy has run the UF
four-mile course in 20:24 which
places him 3rd on the team
behind Brown and Nason. He is
known for his consistency and
runs every race with the top
group of runners.

2 ''''it. r ~' ' r,.y . Sfe'^lll^
: > m^.,Â¥ \,lfm3ms wtof v -.* '*'. ;. *\. ~ f
>v '. 7 fy w'- * 4 / ,*: > <**? V , ijffnrWMlFfrImr|ilTi. 'r*y&Sa%& '^/,g^- *' */.
'* ~ s+*',s *7 ''*'s&&**: '>4*l. 'K rUfcitv*--"'' y
* KEN BURNSED
... leads Caswell in run through woods

'll
IB B
Mr. m
H m 1
Hr m 1
.A M
V " N
PHOTOS By NICK ARROYO

laL
JOHNNIE BROWN
This freshman boasts the title
First Negro To Compete For
UF and has lived up to his star
billing. His 19:47 time for four
miles is second only to Frank
Lagotics tremendous record of
18:57. One of the best-liked
men on the trade team, Johnnie
has a quick smile and a wit to
match. He and Jack Nason have
paced the team through the
entire season.

Scoring in a meet is simple. One point is awarded to the first place,
two for second, and so on. Only five runners count in the scoring, but
the other two may keep the other teams from placing as high. The five
places are tallied for each team and the low score wins. In big meets, a
winning score may be as high as 60 or 70.
Why would anyone put himself through this kind of routine? What
motivates someone to accept Carnes 1 edict: If you want to be good,
youve got to hurt. The more you hurt, the better you will be.
You realize that you are gliding, and the other runners are fading
back. Through the agony of your utmost effort you can feel the
elation of knowing that you will win.
That one moment, somehow, makes it all worth it.
One runner replies:
That is not an easy question to answer. But the idea is something
like this: Youre coming off the turn in the finals of the half-mile at
the Drake Relays and there are three runners on your shoulder and
two right behind you. Everyone is breathing almost in unison. The
only sounds you hear are the spikes digging into the asphalt.
You know right then that youve got to pick it up to win. And
you reach way down deep inside for it. When you find out youve got
it, the sky is Unbelievably blue, the sun is shining and you forget the
pain of grey, wet morning runs, of long midnight jaunts to avoid the
summer heat, of races when cramps brought tears of frustration and
pain. All of it is in the past, like it happened to someone else a long
time ago.
The claim that distance runners train year-round is not
exaggerated. As soon as the spring track season is over, preparation for
the long mileage of the fall cross country season begins. Cross country
overlaps with the winter indoor track schedule and that in turn leads
into the spring outdoor season. Then the cycle begins all over.

#
STEVE ATKINSON
A senior from Columbus, Ga.,
Steve missed last season because
of injuries, and as a result has
two seasons of eligibility left. He
has run a 4:13 mile and usually
paces the varsity squad when
they run without the frosh. A
hard worker, Steve trains with
Olympian Jack Bacheler. Barring
injuries or illness, Steve could be
UFs top prospect in the mile
this spring.

Monday, Novombar 18,1968, The Florida Alligator,

L Jfp
KEN BURNSED
A sophomore from Brandon,
Ken ran on the undefeated
freshman team last year and
eventually moved into the top
seven varisty team. During the
outdoor season he ran a 1:52.3
half-mile while placing sixth in
the SEC championships.
Primarily a half-miler, Ken is
known for his consistency and
dependability when the chips are
down.

: ; : : v &o + r 38 'JprWtsri
JOHN PARKER
A senior from Orlando, John
also has two seasons of
eligibility. He has not run track
full time until this year,
concentrating mainly on
basketball. With a half-mile
clocking of 1:54 in the
intramural track meet last
spring. John began distance
training full time and now
appears a good prospect for the
half-mile. He has run the UF
course in 21:00 and on occasion
has paced the varsity squad.

Page 13



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambor 18.1968

We won, and thats all that
counts.
Some people will cofnplain
that we didnt win big enough,
that Kentucky was a pushover
and that we were sloppy again.
We might have stomped
them, if it hadnt been for some
questionable officiating by SEC
officials.
Both teams suffered, but it
seemed our penalties came on
crucial plays cutting short a
possible scoring drive or
keeping the ball in Kentuckys
possession.
Kentucky played rough and
fought the Gators every inch of
the way. The Wildcats were all
over the field, when a tackle was
made all 11 men on the field
figured in it some way.
For a team that was supposed
to be so demoralized, their
coach has resigned, their leading
scorer was out with an injury
and another starter had quit the
team early in the week, they
certainly were up for this one.
From the beginning of the
week when the seniors had
called a team meeting to tell the
rest of the squad how badly they
wanted to win Saturday until
the time ran out at the end of
the game, this was the Gators
game.
But the Gators were not to be
undone.
I must admit their were some
hectic moments along with the
exciting ones: like noticing how

Wmnr
TOM KENNEDY
FOR A LOSING CAUSE
UF's Bill Reed (top) is holding down FSU's John Rider (bottom) in a
wrestling match Friday night in Florida Gym. The Seminole grapplers
came out on top 19*14.
. W HL>
HF
mUHmisMW v
*' :jLxX-Cv > jfjS' jV' V v- V :
. :gij : jjSL
NICK ARROYO
UF SOCCER CLUB WINS
Miami-Dade Jr. College succembed to the Gators 3-0 in a match
Friday afternoon. UF has now won 14 straight games, five of them
coming this fall.
WX'WXttWKWWMWiWWrtVAV.V.'.V.VrtVW.'.V.'.'.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V,
1 Albert Predicted
Albert continued to show his superiority in pre-game j;
| predictions this season by selecting the winners in 13 of the 14 :|
£ games prognosticated for this weekend. $
Alberts percentage for the year has now risen from .866 to $
| .874. |
His only incorrect prediction last week was the Tampa- jj
$ Southern Illinois game. £

Gators Were Not To Be Undone

n^y er y o^*e^q^ e Thro u gh|
IMI || -.*> |||.' x- | Wy
SL B 1 V J9H
I M IS Hi
I -.' f- g|
JBlig:. I V
sinus I Ml M
AkkP h>H
LARRY RENTZ (LEFT), JOHN FAIX (CENTER), AND JIM HADLEY (RIGHT)
.. .Rentz played well until an injury sidelined him in the second quarter, Faix filled in for Ely, and Hadley
was double teamed most of the afternoon which gave other Gators a shot at the QB.

congested and sick Steve Tannen
was Friday night, or hearing that
Larry Rentz had got up
Saturday morning and was
having difficulty breathing so
the trainer had put vaporizer on
his chest to clear him up, or
noticing a limp in Larry Smiths

walk Friday.
But these were just before the
game.
Rentz looked like he did last
year, the way he mixed up his
plays, worked the option, fouled
up the defense by putting Smith
in motion and then handing off
to Christian up the middle or the

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Then Come To The
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way he faked to Smith and went
into the end zone standing up
for our first touchdown.
The offensive pass protection
was executed beautifully, in fact
Rentz was not thrown for any
losses and Peacock only lost five
yards.
Typical of the Year of the

Gator, Rentz got hurt near the
end of the first half and did not
return. The diagnosis was
bruised or cracked ribs. Also
injured at one time or another
during the game were Jim
Yarbrough, Smith, Bob Coleman
and David Ghesquiere.
The defense rebounded from
the Georgia game and kept the
pressure on the Kentucky
quarterbacks. One quarterback
was thrown for losses totaling 54
yards, while the other was held
to two yards in two carries and
only completed one pass.
Jim Hadley was double
teamed many times during the
afternoon, which gave the other
defensive lineman shots at the
Kentucky quarterback, which
they took advantage of.
Everyone came through. John
Faix, who had seen very limited
action all year, filled in for an
injured Mari. Ely. Faix broke up
a couple pass plays that could
have swung the game the other
way.
Harold Peacock got his big
chance, and believe it or not can
roll out. Peacock was not
another Bubba Wyche, who
came in for Tennessee last
season when the first two
quarterbacks were injured and
beat Georgia Tech.
Peacock did lead the Gators
to one touchdown and
completed five of 12 passes for
75 yards. I could single out more
Gators who did well Saturday,
because everyone did, but lets
just say it was a team effort.



M -OVERALL GAME PRAISED
Graves: The Years Best Effort

A week ago, Ray Graves
announced that a new season
was about to begin. He had just
watched his team go down to a
51-0 humiliation at the hands of
SEC Champ Georgia, and the
knowledge that he had been
embarrassed on the field gave
him a bigger challenge.
Saturday, Graves pulled out a
victory cigar and celebrated. For
the first time in a month, the
broad grin was there, and the
furrows in his brow werent.
This will go down as my
sweetest victory, Graves said.

.jsf jilt "^ ; ilm :
BRIAN GOODHEIM
FENCER STRIKES
UF's Jack Griffin (left) fends off an attack by USF's Dean Morehouse
on his way to an international ranking. The Gators did not place in
the intercollegiate competition, but did manage ranking in the
international contest.

lourney bet
For Paddlers
A ping pong tournament,
open to ail students and faculty
members, will be held Nov.
18-23 under the sponsorship of
the Council of International
Organizations.
The tournament will be held
in the Games Area of the Reitz
Union. Persons interested in
competing should sign up at the
desk in the games area or at the
I nternational Center, located
beside the Architecture and Fine
Arts Building on Stadium Road.
Admission fee is 50 cents.
Competition in the
elimination tournament will be
arranged by pairing off
contestants and letting them set
the time for their matches,
reporting their scores after the
matches are over.
EXCEPTIONAL EARNING
OPPORTUNITY
for
Science teachers or science
graduates to teach and travel in a
science lecture program of nuclear
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States.
During each full week of travel,
science educators are paid $63
subsistence, $25 premium pay
and lodging cost plus a minimum
base salary of S6OO monthly.
Vehicle is provided (with credit
card).
Qualifications: Degree in science
or science education. Capable of
extensive travel. Good health and
speaking ability.
Employment to begin in
December, 1968, January, 1969,
or July, 1969.
For application and further
information, write:
Personnel Office
OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED
UNIVERSITIES
P.O. Box 117
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830
An Equal Opportunity Employer

The pressure is off for now.
Weve made a great comeback
bid, and the team wont be
forgetting this game for a long
time.
Graves then started handing
out the praise.
What do you say about a
defense like this one? Skip
Albury, Dave Ghesquire, Dave
Mann and Jim Hadley especially
deserve every bit of thanks they
can get.
Skipping over to the offense,
Graves singled out Larry Rentz
and Harold Peacock as the two

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outstanding players.
Larry might have sat out the
second half of the game on the
bench, Graves said, but not
before he gave us a 10-0 lead. He
played a superb game in every
wav
As for Peacock, he added
the winning score. He went in,
moved the ball well, and got as
much out of the team as anyone
could have.
Going back to the defense,
Graves commented on the
playing of Ghesquire and
Albury.
Both of these boys saved the
game more than once. Albury
made a pair of interceptions that
certainly made the difference
between winning and losing. He
made his finest play of the year
when he intercepted that
Kentucky pass in our end zone.
Ghesquire came up with the
big tackles when they were

GSve your
contact lenses
a bath
11l In order to keep your lenses as
comfortable and convenient as they were
meant to be, you have to take care of
them. But until now you needed two or
more separate solutions to properly
prepare and maintain your contacts. Not
with Lensine. Lensine is the one lens
solution for complete contact lens care.
Cleaning your contacts with Lensine
retards the buildup of foreign deposits on
the lenses. And soaking your contacts in
Lensine overnight assures you of proper
lens hygiene. You get a free soaking case
on the bottom of every bottle of Lensine.
It has been demonstrated that improper
storage between wearings may result in
the growth of bacteria on the lenses.
T h 's is a sure cause of eye irritation and
in some cases can endanger your vision.
Bacteria cannot grow in Lensine which is
sterile, self-sanitizing, and antiseptic.
Just a drop or two of Lensine, before you
insert your lens, coats and lubricates it
allowing the lens to float more freely in
p* the eye's fluids. That's because
JJ Lensine is an "isotonic solution,
which means that it blends with
the natural fluids of the eye.
BaDK Let your contacts be the
convenience they were
meant to be. Get
some Lensine, from the
UP IB Murine Company, Inc.

needed most. He outguessed the
quarterback protection, and got
in on top of every play.
For the winning coach, the
game meant an assured winning
season. It was termed by Graves
as our best overall effort this
year.

TOUERT AKA SOCIAL COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
THE
TROPICS
NATIONALLY ACCLAIMED CHAMPIONS
WINNER OF NATIONAL BATTLE OF THE BANDS
REITZ UNION BALLROOM NOV. 23,1968
(Tickets sold at Union Box Office)
8 P.M. til 12 midnite
^

Monday, November 18,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Good Strvict Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
i
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
606 E. Pnlv. Aw. 378-4873

Page 15



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I David Ghesquiere was credited with three of the games' biggest _
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A> I Also in for a cut of the action was quarterback Harold Peacock B
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Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November It, 1988