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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
.. .. .
Fund Snortaae Breeds UF Fire Menace

See editorial page 8
(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of a two-part series
examining fire protection
practices on campus.)
By DAVE OSIER
WALT BENJAMIN
Alligator Staff Writer*
Serious discrepancies in
fire safety exist on campus,
says UF Physical Plant
Director Calvin C. Greene.
But Greene, who is
i responsible for fire safety on

Florida Alligator

Vol 61, No. 39

Cold Weather Cools
'Moving' Panty Raid

1; 1 f

1
UF PANTY RAID RANDY BASSETT
.. .poorly coordinated
'Accent Essay Contest
Deadline Is Monday
Entry deadline for the Accent 69 essay contest is Monday.
More than SIOO prize money is being offered. The entries
will be divided into three categories; freshmen, all students and
faculty.
Twenty dollars will be awarded for the best essay in each
group with an additional $35 going to the best overall.
Theme of the contest is the same as the overall theme: The
Dimensions of Freedom.

| DEPTH REPORT j|
4

campus, isnt telling where
the fire hazards are.
He told the Alligator
Tuesday he does not want to
publicize the hazards until
they are corrected. He
claimed withholding the
information was necessary
because some employes might

America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida, Gainesville

The

be tempted to resign if they
found out they work in
hazardous areas.
Greene also noted, though,
that there has not been a
major fire on campus in over
60 years.
A fire in the Jennings Hall
cafeteria two weeks ago

Thursday, November 14, 1968

By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writar
UFs first panty raid since
spring of this year took place
Tuesday night in the
Graham-Weaver-Hume area.
Campus police reported no one
was arrested but several names
were given to the dean of mens
office.
The raid was apparently
started when a number of men
residents from the Weaver area
started yelling panty raid. The
shouts brought others from their
rooms to join the group until
over 200 students were marching
between Hume and Graham.
Inspector Gene E. Watson of
the Campus Police Department
said about a half dozen officers
were dispatched to the area.
Watson said during the hour his
men were on duty there was no
destruction of property, fights,
or other disturbances that
warranted arrests.
Watson attributed the quick
dispersment to fast action by the
campus police, housing officials,
deans, and the cold weather.
The only problem encountered
in the dispersion was the
constant wandering of the crowd
from the Graham to Hume areas.
Participants in the raid said it
had been planned and advertised
among the students for the last
week. The turnout was
disappointing to some of the
raiders who left the scene in an
attempt to get men from
Murphree area to aid them.
Their attempts were met with no
reaction from the Murphree
residents.
Although the raid was not as
well coordinated or successful as
some had hoped, several male
students were seen running
around the Universtiy with the
normal panty raid trophies.

prompted an Alligator
investigation of campus fire
protection measures.
The fire, erupting on a
cooking stove, was not
extinguished by a dry
chemical system installed in a
duct above the stove. A hand
extinguisher also failed to
douse the flames. Water
finally was used to stop the
fire.
U F has no fire
department. All large fires are
handled by the Gainesville
Fire Department.
It takes two minutes for
a fire company to reach
campus In a fire, Gainesville
Fire Chief John Dampier said.
A normal response brings
out two engine companies
and a ladder company, he
pointed out.
Dampier said his men are
well acquainted with the
campus and its buildings. He
said the department assists
the campus police in periodic
inspections of equipment and
has made improvement
recommendations.
UF Civil Defense
Coordinator Robert G.
Sherrard, Jr. has been
surveying campus buildings
and has submitted
recommendations for
improvement to Greene.
Florida Gym is the only
building Greene cited as
already having corrections
completed.
In discussing the problems
in the gym and fire defects in
general on campus, Greene
and Sherrard hinted at what
some of the serious
discrepancies on campus
might be.
The gyms capacity has
been reduced to 5,500 to
conform to the National Fire
Protection Associations
(NFPA) code, Safety to Life
from Fire in Buildings and
Structures.
Because the gyms
stairway fire exits are narrow,
larger crowds would have
difficulty getting out during a
fire, Greene said.
Many older structures
were not built with the
closed-off stairwells included
in new buildings, Sherrard
said.
These stair towers are
self-contained fire escapes,
capable of being closed off
from the rest of the building
: during a fire, Sherrard said.

Senate Takes Action
On r 6B- r 69 Budget
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Body Budget Act of 1968-69 (part II) passed its final
reading at the Student Senate meeting Tuesday night.
A new procedure amendment was also passed under which forms
will be required from all senators to indicate their party affiliation.
The form will serve as the official party membership in the senate.
A second part of the rules and procedure bill -a new excuse
procedure was sent to committee.
Also considered in the meeting was the third reading delegate
official responsibility to the president pro-tem rather than leaving
most of the official powers with the vice president of the student
body, as in the past.
An amendment to the finance law was passed changing the Budget
and Finance committee to nine members includign the Secretary of
Finance and the Student Body Treasurer*

CALVIN GREENE
jlSajuuumama
serious otscrepencies
...
ROBERT SHERRARD, JR.
.. /'not enough people"
i VS 1
W JB B
,-P
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H jMIk
: P I
JOHN DAMPIER
.. .handles UF fires
The Research Library was
designed with this type of
stairwell.
, '. '. ': 'i vr: >
(SEE'FIRE'PAGE 2)



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

Page 2

! *wfc / it? # ;
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COBRA TWO-MAN GUNSHIP R,CK BENSON
... Army's deadliest copter
'Quick Cougar,
This Is Max
(EDITORS NOTE: This is the seventh of a series by
Alligator Special Writer Rick Benson, recently returned from
Vietnam. In this article, Benson describes a routine helicopter
gunship patrol over major combat bases.)
By RICK BENSON
Alligator Writer
QUANG TRI, Vietnam War is a bore, so why not fly as a
door gunner one night to see what Warland looks like after
dark from the air?
In keeping with my pacifist feelings I had no intention of
firing the M-60 machine gun, but I listened and watched as
another door gunner explained how to load and use it.
The important things I had to remember were to pull the
armor plate out before shutting the pilots door, fueling
procedures, and not to fire unless told to do so. I put on a flight
helmet and a protective armor plate and waited by the pilots
door.
We were soon hovering about five feet over the landing pad
as the pilot checked the controls and moved the helicopter up,
down, and backwards before taking off.
The cool wind was Mowing through the cabin as I looked out
and saw the city of Quang Tri outlined by its flourescent-lit
streets below, making it look like any small town in the States.
To the east, we saw several artillery strikes later in the night on
the beach, but no action over our landing zone.
Aerial flares kept the major combat bases in the north
illuminated throughout the night; Dong Ha, Camp Carroll, and
LZ Stud, with the DMZ just beyond the fog cover.
The gunship mortar patrol is flown every night from dusk
to dawn over the landing zone to provide retaliation from
mortar or rocket attacks below.
To make time pass more quickly, the pilot tuned in the
Armed Forces Radio station over the headset. The conversations
between the pilot and the ground sounded like the audio of
Twelve Oclock High and Saturday Bandstand mixed
together.
Quick Cougar this is Blue Max 28, how do you read me?
Girl.. .youll be a woman soon.
This is Quick Cougar, loud and clear.
Soon.. .youll need a man.
Quick Cougar this is Blue Max 28, what are the coordinates
for Are missions tonight?
Ive been sittin in a railway station, got a ticket for a
destination.
Blue Max this is Quick Cougar, coordinates are 4003 to
5001.
Quick Cougar this is Blue Max, roger out.
Homeward bound I wish I was Homeward bound.;.
TBS FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la tha official studant oawspa mt of tha Uni varsity of Florida
mad la paMlffiad Ora Haas weakly axeapt during Juno, July aad August whan it la pffillshad
*weakly, aad during studs at holidays aad axam periods. Editorials represent only tks
official oplrioaa of terir authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Rails
Oatoa Building, Uriserstty of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 91601. IBs Alligator la entered
as aaapad ctaaa Batter at tha United Stataa Fact Office at Gainesville, Florida, 93601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
IBe Florida Alligator reacreat tha right to regulate tha typographical tone of all adver advertlaaaate
tlaaaate advertlaaaate aad to rariaa or tarn away copy which It considers abjscboaable.
the Florida Alligator will not consldsr adjustawate of payment tor any advertisement
1 evolving typographical errors or erreeaoes Insertion unless notice la given to ten Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Mnrager within (1} one day after advertisement appears. Tha Florida Alligator sill
aot bo raapoaaMo tor am teas one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement nchedried
to rue several times Notices tor correction must be gtvee before next lnaertton.

Tire Improvements Slow

BOM PA6£ OMC
But in the gym, not only
are the stairs too narrow, but
they are also open, Sherrard
noted.
It is not necessary that a
building have closed-off
stairs, though newer ones do,
but they must have two
means of escape, Sherrard
explained.
Most of the older
buildings in Murphree Area,
Flavets, wood frame
academic buildings and older
academic halls had to be
supplemented with outside
fire escapes, Sherrard said.
Improvements have been
slow in coming though,
because of lack of funds,
Greene commented.
Major capital outlay must
go for new buildings which
are badly needed, Greene
said, the improvements to
old buildings have been
ignored.
Sherrard cited the old
College Library as an example
of this problem.
Because all stairs in the
library are open, because it
has no outside fire escapes
and if a closed-off stairwell is
not built, the building might
as well be condemned,
Sherrard said.
A closed stairwell has
been recommended, he said,
to make the building
conform to the NFPA code.
With adequate budgetary
support we can have viable
fire protection, Greene said.
For example, a
recommendation has been
made for an additional 19
campus policemen, he said.
Campus police are charged
with inspection and
maintenance of fire
equipment
Presently, fire
extinguishers are refilled only
once a year because of a lack
of personnel, Greene said.
There are approximately
6,000 fire extinguishers on
campus, Shenrard said, and
a cursory inspection should
be made every month.

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C Honda 50 Reg. Price $249. Now $219. 1
Honda 565 Reg. Price $349. Now $319. 1
I Honda 90 Reg. Price $379 Now $325. I
I Honda CBI6O Reg. Price $639. Now $595. 1
1 Honda Super Hawk Reg. Price $719. Now $679. 1
1 Honda 160 CA R. fl Price $559. Now $489 I
1 Honda Dream Reg. Price $669. Now $619. |
V Streits I
C Shop |
818 W. University Ave. B

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... newer buildings have enclosed stairwells
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WAGNER

Two Pass-Fail Systems Being Considered

By JAN SCHMALENBERGER
Alligator Staff Writer
The implementation of the
pass-fail option is being
considered by the UF
Curriculum Committee and the
administration.
Under the option, an
undergraduate student would be
able to take courses outside his
major Field without worrying
about how the grade he received
would affect his average.
The student would receive a
Satisfactory (S) or an
Unsatisfactory (U) for the
course. He would be accredited
hours, but no grade points
would be entered into the
average.
One proposal, now in the
office of Vice President of
Academic Affairs Frederick
Connor, will be considered by
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell. Another
recommendation, proposed by
Dr. Franklin A. Doty, Dean of
University College, is being
considered by the Curriculum
Committee.
After decisions are made on
these two proposals, the
administration and the
Curriculum Committee will
develop the proposal into the
best shape they can, according
to a spokesman for the academic
Affairs office. The proposal will
then be submitted to the
Faculty Senate for final action.
There is no way of knowing
when the final decision will be
made, or when it could be
implemented if the decision is
affirmative, the spokesman said.
Doty, after discussions with
students, members of the
faculty, and other administrators
on campus, made his proposal to
--lik'fcis fist of recommend*-
'jr-EiSi:' sot a student** faifctfe
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Roger Wagner rehearses With the Roger Wagner Chorale for
the Nov. 16 performance in the Florida Gymnasium. Starting at
8:15 p.m., the group will open with the sacred music of the

BY OCONNELL, CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

recorded as an E, together
with the credit value of the
course and a notation of zero
grade points earned.
This differs from most
pass-fail systems in which hours
of S and IT* are not
computed into the average.
Doty said he had discussed
this with members of the
University College Student
Council, 12 freshmen and 12
sophomores chosen by the

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Spaghetti with meat balls 1.50
Italian Foods % Jt Spaghetti with meat sauce 1.50
Specialty Sandwiches CffS9j6o m,y abov. ,wo ta chn r J AT %Jr Spaghetti with mushrooms 1.75
Delicious Salads am 1 with meat bails 2.25
Domestic and Jf spaghetti oven baked in casserole
with cheese 1-75
Imported JM iff ltlutt t| tl .llt| > tf with meat sauce and cheese 2.25
__. ifi UrtU UlUle US 0 M with shredded chicken and cheese 2.50
Wine and Beer 2 X o u J ...
pi jg All Spaghetti orders served with
CONGENIAL B M Italian Tossed Salad, roll and butter
CONTINENTAL V*' HOME BAKED LASAGNA i so
ATMOSPHERE . M *ith m.b.u. 200
aL jMt W HOME STYLE CHEESE RAVIOLI
Serving CMtinumisly CWjC.3U.ITi Hh me.t b.ll. 2 00
1 f am tu Bs3o pm IBNSFI
CLOSE! SUNDAYS w W Above served with Italian Salttd, Roll and Butter
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faculty.
The students felt they
would rather have this kind of
penalty to prevent students from
just wasting classroom space,
Do tv said.
He said this part of the
recommendation might be
debated on the floor of the
Curriculum Committee, as there
is a difference of opinion.
The Action Conference
recently passed a resolution 1
requesting OConnell to consider

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florid^lliMtor,

Renaissance. The program is being sponsored by the student
government as a part of a musical series.

the pass-fail option. He asked
the Council of Deans, headed by
Connor, to investigate the
system and submit
recommendations.
The Council of Deans
appointed a committee, headed
by Dr. Robert A. Bryan,
assistant dean of the Graduate
School, to make this
investigation.
Their recommendation,
which was to adopt the pass-fail
option, was approved by the

Council of Deans Wednesday,
according to Bryan.
The whole thing is now in
the vice president of academic
affairs office, Bryan said.
Both proposals suggest
restricting courses that could be
taken under the pass-fail option
to electives, or courses not in the
students major field of study.
They would also restrict this
system to the undergraduate
levels, and impose some kind of
limit on the number of hours
that could be taken pass-fail.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

Civil Riahts Leader Evers To Visit UF

i
KSf
CHARLES EVERS
... "greatest thing"

Roof Os Union May Be Site
Os New Campus Playground

The roof adjacent to the
Arredondo Room on the fourth
floor of the Reitz Union may
become the newest campus
play area.
Plans being considered
include a miniature golf course,
a sun deck, shuffleboard courts
and a dance pavilion.
Acting on the suggestions of
two Alligator staff writers, Lewis
Rothlein and Anne Freedman,
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich has appointed a
study group to investigate the
project and make a presentation
to the Union Board of Managers
later this quarter.
Problems of structure, cost
and a possible timetable for the

I /) I
&{(
I A
I Private
I Makes
$102.30
I DURING HIS FIRST
I MONTH IN THE ARMY
I To become a private, get your degree, then
sit around and wait for your draft notice.
After all, in your sth month as a Private,
| you may get a raise to $109.50.

Civil rights leader Charles
Evers has been invited to address
the campus Thursday, Nov. 21,
at 8 p. m. i n University
Auditorium.
Sponsored by the Union
Board, the Mississippi NAACP
field secretary will speak on
The Role of the Negro in
America and Civil Rights.
Student and faculty
admission is 50 cents and 75
cents for the general public.
His coming is the greatest
thing that has ever happened to
this campus, said Roger Brown,
union board president.
Brown stressed he was happy
to see that administrative

roofs development will be
studied. Three members of the
Board of Managers will be
appointed by its chairman, Dr.
Delton Scudder, to work with
the Student Government
committee.
The unions original plans
called for use of the roof
facilities, but financial problems
finally rendered the ideas
impractical, according to W.
E. Rion, director of the Reitz
Union.
I think the key problem
would be the structural aspects.
Its a roof not a floor. I am
assuming the capacity is less
than 100 people, Rion said.
One of the original architects

censorship is not prevalent on
this campus.
As long as the program is
organized and the speaker can
contribute something to the
educational processes, I cant see
the administration taking any
action or even wanting to, he
said.
Evers first gained national
attention in 1963 when he was
temporarily appointed NAACP
field secretary following the
death of his brother, Medgar,
slain by a sniper in front of his
Jackson, Mississippi home.
Medgar had held the position for
nine years.
In September, 1965, Evers

of the union, Lester May,
indicated the north end of the
fourth floor roof was designed
for some kind of activity.
He said determining the load
possibility of the roof would
involve considerable research.
Rion termed the miniature
golf idea quite feasible. If the
golf course were open at night,
lights would have to be
provided. But electric and water
outlets are available, Rion
pointed out.
A dance pavilion might be
too noisy and would disturb the
guests in the rooms on the top
three floors of the union, Rion
said.
Senate Leader
To Fill Posts
Majority Senate Leader
Charles Harris will interview
students interested in filling
vacancies in the Student Senate,
Monday from 2:30 to 4 p.m. in
the Student Activities Room in
the Reitz Union.
Vacancies to be filled are in
the colleges of pharmacy,
physical education, architecture
and fine arts, education, arts and
sciences, business
administration, and nursing and
in university college, lUC and
2UC.
Applications are available in
room 305 of the Union.

flame DOUBLE CHEESE
B O,IED BURGERS
2 for 49c
ALL DAY
: wrtw A ie SATURDAY SUN.
NOV. 14 NOV. 15 NOV. 16 NQV 7
BURGER CHEF
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called for a boycott of Natchez,
Mississippi merchants who
discriminated against Negroes in
employment practices.
The same year he was
credited with appealing for
non-violence and averting a
retaliatory outbreak from
hundreds of angry Negroes
following the bombing of a
Natchez civil rights leaders car.
Evers headed a drive in 1967
to elect Negro candidates to
local posts in three largely Negro
Miss, counties.
He led six white
segregationist opponents in
February, 1968, for a Mississippi
district congressional seat. The

IV
8
A
2nd Lieutenant
Makes
$501.18
DURING HIS FIRST
MONTH IN THE ARMY
To become a 2nd Lieutenant, enroll in the
Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps and
then get your degree. For information, see
or call the Professor of Military Science.
(Mil. Bldg.)

45-year-old civil rights leader
was defeated in the runoff after
failing to secure a majority of
the votes.
In June, 1968, Evers
accompanied the slain body of
Senator Robert Kennedy during
the funeral procession.
He was active in forming the
Mississippi Freedom Democratic
Party and participating in its
coalition at the Democratic
convention.



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Thursday, November 14, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14, 1968

Olympic
Payoffs
Reported
NEW YORK (UPI) Avery
Brundage, president of the
International Olympic
Committee, Wednesday accepted
the likelihood there were
payoffs as high as $7,500 to
eight or 10 members of the
U.S. Track and field team, but
said the next step, including
possible revocation of medals, is
up to the Amateur Athletic
Union.
An AAU official, however,
said his group must first have a
report from the U.S. Olympic
Committee on its investigation
of the alleged payoffs, but a
USOC official said, were
interested in getting evidence on
it, but at this time were not
doing anything on it.
Brundage, 80-year-old head
of the IOC, said his organization
was aware of reports of illegal
payoffs during the games in
Mexico City last month but had
no evidence whatsoever.
But Brundage said a
statement made earlier this week
by Douglas F. Roby, president
of the USOC that we know
who the boys were and who
received the money would
seem to be evidence enough.
Brundage, reached at Santa
Barbara, Calif., said the matter
would be takeft up first by the
AAU, which controls track and
field athletes in the United
States, then brought up at the
1 969 meeting of the
International Amateur Athletic
Federation -of which the AAU
is a member.
The AAU has the authority
to strip the individuals involved
of their medals, if it desired,
Brundage said.
Ollan Cassell, an AAU
official, said our hands are
tied until the AAU gets the
USOC report, which was begun
in Mexico City.
We cannot do anything until
we receive that report. They
have not presented the report to
us, and I have not received any
kind of progress report, Cassell
said. The U.S. Olympic
Committee has jurisdiction for
the investigation, he said,
because the reported payoffs
came while the athletes were
under USOC control.
Roby said in Birmingham,
Ala., Monday that several
American athletes cashed
travelers checks for amounts
ranging up to $7,500 during the
Olympic Games.
Roby said there still was not
enough evidence to take action
against those involved even
though he knew their,
names because since those
checks are the same as cash it is
impossible to pin down the
people who were making the
payoffs and just what the
payoffs were for.
The Mexican government
turned over some of the used
checks and they were traced to
West German banks. Roby said.
Rumors during the games
implicated a West German shoe
firm in the payoffs.

DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST
Jfe # m &JU
O I**l Wy ** I

Russia OKs Red China

UNITED NATIONS (UPI)
The Soviet Union Wednesday
urged the seating of Communist
China in the United Nations as
a matter of principle.
Soviet Ambassador Jacob A.
Malik told the General Assembly
Moscows attitude toward
bringing the Peking regime into
the world organization was not
a matter to be approached

New York Teachers
Continue Striking

NEW YORK (UPI) City
councilmen and labor leaders got
into the act Wednesday in the
two-month-old public school
teachers strike which some
critics said was being prolonged
by a credibility gap between
Mayor John V. Lindsay and
strike leader Albert Shanker.
There was also a strong
chance the State Legislature may
be called upon by the Joint
Legislative Committee on
Education law to intervene in
the closure of the citys 1.1
million-student system. The
committee scheduled an
emergency meeting in Albany
Thursday.
Fifteen members of the
Council who are demanding a
special session to discuss the
school impasse met for two and
a half hours Wednesday morning

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according to some transitory
nature of our relations with the
Chinese Communists, with
whom the Russians have been
feuding over ideological
interpretations.
French Ambassador Arman
Berard also backed Red Chinas
entry as the Assembly held its
third day of debate on the
perennial issue.

with Shanker, president of the
United Federation of Teachers
(UFT). Democratic Council Councilman
man Councilman Donald Manes, who head headed
ed headed the delegation, said they
found Shanker very anxious to
settle the strike.
He is very troubled that so
many children are out of
school, Manes said.
Democratic Councilman
Bertram R. Gelfand said he got
the impression that there was a
very serious credibility gap
between the parties based on
our meeting with Mr. Shanker
and the statements being made
by the mayor.
There was no immediate
indication how Council
leadership would respond to the
groups demand for a special
closed-door meeting on the
strike issue.

A vote, expected by the
weekend, will result in a larger
margin than last years 56 per
cent in faor of keeping
Nationalist China in the U. N.
seat, diplomats predicted.
The Soviet representatives
also endorsed the admission of
both East and West Germany
declaring that admission to the
United Nations was a matter of
the rights of sovereign states.
The Russians, although they
do not maintain diplomatic
- relations with West Germany,
realize that Communist East
Germany never will win U.N.
admission unless West Germany
does, too.
Neither Malik nor Berard had
a word of praise for the Peking
regime however. And the
Russian-whose country led the
first assault on Nationalist
Chinas U.N. seat 19 years ago agoeven
even agoeven refused to mention
maverick Albania, chief sponsor
of this years pro-Peking
resolution.
Malik would have no part of
the proposal to seat both the
Peking and Taipei regimes here.

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Harriman Meets With Saigon Ambassador

PARIS (UPI) U.S. chief
negotiator W. Averell Harriman
met with Saigon's top
representative in Paris
Wednesday in a 40-minute
emergency conference that
spurred reports that South
Vietnam may end its boycott
and ultimately attend expanded
Paris talks on a Vietnam peace.
Following the meeting at the
UJS. Embassy, an authoritative

Ferre Hits Demo Leadership

MIAMI (UPI) Miamis fiery
Maurice Ferre, blaming a
do-nothing Democratic
leadership for the defeat on
Leoy Collins and Hubert
Humphrey in Florida, charged
Wednesday $250,00 was left
unspent in the party's coffers.
That's a joke, answered Pat
Thomas of Quincy, chairman of
the State Democratic Executive
Committee. If anything, we're
in the red.
Well, It may be $249,998,
Fern filed back, But I do
know it was between $200,000
and $250,000. Ask him point
blank how much money is in the
bank in the name of the
State Democratic Party.'*
The exchange was touched
off when Ferre, a Miami city
councilman and state
coordinator of the Humphrey

Coeds End Protest
Over Restrictions

ATLANTA (UPI) Coeds at
Morris Brown College have
ended a sleep-in at the student
union in protest over campus
restrictions after the school
administration agreed to their
demands.
Our students made a series
of timely requests and we
responded by granting them,
said college president John A.
Middleton.
Student body President
Edward Downsi said the
settlement took about 22 hours,
following Monday night's
sleep-in by a band of coeds.
The demands included
unlimited curfew hours,
elimination of required
attendance at chapel, and an end
to penalties for class cuts and
restrictions on campus dress
in the predominately Negro
school.
Other protests this week at
Spelman College and Dark
College, which together with
Morris Brown and three other
schools make up the Atlanta
University Center, centered on
demands for black-oriented
curriculum and activities.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR... fflj/ /§ jj
]§Wp THE REFRESHING ONE WW

source said the United States
still expects South Vietnam to
join the discussions within the
expanded framework advanced
by President Johnson.
Harriman's meeting with
Saigon ambassador Pham Dang
Lam came after the Viet Cong's
National Liberation Front
(NLF) appealed to Washington
Ur go ahead with the talks
immediately;**' disregarding the

Muskie campaign, issued a
statement charging that a
Democratic funds surplus of
dose to $250,000 was an
indictment of the party
leadership.
Last week Ferre scored state
cabinet officials and leaders of
the state legislature for refusing
to throw a few bones of
support to the Democratic
standard bearers.
When we find our two main
Democratic candidates plunged
into the jaws of defeat, Ferre
said, the leaders of the state
Democratic party do not stand
up indignantly and ask how or
why?' Instead, they quietly sit
on top of powder kegs in the
throne room, talking to each
other.
Ferre said Florida was lost by
a little over 165,000 votes, with

Classes at Spelman College
resumed Wednesday following
suspension of classes Monday
and Tuesday caused by student
protest over administration
policies.
The students and
administration exchanged ideas
on a student petition calling for
curriculum and activity changes
in a two-day speak out, and
negotiations on a smaller scale
were expected to continue in
order to seek settlement of the
issues.
The students at tne
all-woman college were also
seeking changes in school rules
relating to curfews, dress, and
compulsory class attendance.
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balking Saigon government.
It came in the wake of an
angry Saigon Warning that any
agreements reached by the
United States and the
communists in Paris in the
absence of South Vietnam
would not be considered binding
on Saigon.
Despite the warning, allied
diplomatic sources in Paris
reported South Vietnam may

Richard Nixon getting 811,318,
Humphrey 645,350 and George
Wallace 587,634.
Had the six cabinet
members each stumped the state
in their own individual areas of
strength and gotten 15,000 votes
apiece for Humphrey-and they
could have very easily- the
Democratic Party would have
carried the state, he said.
Contacted in Quincy, Thomas
denied there was a $250,000
surplus in the campaign fund.

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Thursday, Novambar 14,1968, Tha Florida Altiyator,

soon reverse its stand agrinst
joining talks that would include
the Viet Cong as well as Hanoi
and the United States and would
endorse President Johnson's plan
for broadened negotiations.
Following Harriman's
meeting with Lam, an
authoritative UJS. source in Paris
said, we've been busy
negotiating with Hanoi,
organizing the kind of meeting
outlined by President Johnson in
his Oct. 31 speech.
He said the UJS. delegation is
looking forward to the your
side-our side arrangement to

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include the United States and
South Vietnam on one side and
North Vietnam and the Viet
Cong on the other.
We are expecting a your
side-our ride type of meeting,
the source added.
It was the first meeting
between the Saigon diplomat
and Harriman since Johnson
announced the halt of bombing
attacks on North Vietnam Oct.
31 and Lam returned Sunday
from consultations with
President Nguyen Van Thieu in
Saigon.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
'* the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
r ftC i/kUllu/V Managing Editor
P
>/Ai4 WiUM au am rez James Cook
__^^____j^Executiyg_Ed_i tor News Editor
Alligator Inquizitor
Hello. I wish to thank all those who entered the Inquizitorium, and
especially those who sent in questions also. Im always willing to take
good questions from whoever has them. Todays song for the day is
the Theme Song for the Organization of Persons Resigned to
Flabbiness. It goes: Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of
the lard.
Todays questions:
1. How do you convert centigrade to farenheit?
2. a) Who sponsored the Lone Ranger show? b) Who was Howdy
Doodys arch-rival?
3. Who ran against Burns for Governor of Florida in 1964?
4. Three of the most popular books of the early sixties were by
women; do you remember who wrote SHIP OF FOOLS, THE GUNS
OF AUGUST, and SILENT SPRING?
5. Who is the police chief of the University Police Department?
6. What was the word that was censored in the FSU controversy
which made President Champion resign? (scream this one to your
friends).
Yesterdays answers -1. Cary Grant, Archibald Leach; Jack
Benny, Benny Kubelsky; Judy Garland, Frances Gumm; Jane Wyman,
Sara Jane Fulks; Anne Bancroft, Anna Maria Italiano; John Wayne,
Marion Morrison 2. Jar-el, Lor-el 3. Janis Biewend, Carol Still, Patti
Bohannon 4. Kefauver, Sparkman 5. Grant Wood
Lock a claustrophobiac in a closet today.

1 was making a mad dash for
class the other day when I
happened upon an exchange
student from Greater Albania, or
some place like that. He seemed
puzzled and worried, so I asked
him what was wrong.
Oh, Miss, he said. What is
this institution, the Electoral
College, I have been hearing so
much about?

' jk /V*Aa> IV,
,'£rvlU
- - i( s J
In These Hands, The Future Os Your Nation.

Staff Writings

Elections Are Really Confusing

Thats an easy question, I
replied smugly. Its the body
that elects the President.
Where have you been,
Miss??? I knew you Yankees
were ill-informed, but even I
know that the people elected the
President on November 5.
College refers to some kind of
educational institution, does it
not?

EDITORIAL
Disclose Hazards

It was disappointing to learn that UF
Physical Plant Director Calvin Greene would
rather not reveal the locations of serious
discrepancies in fire safety on campus.
Particularly when we consider the reason
Greene gave for refusing to publicize the
information.
He said some employees might resign if
they found out they work in dangerous or
unsafe areas.
It is precisely for that reason that we
believe information about fire hazards on
campus should be public.
And we call upon Mr. Greene to make
public immediately any information he has
about unsafe fire conditions on campus.
Because the people who work under such
conditions have a RIGHT to know the truth.
Then, at least, they might be more prepared
to avert serious injuries or loss of life if a
major fire were to occur.
It is, in our view, far better to risk some
resigned employees who worked in
less-than-safe areas than it is to risk the very
lives of those employees simply because they
didnt know. .or because Cal Greene didnt
want to tell them.
Even if a major fire were to erupt today,
though, Greene certainly shouldnt get all
the blame if someone were killed.
As Greene himself pointed out, the major
reason serious fire hazards exist on campus is
because of the low priority fire prevention
and safety receives on the ladder of
expenditures.

t Yes, college does mean
exactly what you said, but
Electoral College is quite
, different. Its made up of people
! who vote for a candidate for
President. Get it?
Oh, I see. People apply to
the Electoral College, take
admission tests, and then
register. But why do they vote?
No, no, youve got it all
wrong. People dont apply;
theyre voted in. And they dont
take admission tests. All they do
is meet after the election and
vote for the candidate who
carried their state.
Come on, Miss, this cannot
be so. Here you are, trying to
tell me that the people in the
Electoral College, which isnt a
college at all, get elected to elect
someone whos already been
elected
Yes, I think youre catching
on . but theres one thing you
dont understand. You see, on
Election Day the voters actually
voted for either Democratic,
Republican, or Wallace electors!
rather than candidates per se.
What!!! That is fraud!! Why
didnt the electors campaign??
And to think of how those
candidates duped the public into
thinking they were voting for
them!!! Its out-and-out deceit!
Now calm down. Its really
just a formality. Each group of

electors is identified with its
candidate; and they always vote
for the man they are committed
to.
Do they have to?
Well, uh, in about half the
states . lets forget about that
possibility.
Okay. Now tell me when the
Electoral College is in session.
And is it on the trimester or
quarter system?
God damn it! Will you get it
through your thick skull that the
Electoral College is not a college.
It meets once every four years,
just long enough to vote. And
the electors of each state meet !r.
their state capita! to do this.
Oh, so there are really 50
Electoral Colleges, since there
are 50 states.
No. There is one Electoral
College. It meets in 50 different
places.
Yes, of course. And I
suppose the electors just go to
the state capital. vote t for
whomever theyre supposed to,
and then go home.
Yes, yes, thats exactly

The Florida All igator
*? e Universit Y Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Pubiicatmns.
Exi tO 2 83 2 USneSS Adverl,iinq offices *" Room 33D Rtz union. Phone
j the writer F, !ri Tlter f the not thse of the University of Honda. _J

For example, the University Police, who
are charged with the responsibility of
checking fire safety procedures are woefully
undermanned. Ihe shortage of police is even
more underscored when one considers the
hundreds of other tasks they are expected to
accomplish.
Also, providing adequate safety devices
including fire extinguishers which can be
depended upon to work when the time
comes, costs money money which has
too long been diverted to other but
perhaps less important projects.
Fire safety should be elevated to its
needed rank of high priority on the list of
where money is spent.
Before its too late.
Well Done
A belated note of thanks.
Homecoming, 1968, was a tremendous
success, particularly Gator Growl, which
took on a new and shortened look this year.
Alumni coming home, students still at
home, faculty, staff and friends of the UF
were obviously well-pleased with the
weekends festivities.
The entire Homecoming staff, under the
energetic leadership of General Chairman
Manny James, should be congradulated for a
job well done. They set a standard which
will be hard to meet by future staffs.
So, on behalf of the thousands of people
who enjoyed a great weekend, a hardy
thanks.

: By Janie Gould

right! One more thing: The
states all have different numbers
of electors, based on population.
Florida only has 14, but
California has 40.
You mean the 50 Electoral
Colleges all have different
enrollments? How silly!
Not really! You see, that
gives the big states more voice in
electing the President; so the
candidates can concentrate on
the large states and ignore the
others. And another thing: The
Electoral Coli ge system makes
popular votes useless at times.
I do not understand.
Well, suppose, for example,
Nixon carried Illinois by just a
few votes. Well, all the states
electoral votes would go to him,
while Humphrey wouldnt gain
any electoral votes from the
popular votes he received.
Ah, I think I understand this
Electoral College thing now. But
I have one more question.
Whats that?
What are the admission tests
like?



Tilting Windmills:

Forcing A Bitter Pill

The Florida Alligator has done a disservice to the
students of the UF. And, as has been the case in the
past, the injury to the students is guised in the form
of good investigative journalism.
The disservice I speak of is the recent series of
special reports on the UF Infirmarys birth control
pill policy.
In an often naive but always sincere attempt to
let the people know, The Alligator revealed to
the citizens of this state and the students of this
University that birth control pills were being
prescribed by Infirmary physicians to single females
under the age of 21.
According to The Alligator, and our University
president who is himself a former Chief Justice of
the Florida Supreme Court, such action by
physicians is illegal.
Hence, in all likelihood, The Alligator has
managed to summarily end the dispensing of the
pill by University physicians to those females,
single and under legal age, who have determined to
cast aside what is now considered the old morality.
While I cannot myself condone the promiscuity
that constitutes the new (im)morality, I find it
impossible to condone any action which might
cause unnecessary heartbreak and suffering. I find it
impossible to support a series of supposedly public
service-oriented articles which may sentence some
coed to an unwanted pregnancy or a dangerous
abortion.
Let us not deceive ourselves; with or without
the pill our societys attitude toward sexual
relations has changed. Like it or not, pre-marital
sexual relations are a fact a very real fact
throughout our society and its various economic
and social strata.
The argument cannot rest there, however. It will
be asserted, perhaps with great reason, that the
pill has greatly added to our new (im)morality.
Yet, even if this be true, it is even more immoral
and certainly far more cruel to inflict the physical
and psychological suffering of unwanted pregnancy
upon any coed who has engaged in pre-marital
relations, pill or no pill.
But, to be even more to the point, all The
Alligator has really done is to force under-age single
females to seek medical help in the Gainesville
community through private physicians at great
personal expense. Worse yet, The Alligator may
have gone a long way towards establishing a
black-market or pass-em-along network for the
pill amongst University women.
In accomplishing all this destruction, The

U.S. Flag Does Not Deserve
Venom Os Misled Students

MR. EDITOR:
This past Tuesday evening
some obviously ignorant, misled
student burned a flag while
other equally ignorant, misled
patrons cheered him on, all as a
symbol of discontent with
national policies. Why must their
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers' names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Afraid To Make Any Move Out Os The Stone Age

MR. EDITOR:
Maybe its all above my head.
Maybe I'm missing something.
But President O'Connell's last
judgments on marijuana and
birth control leave me, and
many others Ive spoken to
bewildered and somewhat
disgusted.

venom be taken out on the flag'
The flag is not a symbol of the
war in Viet Nam. It does not
represent the views ot Mr.
Nixon, Mr. Humphrey, or Mr.
Wallace. It is a symbol of the
United States of America.
If they were honestly
discontent with the war and the
political parties, and were not
just out for a little mid-week
hell-raising, why didnt they base
their attacks on the war and
politics?
Out there somewhere in front
of Tigert Hall, burned, shredded,
and walked on, is the remains of
what once stood for mams basic
human rights.
. . and they call themselves
learned.
ROBERT R. THOMAS, 2UC

If the authorities concur in
that "the marijuana laws are too
harsh, why must we still test their
validity? And even if there
wasnt sufficient proof of these
laws absurdity, can we test
them by stricter enforcement?
What will that constructively
accomplish? As I said, its
beyond me.

By HarveyAlper

Alligator has not-so-incidently invaded the
traditionally private and secret area of
physician-patient relations. By sending a coed
reporter to the infirmary as a young woman
ostensibly in need of help, and then turning on
those who gave her aid, The Alligator has dealt a
low blow to the medical men who seek to help
students on this campus.
An analogy might well be in order here; recently
The Alligator published a now much-publicized
interview with Jack Dawkins a Black man sought
by local police on charges or arson. As of this
writing, Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich is working
to insure that he will not be forced to reveal
Dawkins whereabouts to police because, as Aldrich
rightly claims, the interview in question was
conducted under a professional cover of secrecy and
source protection.
Plainly, Aldrich sees a reasonable right to protect
his patients as a moral and ethical fact. This is
commendable.
How then can he morally and ethically violate
the even more hallowed and respected
physician-patient relationship?
It should also be recognized that in presenting its
articles on the pill and the coed, The Alligator
neglected to consider that UF President Stephen C.
OConnell is a devout Roman Catholic and an
ex-judge.
While OConnell can only be all the more
respected for his religious devotion and legal
accomplishments, it is foolhardy to think that as a
Catholic and as a man of the law he could allow
birth control pills to be dispensed illegally to coeds
at a University he directs.
OConnell is a man who condemns even the
slightest breach of law. He holds that if the law is
wrong, it should be changed by the peoples
representatives in the legislature. Until and unless
the law is changed, OConnell deems it his legal and
moral duty to strictly enforce and uphold it.
And, considering the presidents religious faith,
his views on this matter must be all that much more
against even the slightest breach of law under the
guise of even the physician-patient relationship.
Certainly it is unfortunate that so many will
probably now suffer for so little. Lest we condemn
The Alligator, however, let us all remember that we
all make mistakes.
The shame of it is that our biggest mistakes may
now well become The Alligators fault as well as our
own.

NIXON WlNs'
lf Checkers Had Only Lived To See This

When I heard that birth
control pills were being
distributed at the Infirmary, it
seemed like a realistic movement
out of the Stone Age and a
display of consideration for the
individual student. What is more
of a health problem than
population control? I've seen
too many mental problems for

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

OPEN FORUM:
Abna mi VIMMt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."

Waiting In Atlanta
For The Snow To Stop
Way Down In Dixie

By CAROL SANGER
I hate airports. Especially
when its cold. When it snows.
Its snowing. Snowing in
Atlanta. In early November.
Its not snowing in Cincinnati
or Chicago or New York. Just in
Chattanooga and Greensboro
and Atlanta. Oh well.
Snow is nothing after the
great earthquake. Right down
the middle of the United States.
It fractured the union, in away,
and no one could stop it.
They must have been angry.
Not being able to do anything
and all. Makes you wonder.
Snow and earthquakes. In
November. In the South.
And the tornadoes. Whipping
through the rain and snow.
Toward the airport. In Atlanta.
Boy, do I hate airports. And
waiting in them. For the snow to
stop. And it snows harder. And
people run everywhere and say
why wont it stop, oh dear there
goes my two oclock meeting,
what will i ever do and its all
your fault.
My plane is in Nashville.
Maybe. Or maybe in Augusta or
Chattanooga or Jacksonville. No
one knows. And no one knows
why the next guy doesnt know.

lack oi uic pm atiu too much
peace of mind when they were
available. It is the responsibility
of the Infirmary to have drugs
that are necessary for the
students health. The individual
student is responsible for the
choice of whether or not to use
the pill. To avoid the problem
by dismissing it as not being

I dont care.
Everything has suddenly
disappeared outside. Because of
THE SNOW. Everything snuffed
out under a white, thick blanket.
The lounge. An old lady.
What was that you said
about tornadoes?
I told her. Big deal after the
earthquakes and floods and THE
SNOW.
Oh dear! She is upset. Gets
up. Sits down.
I hate airports.
Oh dear! A pause. The
snow falls.
Sort of a pleasant oblivion
comes with it.
My son is in Vietnam. She
was talking. Behind me, in the
mirror, I watched her.
He said its later than you
think...
For what? I really wasnt
sure.
The end of the world. Its
true too. Everything is going
wrong. Oh dear!
It cant be. Everything is
covered with THE SNOW now.
Wrong and buried and frozen
and still. In the airport I hate.
The snow falls. Heavy and
heavier. In Atlanta. Cold, but I
walk into it because I have to.
Its later than you think .
I hate airports.
A news stand. A magazine
LIFE. The world split open like
a cracked egg. Its insides running
out and its outsides caving in.
From the rumble of an
earthquake, the rush of flood
waters, War, the weight of THE
SNOW outside.
It was sti'l snowing. In
Atlanta. When 1 left.
Absent Senators
These persons did not answer
roll at the Student Senate
meeting Tuesday night: Sam
Hudman, James Morgan, Kathy
Monaghan, Arch Maldonado,
Patrick Tuck, and Bob Marshall.

related to health is an
inexcusably inconsiderate
action.
President OConnell, will you
forever be afraid of progress?
Will you forever fear the
students freedom to make
responsible decisions?
ANNE LAMPERT, 2UC

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Aliigrtor, Thursday, November 14,1968

fieinri A Gntnr Band Member Means ...

By KATHIE KEIM
ANigator Staff Writer
One of the most familiar campus organizations at the UF is the 1
Gator Band with appearances at football games, in parades, at pepi
rallies and concerts bringing it into the public eye.
Performing as a marching, musical unit, the band has characteristics i
setting it apart from most other groups, however much they may)
share the spotlight color, precision, and if nothing else, a claim to
being the only campus organization that uses an eight-foot-high bass i
drum, the drum with the biggest boom in Dixie, to dot an F in
halftime formations.
Membership in the 230-piece Gator Marching Band runs the full
range of academic studies, with future architects, engineers, teachers,
pharmacists, journalists, and a rising number of music majors all
participating.
The band includes the freshman away from home for the first time,
the senior wise in the ways of the world, even the graduate student
needing a respite from the rigors of research.
Being a Gator Band! member means participating in unusual, odd,
even frustrating happenings, such as when a bus laden with band
members bound for last Saturdays football game with Georgia broke
down enroute, forcing its passengers to shift to other buses for the
rest of the trip to Jacksonvilles Gator Bowl.
That may have been a sign of things that could only worsen that
day. Cloudy skies unloaded a cloudburst, dampening spirits, band
members, instruments, music, uniforms, and the field, not to mention 1
the football team.
The rain resulted in plumes being stuffed inside of jackets instead
of being displayed in hats, clarinetists putting their instruments aside;
and marching at halftime without instruments, bass players wearing;
the large flaring bells of their instruments over their heads in hopes of;
keeping some of the water off.
(Clarinets are made of wood and hence can suffer from warp if not:
kept relatively dry.)
What is more, the band found itself sitting in folding chairs on the:
sidelines because the seats that should have been reserved for the band;
in the stands were sold to the general public.
As a result, the band, too large to be seated as one group on the:
sidelines, found itself divided into two halves, one on each side of the
football teams bench. Each half was bigger than the Georgia band as a:
whole.
There were also the humorous, unusual quirks to the afternoon, as;
when a bass player turned his instrument over only to find a musty, j
mildewed, long-forgotten white glove fall out of his horn at his feet, j
And then there was the trip home, as 230 wet, cold band members;
bonded bases laden with one-line gags about supporting the Infirmary j
on Sunday and the local cleaners on Monday.
This year*s band members went through daily rehearsals the week j
before classes started, changing over to a schedule of rehearsals on j
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays after classes began.
In addition, there are one-hour practices on the mornings of home j
football games.
Tuesday rehearsals are spent in the bandroom going through the
music and diagrams of maneuvers for the upcoming halftime show. On
Wednesdays, band members go through their moves and maneuvers on
the practice field, polishing up the show during Friday practices.
Many band members continue in band activities throughout the
band year, playing in the Symphonic Band, Concert Band, the Variety
Band, Pep Band, and Summer Band.
The Pep Band organized on a voluntary basis, provides music for j
pep rallies, team send-offs, and freshman football games.
The other bands provide twilight concerts and other public j
functions, displaying a wide range of music, from the concert;
showpiece of the Symphonic Band, to the somewhat lighter repertiore I
of the Concert Band and Summer Band, to the jazz and stage band i
repertiore of the Variety Band.

QUIK SHOP
GROCERIES-MEATS-FROZEN FOODS
COMPARE THESE EVERYDAY BARGAINS
FRESH BAR-B-Q
GROUND CHUCK $1.19/3 lb. SMOKED HAM 49c/lb.
CHUCK STEAK 49c/lb. ALL MEAT STEW 79c/lb.
SIRLOIN $ 1.09/lb. FRYERS 29c/lb.
CHUCK ROAST 49c/lb. FRESH GOAT MEAT
ROUND STEAK 89c/lb. FRESH FISH
LAUNDROMAT NOW OPEN
'COME SEE US TODAY
Open 7 days a week
4122 N.W. 6th St. Ph. 372-6011

Hyp*? /
cmic nAve uriTuiun rncc diput

Traffic, Parking Are Subjects
lAt Road Board Meeting Friday

:j The Florida State Road Board will meet at UF
for the first time in its history to hear city, county
: and university recommendations on the traffic and
£ parking problem.
The meeting is scheduled for 10 ajn. Friday at
{ the Reitz Student Union.
i Emphasis is being placed on the meeting by UF
i President Stephen C. OConnell who says there is a
; need for funds to finance the construction of
i parking facilities and roads on campus.

No 'Awareness
Operation Awareness has
canceled meetings for the
remainder of this week,
according to Howard M.
Rosenblatt, 4ED, project
director.
Registration for classes is the
reason given by Rosenblatt for
suspension of programs.
The next program is
scheduled for Tuesday, 3:45
p.m. at the Plaza of the
Americas.

SOME DAYS NOTHING GOES RIGHT
... disappointed and drenched Gator Band at Gator Bowl

GREEKS
Pictures for the Seminole are tow being
taken in Room 346 of the Student Union.
Call 392-1681 AFTER 12 p.m., for your
appointment. The attire for the pictures is
dark coat and tie for the males and dark
round-neck sweaters for the females.
Pictures will be shot from 12-5 and 6-9 p.m.

Through the road department we have been
able to obtain $150,000 to build a parking lot south
of Hume Hall. We hope to have money left over
from this project to build more parking facilities on
campus, OConnell said.
The present system for funding construction of
parking lots and roads on campus, according to
OConnell, is from a joint budget that must serve all
institutions of higher education in the state.



NEGRO Founder, Two Co-Workers Killed

BOSTON (UPI) Five
Negroes invaded a ghetto
self-help organization early
Wednesday and shot to death its
blind founder and two
co-workers in what police
suggested was either a robbery
attempt or a savage power
struggle.
Two other staff members of
the New England Grass Roots
Organization (NEGRO) were
hospitalized in critical condition
at City Hospital.
Five black men were sought
for the killings, police said. It
was not known if they stole any
money before darting out of
NEGRO headquarters in
Roxbury, the citys
predominantly Negro section.
Fred Rose, 41, a public
relations specialist for the
organization was in critical
condition with bullet wounds of
the neck and shoulder.
Ronald Hicks, 31, a staff
member, was in serious
condition with gunshot wounds
of the chest and abdomen.

Communists Tighten
Journalistic Control

PRAGUE (UPI) Journalists
throughout Soviet-occupied
Czechoslovakia were ordered
Wednesday to submit to
absolute Communist Party
control in an intensifying
crackdown on the press.
The demand, the harshest yet
in a long and largely
unsuccessful campaign to censor
the press, came on the eve of a
crucial meeting of the partys
Central Committee.
Stalinist conservatives were
expected to push for more
power in a conference-table
showdown with the liberals of
party leader Alexander Dubcek.
News of the governments
attempt to harness the press was
accompanied by reports of more
editors being fired from
newspapers and journals critical
of the post invasion regime.
Meanwhile medical sources
reported the dismissal of doctors
for their political views.
The press crackdown was
approved by the partys ruling
presidium late Tuesday, sources
revealed Wednesday.
They said the orders to fall in
line were transmitted
immediately to editors around
the country.
Evzen Erban, chairman of the
all-party National Front and a
presidium member, accused
some member of the media of
falling victims to Western
propaganda and said this was
revealed by their writing
between the lines.
He said the Foreign Ministry
would consider the great greatnumber
number greatnumber o ( foreign
--ejMmondents in the
their dispatchers*?*
kjRPHS the 'fWy rjwnvpf -i
Vjrobtfc:riljKj
much as it had before beforethe
the beforethe Warsaw Pact invasion last
August.

Killed in the pre-dawn
outburst were Guideo St.
Laurent, 38, blind founder of
NEGRO, which he billed as a
public relations agency for the
ghetto, Cornell Eaton, 32, of
Roxbury, and Harold King,
believed to have arrived recently
from Cleveland. Ohio.
St. Laurents huge Belgian
shepherd seeing eye dog,
Russ, was tied to a chair
beside his dead master when
police reached the scene after a
call at 4:17 a.m. A man said in a
very faint voice, Help. Five
men shot.
Rose told police in the
emergency room at City.
Hospital the five men barged
into the office a former
sandwich shop when Hicks
answered the bell shortly after 4
ajn. EST.
He said they chanted
Wheres the money? Wheres
the money?
They shot Ricks at the front
door and headed down a
corridor into the back office
where St. Laurent and the others

There had been numerous
appeals from the party to editors
and broadcasters to censor
themselves, but most of these
appeals and decrees had little
effect.
Some Czechoslovak
journalists faced with the choice
of conformity or removal have
said they would quit and
become factory workers rather
than bow to the old restrictions.
Earlier this week the
government announced a ban on
travel to the West. Observers saw
this as a measure to prevent an
exodus of leading intellectuals,
scientists and other talented
people from the country.
UPI
NEWS
GOP Reports
Expenditures
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Overdue financial reports filed
on the contributions and
expenditures of the
Nixou-Agnew election campaign
bring the known campaign cost
-to over $lO million.
t i
ItZ
*****
sl-2
?;'/ itiiilion a ndfex pe nditif *es
totaling $986, 866 for seven
Nixon-Agnew committees during
the period Aug. 8-Oct. 21.

SHE TTO ORGANIZATION INVADED

were, police said. Hicks fell on
the sidewalk, where police found
him.
Rose said he was hit when the
assailants opened fire with small
caliber pistols. He crawled under
a desk after being hit and a
gunman walked over and shot
him again.

Grand Jury Indicts Immigrants
Held For Conspiracy Charges

NEW YORK (UPI) A
Brooklyn grand jury backed up
conspiracy charges brought by
police against three Yemeni
immigrants by indicting them
Wednesday on four counts each
in connection with a plot to
assassinate President-elect
Richard M. Nixon.
The jury acted after hearing
two days of testimony from
witnesses presented by the Kings
County district attorneys office.
The star witness was a fourth
Yemeni, as yet unidentified,
who tipped police to the alleged

a perfect size/
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~>> /. ~ a,
fjh
a special
i I *%
your looks but how 1 Jjp | jjJk
you feel as well. j A M I Hk WBfaP
(It puts pressure on iBI fjjf

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Investigators said robbery
appeared to be the motive, but
other authorities discounted that
theory. They said the shooting
may have been the result of a
power struggle in the black
community.
Detectives said the five
invaders may have been known
to St. Laurent and the others

plot last Friday.
Those indicted were Ahmed
Namer, 43, and his two sons
Hussein, 20, and Abdo, 18. They
face maximum prison sentences
of 24 years each if convicted of
conspiring to murder, criminal
solicitation, and two counts of
possessing dangerous weapons.
The Namers were arrested in
a police raid on the $57-a-month
Brooklyn tenement apartment
last Saturday. Two guns,
ammunition, switch blade knives
and correspondence with
individuals in the Arab world

because they were admitted past
elaborate security precautions at
the rear office headquarters.
The front door not only has
an electronic eye system, but a
two-way speaker setup to enable
persons in the back to speak to
would-be visitors before opening
the front door.

confiscated in the raid.
Federal authorities were
investigating the possibility that
the alleged plot was related in
some way to the assassination of
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy last
June in Los Angeles and that
one of the Namers had made a
trip to California this year.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

\ f,
A gjdj
tmm j^r-trr
effective \I _/ JtimimL *
/J\ Jmm Peppered Loaf *3 8P
Mov. i4,i5,i6, 1968 jHl' Btf-IUP Fryers k W
r ~~" j ~" . ** -" a -~ %g o r~ ~ w B \W' eXvLVnf -s. ~~- " H wka^ul

Fryer Breasts * 59*
Fryer Thighs 59*
Drumsticks 59*
Fryer Wings 29*
}
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
Pot Roast... 59*
Swiff* Pmmkm iblw ! lifftol
Beef Roast 99*
Swift's Mm CM
Beef Roast.. 99*
Chuck Steaks 69*
Short Mm... 69*

Shaft* A Bake
Chicken ..... 2 49*
Chicken 2£* 49*
Chicken 2 49*
>
\sy^^S
Orange Juke 3 *LT*I
Frozen Waffles .... 2j^2s>
Coffee Rich 2? 29*
Strawberry Halves... 3 *1
Mince Pies 3^l
Oyster Stew M39*
Niblets Com mT35*
Small Onions 39*
Sole Fillets 59*
Sandwich Thins. mT49*

lAiy SaiTt Pnwm ** I m >>< UfmM
.... || n | [ S(KlI .....

i



wrfha GOOD BREA KfflST O
* MkMlhM
m mm --

Jjio Gilriw 25-49
FauJUnM 4 5f *1
Bathroom Issue 4 I J I
Crisco 09 **£ 69*
Tomato Ketchup 4 *1
MaidJSyrup .....tT 99*
Pancake SP
Large Eggs
- 49*
Cream Cheese V* 29*
Margarine \£29*
Cheese \£33*
Teez Dips 1?49*
Longhorn Cheese 83*
Cheese Spread V9*

FRESH COFFEE
ALL GRINDS
Maxwell
House

IssJfcs*"* s ** v- yfc. a^rwTpsr
*' Potatoes iL ,_. w
4A AO* U 9 .%lJ* t %rnrnmi **TW
_ ! vastwrfp "-->
Hmwppks J- PPSIB oUQ>n*~
mm -* -39. fpmiyl ,I! sw M SI
aZZSU > zzxssttis 3430 NW ,3,k
/*/LwT a 2J* jpsTy>yriirse. 1014 n. main st.
i_\____ MH y| MMMMMMMHHHMHMMMHk^^MMMUMMMUMUMUMMM | MMMMMMMUMMMUMMMM uStMWMMMMUUMMMMMMMMAMMUMMMMMMUMWMMUMkA MMMMMMUMMMMWUMriMUMMWMMWMMMUUMM MAMMWMMMkMMMUMMIIMMMMMMMMNMMMMr

Dole Pineapple
. - - is >. a#w
vnociiiui reuggevs pt*
Assorted Appetizer* S 39*
The Drink Off Heel*. Iwit
Prune Juke 4 LT 59*
It Soie ny TtMie UmIIV
V-jB Cocktoil Juke 2 89*
Dole Pineapple 2? 31*
8
10p-elf Label! USA Nk lUapei
Lux Liquid Ir 53*
22 ea. J(W
spray snras con rair

I a a I ell

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Uttf*s Twiw SwMt
Garden Peas 5- 1.
Q^DB_MOHTES*raSIAKES
* --
iw ana nay i viivu
JFrah Cocktafl 4tr 1.
Frait D rink 4 tr *l.
Pears 3^B9*
GoMenCom..s *l.
Bantam Corn S -1.
M Man Sod-fecfc er Stewed
Tomatoes 4 *!
Croon Boons Its *l.

V I' li T

Page 13



re rvyrrrrswr*'*Vev^s*rf *yrtrrevrrw r i
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE §
1964 Lambretta runs great. Luggage
rack. S9O. Call 378*8072. (A-st-39-p)
reaeflA ** tm I
t SffvTC l sn
THRU "SwwT I
| SAT ONLY
j BEST FOREIGN okvtk
. YEAR! IVE SEEN FROM
I; iTi EUROPE M ANY-1
' jaHIIIA where else in
h SEVERAL YEARSr;
rbes
lESMytt FEATURES
9muh 3
Nstreet^

4JBnraMei
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
. i
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
I allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
. a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
ttfen 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
; of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
Insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
' preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
r&nesville, Florida, 32601.
No refunds will be given on ad cancellations.
Deadline -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN N Mt - -DATE.
.(consecutive) STUDENLf PHONE.
for rant 1 V
0 wanted 2 < y ADDRESS..
D n .3 days (*lO% discount)
help wanted
Q autos 4 days (*lO% discount) CITY STATE, -TIP -TIP
-TIP personal Q 5 days and over
lost-found (*20% discount)
tervicef WORDING
mum 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 'i 11 1 11 m n r,
ran iinni iiimiiiiiiiiiimiii
all I II M M I I ) M M M M I I I II 111 I I'l INI
m i mm 11 rrr

Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

wcoe^c<*x*:*s!W<^
FOR SALE §
r it $
*^;*;*;c*;w.>vA*;v^x*Ki*Wv;-:*:-i--:K^\
Lovable Siamese kittens,' 7 weeks old,
potty trained, males and'females. Call
evenings 378-7638. (A-5t*35-p)
Trailer. 1 Bdrm. Furnished, AC, large
cabana. Askirg SISOO. Call
372*9390. Rm. 5 j 6. (A*3t*37*p)
FOR SALE: 1966 Honda S9O.
Excellent condition. Just tuned. Tool
kit Included: $225. Call Tim at
392*7951 anytime after 8:00 p.m.
Only 5000 miles. (A-3t-37-p)
f Wa It BTs ne y "si
I Snow-White I
I The 7 Dwarfs I

i FOR SALE §
v j{
Y-f^-^'- I*** 1 *** v *'' '*-*
3bdrm, 2bath, dng & utility rim,
screened porch, air*c. unit, tool sned,
washer, refrlg, carpeted. sll3 a mo.
SISOO down, 1611 NE 19th Lane,
372-2722, near elem & Jr-hi.
(A-10t-32-p)
Zenith Circle of Sound Stereo
System. Nearly new must se!! for
highest bid over $135 call 378-9171
after 6. Records availible if wanted.
(A-3t-38-p)
Tame tegu lizard 2W" sls. Bottla
raised lion cub $350. Baby
oppossums $5. Ocelot kitten $2lO.
The exotic pet of your choice.
Underground Zoo. 378-8810 or
378-7152 (A-2t-38-p)
SUPER stuff, sure nus! Thats Blue
Lustre for cleaning rugs and
upholstery. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-39-c)
65 Hondo 90. Very good condition
helmet included. Call David Rogero
376-9129. Make offer. (A-2t-39-p)
HONDA 250 SCRAMBLER. Good
condition, never abused. Ideal for
campus/woods/short trips. $250.
(Im broke) 376-1859. (A-3t-39-p)
Beautiful junk old trunks, old
frames, good clothes, china, silver, oil
paintings, wrought iron dinette, brass
fireside set. 1709 NW 11 Rd. Sat. &
Sun. 10-5. (A-2t-39-p)
, xr.;.>;.;.y.v.ssX*:*x*x*x*x*: M*x*M*v*vx*x*:jr
f OR RENT
CAMELOT AFAR i &ENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
Efficiency apartment, suitable for
two. $75 per month. 1829 NW 2
Ave. Call 376-8990. (B-st-35-p)
Furn Downstairs Apt. 2 br. Air Cond.
Call after 5:30 378-7845.
(B-32-TF-c) <
'Must Sub-let: 2 Bedrm Furnished
Apt. at the Summit House. Rent paid
to Dec. Istmove in immediately.
Call 376-9688 between 9:00 A.M. &
6:00 P.M. (B-st-36-p)
Modern 2 bedroom, air condition,
heating unfurnished. Available
December 30. $165 per month.
Landmark Apts. Call Achey
3727555. (B-15t-38-p)
Apartment to share with male. Furn.,
air-cond. s.w. 16th ave. available Tn
mid Dec. Call 3789277 (B-3t-39-p)
Need to sub-let 2 bedrm. furnished
apt. at University Gardens. Rent paid
to Dec. 10. Move in any time in Dec.
Call 378-7188 after 8:00 p.m. any
night. (B-3t-39-p)
Unfurnished 2 bedrm. apt. Camelot
Available after Nov. 16 $53 a mo. 9
mo. lease remaining. Call 378-9185.
(B-2t-39-p)
WANTED
i<*:*:*:*:*:*:*:*:*%sww:*:*:*x*>:*x*w,^!W*i*;*;*K*s<*:S
Lead Singer wanted for rock group.
Call 372-9303. Pete Armfield.
(C-3t-37-p)
If3o
&<4o
7/45 KV
STWAWGLEnTSSSfI
** * iy
BBISMKj 7*0*20

! TONIGHT
FROZEN DACQUIRIS
59 | for your entertainment pleasure
! from 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.
ROLAND WINTERS
! playing the 12-string guitar.
ALIBI LOUNGE
| 3334 W. AVE. (
TrtlinrfM I first run main feature
I MMmBB |* METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYERwarnsADOU6LASLAURENCEPRODUCTIONsums
I |QB!< Elvis Presley
I Jfmlg uvEAimu
i"*wyipTnnirrSn^miilj|^MreatniiinrT
I I MGM presents An Allen Klein Productionblit make
I I
% J
-My '* <^ s
The saga of Harold...from dedicated lawyer
to more dedicated dropout.
feature
I | ft SHOWN
The turned-on brownie that made it all happen.
VAN FLEET.LEIGH TAYLOR-YOUNG SS
J TECMicoLor FROM WME* uos,snu UTS w



GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED 1
*
Two female roomates to share two
bedroom French Quarter apt.
beginning winter quarter. 3769659.
(C-st-36-p)
2 girls to share 3 br/2 bath house.
Beautifully furnished, carpeted,
cent'ral//AC. Available Jan. 2. Ph.
378-6679 after 6 p.m.(C-10t-34-p)
Female roommate needed for 2nd
quarter. Apt. near campus. A.C.T.V.
Call 378-5803 after 6 p.m.
(C-st-36-p)
Fourth coeo roommate needed for
new Landmark Apartment starting
second quarter. Call 378-8731
anytime. (C-3t-39-p)
Female roommate French Quarter
38. Winter Quarter. Poolside. One
bedroom. Call anytime. Pat Quarles.
378-6974. (C-st-39u)
Roommates wanted 1 block from
campus. Cali Sharon 372-7054.
(C-3t-39-p)
HELP WANTED §
Women Girls: Telephone & survey
work part-time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
WANTED: Experienced waitress,
night shift. Jerrys Restaurant North.
1505 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
(E-37-10t-c)
HELP WANTED MALE: Mens
clothing salesman, part-time,
Discount privileges, salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-35-st-c)
Help Wanted: Part-time RADIO
ANNOUNCER for top-rated
Gainesville station. WEEKEND work,
experience necessary. Call Mark
Fowler 372-2528 between 9 a.m. and
10 p.m. (E-35-6t<)
Need woman to sit with 5 months
old child 8:30 to 5:30 Monday thru
Friday in home. Tel. evenings
378-2767 daytime 392-2929.
(E-4t-37-p)
Like movies? Want to review for the
Alligator? Turn in a review of any
movie in town the day after it opens
to the entertainment editors desk,
third floor Reitz Union. We will call
you. (E-tf-38-ACO
Ladies earn extra cash. Call for an
appointment. Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, Friday at 378-3185 from
10-12 A.M. and 1-4 P.M. (E-7t-36-p)
20 men and women part time to
deliver to local area. Must have auto
and know city. Apply 14 E. Univ.
Ave. Upstairs offices 1 and 2.
(E-38-10t-p)
Male and female to contact dorm
residents for the Florida Times
Union. 378-9058. (E-38-p)
HELP WANTED: Must be 21. Apply
after 4 p.m. Shakeys Pizza Parlor.
(E-3t-39-p)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gain valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nation's 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating. Apply in
person, Room 330, JWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
WANTED: Carhops night shift.
Apply Jerrys Restaurant North.
150 5 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
(E-37-10t-c)
' turn
AUTOS
GAINESVILLES LOWEST PRICED
USED CARS drive slowly on SOUTH
main st. Look for the small DATSUN
sign. BIG savings, courteous men and
women to answer your questions.
Godding & Clark motors 1012 south
main street (G-st-37-c)
j 4 MGB Ecstatic driving midnite
blue, wire wheels R&H new tires, for
the enthusiast on a budget $1175
378-6917 handled with TLC
(G-6t-39-p)
64 Chev 327 central air 327 R&H full
power w.b.& 5t new tires & insp
sticker $950.00 phone 4663567 after
5:00 p.m. (g-st-39-p)
Jaguar XKE CPE 1966 model. Fully
equipped with air condition, AM/FM
radio, front & rear bumper guards.
Only 26,000 miles S3BOO 378-8532.
(G-st-35-p)
Transportation special 59 Rambler
wagon SIOO 378-7648. (G-st-38-p)
VW Sedan 59 State Inspected. Clean
372-0033 after 5:30 and weekends.
(G-st-35-p)

| AUTOS 1
1967 Volkswagen 16,500 miles clean.
Includes S2OO worth of extras $2500
need to sell one car. Call 378-5381
Ext. 347 or 372-1538 evenings.
(G-st-35-p)
Buick Special 1961 Bsyn., 4 doors
auto. tran. radio heater. Excellent
condition $375 or best offer. Moving
must sell. Call 372-1274. (G-3t-38-p)
1966 Triumph Spitfire; Hard, soft
Tonneau tops; radio; 28,000 mi.
SISOO. Call 376-7551 during day;
376-7161 after 6 p.m. Good
mechanical condition. (G-st-35-p)
1965 AH Sprite in top mechanical
condition. Top & new tonneau. Call
378-6792 after 5 p.m. for details.
(G-st-35-p)
i PERSONAL I
x S
YOU can win a 1969 BRIGHT RED
MUSTANG FASTBACK, sports roof,
351 cubic inch V-8 engine, special
racing tires valued at $3,004? HOW?
LISTEN TO WDVH 980 On your
radio dial, for clues to find the
hidden keys, in the WDVH GOOD
GUYS MISSION NOT IMPOSSIBLE
CONTEST. Where are the keys? ITS
UP TO YOU! (J-36-3t-c)
Party: Single people only Sat 16th
Grad-Law-Med-Nursing students;
staff faculty-secretaries. Apt. 112,
700 SW 16 Ave 378-9095 BYOB.
This is an experiment, try to be
there. (J-3t-38-p)
Free kittens 7 wks old litter trained 3
females call after six 3786713
student (J-3t-39-p)
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
Union _______________
RECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europes
most famous campuses. For info, call
392-1655 or come by 310 Union.
(J-18t-36-c)
.vX LOST A FOUND f
I'X*x-x^*xoxo*x-sx.!.v.:.w.v;sw-x*;*xx*;>s:
Red mens sweater with white trim.
Reward offered. Please phone
392-8363 (L-lt-39-p)
Eyeglasses lost vicinity Reitz Union
brown frames call 372-2488 reward
(L-2t-39-p)
Lost black frame glasses in black case
call 378-6428 after 5. (L-lt-39-p)
Lost leather purse last week inLlt.hall
need I.D.s for regist. call 392-8664
or take to room 105 Hume reward
money in purse. (L-lt-39-p)
Lost Sat. Nov. 9 Ladys gold Benrus
watch; stretch band. Very
sentimental. Please call 392-9042 or
drop note to box 16-008
Yulee.(L-3t-39-p)
FOUND: Tan cocker spaniel 6
months old. Call 392-7980.
(L-3t-37-nc)
Lost Sat. at law skits, game or Phi
Delt house Fathers hi school Alpha
Omega pin from gold disc on charm
bracelet. Call 392-0415. (L-st-35-p)
>.v;*;*:*x*x*x*x-w.si* I *ixx*x*x*x*x*x*v.v.v.-.*:;
SERVICES
i f
:*X-x<*x;rx > x*x:*x*x-x*x.*-v?x*x-x*x*x.v.v.v
Volkswagen repairs factory trained
specialist 12 years exp. Quality
service at fair prices. Gainesville
Machine Shop. Please call 376-0710
1224 S. Main. (M-7t-38-p)
Child care for 2-5 year olds. Home in
NE section. FMayroom, fenced yard
with swings. Lunch and snacks
included. $lO weekly. 376-8523.
(M-3t-35-p)
Articulos de joyeria. Oro 18 K G Ran
surtido de medallas, escapularios,
aretes, dijes, anillos. Diamantes y
perlas cultivadas. Relojes Ultramar.
Llame al 378-6498. (M-st-37-p)
FINE JEWELRY order now for
Xmas. 18 K gold items (watches,
rings, charms, medals, etc.) Diamonds
& Pearls also. Call 378-6498.
(M-st-37-p)
Problem with German? Keine
Sofge! For professional tutoring and
translation on any level. Call:
378-3520. (M-lt-39-p)
TRIP TO THE BAHAMAS A Break
in the study Drudgery $73.00 covers
flight, room, meals 8i social events.
Nov. 28-Dec. 1. call 392-1655, Rm.
310 Union (M-3t-39-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus Call
M and R TENNIS SERVICES.
378-2489. (M-lt-39-p)

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Thursday. November 14,1968. The Florida Alligator^

OVEREXPOSURE
Long hours undor the hot
lights of the Seminole office
just got to be too much for
secretary Kathi Kelley. She
decided that there just had to
be away to cut down the
exposure.
Her small black umbrella
seemed like a good answer.
'The perfect solution to a
glaring problem/' quipped
one kibitzer.
Even with the umbrella
open, it became obvious that
it wouldn't work.
Who would hold the
umbrella? Besides, it's bad
luck to open an umbrella
inside a building. Kathi laughs
it all off.
If nothing else, the moral
to this story is simply that
Alligator photographer Brian
Goodheim knows what makes
a pretty picture.

Page 15



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

Page 16

Saltines Rolls
Cookies 3/sl. Buns 2VwSm SUUrS mMSk
8read....2/49* Bread... i j| l^mM
sssffl / I
WRIGLEY S GUM 69* * y, 7
7TKW CANNON
IllllETf $049
sis .c 1 COOKING OIL 69*
If A ~UUM* WESSON OIL 79*
SHAMPOO 88 __ ___ m iiii#p AAi
w,n-..u,e STOMt, BNL OP BO BB VOPOBBB 00 0
/eOIFEtS. BIER OR ALE 79*
I till) (AINA I ION _
sea astor sm fgaEVAP. MILK 7/sl.
fl s39' 49 h US* B ;
BATH TISSUE.... 5/sl*
PAPER TOWELS S/Sl
Q. WHITE. HUE 01 COtP WATU Allow., limit I W/IS.OO o. Mm. Fimhw. |.>M.g Cigontt.. Him IW W lE SP# 4P I 4
DETERGENT 39 tomato JUKI /si.
Mb. (Otts.) LAND O SUNIHINI lH On. W.h IS 00 ot Mat. F*. Mm ti.h,<*na CsMtMtM
BUTTER
TOMATO CATSUP 3/$l jSSmf rrc
PINEAPPLE 4/$l |(M) 4-FT. ARTIFICIAL Jmj^HjL
CHILI W/BEANS 3/sl\ y 088O 88 Ks
VIENNA SAUSAGE 5/$l WJ£afe|u^BT
TOMATOES 5/Sl Cream of Wheat . 43 c r '" iBBH^^Ek
SAUCE 8/$l PEAS 4/$l ? Food 349 HH
SAUCES/S1 BEANSS/Sla- " - I*
B lz!x 8 .T., 1 Shortening 89
PASTE 6/$ I FOOD 8/$l Fa^yte":".... 45*
i iwj i tyr l ^;
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Queinnv >i|l>Hj>iMw>e PricGoodTNvNovwWtf 16 MH USOA t MOtct Wh WANt) ttMN FID sttAk
~usdachoice beef 22 Porterhouse.. T
roast w steak $1.29 fflHj T-Bone Steak T
ROAST $1.19 STEAK 98 ZZe *
ROAST 79* STEAK -$1.29 w|rrl $ 139
ROAST 89* ROAST $1.19 S OO'BJOniCOS.... I
beef.... s $1.99 roast ii.l9 HP Chuck Steak.. 69*
USDA CHOICE BEEF RIBS or STRIPS I
NMU mi mw
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rjSSB&E& VVferT CHUCK CHOICE CORN
88m§fr V.ROAST 49 J
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10-Cowd BORDENS
CAHNED BISCUITS 4/39*
4-oe. KRAFTf lUCIB NAf URAL SWISS ODMIJRONiBI WIT OCOMA CHICKEN. KEF O. Tumv
CHEESE....... 43* CHEESE 79* H ea | DS es K/tl.
COOKIES 4/sl. CHEESE 2 59* j. . ,1.
Orange Juice... 6/sl.
ADDICT Perch Fillets 39*
m MrrbCtl m frozen food
__ B Hod Gal, THRU TV MAID AU FLAVORS _
A C AO. J ICE MILK 2/sl.
J 0/ BEEF STEAKEnES 88*
MEAT DINNERS 39*
Cqn CAMFBHIS SHRIMF SOUR OR OVSUI U) oz. LIBBY CREAM CORN OR ASTOR
C0RH.Z....10 69* ORAM6ES... S a 59* Slew 3/$l Cut Cora 5/$l
cLTw4. MORTON MINCL MLAI OR FUMRKIN 10 oz ASTOR SUCCOTASH OR MIXED
EASTERN KP HMCIOUS IRISH FIRM A _ _ z
APPLES 11/sl. CABBAGE.... 3 49* Pies 3/$1 Vegeh 5/$l
.. u. I WMAfT BAKIMr. II S Mo I YIUOW 4-N* FSKWO BABY IIH ICE OIXIANA SfEC. BUTTER BEANS OR CUT
POTATOES 10 69* ONIONS 3s. 29* Cream Bars 59* Gr. Beanss/$1
u S No. I GEOB&A RfP SWEET ESCABOLE. ROMAINt. ENDIVE OR RADISHES Head or Bog >0 < ASTOR LIBBY Ik lb. holy Bog SHOESTRING FRENCH FRY
POTATOES 3 39* SALAD ITEMS.. <4o* Gr. Peas 5/$l Potatoes 3/$l
Bymymumiy. YsaaaaM" riw aid T
ifllllli^^: iljl l / ilill l / T *y-SXi Covered 1 Raisins 39*
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yinr T= rtcm libm * uuiyui luy iviia v7

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Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 17



i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Novmber 14,1968

Page 18

Herb Shriners Daughter: A UF Frosh

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
UF freshman Indy Shriner is independent,
sensitive, and artistic, and the daughter of
comedian Herb Shriner.
**l guess if I were to be anything but me, Id
be a gazelle wild, and graceful and free to go*
she said.
Indy frphfca her choice of the UF as a
function of her. independence.
I always wanted to attend a Florida college
and this is the biggest and best.**
She thinks the campus is beautiful and says
she loves the M old buddings.**
Her basic ambition is to get through this first
year of college.**
As an ultimate career, she is entertaining
thoughts of being a fashion buyer for a store.
Indy, her parents, and her twin brothers
moved to Florida from California one year ago.
Asked how Florida differs from California,
die said, people are crazier in California; there
are more lunatics.**
Home is now Fort Lauderdale where Indy
graduated from Cardinal Gibbons High School.

Profs To Travel, Promote UF

Thirteen UF administrators
and faculty members will travel
to Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach counties Thursday for a
series of 24 speaking
engagements.
The talks are designed to
acquaint people in the areas with
UFs educational programs and
goals.
The University of Florida
Days*, the official name of the
project, is conducted
periodically each year in
cooperation with the Alumni
Association. The group has
already appeared in nine
counties this year.

WHATS
HAPPENING

By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN BREAKING THE BOTTLE TO LET OUT THE LIGHT: A
fellow named Gideon did that several thousand years ago, and the
Student American Civil Liberties Union will see a film tonight about
another fellow named Gideon who did sort of the same thing in a case
before the U.S. Supreme Court. The meeting begins at 7:30 and is in
the Law School Auditorium.
IN ON THE OFF BROADWAY BOARDS IN GAINESVILLE
HERE NOW: The Gainesville Little Theater presents its production of
The Little Foxes a play by Lillian Heilman, tonight at the GLTs
playhouse on 4039 NW 16th Blvd. The play will also be presented on
the 15th,16th, 21st, 22nd, and 23rd of November.
IN FINDING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF PABLO BUNYAN: Mr.
Michael Lemnartz will discuss Forestry in the Dominican
Republictonight at 8 in the Latin American Colloquium Room of
the College Library. All are welcome.
IN TACKLING LE LEDGER: The French Club meets tonight for a
business meeting in room 118 of the Reitz Union at 8.
IN PEACE, KIND I: The SDS-SSOC meets for a Draft Counselling
seminar in room 363 of the Union tonight at 8.
IN PEACE, KIND II: The Presbyterian Student Center members
meet in room 357 of the Union today at 10 a.m.; The Unitarian
Student Forum gathers in room 150 C of the Union for lunch today
at 11:30 a.m.; The Christian Science Organization steps into room
118 of the Union today at 12:30 p.m.
IN PEACE, KIND III: Project Samson has a meeting in room 316
of the Union tonight at 7:30.
IN GREEK-LETTER GOINGS-ON: Alpha Epsilon Delta, the
pre-medical honorary society, will sponsor an orientation for all who
are considering a field in health-related professions as a career.
Beginning at 7:30 tonight in room H 611 of the Medical Science
Building, the event will feature speakers from the medical school and
a pre-med counsellor.
Gamma Beta Phi has a regular meeting in room 363 of the Union
tonight at 7:30; the Delta Delta Deltas celebrate Founders* Day
today.

Talks are scheduled at 11
clubs each in Dade and Broward
counties and two in Palm Beach
county.
The members of the group
are:
Dr. Richard C. Harden,
resident director of UFs
Graduate Engineering Education
System (GENESYS); Robert R.
Lynch, Information Services
director; Dr. Gustave A. Harrer,
director of University Libraries;
Prof. John A. Nattress, associate
dean of the College of
Engineering; Dr. Frank
Goodwin, professor emeritus of
marketing; Dr. William V.
Wilmot Jr., chairman of the

Everything happens to me when Im with my
parents, she said speaking of her life at home.
Mostly by strange* I mean the different
people you meet while traveling with
entertainers, she said. Like President
Eisenhower, she added.
She doesnt recall an experience any more
traumatic than a broken collarbone.
But life isnt exactly dull at home,
particularly when you have an exotic pet like
Tiki, a gibbon. Friends really cant get used to a
friendly little ape in diapers, Indy said.
Indy described her father, the man, as
idealistic.
He loves people and is interested in
everybody and everything.
Indy just didnt catch the show business
bug, she did mention appearing in one movie
High Road to Adventure when she was about
seven.
Her choice of qualifications for a future
husband are revealing, thoughtful, mostly,
though good looks would be nice.
She definitely plans on finishing her
education. Youve got to be able to talk to a
good husband on his level, Indy says.

department of management and |
business law; and Arthur I. g
Jacobs, director of the Division |
of Development Services. |
t
Others making the trip are: |
Dr. Robert N. Braswell,
chairman of the department of
Industrial and Systems :j£
Engineering; Dr. Kenneth F. ;
Finger, dean of the college of
Pharmacy; Dr. David Stryker, %'
University College honors
program director; Dean Bert L.
Sharpe, College of Education;
William J. Watson Jr., head of
the division of Alumni Services;
and Dr. Robert E. Uhrig, dean of
the College of Engineering.

Now Volkswagen
brings lasting relief to left feel.
Thanks to a new miracle
ingredient in our little car
called the automatic siick
shift* you can finally say
goodbyetotheclutchpedal.
How does this new ingre ingredient
dient ingredient work?
OH Two ways.
First, it provides continuous unemployment for your left foot.
Second, it provides near unemployment foryour right hand.
(The only time you ever shift is when you go over 55 mph.)
Yet, even with its new ways, the bug continues to uphold
the old ways.
It takes only small amounts of oil. Absolutely no water.
And absolutely no antifreeze.
Best of all, it still delivers about 25 miles to a gallon of gas.
Don't you feel relieved already?
Miller Brown
1030 East University Avenue Motors, Inc. uTMonzto I

j iiii^MmlMi
M fmf
r "' I ir/ I*l I J ', r~-. al ,* II } I ~ v\. v
I ?-* I II I \ I 11 I 1 -r 1 ' 1 v ','
I ,-.: 4 -'> I ~?\ I _/' ';*,-- .-Is I v V-v
>j
fete,
X : '../ -^'^ sJ^'^-"v y- "' "'^flr~j j ||MMil 1 11. 1 M M
K:'
<
li
J ii ilff' ?m
* CfiKnuKi mMq
t*M i ? |9Hh
I j INDY SHRINER
: .. .daughter of Herb Shriner
PRIMROSE INN
JhLbi I|ua4 l**J
* WwPl W* %SBffi£w%m'
Is(rHF*CT Superb Service
Attrecthre Atmosphere
Private NrNrt
214 W, University An. Phene 576-5472

..V.V.WW



whats
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.

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Gainesville Mall
celebrates its Ist anniversary
today with whales, sales and a
birthday cake containing SI,OOO
in prizes.
Its a whale of a
celebration, said Sharon Witt,
Mall promotional manager. The
whale she refers to is a huge
tank in the center of the Mall.
Trout have been placed in the
tank and shoppers may try their
luck at fishing while shopping.
The whale sale is just one
of many promotional attractions
used by the Mall to attract
customers. In the past year the
Mall has sponsored an auto
show, an introduction to
Gatorade, and is currently
sponsoring a camping show.
We have something going all
the time to create traffic for
our tenants in the mall, Mrs.
Witt said.
B. S. Datz, vice-president of
the Mall Association and general
manager of the Malls Sears
store, had this to say about the
Malls first year:
The Mall has been very
successful for the first year.
There have been some problems,
but it has been a typical first
year for a new shopping center.
I think the major problem
we have encountered probably
has been the education of our
customers to the fact that the
Mall is not a strip shopping
center, Datz said.
In Northern areas, Datz
explained, malls anre common
place. But, traditionally
shopping centers in southern
areas have been of the strip or
open-air variety.
Because of this, many people

FREE COFFEE
with purchase of .
Cone*
Soda*
Shake*
Sundaes
Hot Dttg*
TKT
IN THE iK
MIIISVIIiK

'Whale' Os A Celebration
For Mall's Ist Anniversary

thought that the entire Mall was
just what they saw in passing on
13th St.,
But such is not the case.
The Mall is a completely
enclosed structure housing 35
stores. It has wall to wall carpet
and a year round temperature of
72 degrees. With 284,000 square
feet of parking space, the Mall
has enough space to
accommodate 2,000 cars within
its confines.
The Mall is the first regional
shopping center in the
North42entral Florida area. And
the only one of its kind between
Orlando and Jacksonville. It is
designed not only to attract
Gainesville shoppers, but
shoppers form all over North
Central Florida.
The Mall is the only one in
the South that is carpeted, said
one Mall official, it is actually
an experiment. There are a few
up north and west that are
carpeted, but this is truly an r
innovation for the south.
Besides being the largest
shopping complex in Gainesville,
the Mall also includes the citys
largest store Maas Brothers.
Maas has 107,000 square feet of
shopping space on two floors
with enough room for a third
floor.
The Mall plans to continue its
promotional attractions during
the coming year. Our
promotions will evolve around
attractions that are of
community interest, Datz said,
such as art shows, camping
shows and the like.
Sales, a whale full of trout,
a birthday cake full of prizes,
and 2,000 easy accessable
parking spaces.
Air-conditioned shopping,
wall to wall carpet and
promotions of community

interest.
All this means shopping in
total comfort within an
atmosphere free of weather

I Special Purchase I
I WKgiSt Qold and I
c Dia mor ld barrings I
If n **) |
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SUMPTUOUSLY SITUATED IN TWO GREAT LOCATIONS: 1
1131 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. AND 2552 NW 13th ST. I
|Ar# BSk jM fl wn.
WR yllv< m
ft f/flf f'
CELEBRATING 2 OCCASIONS IN OUR 2 STORES I
MALL ANNIVERSARY I
WOULD YOU BELIEVE WE HAVE BEEN OPEN IN THE 1
MALL FOR ONE FULL YEAR . TIME SURELY FLIES! I
CAMPUS EXPANSION I
SALE
WE KNOCKED OUT THE WALL AND TOOK OVER THE STORE I
NEXT DOOR TO OUR CAMPUS SHOP TO MAKE ONE GREAT 1
PLACE FOR YOU TO SHOP FOR ALL YOUR NEEDS. I
S -v**-',
RIGHT NOW WE'RE CELEBRATING THESE 2 OCCASIONS BY 1
OFFERING GREAT VALUES ON MERCHANDISE ... SUCH AS I
DRESSES ... SLIMS .. SHORTS ... SKIRTS ... NEHRU TOPS LEATHERS I
ONE-THIRD to ONE-HALF OFF I

restrictions. Shopping in an area
where everything from socks to
garden hose to thumb tacks are
at your finger tips.

All this begins at the corner
of NW 23rd Blvd. and 13th St.
All this and much more is
the Gainesville Mall.



Ultra-Modern Sears, Roebuck
Celebrates Ahead Os The Rest

Opening a little ahead of
their fellow merchants in the
new Gainesville Mall, Sears,
Roebuck and Co. department
store has been of service to the
people of Gainesville in their
present location since 1965.
The 5 1 merchandise
departments in the 100,000 sq.
ft. single-story structure cover all
the major lines of Sears
merchandise.
No detail was overlooked in
making Sears convenient,
complete in merchandise
assotments, customer services,
and pleasant to shop in, B. S.
Datz, store manager, said.
Lighting on the inside of the
building has been planned to
reduce eyestrain and provide a
soothing atmosphere. Pastel
panels and wood paneling give a
luxurious appearance.
Entering the store from the
front entrance, one of the
features likely to attract the eyes
of the woman shopper is the
tastefully-appointed fashion
departments. Manikins in bright
colors of fall will be eyecatchers.
Displays of dresses, coats,
sportswear and millinery tempt
milady to browse.
Fixtures which hold
merchandise are the latest
functional type, designed to
display merchandise to its
greatest advantage and to
facilitate selection.
An up-to-date sound system
is provided in the store.
Scientifically engineered to
distribute sound evenly over the
entire building, the system serves
a three-fold purpose: (1) as a
paging device in the event of
emergencies; (2) to furnish
background music for shopper
enjoyment and employee
efficiency; and (3) to highlight
merchandise values to customers
in the store.
Arrangement of the various
departments in relation to each
other is another feature that
represents considerable planning.
Though few partitions are in
evidence, the store is actually
arranged into separate stores:
home furnishings, womens and
childrens wear; mens wear;
home modernization and repair;
appliances and housewares and a
fram and garden shop.
Automotive services and
accessories form another store
within a store in the auto service
center at the front of the main
building.
This arrangement is planned
to make it easier for customers
to select items that are related in
nature. A customer shopping
for living room furniture just a
Shop
ill
MMESVim
And Other
GATOR
Advertisers

few steps away will find rugs and
carpets, draperies, slip covers,
and other items

Our Lowest Prices Ever
S a VC 77.95
50r C Campus 50, 49cc Spunky 2-cycle engfne. I
< Mo-Ped or Sabre Cycles } \ mpg. I
# teen. I
Your Choice f j
Cempus 50 Cycles . zips you around campus or town I
| at a very small cost, up to 130 MPG, 34 MPH. 50cc j I
49cc Mo-Ped Cycle I
Great for students living
' ./ 1 on a shoe-string. Quiet 2.3 I
X"; --: X XO MOYEY DOWIV MPH e a 9 nd e up 9e to 144 MWL I
"'w. on Sears Easy Payment Plan Handy parcel rack for I
books. I
SAVE $144! 4-Speed Shift SAVE $120! Sears 9-HP
Cruisaire Scooters 106 Super Sport Cycles I
. Reg.* $3591 tT 4
Handsome continental 106 cc, 4-cycle engine I
design combined with powers ypu up tQ 60 MPH
power and comfort! 2-cycle ff B I Up to g 6 MPG Quick QT "B
engine powers you up to 47 | 4-speed shift. Mm £ £
' MPH. Up to 130 MPG!
SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE SC3.ES TOP 0F THE MALL N w 13th at 23rd Blwd I
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back | 1
sears, roebuck and co. Shop Monday thru Saturday 'til 9:30 P.M.! j
c.

that go into room planning.
The same system applies
when shopping for apparel.

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

building or home repair
materials, or items for the car.
The store features a coffee

house, a pet shop, a key shop, a
garden shop and a catalog order
desk.

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

Zales Manager
Proud Os Ist Year

The store will celebrate its
first anniversary Nov. 14 in
Gainesville Mall Shopping Center
at 2520 N.W. 13th Street.
In announcing the
anniversary Marven Berkmen,
manager, extended an invitation
to area residents to visit the new
facility and enjoy refreshments
while viewing the latest fashions
in fine jewelry, watches and gift
items. Berkman has been
associated with Zales since
1963, has managed the
Gainesville store since January
of last year.
A native of Boston, Mass., the
Zales manager graduated from
the Huntington School there.
After completing his studies of
marketing and management at
the University of Miami,
Berkman joined Zales in a sales
position at the Miami store. He
was assistant manager of a Miami
Zales before his promotion to
Gainesville.
Berkman, his wife, June, and
son, Gary, make their home at
1324 N.W. 16th Ave.
The new Zales Jewlers is one
of the most modern in the chain,
having been designed by Zales
own architectural staff. Like
Zale stores all across the United
States, it will feature exclusive
diamond rings, earrings, pins and
watches by the same design staff
that won for Zales three
coveted Diamonds International
Awards in worldwide diamond
design competition. Zales and
its designers are now members of
the Diamonds Internationsl
Academy on the basis of these
awards.
The diamond ring or pendant
which you see in Zales window
had a long, involved journey
from its home in an African
mind to the highly polished
mounting where it now rests.
And Zales was with it every step
of the way.
As the largest purchaser and
user of diamonds in the world,
Zales purchases rough diamonds
in wholesale lots for greater
economy. The gems are then cut
in Zales own diamond cutting

wide, bokUnd
Rich 14 karat gold and diamond* W
iT I' j \. f ,/J
* *-'
i *>- *.'
J -
r**~ ,-.i^s3E£g|3B^r. %.**> ". *>,-. >l*.4*i-- *?y
* < ; *
' s * J2SS23BK-.- lv "-'- f
. v
Open an account \
Zales
R S -V --

plants, located in Antwerp,
Puerto Rico, Tel Aviv and New
York, and mounted in settings
which have been designed and
hand crafted by the companys
own experts.
Large scale buying and
production also account for the
outstanding watch values offered
at Zales. In addition to Elgin,
Longine and Bulova models to
fit every taste and pocketbook,
the new store will offer a
complete selection of mens and
womens Baylor watches. The
Baylor line is exclusively
franchised to Zales and sold
only in their stores.
The Zales store carries in
addition to fine jewelry, a
complete selection of
exceptional buys in name-brand
housewares and other gift items.
Susan Scott
Gainesville Malls Susan
Scott Shop was the fourth to
open in this 42-year-old Florida
chain.
Each of these stores in
Miami, Orlando, Cocoa Beach
and Gainesville is really a
local specialty shop operated by
local personel. The manager,
assistant manager and sales
personnel were hired in
Gainesville.
The warm hospitality
suggested by early American
decor native to the Southern
colonies invites the
fashion-conscious customer to
enter the store.
Sizes 3 to 16 are offered in
active and spectator sportswear,
swimwear, coats and dresses for
casual wear and dressy
occasions. Susan Scott carries
clothing to match the
personality, purse and way of
life of students, career girls, club
women and homemakers.
The Susan Scott chain began
in 1926 in Miami. Samuel
Sprintz opened the first shop
under the name of Lila May,
named for his daughter.

KrlFieHrfy LiriFj
L invites you. to view their
EoB collection of -frolicKino
fobulori ous -finds to** th$ J mUm
EM A festive season i WJm
Hf £& LuJ* otdu£6 jjndbuJbu VQ
l[ k touyjtJb candies, UsUUe*
IkJ LovvAuc, CLivLoru > wuto >
-bwv auv v JugWDu*d- am£
Ata4/n£A&-Jjj
the funnetft shopping cf
l||sto this very minute L Mjj
Ml mm
mm The Gainesville friall cru
Ew 10:00-9:30 njonday-Sab*^^
Ilf 55M W- University Avft-
I | cute cozy I
I/l all girl store.
\ \ k- to see cott n
I candy, gingerbread and
1 j lollypops.
I i. yMMMMI We're very selective
I I 1 when we buy outfits,
I I Only the dazzlers
our
I SKIRTS now 7.90 JACKETS now 1/3 off I
S Cotton blends reg. 14.00 genuine suede genuine m
jB leather reg. 45.00
JUMPERS now 7.90 PANT DRESSES AL9O SAVINGS I
'S*gs r cordttfQy .- -' OMseesand sportswear
\r^':: ~ 16 00 -/ > T?z: .r.
| AT THE GAINESVILLE MALL



jjgok |L
jit* ,. A N wt mM
Lemer Shops has been and will continue to be one of the Fashion
Leaders in the Gainesville Community, as Mr. Siegel states. It is our
desire to always provide our customers with the most updated apparel
at most reasonable prices available, and to provide our customers with
their choice of purchasing through cash, lay-away or through the easy
payment credit plan made available byLemer Shops.
First Year Sale
The Lemer Shops in Gainesville Mall will celebrate its Ist anniversary
by presenting a host of fashion items in every dept, at substantial
savings for this event.
Mr. Norman Siegel Store Manager states that Lemer Shops is
presenting these outstanding values in appreciation for the successful
first year in which customer acceptance made it possible for the
Lemer Shops to substantially improve upon its original plan. Mr.
Siegel further states that now that he is more familiar with the apparel
needs for the Gainesville community he has taken the necessary steps
to insure his customers that fashion selections both for Christmas
giving and for personal use will be greater than ever before throughout
his entire store. This includes his boys and girls department as well as
the junior, misses and womens departments. Mr. Siegel has further
enlarged his sportswear department, to provide a greater variety of
sportswear items for the young fashion minded college co-eds.
Entirely new lines of slacks, skirts, sweaters and blouses have now
arrived in time for the Holiday season.
(Complimentary J^esson
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO
MERLB NORMAN COSMETICS' EXCLUSIVE
COMPLIMENTARY MAKE-UP LESSON.
A COMPLETE NEW LOOK AND A COMPLEXION
CAKE PROGRAM DESIGNED JUST POE YOU.
IN PRIVATE. WITHOUT CHARGE.
CALL TODAY.
The Mall
mERLE nORITIRn COSfTIETICS
378-7822
WORKING LATE AGAIN!
NO SWEAT!!
In the Ma 11...
We cut hair til 9 :3opm
WU(i
Also 1125 W.Univ. Ave. Bam-s:3opm
Best Shoe Shine in Town
I

Northwest 13th Street & 23rd Boulevard
ANNIVERSARY
thursday, friday, Saturday!
I fashion dress buys! I
v I Look your best... and save while you do. The new- I
-v> wJ est go-everywhere fashion silhouettes... the new newy
y newy ?' W,*!..\ if I est fabrics. Wanted in-season colors. A must" sale.
mm *^^^ijS I Misses ''^ un ors '' petites andy uthfu *^ s zes -1
\m ' M I sweaters sale-priced! I
I^l pr,ced r 'ght and gift-right, too. Included are bulky |:
ft \ Mm We*: < -f' I and regular cardigans, slipons...classic and novelty
st.lt! otto. acrylic, In II to 10 I
lppjiiA\ Savings just when you want them. Choose from all
I > Mmm '£>& these: stretch styles with fashionable stitched .1
-R tdiont. .it 3t.t. ,i. 10. K
I Cuddly brushed tricot priced for extra value. Ideal I
wiSm, I for now ,deal f r gilts. Gowns and pajamas lace {
trimmed and embroidered. Sizes 34 to 40; s, m, I.
B I girls slacks, slack sets! I
m I 20% off ur reg. prices 11
I example: were 3.99 sale 3.19 I
mmm Good savings, good choice. Nylon stretch, orlon #
I acrylic, bended fabric. Plaids, solids. Sizes 3to 14. H

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 23



03
1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

Page 24

Fremacs Well-KnownDowntown

Among those celebrating the
move to the Mall is Fremacs a
store well known at its
downtown location for many
years.
Fremacs is one of 22 similar
stores in the Florida chain,
specializing in mens wear for all
ages.
The store in the Mall
beautifully displays Fremacs

Loan Branch Office In Mall

The First Federal Savings and
Loan Association has been
serving Gainesville since 1936.
The Association, like all federal
associations, was created to
provide a place for people to
save their money, profitably and
safely, and to provide the
financing to purchase or
construct homes. First Federal
now has assets of over forty-four
and one-half million dollars and
is the largest specialized savings

Anniversary Special
Lacy and beautiful yet strong
enough to smooth you to a perfect
shape. Our Anniversary Special is a
Lycra Spandex power-net PANTY
GIRDLE.
Sizes S-M-Lg-XLg. Colors
white, pink, blue, beige & yellow.
Special price $4.99
ffimjfokj
JhKA/gIKI)I>s/LIN(. I kii
Gainesville Mall
I ANNIVERSARY
| SPECIAL GROUP 11
SPORTCOATS
Each sport coat in this selected group is
from our regular stock and is reduced for
this event only* Florida weight/, plaids &
checks. A**
NOW *2B
GAINESVILLE MALL

exclusive line of fine mens wear
in an Early American decor. The
red carpet contrasts with a black
ceiling for an accent on luxury.
For students Fremacs offers
instant credit. All you need to
do is establish your standing at
the University just show your
I.D. Then the store is yours.
Manager Bud Garland moved
with the store from the

institution in North Central
Florida.
First Federal has two offices
the home office located at 249
West University Avenue and the
branch office located in the
Gainesville Mall. The branch
office quarters were enlarged
when it was moved into the
Gainesville Mall. To meet the
continuous growth of the
Association, additional space of
over 1,000 feet has been added
to the home office.

downtown location. Before that
he was in St. Petersburg, but
Bud says he likes it here.
Fremacs has been a welcome
addition to the Gainesville Mall
for those who like to shop with
a name they know and trust.

WOOLWORTH'S
\\ / I
W
\ H Strvtvh dvnim
Misses 9 cotton-and-nylon GIRLS' CAPRIS
STRETCH DENIM CAPRIS 979
Comfortable and carefree
because they stretch with
every movement...need no
f Easy-rare cotton-aml-nylon
iroping. Navy, faded blue, blend needs no ironing . al alloden,
loden, alloden, wheat. Sizes 8-18.
Navy, faded blue .wheat. 7-14.
Texlured nylom
UICGEG' TfIDC ash able rayon-nylon biend
Ins STRETCH MOTS
... foi foilow
low foilow ev Great for pants, or a > s look slock. Side zip-
Full fashioned with turtleneck, per, stitched crease. As Asshort
short Asshort sleeves. Back zipper. Ma- ,
chine wash. Many colors. 34-40 sorted colors. Sizes 10- IS.
tSSSSSOBi tour MONEYS WORTH MORE AT lafOi T1
MALL STORE ONLY

, I FIRST FEDERAL SAYINGS
AND LOAN ASSOC.
OF GAINESVILLE
"The Place To Save"
249 W. U. AVE. BRANCH: IN THE MALL
PHONE 376-7551



Unusual In-Gifts
Available In Mall

For all those frivolous or
fancy gifts for your Fine, fun
friends, the place to go is The
Party Line.
Color madness prevails in this
exciting and unique gift shop
located in the Gville Mall. The
wide selection of merchandise
includes such fabulous finds as
plastic pop-art pillows, silver
wine goblets, giant jack door
stops, and a rainbow of color in
straw flowers just to mention
a few!
This shop is delightfully
divided into 3 main sections.
The front section contains fun
gifts of paper mache, stationery,
and cards. On the left side,
beyond a huge archway, is a
coloful candleroom containing
every size, color and shape of
candle and holder anyone could
desire. The raised middle section
of the shop is carpeted and
boasts special gifts of silver,
brass, china and crystal. There is
a mens gift area, too, with bar
accessories, mugs, aprons and
wine racks. The lower back
section is specifically set up to
help you entertain. There is an
enormous collection of kitchen
enamelware, place mats and
napkins, and every imaginable
cooking utnesils. A tremendous
armoire houses scented soap
balls, room sachets, and bubble
bath. And last, but certainly not
least, is a marvelous gormet food
corner stocked full of goodies
for entertaining on any occasion.
One of the specialities of The
Party Line is their clever canning
machine guaranteed to cure
and package peeker. Almost
any gift may be placed inside the
can and sealed before your very
eyes!
Since Christmas will soon be
here, so youll see The Party
Line bustling with preparation.
There are Christman cards,
wrapping paper and yuletide
yarn, and many distinctive and
different tree ornaments and
decorations. Everything to make
your Christmas a creative and
cheerful occasion.
The Party Line, has 2
locations: The Gville Mall and
The Westgate Shopping Center
(331 1 W. Univ. Ave.).
flic Westgate Shop is just as
unique, but different. Its the
paper goods store for birthdays,
weddings, anniversarys or just
plain party celebrations. There is
a tremendous selection of paper
table goods, invitations,
centerpieces, and a great variety
ot candles and holders. This is
the store to come to for all your
paper party pretties. This shop,
too, contains a fun array of
some of the gifts found in the
Mall store.
Remember The Party Line
when you need a gift or want to
give a party. There is so much to
Visit Cherrys
Cherrys extends this special
invitation to visit them at their
store in the Gainesville Mall
Refreshments will be served
liom 3-5 each afternoon during
our anniversary celebration.
We will be looking forward to
. seeing you at Cherrys-

choose from, you cant help but
be impressed.
Both shops are owned by
Sherry and Terry Davidson,
long-time Gville residents, who
are happy to serve you anytime.
Brothers Run
Stag ( n Drag
Alex and Leon Robbins
opened Stag k n Drag number 2
in the new Gainesville Mall. The
Robbins brothers, both former T
E Phis have been in business
here in Gainesville for 21 years,
the Robbins family have resided
here for 57 years.
The Stag *n Drag features the
same traditional Williamsburg
decor of the University Avenue
store, and the latest fashion for
men and women. Famous lables
such as Haspel, Griffon, Stanley
Blacker, Sero,Creighton, Arrow,
Higgins, Coventry Square, Gold
Cup, Harness House, Cox-Moore,
Jantzen, and Puritan. The store
is managed by Alex Robbins.
Also filling the stock are such
wardrobe musts as Glen of
Michigan, Gay Gibson, Mister
Pants, Norman Davidson, Jeune
Leigue, Etienne Aigner, Country
Miss, Jantzen, and many other
familiar names.
Stag n Drag gives easy
accessibility to a great variety of
styles and brands. Catering to
the sophisticated, young modern
look.

__ IVrr crlcbritinp: our 1.1 Annisr-nxr* in tin- (einr.*ill>- Melt illi inil.lMiuling Inis, in l.mlip. j!
XMnt'irlrithinn (iimr rrr thrur Biiinrt vetiiii tilin'*. \ I
/I) iadiks AU.iKATIItK AM. MENS u/ x,
COATS SPORT COATS JSk-.'V I
W0 l< W o **' #r oa,t tijw 43 I
,00 (All *l4" US 00 *22 50 30 00
/l fm II dacron-cotton men s long sleeve THpk U I
' f SKIRTS SPORT SHIRTS | I
Ijji/Jf ...
r"ft T T bleof V?. Price I
ONE GROUP I Gift items /ZX | FAMOUS NAME
nDPC or S I USE CENTRAL CHARGE T I
DRESSED ~ SOCKS I
$6 oo Stas n Draa 79* ,$225
to 523.00 VJ GAlNtsviLLb MALL STORfc ONLY \

FEATURING: IN T^^ ALL OUR SHOPPERS SPECIALS
Italian Fatal* Faxool"
Specialty Sanduirhes r*.d with *to7se7soi7droil o-.d*
Delicious Salads Ham and Cheese on
Domestic and jr X. Sesame Roll 85
imported g OtormtarUaB g S2Sr^-^
wine and beer /so gt ers
congenial h it T o h :,;; s r b '-- 75
CONTINENTAL \ Super Meatballer . .75
ATMOSPHERE 9 u B
. VL A yu ft, IP Spaghetti with
Serving Continuously Meat Sauce 1.00
11 am to 8:30 pm M served with tossed salad, roll end
CLOSED SUNDAYS ~U%BT bu er
Amn]mMQ>ipml
I £1 10% OFF
j Our Entire Stock
| Os Fashions
Isjf [O And don't forgot to
iff register for a 25 dollar
Pi yf Gift Certificate to be
I given away during our
| If Anniversary Celebration.
V %
Women who love fashions love to shop ...
W. Univ. Ave. CHERRYS In The Mall j
** rrrYYYYvyyri-rrvyMVvvwwwwMifiA*

Thursday, November 14, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 25



Page 26

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

It's a Whale
/ ) of a
/ / Celebration!
t I NOV. 14,15,16
l I FIRST anniversary
\ QfJHE
VY \ ffi
\l \. \ FREE FISHING l|
\ 1 To lOMinutooFnhing or 2 fish M
I \ 1 slocked with
\ I hundreds of Real, Live Brook, Brown Hjf W jl
% I and Rainbow Trout. Fun for every one. V^|V
\ 1 I age to 4 to 84 No License needed
X 1 I equipment furnished and you keep the pP '^W
\ 1 I fish you catch. fj|l
1/ CELEBRATION FEATURES
* FREE CAKE for 3000 ... NO v, 6J^
* free CAMPER SHOW ... hov, 6
I 1 PRIZE CAPSULES WORTH
OVER *IOOO NOV. 16- 2.00 PJ
r~ See The following pages for
Special Anniversary Values



*.id".ji* l^,, 4li *,''-'fr-V'.Vi'*'i>i'.^'i.'\j' t,*< £*jr"''"'? 1 1 J
v : : <*-iii^^* < ?N &;\ W||f' ..[,.
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Florida Players first
production of the year,
Seijeant Musgraves Dance,
has played to capacity audiences
all week and the remaining
performances are already sold
out.
A massive statement on war,
the pby is filled with military
uniforms.
Serjeant Musgraves Dance
is unique in that it may infuriate
doves as well as hawks. It is the
work of the young English
playwright John Arden, who
brings to the problem of war a
solution which is equally
horrible.
Photos By
Nick Arroyo
and
Mike Huddleston

i^BBH^HBBBBi^^R^B 1 '
.jM w : ;f .. %$&&
gS Jar _^|
BTB J§' _^ga|
ji fipr IT W^S
r Jr
%:
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Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator, I

'Serjeant
Musgraves
Dance
r
EJ
HI

|P'
K
VS j|K'.
''.'-"'"BRHP Jl^B
f JBPm Bf j^-vB

Page 27



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

Page 28

wW>.

By SUSIE HALBACK
\
Alligator Reeiiber
(EDITORS mTE: A
portion of this review appeared
in Mondays Alligator. This is
the review in its entifety.)
Extravaganzas of the cinema
all too often seem to
over-spectacularize themselves.
This unique method of theatrical
self-destruction leaves a
lamentable remainder which is
lacking, to say the least. Such a
production is Warner Brothers
Camelot now playing at
Center 11.
*
In contrast to the bright and
cheerful magnificence, and
happily-ever-after mood of the
Broadway production, the
cinematic version of Camelot
is disappointedly dreary and
sombre, and at times, quite
barren. Music, by Frederick
Loewe, seems to be an
after-thought in many spots,
despite the familiarity of most
of the tunes.
But ladies, if you've missed
your afternoon soap operas,
don't despair. Camelot has
enough tear-jerking potential to
suffice. Its mood of romantic
depression is begun with the
very first frames.
Camelot is an attempt to
depict the pagentry and revelry
of King Arthurs Round Table,
as envisioned by director Joshua
Logan. Logan tampers with
history quite a bit, but then
Arthurs story is only a legend
anyway.
Arthurs marriage to
Guinevere (Vanessa Redgrave),
his formation of the Knights of

Listen To
*![
Sports Roof
dues given doily to
where the keys ore hidden
Mission A Impossible Contest
The WDVN Good Coys hove Hidden the key* to o brood new 1969
Mustoof Soerts Roof, V-8 with radio, white fidewolls end other extras
o $3,000 outoiQobile somowhoro io the Crooter GeinciviKc Aree.
Two oow chioe ora given tally on WDVH to the location of the
keysso tune in now and win!
LIST OF CLUES ALREADY GIVEN AT
FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:
Lew Cafeteria All Cotton
313 W. Univ. Avc. Min-A-Mart Shaw b Kcetrr
Stores Ford Town
Rod Born 238 W. Univ. Av
Across from C.H.S. Morion Finance
222 W. Univ. Ave.
Here Are Two Clues To Start You
To the Hidden Keys
The cars .era whisxing post I As the keys survey the scene scenesee-a*
see-a* scenesee-a* I'm shoppng merrily. they con see red, yellow and
fttsn.

the Round Table, the arrival of
Sir Lancelot (Franco Nero), and
his subsequent love affair with
Guinevere all these are
portrayed in beautiful color,
accentuating the black and gray
hues of Arthurs court.
Acting performances were a
little more varied. Vanessa
Redgrave made an intriguing
queen, while Lancelot was
portrayed as a bumbling
do-gooder, rather than the
worlds greatest knight. Richard
Harris, as Arthur, though, gave a
tremendous performance.
Camelot is truly his show, and
I can think of no one more
capable than he to fill the tragic
role of the righteous yet ill-fated
king.
Although the appearance of
Arthurs legendary kingdom
must ultimately depend upon
each individuals own
imagination, this cinematic
interpretation of Cameiot does
succeed admirably in one
respect. The code of chivalry
created and attempted by King
Arthur was doomed to failure
from its very beginnings because
it demanded absolute perfection.
King Arthur required this
perfection from his knights, at
the same time becoming the
worst sinner and hypocrite of
all.
Pathetically and tragically,
the Camelot of Arthur never
really existed. Perhaps for one
brief, shining moment . . it
did, but then the curtain closed
upon it forever. It was at best
only a sad, and a beautiful,
dream.
I V A

State Fair Art Works
On Exhibition In Gallery

By ROY C. CRAVEN, JR.
University Gallery Director
The lively and colorful
traveling section of Florida State
Fairs 1968 Fine Arts Exhibition
now at the University Gallery is
dominated by three-dimensional
works.
This phenomena, perhaps, is
not surprising for several
reasons. First of all, sculpture
today has not only become the
most dynamic, diverse, and
creative activity on the art scene
in America, but this years juror
was Mr. George Segal, a
significant contemporary
sculptor.
It is claimed by many, with
whom I disagree, that painting is
dead. I might concede that
painting has momentarily, at
least, stalled in a desicated
vacuum which has defied the
most strenuous efforts and
activities of the present crop of
OP, POP, and realist painters to
move it forward into a vital and
productive current. It might also
be admitted that painting, for
the time being, has been
over-shadowed by sculpture,
because sculpture has benefited
and been stimulated into an
expanding vitality by a wide
variety of modem materials and
media.

You cant
get any closer.
Some men think the only side of their faces with a lead- The Tripleheader has a
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Speedshaver. or closer than the blade in 2 And it wont pull or nick
In a very independent out of 3 shaves. or cut.
laboratory, we had some very The Tripleheader has Because it shaves your
independent men shave one three rotary blades inside new, beard.
Hi*, thin, MicrogrooveTM heads that Not your face.
r | n 'float/ so it follows your face,
wife, toshaveyoucloser Norelco'
you cant get any cSomt
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Among some of the intriguing
items to be seen and experienced
are" a king-sized, aluminum
match book, four feet high; a
life-size, mangled,
polyester/fiberglass corpse,
entitled Stop Crime Mafia
Victim, a section of a wall
which melts upside down; a
three- foot-square, bright orange
box with a ten-foot red
tongue; a brick loan-office
wall; and many others.

Alice B. Toklas brownies
Do Some Strange Things

Alice B. Toklas brownies do
strange things to people.
In Peter Sellers newest
-v __
p
PETER SELLERS
.. .stars in 'Alice B. Toklas'.

Needless to say, this
exhibition is unorthodox, bright
and entertaining, but, is it all
art? The viewer must judge for
himself.
This exhibition will be on
view through Sunday, November
24th. The University Gallery is
open free to the public Tuesday
through Saturday from 10 ajn.
to S p.m. and on Sunday from 1
p.m. to S p.m. It is closed
Mondays and holidays.

movie, I Love You, Alice B.
Toklas!, opening at the Plaza II
Theatre tomorrow, brownies will
play an important roll in
changing his personality.
With a Monarch butterfly
painted on her right thigh, Leigh
Taylor-Young makes her first
film appearance. An attractive
young lady, Miss Taylor-Young
should be recognized from the
Peyton Place television series.
Jo Van Fleet, in her first
movie since playing Paul
Newmans mother in Cool
Hand Luke, takes Peter Sellers
as her son and changes roles
accordingly. She is billed as a
tumed-on Jewish mama.
Typical of the Sellers' style,
Lou Gottlieb, a full-time gum
plays himself.



Kentucky Cautious?

(Editors note: The following
a Dress information story
leased yes.erday by
Kentuckys Sports Publicity
office. The piece, written by
Russell Rice, should give an
insight into what the Wildcats
expect from us.)
Charlie Bradshaws Kentucky
Wildcats, minus the explosive
Frosh Meets
FSU Nov. 28
The freshman football game
between FSU and Florida,
scheduled for earlier this year
but cancelled by Hurricane
Gladys, will be played Nov. 28,
Thanksgiving Day, at 10 a.m. at
Florida Field.
The Baby Gators, coached by
Jimmy Haynes, are led by
quarterback John Reaves,
wideouts Andy Cheney and
Carlos Alvarez and running back
Tommy Durrance on offense.
Defensive standouts have been
linemen Bill Harrell and Bruce
Cutright, linebackers Eric
Taggart and Gary Kadric and
defensive backs Doug Sorenson
and Jimmy Barr.
FSU has an excellent
freshman team with a 2-1
record. The latest Baby
Seminole game was last week, a
14-12 victory over the touted
Georgia Tech freshmen, and
their sensational quarterback,
Charles Dudish.
The Baby Gators opened this
season with a 54-17 victory over
the Auburn freshmen; bowed to
Miami, 20-17, in the annual
charity game in the Magic City,
and then came back to beat the
Georgia Bullpups this past
Monday. 17-15.

DIVISION OF
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

OPEN LETTER TO UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STUDENTS:
I want to apologize for the embarrassment and humiliation you suffered last
Saturday. I, too. stodd wet and numb looking at the scoreboard thinking how
cold a rain can be when yfeu are being massacred.
I have always felt a need -to answer your questions or give any student an
audience when requested because I believe this is one of my responsibilities.
This belief is even firmer today because of the support you have given this
football team. You students ane the truest Gator fans.
I know you wonder, "What does a coach think about when his team is behind.
51-0, in the rain?"
At that point I looked up at the emptying stands and saw several thousand
Florida students huddled together still cheering for the Gators and if ever
an unnoticed tear fell it was then. I vowed to repay a debt owed to our
students, if it takes a lifetime.
Football does indeed appear grim now but you have my promise briqhter d y
are ahead and we will not accept defeat.
This wonderful student support, in victory and defeat, is deeply apprec
by the team and coaches.
sincer?ly^
\ i
\ /
A-*-) t*
Ray Gnav^s
Head rdotball Coach

offensive punch represented by
Dicky Lyons, Saturday meets a
Florida team which also had
trouble crossing the opponent's
goal line a week ago.
Lyons, who has scored 11
touchdowns this season, received
a shoulder injury while returning
the opening kickoff 34 yards
against Vanderbilt. His status for
the Tennessee game next
weekend at Knoxville is
doubtful.
The 34-yard return gave
Lyons a national record of 2,199
for career kickoff and punt
returns. He added another nine
yards on a punt return late in
the game. The old record was
2,177 yards held by Steve
Bramwell of Washington
(1963-65).
The Lyons injury was one of
two major setbacks for the
Wildcats in less than three
weeks. Three days after the team
lost to Georgia here Oct. 26,
starting quarterback Stan
Forston had an appendectomy.
Forston returns to action
Saturday but didnt seem quite
up to par.
The Wildcats, 3-5, must
defeat Florida and Tennessee to
give Bradshaw a break-even
record in his last season as head
coach. Kentucky has defeated
Missouri, Oregon State and West
Virginia, but has lost all Five of
its conference games to date.
Kentucky will depend on
running backs Dick Beard and
Roger Gann to take up the slack
left by Lyons absence. Gann,
who has been used sparingly
lately, carried the ball 12 times
for 71 yards agains Vanderbilt
while Beard gained 81 yards in
24 carries.

Kr. 13. lift

j What Ab out" G ra v es ? j

Rumors have been flying this
week.
Coach Graves is through, the
alumni wont stand for a season
like this.
Graves cant put a good
team together.
The Gators arent capable of
having a nationally high ranking
team because of coaches and
spirit.
Team dissension is tearing
the Gators apart from the
inside.
Accusations are expected
when a team is losing and
answers are hard to come up
with.
In fact there was even a
rumor going around that I was
afraid to say anything after last
Saturdays . (what can I call
it, surely not a game?).
There wasnt anything to say.
We looked bad, they looked
great and we suffered.
What about Coach Graves?
Graves is not going to step
down on a losing note. He is a
proud man, who is fond of the
happy moments that have been,
but looks forward to the
possibilities of what can be.
Earlier in the year he said:
God gave us a mind to have
dreams, but a memory to have
roses in December.
He doesnt like to lose or
quit.
Graves stepping down now
would be similar to President
Johnson leaving office without
having made significant progress
towards peace in Vietnam.
A coachs mistakes are

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 14485 UNIVERSITY STATION
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA 32601

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

magnified by a losing effort. In a
winning situation the same move
would be called brilliant.
Lets not be misled. There is
something drastically wrong
with our football program.
There has to be a certain
amount of dissension on this
team.
How can Don Gramling not
feel resentful, when after grading
out very high in the Mississippi
State game he is replaced by
Larry Rentz who hasnt been a
flanker for an entire year?
What about Harold Peacock?
Somewhere somebody started
the rumor that Peacock was a
dropback quarterback and our
offense couldnt be centered
around him because of this. At
Northeast Oklahoma Jr. College
where Peacock was an
All-American quarterback, he
did roll out on pass plays, even
though he prefers to stay in the
pocket, just like Eckdahl.
The quarterback problem has
even been explained in terms of
confidence. The coaches say
they dont trust Peacock.
Then again, it might have
something to do with the fact
that Rentz is from Miami,
Eckdahl is from Gainesville and
Peacock is from Pahokee
(where?).
That brings about another
problem. How much influence
does the alumni have over our
team?
They do donate a great deal
of money. For example: prime

Graves Vows New
_ f -i
Season For Gators

By 808 PAOECKY
Alligator Special Writer
Im a defeated coach. But
Im not a defeated man.
With those words, Ray
Graves, head football man at
UF, said Tuesday hes starting a
new era of coaching.
Sometimes you have to be
shaken up a bit, said Graves,
referring to the 51-0 butchering
by Georgia Saturday. Its a new
season this Saturday with
Kentucky.
The players and the coaches
now have to learn to take defeat.
The players are now playing for
their pride. In the last three
days, the players have shown
more leadership than at any time
during the season. Their
comeback makes me feel good.
The Georgia defeat made me
a younger coach, said Graves.
I certainly didnt get older. Ive
learned some things by mistakes.
But for the team, as well as
the coaches, weve forgotten
Saturday. We got our pride to
protect.
But Graves couldnt forget
this season, one that was to be
the year of the Gator but now is
the year of the Fall.
People gave us high
pre-season ranking for three
reasons, said Graves. One was
Larry Smith. Another was two
inexperienced quarterbacks.

seats on the west side of the
stadium can only be had by a
donation of $25 or SSO dollars
per seat plus the cost of the
ticket.
Still this doesnt give them a
right to dictate policy.
That should be left up to the
coaching staff and Athletic
Department. In this case when
the head coach is athletic
director, his decisions
concerning staff should not be
dictatorial but subject to the
Athletic Department Executive
Board and coaches not the
alumni.
The coaches are paid to put
together a winning team and to
make the decisions it takes to do
this. Let them decide who plays,
not the different alumni clubs
around the state.
If the Tampa alumni,
Jacksonville alumni, Miami
alumni or Sarasota alumni come
up with a good prospect for the
UF, thats great. But none
should play just because we
want to please the alumni.
Tough if they dont like it.
We want the best players on the
field, the ones that can bring us
wins, not the ones that can make
some guys happy who went to
school here five, ten or fifteen
years ago.
It is the alumnis obligation,
along with other citizens of the
state to make sure UF has funds
to operate, but this is our school
not theirs. Just like when we
graduate it will no longer be ours
but someone elses.

Another was two great
linebackers.
Well, weve never had Larry
Smith healthy at any time this
season. Youve got to have a
superstar for an outstanding
season, the one who commands
respect no matter who you play.
Our quarterbacks have
disappointed me. We have the
worst passing offense at Florida
in the eight years Ive been here.
And Dave Mann and Mike
Kelley have never played
together at linebacker except for
the opening minute of the first
game against Air Force.
This sounds like alibying.
But its not. People want to
know why we havent had an
outstanding year. So I give them
the reasons, not alibis.
Another factor Graves
considered in the Gators
descent from stardom is lack of
depth.
One team official sized it up
this way.
In any season you are going
to have injuries. Florida
traditionally has been a school
that hasnt had any depth. And
often times the difference
between a 6-4 team an 8-2 one is
depth. Because we can not
accept everybody like some
schools; because of academics we
have a great difference in
ability between our No. 1 and
No. 2 units.

Page 29



Page 30

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14, 1968

\ Albert I
| Predicts j
Albert The Alligator^w

Well, fans, two teams tripped up the ol prognostigator last week.
Kansas was one of them, and 1 II let you guess who the other one was.
Incidentally, Ive been informed that I have to write more in
keeping with the format of the Alligator sports pages, meaning I have
to make intelligent comments after my predictions, instead of funny
jokes. Okay, here goes.
Alabama over Miami by 10 Charlie Tates rollicking Hurricanes
will make their debut against this fantastic Alabama grid squid er,
squad. However, Bear Bryants mauling mauraders look like the
snapback choice in this calamitous collisions.
Georgia over Auburn by 7- Look for a lot of rib tearing and
snarling when the Bulldogs attempt to defend their valor against a
blood thirsty leeching Auburn powerhouse. The field will be red, and
watch for the Georgia scoring machine to slice up Shug Jordans
streak. (???)
Southern Cal over Oregon State by 16 O.J. Simpson will drive
across again for the tromping Trojans and maul the defenseless Oregon
State squad. There will even be blood in the stands especially on the
neat looking girl up in Section.. .oops. Well, watch for a high spiraling
end over and kick to be a decisive factor in the execution of.. .is this
for real?
LSU Over Mississippi State by about a hundred points Whoever
coaches at LSU will tear apart the coach at Mississippi State before
50,000 screaming fans. Watch for brilliant running by Pete Maravich
(or does he play baseball?) and a high scoring framistan in the third
period.
Florida State over North Carolina State by 14 This is getting bad.
The Seminoles will do something to the (Wolfpack?) that shouldnt be
said. Anyway, they ought to win. I just know whos going to win, how
do I know what theyre going to do during the game? Sheesh.
Tampa over Southern Illinois by 12 Roddy Grubbs hair has black
roots.
Tennessee over Mississippi by 11 Alright, back to the grind. The
high scoring Volunteers are a class above the nit-picking cotton
pickers, or something like that. We go with Tennessee, but watch for
the upset. (The other papers say that all the time).
Penn State over Maryland by 35 This is ridiculous. How about a
politico joke? How many politicos does it take to kiss a coed?
Kansas over Kansas State by 21 Try six. Four to hold down the
coed (would you want to be kissed by a politico?), one to do the
kissing, and one to read the instructions.
Ohio State over lowa by 7- Ohio State will fring their special
elephant play on the Cornhuskers. A herd of elephants from the
Clevland zoo will be flown in for the purpose of squashing lowa. If
Ohio State still loses an atomic bomb will be dropped on the stadium
so that no one will ever know they lost.
Minnesota over Indiana by two million points Watch fora heavy
garg to polack the stands with things. Honest, Marc, I tried, but I cant
write this kind of stuff.
Notre Dame over Ga. Tech by 14 Dr. Cade is now perfecting
Gator-slow which will be slipped into the Kentucky squad during
pregame ceremonies. Next Monday, it will be on sale for Florida men
to feed to their dates on weekends.
California over Oregon by 16 It would be nice if some students
0 r ..** e^ie r a n petitioned to have my cage heated. Get the hint?
Finally, Im still siding with Florida. My namesakes will womp the
Wildcats something fierce. If Wendie comes to my cage Saturday
night, she will get an Alligator Kiss.
Go gators.
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Graves Pinning Hopes
On Healthy Larry Smith

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Florida Coach Ray Graves
put his squad through a light
workout Wednesday which saw
the return of Larry Smith. Steve
Tannen, and Jim Yarbrough to
the field.
Each player is in a different
condition, and each reflects the
hopes that Graves is depending
on this weekend.
Graves is counting on a big
win over crippled Kentucky, not
only to save a winning season,
but also to save the morale of a
team which hasnt won a
football game in a month.
Smith is back to full service
for the first time in three weeks.
He has sprained and pulled an
arch, and completed a bout with
strep throat. However, that is
behind him now, and Smith will
be counted on big for the
Gators.
Then, there is Tannen, who

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has been outstanding defensively
in every game. The junior
cornerback pulled a groin
muscle, and despite a two-day
sidlining, may see action this
weekend. Graves still is noi
writing him off as a possible
starter.
Finally, tight end Yarbrough
will play this weekend, but more
than likely in a manner
reminiscent of Smiths action in
weeks past. Yarbrough is hurt,
but he is also needed.
A fourth player, who only
kicked around a football
yesterday, might be mentioned.
He is Jackie Eckdahl. He is out.
Period. If his sprained thumb
doesn't keep him away from the
quarterback slot, a freshly
re-injured toe will.
But other than these players,
the Gators are looking healthy,
and Graves face begins to show
relief with each practice session.
A pall of defeat hung over him
earlier in the week, but now, it
begins to disappear.

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Part of the relief, of course,
has to be the news that Dickie
Lyons is out for the Kentucky
game. The Wildcat tailback
would have put Graves'
secondary to a test that injuries
might not be able to take.
Still, there will be Dick Beard
and Roger Gann to contend
with. Graves will watch for this
pair, as they now make up the
failing brunt of the Kentucky
offense.
Finally, out of the long-lost
category has come Bill Gaisford,
a defensive halfback who was
injured intheFlorida State game,
and was considered lost for the
season.
Gaisford is back running
again, and even though it is late
in the season, he is expected to
be ready for Miami.



WITH walnut hill background
Success Cant Spoil UFs Guy Dennis

By 808 PADECKY.
Alligator Special Writer
The biggest thing about
Walnut Hill is currently filling
Room 202 at Yon Hall Guy
Dennis, a 253 pound offense
guard for the Gators.
Four years ago, Walnut Hill
claimed possession of Mr.
Dennis. Or more correctly, Mr.
Dennis possessed Walnut Hill.
For you see, Dennis is much
easier to locate than Walnut Hill.
It doesnt have any
landmarks, Dennis said. It
doesnt have main street or even
a stop light. Its just kind of
everywhere.
Walnut Hill also doesnt have
a post office, which should come
as no great surprise. So Dennis
gets his mail from Atmore, Ala.,
just five miles away, where there

Three Gator fans turned out early for the Georgia genre Hi
Jacksonville, and were greeted by a torrential downpour. The well
dressed gator this year would seem to be wearing plastic laundry bags,
or stiff cardboard to keep off the rain. Then again, this picture might
have been taken after halftime...
Four Frats Move
To Orange Finals

TEP, SAE, and Pi Kappa Phi
all moved into the semi-finals of
Orange League football Tuesday.
In the only uncompleted
bracket, Sigma Chi stopped
league leading Beta 19-18 to
put that bracket into a
three-way tie, but a Beta protest
could give the Betas the bracket.
TEP, facing its stiffest
competition to date in Phi Delt,
came from a 1312 halftime
deficit to score 26 points in a
38-19 win.
SAE stormed over Pi Kappa
Alpha to move into the semis
against the uncompleted bracket
winner.
Hart Sponsors
"LSD" Rallye
Looking for a Little
Something Different to do this
weekend? If so, the Hart Rallys
Team with sponsor an LSD
rally.
Registration is at 6 p.m. at
the Commercial Bank parking
lot (across the street from GHS),
with the drivers meeting at 6:45
and the first car leaving at 7:01,
for a cruise through Greater
Gainesville and campus.
This is a non-speed type of
event, and easy on your car.
Entry fees are $3.00 for
non-club members and $2.00 for
ANY sports car club member.
For further information call
372-8119.

IS a post office and which
supplies rural deliveries to the
Dennis household.
From that rural post office
Dennis received a letter some
years back. Gator scouts thought
the shy, young man could play
college football for them and
asked him to become a Florida
man. Dennis, however, wasnt so
sure.
I hadnt even thought of
going to college, much less to
play football, Dennis said.
Nobody from Walnut Hill ever
went to a big college. And I
think only one kid went to
school on an athletic
scholarship.
I didnt know anybody here
at Florida, said Dennis. I Was
just afraid.
I had a lawyer friend from
Pensacola who took me to a
Florida game my senior year in
high school, Dennis said.
After seeing Florida Field, I

Pi Kappa Phi, moving up
from a Blue League Presidents
Cup, made its strongest showing
to date in the Orange League by
edging over SPE' 2419 and
moving into a semi-final berth
against the TEPS.
In other league action, Sigma
Nu toppled the Delts, 370,
Lambda Chi stopped the AEFis
38-19, Pi Lam beat ATO 32-7
and KA beta Kappa Sig, 18-6;
In Independent football, the
Tallywhackers arrested the
Keystone Kops, 336, Cuban
Power bombed the Rodans
19-18, the Ropes tied up the
Oldtimers 266, Lagnaf beat the
Med II 31-0 and the
Roadrunners out-raced the
Purple Mooses 6-0.
Lots Os Water
Lake Norman, North
Carolinas largest lake, covers
33,000 acres and runs3s miles.
Good Service Starts
of
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was really scared then. It made
our high school field really look
puny.
Dennis was a fullback for
Ernest Ward High School as a
junior and then turned to
lineman his senior year. The
reason was he weighed 253
pounds. And he hasnt added an
ounce since then.
Dennis didnt make any
All-State teams playing for his
Class B high school. But in a
graduating class of 54, Dennis
stood out in more ways than on
the football field.
Dennis is no dummy. He was
smart enough to get offered grid
scholarship t to Southeastern
Conference academic
powerhouse Vanderbilt. But
Dennis drove the 300 miles to
Gainesville to become a Gator.
I really didnt think Id play
football for Florida, Dennis
said. I heard of all those guys
from the big towns making
all-state and all-everything. But
they really needed offensive
linemen so I got a chance.
The rest is history. Dennis
made All-SEC his sophomore
and junior year and was voted
the SECs best lineman in 1967.
This year he is tabbed as a
pre-season All-American choice.
Id like to play pro ball if
anybody will have me, Dennis
said.
Dennis will get drafted by a
pro team, Coach Ed Kensler
said, who worked on the offense
the first seven games of the year.
His rate of improvement is
astounding. His sophomore year
was great. His junior year was
just fair. But this season hes
played the best hes ever done.
But you should see my
brother Joey, Dennis said.
He's going to be a.much better
football player than 111 ever be.
Hes a freshman right now at
Ernest Ward. I hope I can recruit
him to Florida. Hes6T\ 155.
Joey better hope that big
brother contacts him personally
because you never know about
rural mail nowadays.

GRAND OPENING
I TO ACQUAINT OUR GAINESVILLE NEIGHBORS I
WITH THIS NEWEST A MOST ADVANCED METHOD
I- OF FABRIC CARE
I* WERE HOLDING THIS SALE DURING OUR GRAND
V OPENING Ut GARMENT REG PRICE
2nd LIKE GARMENT 1*
"4-DAY SERVICE" V
MAKES DRY S CLEANI JjffIJUfff iSSSna) I
OBSOLETE J ** HUmiM
1104 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. AV 378-3119

Thursday, November 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

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GUY DENNIS PROTECTS FOR JERRY VINESETT
.. Walnut Hill's finest will welcome a stint in the pros
1
JFfjfflTfVW MANAGER
jggmfiw training
We offer:
A career opportunity with one
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companies
Including:
Salary while training. Salary
plus bonus after training.
Excellent fringe benefits.
Requirements:
High school graduate, own
transportation and willing
to relocate. =*
Contact Mr. Haynes for
ylrsP J personal appointment.
Gainesville- Florida

Page 31



Page 32

I* .The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 14,1968

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