Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Zfi M B IBm I 1 kps B Jml m%# an Jk k A
Pr S§| IBP j Ip? pr~ j& JBp 188

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 38

FOR DAWKINS S TORY
Alligator Chief
Not Charged
By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
Stating that a newspaper has certain responsibilities to
their informers, Alachua County Sheriff Joe Crevasse said
Tuesday that no action will be taken against Alligator
Editor Harold Aldrich for withholding inforr at ion
concerning an accused felon.
Aldrich printed an exclusive interview with Black
militant Jack Dawkins, who is wanted by local authorities
on three charges which include first degree arson.
When contacted by Capt. Ron Stanley of the sheriffs
office, Aldrich refused to disclose the whereabouts of
Dawkins, saying he had no right to incriminate the people

Pill Policy
Explanation
Requested
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has asked for a
report on the procedure as it
is presently being carried
out at the student infirmary
on the prescribing of birth
control pills.
The report is being
compiled by Student Health
Service officials and will also
make any recommendations
for future policy.
OConnells request came
as a result of an Alligator
series on birth control at the
UF.
An Associated Press article
saying OConnell had called a
meeting with infirmary
officials is false, OConnell
said.

I.*** % 4 '..
v -a.
v t Bu
;>: ilMfegL
LAVON GENTRY
,%
: . wants jury trial

The
Florida Alligator

who helped him find Dawkins.
Stanley warned Aldrich that
he could face possible charges of
aiding and abetting an accused
felon.
1 have no desire to obstruct
the police in their efforts to find
Dawkins and bring him to trial,
Aldrich said Tuesday.
At the same time, I believe
the people of Gainesville have a
right to know that Dawkins is
still alive and plans to return to
the city, he said.
Aldrich said he believed the
story served the public interest
and to get the story he had to
promise to keep certain
information confidential.
Crevasse said it was routine to
have an official question Aldrich
about the story, and when the
editor refused to answer
questions, they recognized his
right to protect his sources.
When asked if local
authorities knew Dawkins
whereabouts, Crevasse would
not comment, but said
Dawkins is wanted on a
(SEE 'ALLIGATOR' PAGE 3)

Gentry: '| Know Ill Be Found Guilty

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last of a two-part series
on the Lavon Gentry case.
Todays article deals with
several questions that 'vise in
connection with the case).
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
I know Ill be found
guilty. That is Lavon
Gentrys prediction of his
own fate his trial for
willfully and maliciously
defacing a building.
The UF sophomore who
taped posters on walls of
campus buildings contends
that unless he gets a jury trial,

University of Florida, Gainesville

i 58*,....
RANDY BASSETT
GETTING IT OUT OF THE WAY

One of the UF's notorious registration computers
stands in wait as early registration crowds wait in
anxious anticipation. If you strike out with the
machine, it's back to course schedules and

New Crocodile Fearful
Os Campus Censorship

The Crocodile, revived from a three-year
oblivion, may not be distributed on campus because
it fears an encounter with censorship.
The staff of the new opinion-format magazine,
an underground newspaper in its former days, held
an organizational meeting Monday night and
decided not to attempt campus distribution because
of university rules governing acceptability of
publications sold on campus.
The group of about 20, headed by Crocodile
Editor John Sugg, also discussed the possibility of
publishing the magazine's first edition this term.
The group decided the major format of the
magazine will be in-depth analyses, essays and other

w
All iLTnt< >r

BACKGROUND REPORT

Municipal Judge Wade
Hampton will find him guilty.
Judge Hampton is trying
to table the motion for a jury
trial, Gentry said, because
a jury could concievably find
me innocent.
The American Civil
Liberties Union (ACLU) is
taking an interest in Gentrys
case, paying court costs and
helping to arrange for an

attorney, because according
to chapter chairman Bob
Shetterly, there is some
question of free speech
involved.
The police report of
Gentrys arrest, took notice
that the posters said Bust
The Draft:
Complainant reports that
Lavon Louis Gentry is back

-Sign Os The Times Times

Wednesday, November 13, 1968

department heads. Closed classes or closed doors
may cause another day's wait Still, it's better to get
it out of the way.

literary pieces. There will also be a section for
timely news.
During discussion of format, it was pointed out
that the magazine will analyze what really happened
rather than the shallow, biased treatment given by
the Alligator.
Coverage given the recent flag-burning incident
in the Plaza of the Americas last week was cited as
an example.
The group decided to set a copy deadline for
next Wednesday and decide then whether enough
material was available to publish a good first
issue.

America's
Number I
Cottage
Daily

9
on the main part of campus
posting the Bust The Draft
signs on the doors to Walker
Auditorium, states the
report.
The fact that the police
made reference to the
content of the posters,
Shetterly said, indicates there
is a violation of free speech
involved.
Gentry agrees. In fact, he
says he saw a policeman
rather nonchalantly pull a
poster down from a stop sign:
He was ready to throw it
(SEE 'GENTRY' PAGE 4)



Page 2

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 13, 1988

Attack On Bunker 19 'Bia Snow

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the sixth of a series by
Alligator Special Writer, Rick
Benson, recently returned
from Vietnam. In this article,
Benson describes a North
Vietnamese attack on U.S.
positions.)
By RICK BENSON
Alligator Special Writer
QUANG TRI, Vietnam
Illumination flares!, bring
the sound up on the mortars.
Artillery!, Have the gunships
begin firing. Action!
Sitting on top of a sand
bag bunker during a fire fight
is like watching a war flick at
a drive-in movie in the states.
The action usually takes
(place about three or four
miles out across the valley
when NVA squads try to
attack U.S. and South
Vietnamese security units on
bridges along Highway 1.
The scene begins around 8
pjn. as illumination flares are
shot in the sky creating light
patterns in the clouds as they
drift *]groundward on their
mini-parachutes.
Adding to the spectacle
are the helicopter gunships
that hover in a stationary
position while spitting red
tracer bullets from their
machine guns.
From the bridge, a line of
tracer bullets fly across the
ground while mortars and
hand grenades send off
muffled explosions. From the
bunker it's hard to tell
whether the grenades and
mortars are coming in or
going out.

Claxton Out On Bail, City To Hear Case

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligrtor Assignments Editor
John R. Claxton, 2UC, was
released Tuesday night on SSOO
bail several hours after he was
arrested for defacing an
American flag at an apolitical
rally last week.
Bail was posted by an
associate to Selig Goldin, a
Gainesville attorney, despite a
Florida State Statute (FSS
424.20) which says council may
not serve as bondsman for, the
defendant.
Claxton was arrested in a
meeting of the Students for a
Democratic Society-Southern
Students Organizing Committee

Hum oji to stw
*****
***%*mSS&*
Morion Fintmct Co*
376-5133
111 W. Unhnmify Avo<
AWJOATOR Is tho 'aglets) student nowspupor at the Urtvurulty of nor** f
ssfl is pMIMsd floe dM weekly except during Jane, July sad Auguut when It U jNtHlshed
emi-weakly, sod during stadsst holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official optstoas a i their eethors. Addrees correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Delta
Uata Bttlding, Unteeratty of Florida, GelnesrUlo, Florida, 38601. The Alligator Is entered
JBfiFl. class petter at .the Unttad States POf* Office at Gainesville, Florida, SMOI.
Subscription rate it 110.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter. i*
The Florida Alligator reservee the right to regtaate the typographical tone of all adver adverttaeaMata
ttaeaMata adverttaeaMata aad to revise or tarn away copy which tt considers objectionable.
n *. n ? M> AlUgatog will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement
invemag typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver-
Mtf r wtthtn (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida rinpy will
net be raeponstNo tor more than one Incorrect Insertion rs an
to ran seeetal times. Mottoes tor correcttoo meat be given before next Insoithw.

i tr .. w&mll £
; _/ I >r| af, i ig|/|
WATCHING THE SHOW
. . bunker guards sit in aluminum chairs

The faceless battle
continues as the helicopters
send rpCkets whooshing from
the sky.
mosquito meets his fate as
you wonder when you took a
malaria pill last.
After the last flare grows
dim and only sporadic rifle
fire breaks the silence, bunker
guards return to their
conversations of girlfriends,
food, and getting out.
Next week, folks, we

(SDS-SSOC) steering committee
in the Reitz Union.
He was arrested by Detective
Homer McGilvery of the
Gainesville Police Department
and Investigator J. K. Morrison
of the University Police
Department. They were
summoned to the Union by an
eyewitness to the election night
flag burning in front of Tigert
Hall.
The officers entered the
meeting after waiting for more
than an hour outside. Claxton
was one of about 15 SDS-SSOC
members present and offered no
resistance to the arrest.
McGilvery told Claxton a

have a really big show. Right
here, in front of bunker 19,
we'll have a nuclear
explosion, two human wave
attacks, followed by the
Beatles singing America,
and a savings bond rally.
For those who enjoy
combat vicariously, the
bunker show is a relatively
safe way to watch the war
without really getting
involved.
In regards to combat
action our hillside location

John Doe warrant had been
issued for the person who
burned the small flag. A John
Doe warrant is issued when the
name of the person is not
known.
This type of warrant is used
often, McGilvery said.
Claxton was arrested under
statutes 256.06, 256.08 and
256.09, and was charged with
publidy mutilating, defacing
and defiling the flag of the
United States of America.

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enjoys a strange isolation
from the war. It has not come
under any type of ground
action except sniper fire, and
only three or four mortar and
rocket attacks since March.
The only thing that jars
ones consciousness of a war
about him is the firing of 155
Howitzers on top of the hill
with the shells whistling
overhead at all times of the
day and night.
And as Petula Clark might
sing, ... the war goes on.

City statutes mirror state laws
and the maximum penalty in
the city for burning a flag is a
fine of S4OO and or 60 days in
jail.

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SG Prepares
UF Directory
Os Speakers
Student Government is now
putting together a speaker
directory for organizations
desiring a ready reference to
local persons abatable to serve
as a speaker.
The directory will list all
available speakers in Gainesville
and the topics they are willing to
speak on, according to Jerry
Schechter, project director.
Any persons wishing to be
listed as an available speaker is
asked to contact the SG offices
on the third floor of the Reitz
Union, giving the name, times
available, and what topic they
are willing to speak on, said
Schechter.
The directory is expected to
be done by Jan. 15 of next year/
ASAE Taps
Prof. Choate
Agricultural engineering
professor R. E. Choate has been
selected honorary member of
UFs student branch of the
American Society of
Agricultural Engineers.
The UF ASAE honored
Choate for his outstanding
qualities as a teacher, engineer
and community leader.
Choate joined the UF faculty
in 1947. He is a student
counselor in the Department of
Agricultural Engineering and a
member of the Action
Conference. He is also chairman
of the presidents committee on
student organizations.

Flag burning is also a federal
offense punishable by SI,OOO
fine and/or one year in jail.
Preliminary trial date was set
for Nov. 17, in city court.



Senate Studies Faculty Evaluation Program

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
An Action Conference
recommendation to involve the
entire UF faculty in a teacher
evaluation program is being
considered by the Professional
Relations and Standards
Committee of the Faculty
Senate.
The recommendation
provides that the results of the

RANDY BASSETT
A SLOW DEATH
Old Homecoming displays never die they just fall apart. This
decoration went to that big display graveyard in the sky Tuesday,
after a life that lasted as long as Gators' hopes for a good football
season.

Alligator Editors
Confidence Held

won mb o
midemeanor and they generally
dont extradite on a
misdemeanor charge.
We think Jack will show
back up, Crevasse said.
State Attorney Max S. Futch
said his office would not take

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teacher evaluation go to
department chairmen and deans
to be used in determining
faculty promotions and salary
increases.
The Professional Relations
and Standards Committee will
consider the proposal as
recommended by the Action
Conference and make
recommendations to the Senate.
Dr. Corbin Camell, chairman
of the Teacher Evaluation

any action against Aldrich
either, according to a story
which appeared in Mondays
Miami Herald.
The story quoted Futch as
saying he did not think Aldrich
had any information concerning
Dawkins whereabouts.
Futch was out of town and
could not be reached by the
Alligator for comment.

Committee, said they hoped to
extend the present voluntary
evaluation program to involve all
faculty members as a counter
pressure for good teaching.
We have no good means of
meaningful feedback on the
quality of teaching, he said.
Camell indicated that the
voluntary program attracted
good teachers who care about
their teaching and there is no
significant comparisons made
from the results.
The teacher evaluation
program that has been handled
by Student Government for the
past several years has been on a
voluntary basis and the results
have only been given to the
instructor for self-evaluation.
The proposal now under
consideration recommends that
teacher evaluation scores be
transmitted to the department
chairmen and deans as well as
the instructor.
I am in favor of letting the
results go to the deans and
department chairmen upon
request, Camell said.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said the UF ought to
institute a system to teacher and
course evaluation designed and
operated with a positive, not a


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Wednesday, November 13. 1968. The Florida Alligator.

negative or punitive, purpose.
Care must be taken that it is
used in such away as to give the
instructor an objective measure
of his effectiveness, and that of
his course, upon which he can
act for self-improvement,

.
WHATS
HAPPENING
, By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN STALAGTITE OF THE MONTH: The Florida Speleological
Society meets tonight in room 347 of the Reitz Union at 7 to inspect a
fold-out of the group put together this month (the fold-out being,
alas, a map of Warrens Cave). (Mighty clever press release, boys.)
IN LAST LAUGHS: Youll hear those all over the place if you go
to tonights meeting of the Young Republicans Club in room 349 of
the Union at 8.
IN LASTING LAUGHLESSNESS: The American Independent
Party meets in room 357 of the Union tonight at 7:30.
IN OUT-CANOEING THE SEMINOLES: The Sailing Club meets
tonight in room 150 of the Union at 7:30 to make plans for its team
meet against FSU on Sunday, November 23.
IN GREEK-LETTER GOINGS ON: Panhellenic Council has a
social tonight at 7 in room 235 of the Union; Theta Sigma Phi gathers
in room 355 of the Union tonight at the same time.
Wake up, people. Rothlein has an i and a n in it;
Communist has an i and a n in it.
Need we say more?

OConnell said in a
memorandum regarding the
teacher evaluation proposad
tenure, he said.
It should also be one of the
bases for promotion and
tenure, he said.

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 13, 1968

Gentry Wants Jury Tria

BUM MtfOK
away, until he read what was
on it, Gentry said. Then he
radioed the station and
picked up (Bobby) Querns
and myself.
But, aside from the
question of free speech, what
has irritated most people is
the issue of selective law
enforcement. The
fundamental question, of
course, is whether Gentry was
actually breaking a law.
Municipal law, prohibiting
willfully and maliciously
defacing a building, is the
charge booked against
Gentry. Whether taping
posters (with clear plastic
tape) constitutes such an
offense, is apparently a
matter of interpretation.
On the campus level, the
Code of Student Conduct
prohibits malicious
destruction, damage, or
misuse of public
property... and another
section of the code cites
vandalism.
Former Student Body
President Charles Shepherd,
who helped write the code,
believes taping posters on
walls could be so construed
to be a code violation, but
interpretation should be the
job of the Committee on
Student Conduct.
Even so, there is nothing
specific in the Student
Handbook about placing
posters on campus. Student
Body Vice-President Gary
Goodrich claimed,Students
are not responsible for rules
which are not known.
All this brings up another
point. If Gentry did indeed
violate the code, why was it
not handled by campus
authorities? Why did
University Police take him to

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the Gainesville police station
to be booked?
According to Lt. Vernon
Holliman of the University
Police Department, there is
no machinery on campus to
handle such a violation.
Anything over and above
minor traffic violations is
handled by the city, he said.
Gentry says he was taken
downtown because University
Police cannot book such a
charge, a municipal law.
In fact, the Committee on
Student Conduct could have
handled Gentrys case, if the
code could have been
interpreted so as to forbid the
taping of posters in
undesignated places.
Assistant Vice-President
for Student Affairs James
Hennessey agreed the
committee could have
handled the case. But it is up
to the arresting officer to
decide, he said.
Besides, the committee
has a new chairman and new
members, he said, and their
machinery is just being set up
now.
In fact, the old members
terms ran until the new ones
began, so the committee was
always in working order,
according to Goodrich.
But more important,
perhaps, is the question of
selective law enforcement. It
is common to see the campus
plastered with posters, but
this arrest is not common.
Why?
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell says respect for
authority is at stake (Gentry
put up posters after being
told not to). But others,
pointing to such incidents as
the street fight between
members of two fraternities,
when the whole matter was
referred to the Interfraternity
Council, claim the UF is

inconsistent in its
treatment.
The Sigma Nu SAE
incident clearly shows a lack
of respect for authority,
Goodrich said. Yet nobody
was arrested. The University
is using its full legal resources
on Gentry.
How many others have
been arrested for putting
posters on walls? Dean of
Men Framk Adams says,
offhand, that he has not
heard of a similar case as long
as he has been here (23
years).
However, Hennessey
claims were on this all the
time. Any time authorities
see posters going up in
unauthorized places, they
take them down, he said.
Gentry charges the police
with select ive law
enforcement, or as he puts it,
a blatant injustice to my
civil rights.
He claims, for example,
that when he asked a police
officer what his charge was,
the officer said there were
three or four he could use.
When Gentry asked which
one, the officer said, I
havent made up my mind
yet.
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Four Month Trial Delay
Forced By Lawyer Switch

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UPI)
James Earl Ray formally hired
Percy Foreman Tuesday to
defend him against charges of
murdering Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. and a judge, calling the
last minute delay an awful
thing postponed his trial until
March 3.
Art Hanes, sacked by Ray in
favor of Foreman, told reporters
the switch was a delaying tactic
pure and simple. I was prepared
to go to trial but my client
wanted a delay.
Rays trial for the April 4
slaying of the civil rights leader
was to have begun Tuesday, but
Criminal Court Judge W. Preston
Battle said he had no choice but
to delay it.
Its an awful thing to have
to continue a case at this time,
said the judge, but the
defendants right to counsel of
his own choice is guaranteed by
the constitution of the State of
Tennessee.
Battle set the March 3
date-apparently a tentative
one-when Foreman and
prosecuting attorneys failed to
agree among themselves on a
new starting time.
Let the court know on or
about Dec. 12 if you can get
ready March 3, Battle told
Foreman.
Ill let you know, Foreman
agreed.
What was to have been Rays
trial began about IS minutes
late. The defendant, looking
sick and scared according to a
British attorney who represented
him when he was arrested in
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Winter dealt its first
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The storm center was moving
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London, was led in by deputies.
The session, originally set as
the day of the trial's start, prior
to Foremans dramatic injection
into the case by two of Rays
younger brothers Sunday night,
Paris Talks
Halt Again
PARIS (UPI) The United
States and Hanoi agreed tacitly
Tuesday to a new postponement
of expanded Paris talks on
Vietman despite warnings by
allied diplomats that serious new
fighting may erupt in South
Vietnam unless the conference is
convened soon.
By quiet accord, North
Vietnamese and American
officials decided to delay the
start of the talks until the Saigon
government agreed to take part.
The expanded, talks,
originally scheduled for Nov. 6
following the bombing-halt
agreement, had been put off
indefinitely last week, but there
had been hopes that they might
begin this week. These hopes
vanished, however, when allied
and Communist diplomats said
Tuesday there would be no
meeting Wednesday.
The deadlock over the status
of the negotiating team at the
talks deepened when Hanoi
again flatly rejected Saigons
latest demands that the Viet
Cong representatives be invited
only as members of North
Vietnams delegation.

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had begun at 10:49 ajn. EST.
After the recess conference.
Foreman made a strong
argument that he did not have
physically or geographically
enough time to question all 360
potential witnesses the state has
listed.
Foreman said allowing two
hours of questioning per witness
you come up with 90 days of
interviews. Foreman had filed a
written motion requesting that
he become trial counsel and that
after a 90-day wait, the
prosecution and defense meet in
open court to confer on a new
trial date.

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Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 13, 1968'

EDITORIAL

For The Codes Sake ...

In Tuesdays edition, the Alligator
editorially called on univf nity officials to
drop the charges against La on Gentry.
Gentry is the bearded activist campus
police arrested Aug. 9 for taping signs o 1
buildings.
The signs, incidentally, advertised a Bust
The Draft rally in the Plaza of the
Americas, sponsored by Students for a
Democratic Society-Southern Student
Organizing Committee.
At any rate, after Tuesdays editorial,
several thoughtful people reminded the
Alligator that Gentry deserves to be tried in
a civil court because he was arrested only
after being warned by police to stop putting
the signs in unauthorized areas.
True, Gentry was first warned. He
disregarded the warning. He was caught.
But there was no need for the arresting
officer who, by the way, wasnt even sure
at the time of the arrest what the specific
charge was to book Gentry for violation
of a municipal ordinance.
The fact is Gentry faces a jail term for a
ridiculous charge. (Unless, of course, you
think Scotch tape actually defaces a
building.)
The fact also is that there is no justifiable
cause for the university to continue to pass
the buck to the city court just so Gentry can
be more severely punished for his crime
against society.
One of two alternatives could presently
be used to help wipe some of the mud of
legal vindictiveness off the universitys face.
First, Gentry could request that civil
authorities return the case to the arena of
proper jurisdiction, namely the university.
Such a course of action, though, amounts
to little more than wasted breath.

Fifth Column

Skin Wins Once Again

Many of my faithful readers
(both of them) will recall a
column written last spring about
Gainesvilles latest boffo
night-club act, Dubs Thursday
night mini-skirt contest. Well,
I am here to report that free
enterprise and the American
spirit of competition have
triumphed once more, OR, Skin
Wins Again.
You see Trader Tom has
finally opened up his new boite
known as Gatorland South. It is
next door to Jerrys on U.S. 441
South and it is remarkably
similar to his old hole, e.g. it is
gross. The only difference
between the two places is that
Traders South is somewhat
bigger. But therein lies the
attraction.
For last Thursday night Tom
staged his Grande Opening. He
closed up the old place for the
night, picked up on an acid
band, procured 20 kegs of Busch
(a new one night record for

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Busina*. Advertising offices in Room 330, Rsttz Union. Phone
382-1681,382-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida AlHgatar are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florids.**

Gville Im told) and charged
S2.SO per person admission with
all the beer you can drink. As an
added attraction he premised a
bikini contest later on that
night.
So hard-working yours truly
dropped by in the line of duty
later on that night, and I would
like to report that the show was
a gas. And the reason that
Traders makes it while Dubs no
longer does is simple: Toms got
soul.
I mean the minute you walk
into Dubs its a hassle no
standing on chairs allowed,
fighting to get a drink, hot,
crowded, sweaty, lets face it,
Dubbie had a great idea but let it
get out of hand. He tries too
hard to make it all in one night.
Admittedly, Tom isnt in the
Beer Biz for fun. But once hes
cracked his nut for the night,
hes whoopin as much as the
next guy. He wears these
incredibly gross Hawaiian sport

Secondly, the university could withdraw
the civil charges against Gentry and bring his
case back to the university, where it
properly belongs.
The second alternative is the superior
one.
Except for one minor detail. The
university will have to admit that it made a
mistake.
But if charges against Gentry are not
dropped, if his case is not returned to
university jurisdiction, a far greater mistake
will have been made.
The hallowed Student Code of Conduct,
billed at its adoption as a significant step
forward for student freedom and university
fairness, will probably crumble limply into a
useless pile of the corrupted ideas of
progressive thinkers.
For the sake of whats left of a
once-brilliant idea and for the sake of
fairness in making the punishment fit the
offense, Gentry should be summoned before
the Student Conduct Committee for
violations of the Student Code of Conduct.
To wit, Section D, Paragraph 3(d),
Student Code of Conduct:
Expulsion or suspension from the
University or any lesser penalty may result
from ... the following violation of the Code
of Conduct: .. .e. malicious destruction,
damage, or misuse of public property ...
If UF President Stephen C. OConnell
believes in judicial decency, respect for
university regulations and a common sense
of proportion and fairness, he will withdraw
civil charges against Gentry and refer the
case to the Student Conduct Committee.
If, on the other hand, OConnell believes
the university should continue its role of
primeval headhunter, he will allow the
charges to stand.

By Jason Straight

shirts and yells inanities into the
mike just like any other bozo,
and pretty soon you realize
theres no pressure, you pays
your money and you does your
thing.
For example, take his bikini
contest. Five minutes before it
started the crowd was
completely oblivious, still
dancing, still having a good time.
At Dubs youve got these
weirdos that come out of the
woodwork every Thursday night
and stack up ten deep on the
dance floor three hours before
the contest begins. And Tom is
hip, he STARTS the girls half
nekkid in a bikini and he doesnt
give the crowd any grief about
standing on chairs. (Chairs, hell
- there must have been at least
30 people on the bar I saw
one guy fall off 8 times.)
By the time closing rolled
around the beer was two inches
deep on the floor, Proteenus and
Jax were doing their thing, Tom
was happily exhorting the crowd
to finish off the rest of the beer,
and the honey who won the
contest was looking for a ride
back to the dorms (she was a 1 st
quarter freshman).
So hold your breath fans, the
Thursday night battle of the skin
has been joined, and the
student body anxiously awaits
Dubbies countermove.

Florida Alligator
*Tha priet of freedom
fc th* OKorciM of rewomibaity. M
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
PtCftri* Managing Editor
M Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor

Staff Writings

Being Nosy Is Our

Journalistic Duty

Once more the Alligator has
gotten out of line and had to be
put down by one of those duly
authorized campus organizations
whose duty it is to see that no
one raises too much hell.
Playing Batman this time is
someone claiming the dubious
distinction of being the editor of
the Jennings Hall EYE. The issue
is whether the Alligator should
deal with subjects such as the
UF policy on releasing birth
control pills and relative
information.
Young Randolph Hears! of
the dorm world feels the subject
is not one for discussion. In a
letter in Monday's Alligator we
are told that we should not only
avoid subjects like birth control
pills but also that we should
treat them with more acumen.
In other words, don't write
about some things and if you do,
do a good job of it.
But the last sentence of the
letter is the real corker:
... your journalistic duty is
to report and comment on those
(issues) already existent.
It seems strange that at one
time or another, every entity on
campus receives a flash of insight
from the heavens and is
suddenly keenly cognizant of
the Alligators journalistic
duty.
Everyone on campus with the
hard-hitting qualifications of
having pulled a C in JM 118 is
suddenly an expert on whether
the Alligator staff is qualified
to comment on various issues.
y.v.v.v.\v.w.v.v.v.v. .v. xvAwx
Alligator Inquizitor
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
i i
A pleasant good morning* to ya. I am very happy and pleased
as I walked into a whole stack of last minute replies to my
i Inquizitorium today (Tuesday). And YES, there is a winner! I :
must also announce, to the dismay of some of the more smug
contestants, that not a single person answered all 15 questions
I corre ctly. However, the winner, runner up, and answers will be
| printed Friday.
Let these occupy you, please:
1. Here are six more actors and their real names. Can you
| match them up?
Archibald Leach Jack Benny
Benny Kubelsky Cary Grant
:j Frances Gumm Judy Garland
:j Sara Jane Fulks Anne Bancroft
:j Anna Maria Italiano Jane Wyman
Marion Morrison John Wayne
\ unj at Were t^ie names f Supermans parents in Krypton?
i were the three contestants in last years Homecoming
: Queen contest?
S was Adlai Stevensons running mate in 1956 ?in
\ 1952? :
£ 5. Who painted American Gothic?
;. 6. It s 12:00. Do you know where your parents are tonight?
Send a copy of TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD to the Audubon >
;: Society today. :
. iViVl .,y,;

By John Parke

Our journalistic duty is
defy ostrichism. The editor of
the Jennings EYE is an ostrich.
These are the dont look at it
and it will go away people.
Our journalistic duty is to
report as fairly and as accurately
as we can what is going on,
remembering that most of us are
being trained to make that our
lifes work. Cries of bias and
editorializing are heard from
almost daily. We ask you to
remember one thing. That from
the inception of our training in
the reporting of news, every
possible attention is paid to
being ;asflrirand as accurate as
humanly posrible.
Our journalistic duty in
short, to all of you who have
been offended by too much
coverage, too little coverage, too
brilliant coverage, too dull
coverage, and all of you
ostriches everywhere, our
journalistic duty is to be nosy.
To try to pin the administration
on its policy on birth control
pills. To find out why a
cheerleader was dismissed from
the squad illegally. To uncover
the true story of marijuana use
on campus. To let people know
about the existence of the
fraternity test file system.
To probe, to dig, to uncover,
to follow bad tips and to
interpret hum-hawing officials,
to make thousands of phone
calls, to check and re-check
facts, to write, re-write, to
report, and to publish.
That is our journalistic
duty.



OPEN FORUM:
jAdriiuiMjl ViA&tot
There is no hope for the complacent man."

'Hello, Beef Research Farm
Is Mildred Burghes There? 1

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Features Writer
Will the real Beef Research People please Answer
the Phone?
Centrex had me on their drive a UF coed crazy
list this weekend, when it went into effect.
It wasnt enough Friday night when I was the
only one on the third floor of Jennings with a dial
tone in her Centrex phone which wasnt supposed
to work until 4 a.m.
It wasnt enough that everybody else on the floor
could get calls in on their phone all week and I
couldnt.
But to finally get a phone call other than the
phone companys nasal, We are testing, which
worriedly asked:
Emergency room? Is this the emergency
room?
Later Friday night, in the middle of the Mammas
and the Poppas... Brrinng. Brrinng.
Hello, I said expectantly.
Is this the medical center? a womans voice
asked hopefully.
I cracked up. Between tied tongue-fulls of words
I told the nice lady that she had reached the wrong
number and was she calling from off-campus?
Yes she was, she said crisply, and hung up.
I called one of my friends. She said she had been
trying to call me but that it sounded like no one was
home.
Nice, 1 thought. Everybody can call me but my
friends.
Saturday things were quiet, but Sunday, the Beef
Research Fan Club started calling. Long distance
yet.
Brrinng. Brrinng.
So who is it?
Long distance calling for Mildred Burghes.
Operator, I said. What number are you
calling?
392-1750.
Are you sure you dialed correctly? Some nerve
I had asking the operator that, huh?
Yes, of course, she said a little sharply.
Well, my number is 392-93**.
Please forgive the ring.
Things were fine, even great, for a couple of
hours. People were on the other end of brrinngs that
I actually knew!
Brrinng. Brrinng.
Hi Ya!
Beef research? the male voice on the other end
asked.
What did you say?
Is this Beef Research?
I said no, and asked him what number he was
calling.
392-1750.
This happened two more times.
On the third try, just as a lark, I asked the man if
he knew Mildred Burghes.

For The Guys With The Long Hair" " TO
# With two more games to be

MR. EDITOR:
This is a letter from an Army
Sergeant Jeffrey A. Davis to
his bride of only four months. It
was marked To be opened only
in the event of my death.
He died in late September, on
the field of battle in Vietnam.
The letter was opened. In it was
a legacy for the guys with the
long hair and protest signs.
It is too bad I had to die in
another country but at least I

died for a reason and a good
one, the letter read.
I died for the guys with the
long hair and protest signs. The
draft card burners, the hippies,
the anti-everything people who
have nothing better to do. The
college kids who think they
shouldnt have to serve because
they are too good.
I died so those people could
have a little longer time to get
straightened out in life. God
knows they need it

Shes my wife. We live out at the Beef Research
Farm and Ive been trying to reach her for quite a
while. If I cant reach her the next time, how would
you like to go out? the voice said.
I thanked him, politely, in tears at that point and
told him I hoped hed reach his wife.
A little later:
Brrinng. Brrinng.
Lindsey? a man asks.
Is he any relation to Mildred I ask the gentleman.
Lindsey is Mildred Burghes husband, Im told.
Who am I?
I dont know anymore, I tell the man. Im a little
dorm resident who keeps getting calls for the Beef
Research Farm. So I ask the guy what was the beef
research farm anyway?
Its a cattle research institute of the university,
he explained. Told me he was sorry Id been having
so much trouble.
Several ladies called for Mildred during the
course of the afternoon and the Beef Research Farm
was called again.
Finally, Mildreds sister calls.
Someone told me that you said Mildred had
received some long distance calls. Do you know who
they were from? She was worried that their
mother might be in the hospital or it was an
emergency or something.
Sorry, I told her. The operator didnt tell me
who was calling.
I told Mildreds sister that I was really sorry I
didnt know anymore than I did, and that both
Mildred and her husband had been receiving a lot of
calls and that it had been interrupting my studying
but I didnt really mind cause the whole thing was
kind of funny anyway.
She said she hoped the lines would be
straightened out soon, thank you and goodbye.
Those beef research people sure are popular.
Its enough to make you a vegetarian.
I I
No More Music!
!
$ MR. EDITOR: i
j
I dislike immensely being subjected to the J
loud and rude interruptions of the bands which j
>: are now permitted access to the area near the 5
I Plaza of the Americas on Sundays. The howling 5
and wailing of loudspeakers and guitars 3
pervades even the library, and makes it difficult 1
for many students to study. Even across 3
University Avenue several residents are j
complaining about this unnecessary 3
interruption and irritation. Cant there be just a 3
little peace and quiet even on Sunday? j
j
MICHAEL ABRAMS, 4JM 5

I died so those members of
the young generation could
have the right to do what they
do. To protest, have that long
hair, go to the college of their
choice, wear weird clothes and
run around mixed up with no
direction at all.
I came here favoring
freedom so they could protest
the war I fought in. And died in.
I died for America.
Sgt. Davis was also a member

Wednesday, November 13, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Speaking Out

Series No Good

MR. EDITOR:
While fully realizing that a newspapers function is to tell it like it
is, I nevertheless cannot help but wonder about the motives behind
your recent series on the dispensing of birth control pills by the
university. When things are slow theres nothing like a good nude
picture, rape or sex and the single girl theme to improve circulation.
Concomitant with a responsibility to print the news must be an
equally weighted responsibility (a self-censorship if you will) to
evaluate the consequences of such reporting.
The least of the consequences of your series has already occurred
i.e. Pres. OConnells disapproval of the actions of the infirmary
physicians and his call for a conference on the subject. The worst of
the consequences is the likely eventual discontinuance of such
prescribing practices altogether.
What then have you accomplished? What have you done for your
readers, the students of this university? When these questions are
balanced against the question what have you done for Alligator
circulation, the scales tip heavily towards the Alligator side.
Somehow it doesnt seem to be the way it should be.
To be just a bit melodramatic, who will bear the responsibility for
the pregnancies and shattered lives which may occur as a result of ofdiscontinued
discontinued ofdiscontinued contraceptive prescribing and advice to students?
Is Ergol and Apiol (an abortifacient combination) really an
improvement over Enovid, Ortho-Novum or Oracon? Isnt a B.A. or
B.S. degree with the pill better than a U.M. (unwed mother) or Mrs.
without the pill.
What has your series accomplished? Aside from completely
unnecessary, sensational journalism very, very little!
Left Doesn't Hate

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to suggest to Mr.
Alper that he might And it
informative to attend some of
the meetings and seminars of the
movement before he attempts to
delineate its desires and goals. If
he had done so he wouldnt
make such sophomoric
statements as The
movement doesnt want
nominalists. The movement
wants extremists.
On the contrary the
movement urges all ranges of
political thought to join us
including nominalists. Our
goal is to expand the publics
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

of the young generation.
(early 20s).
Os course, he does not
mention the Flag burners. I
guess he could have never
imagined that someday, a fellow
American would go so far as to
bum his own countrys flag.'
Nobody should have that right. 1
dont think he would have died
for that.
MRS. M.E.G.

By Howard Lambert

conscience of the workings of
our society. We dont demand
that they agree with us, we only
urge them to look.
Furthermore I would like to
ask Mr. Alper how he can speak
for the person who burned the
flag? I am reasonably certain
that Mr. Alper does not know
what that persons motives were.
I think that if Mr. Alper is
looking for hate in our society
he should look at other faction
extant. The radical left did not
murder Mrs. Violet Liuzzo, nor
did the New Left slay the three
Civil Rights workers in
Mississippi, neither did we
assassinate Dr. King or Robert
Kennedy. If you are searching
for hate do not look at the
movement. There you may find
regret, disillusionment, and
sorrow, but not hate.
JAMES KRAMER, lUC
Women Students
Say Gator Men
Are Number One

played, and the apirit at an
all-time low on this campus, the
women student spirit the
University of Florida have joined
together to let the Gators know
that they're still no. 1 in our
book, and well be cheering
them on every step of the way.
Behind every good man is a
woman and with all of us
behind you you're bound to
leave 22 Kentucky Wildcats
running scared. Go Gators!!
THE ASSOCIATION
OF WOMEN STUDENTS l

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 13, 1968

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From Country Set's grouping
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Photos by Gut Mustolior

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ordered through Donigan's.
Modeled by Penny.

Wednesday, November 13, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 13, 1968

Traffic Planning Relieves Parking Problem

Fourteen thousand cars were
authorized to park on the UF
campus last year, but only 6,442
parking spaces were available.
The daily scramble resulted in
approximately 7,000 tickets
issued by campus police last
quieter, most of them for illegal
park. ib.
Efforts are being made by the
university to overcome this
deluge of automobiles, which is
a major headache on most
campuses today. A three-part
proposal by the Traffic Planning
Office offers substantial relief by
early 1969.
The proposal, part of a
master traffic and parking plan
for UF, was developed by
Arnold Butt, who initially
headed the Traffic Planning
Office before becoming

r
c
_J H if
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EXISTING ENTItiLcES AND EWTS ~
In MeP-^BHTfiR
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chairman of the Department of
Architecture last July, and his
replacement professor, Harold
W. Kemp, also of the
Department of Architecture.
-The first step, restricting
access to the central academic
area to cars authorized to park
there, is now in effect. Control
points are manned by campus
police at the area entrances on
SW 2nd Avenue, NW 17th
Street, Newell Drive and
Stadium Road.
This restriction of moving
traffic in the central academic
area, the major site of parking
violations, is aimed at
re-establishing pedestriaq
right-of-way and easing the
parking pressures and violations
in the area.

All igator*

BACKGROUND REPORT

-The second step, an increase
in the number of parking spaces,
is also underway with a January
1969 deadline on construction
of a 912 space commuter lot
behind Hume Hall. Also
scheduled is a 126-space lot at
the new law center, a 44-space
lot east of Norman Hall, the
addition of 124 spaces on
Fraternity Row and 227 spaces
in the central academic area.
In all, 1,433 new parking
spaces will be made available in

1968-69 costing some $150,000
in state road board funds.
The third step, the
establishment of a bus system to
provide transportation from the
central academic area to the new
commuter parking lot and also
linking the health center and
on-campus housing areas, is
rapidly developing, with a
proposed starting date of
January 1969.
According to Butt, the
university is presently working

on a budget which would allow
the leasing of six buses on a 7:30
ajn. to 5:30 pjn. weekday basis.
The bus system would relieve
some of the pressure resulting
from the traffic control plan in
the central academic area and
make parking in the commuter
lot more convenient as well as
reduce overall campus traffic by
providing transportation for
many border-zone people.
Present plans call for six
buses, with a maximum capacity
of 70 riders each, operating on
three tentative routes with no
charge to riders:
One shuttle route, 1.9 miles
long, will connect the new
commuter lot with the central
academic area. Circuit time
should be 15 to 20 minutes with
a 10 minute schedule between
buses.
-The second route, 2.5 miles
long, will connect the new
commuter lot with the health
center and the central academic
area. Circuit time should be 15
to 20 minutes with a 10 minute
schedule between buses.
The third route, 3.2 miles
long, will connect Corry Village,
Fraternity Row and the Flavet
Area with the central academic
area. Circuit time should be 20
to 30 minutes with a 10 to 15
minute schedule between buses.
The estimates of circuit times
and between-bus schedules were
arrived at by survey runs over
the tentative routes last summer
using UF buses.
Several plans for financing
the bus operation-costing
approximately $93,600 per
year-and future parking
proposals have been investigated,
Butt said. An increase in auto
registration fees to $lO per year,
plus an additional charge of sls
per year for faculty and staff
reserved-lot parking, have been
recommended to W. Ellis Jones,
UF Director of Planning, by the
Traffic Planning Office.
He explained that Jones will
evaluate the recommendations
after an exchange of faculty,
staff and student reactions, in an
effort to arrive at the best
method for charges. Jones will
then forward his recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell for approval.
He also noted that a dialogue
on the parking and traffic
proposals was already in progress
and that slide presentations of
the proposals had been made to
several groups, including the
Administrative Council and
student government leaders, and
were available to other groups
upon request.
Butt, who made several trips
to other universities to study
various traffic and parking plans,
described the proposed yearly
charges for UF vehicle
registration and parking as
comparatively mild:
The University of Oliiiois
charts faculty and staff sls for
vehicle registration and an
additional $45 for reserved-lot
parking. Students pay $lO for
vehicle registration and a
*** TWfKT. PAQf .11>,



UNIVEKSITV f L
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STAtHU a ROAD _jn |jj| TiacrT HM l
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CONTROL POINTS ACADEMIC AREA
j>.

*.'
Traffic Scramble Relieved By Problem Study

PAGE lOj
five-cent fine to ride the shuttle
buses.
-The University of Georgia
charges $5 for all vehicle
registrations plus an additional
S2O for faculty and staff
reserved-lot parking and a
five-cent fare for shuttle bus
rides.
UCLA charges $72 for
faculty and staff vehicle
registration and reserved-lot
parking and 75-cents per day for
student parking.
We felt that since it was the
increase in automobiles on
campus that was causing the
traffic and parking problems,
that those driven should rightly
be the ones to share in the costs
of providing more spaces,** he
explained. The faculty and
staff will support a considerable
portion of these costs as well as
the students, particularly in the
reserved-lot parking charges.**
Also, we were advised at the
universities visited to avoid fares
for the shuttle bus rides if
possible as coin boxes and
identification checks for riders
were found to significantly
reduce the efficiency and speed
of the shuttle system,** Butt
said.
With the addition of the
1,433 new parking spaces, the
campus capacity will total 7,875
spaces for 14,000 competing
can, a ratio of 1.77 can per
space. A ratio of 125 can per
is usually recommended as
reasonable for faculty arid stiff

parking. A ratio of two can per
space is recommended for
commuting students.
Butt saia the tnree-part
proposal is a short range plan
aimed at immediate traffic and
parking relief. The experience in
implementing it will help in
making final decisions on
upcoming long range plans.
He said the Traffic Planning
Office recommends the
enlargement of the Hume Hall
commuter lot as soon as more
funds are available to further
improve the car-parking space
ratio on campus. He also
indicated that the use of
peripheral parking lots and a
connecting bus system is one of
the major solutions:
recommended for the UFs
future parking needs.
With an expanded bus
system we could utilize large
areas southwest of Lake Alice
for considerable peripheral
parking space and with only a
minute's difference in the circuit
times of the buses,** he
explained.
We considered the
utilization of parking structures
for aO parking needs but favored
the peripheral parking plan for
the major parking load with a
limited number in structures,
Butt said. One reason for this
decision was the lack of land
dose enough to make structures
practical that was not already
designated for other uses.
Another was an aesthetic effort
to preserve the character of the

campus as much as possible.**
In fact, the traffic to ana
from a parking structure in the
presently congested central areas
of the campus could worsen
rather than help our traffic and
parking problems,'' he added.
We do anticipate structures
eventually around the periphery
of the circumscribed
quarter-mile academic area
radius, which would be within
reasonable walking distance for
faculty and staff.**
A parking structure at the
health center is needed now,
however, due to the proposed
expansion of the building
complex, which will remove a
substantial amount of the
existing parking area,** he said.

| n
! r\ f JJTDWITY I li
T 1 5
NEW \ i
PAXXINGi \
* itu-jm*
PROPOSED SHUTTLE BUS SYSTEM

Mi 1 4AAA TWa KlmUa A llt A
liu¥niliw >W| III lOi KMI MlllpuMfi

This situation could be critical
and additional land will have to
be committed for parking until
structures can be built.**
Butt also noted concern with
the traffic flow due to the
increasing volume of traffic to
and from the university.
We now have some 40,000
car movements per day-20,000
in and 20,000 out-with peak
periods at 8 am., 12 pm. and 5
pm.** he said. We have to
handle this with entrances and
exits which are still as they were
designated 20 years ago.**
Os 10 north and east exits
from the university, only
one-SW 2nd Avenue-actually

penetrates in any depth directly
into the community,** he said.
Routes need to be found for
moving regional traffic to and
from the university and through
the community in a logical
fashion,** he added. This will
require the cooperative effort of
the city, county, state and
university to find a solution.
Butt summed up the short
and long-range proposals of the
master plan recommended by
the Traffic Planning Office as a
record of past decisions and a
flexible guide for ftiture
decisions, subject to change
through constant updating as
traffic needs and problems
change.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE I
W/.WW/AV I Q Q
So,#x Excellent condition.
5125 or best offor. 378-3823. 35 mm
Argus with light motor and flam*Bo
or boat offor. 378-3823. (A-st-34-p>
Lovable Siameso kittens, 7 weeks old,
potty tralnod, malos and females. Call
evenings 378-7638. (A-st-35-p)

mu -nnnnnimnjuuLinjui
TONIGHT
DOUBLES
for tfo pnct
SINGLES
for your ntavfainmuvrt
Ploosurt from 9pm to 1:30 am
Roland Winters
Ploying tho 12-string guitar
ALIBI LOUNGE
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
tttiui 4 lines ate requiredMmimum cnarge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the numbei
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
'Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
No refunds will be given on ad cancellations.
Deadline -3.00 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
** w 10 n
I lI II I r
>
sj*sj 3 S --
l cS S a S ft
H H z
Q
>
mmmm Ul U N H
-i < < < 5
****** M
-in a
******** mmmm* 4 3 * $ A
S a o s s o
* S
a a a -2
_ XXX £
22 2 z
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mmtmmm mmmm * i 4 (4
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ft 3 2 c >
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HHRh

| FOR SALE i
3r
Traitor. 1 Bdrm. Furnished, AC, largo
cabana. Asking SISOO. Call
372-9390. Rm. 566. (A-3t-37-p)
FOR SALE: 1966 Honda S9O.
Excellent condition. Just tuned. Tool
kit included. $225. Call Tim at
392-7951 anytime after 8:00 p.m.
Only 5000 miles. (A-3t-37-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 13, 1968

| FOR SALE
Honda 350 less than 2000 mi.,
perfect cond., W/Bates shield & Lug;
rack. Cost $787 new, now $689 call
372-7942 after 6:00. (A-3t-36-p)
3bdrm, 2bath, dng & utility rms,
screened porch, air-c. unit, tool shed,
washer, refrig, carpeted, sll3 a mo,
SISOO down, 1611 NE 19th Lane,
372-2722, near elem & jr-hi.
f (A-10t-32-p)
SORRY SAL is now a merry gal. She
used Blue Lustre rug end upholstery
cleaner. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-38-c)
Camera -35 MM Practica single lense
reflex with interchangeable F 2.8
lens, case, 2X telextender, skylight,
yellow and red lens filters. Complete
outfit, $65. Call 378-7329.
(A-lt-38-p)
Tame tegu lizard 2Vi $15.00 Bottle
raised lion cub $3500 Baby
i opposums $5.00 Ocellot kitten
$210.00. The exotic pet of your
choice. Underground Zoo. 378-8810
0r*378-7152. (A-2t-38-p)
Zenith Circle of Sound Stereo
System. Nearly new must sell for
highest bid over $135 call 378-9171
after 6. Records availible if wanted.
(A-3t-38-p)
FOR RENT |
CAMELOT APARTMENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
Male roomate for house 2nd, 3rd
qrtr. Two sep. bedrooms, kitchen,
bath, livingroom, all furn. Pret Grad,
or senior. $42 per mol Call 37b-5457
(B-3t-36-p)
sublet 2 bedroom Village Park apt.
for winter quarter. Call 372-9651.
Lease Expires in June. (B-3t-35-p)
fficiency apartment, suitable for
two. $75 per month. 1829 NW 2
Ave. Call 376-8990. (B-st-35-p)
fffl V
I T*kFw>f irrilM I* I
1:30
5:40 ffP TjSlf
9:50
BOSTON^HbI
L "ANGLER j J* 11
by DbCokb
K / 1

f VtWlN* ILAST DAY! "THE PARENT TRAP"
KlHllui1fl A MINUTE TO PRAY,
MffiMBMBBBIWM A SECOND TO DIE"
JSSStk Cl \/,?7 A 5 TS TOMORROW FIRST RUNI
ELVIb shoots the works from
Wllif dawn to darkroom!
yUKHk METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
LAURENCE PRODUCTION
' fc liVi illfiu
i i A Little
LATE SHOW EVERY NtTE

ftMCOfloflWortoeaiWWWwpcwwMsMiO'WCOSS
1 FOR RENT I
iMBBWWWOtfIOtMMMaaWMfIWWWMW
Fum Downstairs Apt. 2 Or. Air Cond.
Cali after 5:30 378-7845.
(B-32-TF-c)
Musi Sub-let: 2 Bedrm Furnished
Apt. at tha Summit House. Rent paid
to Dec. Istmove in immediately.
Call 376-9688 between 9:00 A.M. A
6:00 P.M. (B-st-36-p)
Modern 2 bedroom, air condition,
heating unfurnished. Available
December 30. $165 per month.
Landmark Apts. Call Achey
3727555. (B-15t-38-p)
;:x-x-x-x-w-v:vx-xsx-x<-x-x*x-x-v. .'*:*: :ws
WANTED
SC 4
< > :*x-x*x-:-v.-.-.w:->x-X'X-:-xcx.vx*:'X > w-:m
Female roommate needed for 2nd
quarter. Apt. near campus. A.C.T.V.
Call 378-5803 after 6 p.m.
(C-st-36-p)
Two female roomates to share two
bedroom French Quarter apt.
beginning winter quarter. 3769659.
(C-st-36-p)
2 girls to share 3 br/2 bath house.
Beautifully furnished, carpeted,
central//AC. Available Jan. 2. Ph.
378-6679 after 6 p.m.(C-10t-34-p)
Lead Singer wanted for rock group.
Call 3 72-9303. Pete Armfield.
(C-3t-37-p)
RIDE TO MIAMI FRIDAY 11-15, 12
p.m. return late Sunday 11-17. Phone
Mike Carrel at Fletcher K.
(C-lt-38-p)
Like Horses? Dog? Fireplace? female
grad student wants roommate. Two
bedroom apt. with country
atmosphere. Close $50.00 mo. inc.
util, call 376-1077 between 5-7 p.m.
(C-2t-38-p)
HELP WANTED |
v 6
j'-r-r-N
HELP WANTED MALE: Mens
clothing salesman, part-time,
Discount privileges, salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-35-st-c)
Help Wanted: Part-time RADIO
ANNOUNCER for top-rated
Gainesville station. WEEKEND work,
experience necessary. Call Mark
Fowler 372-2528 between 9 a.m. and
10 p.m. (E-35-6t-c) j
Women Girls: Telephone & survey i
work part-time or full time. Salary. I
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
WANTED: Experienced waitress,
night shift. Jerrys Restaurant North.
J** NW 13th St. 378-2481.
(E-37-10t-c)
Need woman to sit with 5 months
old child 8:30 to 5:30 Monday thru
o hom - T el. evenings
378-2767 daytime 392-2929
(E-4t-37-p)
TirOHLv QUALIFIED SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typln P. othor secretarial skills
qssentiaL Permanent job, excellent
I**- Do not apply unless well
dual Hied. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)

Use our handy
mail ?n order
form.

| jp HELP WANTED |j
Lika movies? Want to review for the
Alligator? Turn in a review of any
movie in town the day after it opens
to the entertainment editors desk,
third floor Reitz Union. We will call
you. (E-tf-38-ACO
Ladies earn extra cash. Call for an
appointment. Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, Friday at 378-3185 from
10-12 A.M. and 1-4 P.M. (E-7t-36-p)
20 men and women pert time to
deliver to local area. Must have auto
and know city. Apply 14 E. Univ.
Ave. Upstairs offices 1 and 2.
- (E-38-10t-p)
InllijTTM
f W alt Disney" $
I Sn A > nd W^ite I
I The 7 Dwarfs I
A STUNNING I
I PICTURE THAT
Irlff V W KNOCKED US
j THRU "S.JStjT I
! SAT ONLY pcSL,;
11 "BEST FOREIGN
! FILM OF THE
I VC AD I*? PICTURE*
L TEARr IVE SEEN FROM |
EUROPE OR ANY-I
WHERE ELSE IN
ft 3U|C SEVERAL TEARS!*;
Lfeop a]
eImAIN Si
HSTREETg
HSSHXm thu.
They just stol^^
3 half-million dollarsNTe
But watch what happens \*
when its time for The Split! 1 #
1 L. diahann I#
Jt PnBROWN CARROLL fc
A JULIE ERNEST fr
*A HARRIS BORGNINCA
r
Y Winner
of 3 VI
V Academy Awards! WBmm
[ RICHARD HARRIS vjn
I VANESSA REDGRAVE fl
C&MEMWF
l£l
iS *1 wsMai sn ENDS



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I Ha* w Awyep |
Male end femste to contact dorm
residents for the Florida Times
Union*. 378-9058. (E-38-p)
Female dorm resident wanted to
deliver morning newspaper.
378-9058. (E-3t-36-p)
WANTED: Carhops night shift.
Anolv Jerrys Restaurant North.
1505 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
1 AUTOS I
jaguar XKE CPE 1966 model. Fully
equipped with air condition, AM/FM
radio, front & rear bumper guards.
Only 26,000 miles S3BOO 378-8532.
(G-st-35-p)
GAINESVILLES LOWEST PRICED
USED CARS drive slowly on SOUTH
Main St. Look for the small
DATSUN sign. BIG savings.
Courteous men and women to answer
your questions. Gooding 8 Clark
Motors. 1012 South Main Street.
(G-st-37-C)
1967 Volkswagen 16,500 miles clean.
Includes S2OO worth of extras $2500
need to sell one car. Call 378-5381
Ext. 347 or 372-1538 evenings.
(G-st-35-p)
62 OLDS F-85. New paint, tires and
brakes, V-8 gets 20 mpg. Parking-plus
inspection stickers. Need cash! Just
$395, to see call Art 376-5432.
(G-lt-38-p)
Buick Special 1961 Bsyn., 4 doors
auto. tran. radio heater. Excellent
condition $375 or best offer. Moving
must sell. Call 372-1274. (G-3t-38-p)
Transportation special 59 Rambler
wagon SIOO 378-7648. (G-st-38-p)
1966 Triumph Spitfire; Hard, soft
Tonneau tops; radio; 28,000 mi.
SISOO. Call 376-7551 during day;
376-7161 after 6 p.m. Good
mechanical condition. (G-st-35-p)
VW Sedan 59 State Inspected. Clean
372-0033 after 5:30 and weekends.
(G-st-35-p)
1965 AH Sprite in top mechanical
condition. Top & new tonneau. Call
378-6792 after 5 p.m. for details.
(G-st-35-p)
PERSONAL |
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
Union.
RECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europes
most famous campuses. For info, call
392-1655 or come by 310 Union.
(J-18t-36-c)
Will the young lady. . African
Image..ll2 N.W. 3rd. Ave. Upstairs.
(J-lt-38-p)
fat karen: the phantom likes danger,
you made the club, no.l position is
open can you handle it? (J-38-lt-p)
Party: Single people only Sat 16th
Grad-Law-Med-Nursing students;
staff faculty-secretaries. Apt. 112,
700 SW 16 Ave 378-9095 BYOB.
This is an experiment, try to be
there. (J-3t-38-p)
To the individual who burned the
flag, I, Wayne Smith 214 Jennings
would like to express my opinion of
you face to face, anytime you like!
(J-lt-38-p)
Smith: Babies burned in Viet Nam
would like to meet you. ('J It '3B)
YOU can win a 1969 BRIGHT RED
MUSTANG FASTBACK, sports roof,
351 cubic inch V-8 engine, special
racing tires valued at $3,004! HOW?
LISTEN TO WDVH 980 On your
radio dial, for clues to find the
hidden keys, in the WDVH GOOD
GUYS MISSION NOT IMPOSSIBLE
CONTEST. Where are the keys? ITS
UP TO YOU! (J-36-3t-c)
I'TosTITf OU N bj
Lost Sat. at law skits, game or Phi
Delt house Fathers hi school Alpha
Omega pin from gold disc on charm
bracelet. Call 392-0415. (L-st-35-p)
FOUND: Tan cocker spaniel 6
months old. Call 392-7980.

Wadnnday. November 13. 1968. The Florida Alligator.

1 SERVICES
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto electric service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-ts-c)
Rame Hair Stylist 319 W. University
Ave. Introducing Miss Fleeta.
Limited time $15.00 permanent wave
for SIO.OO $18.50 frosting $12.50.
Free hair cut with price of shampoo
and set. Call 372-5549. (M3t-36-p)
Volkswagen repairs factory trained
specialist 12 years exp. Quality
service at fair prices. Gainesville
Machine Shop. Please call 376-0710
1224 S. Main. (M-7t-38-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next eye
glasses at University Opticians 3265 W
4th Ave. Next to Greyhound Bus
Station 378-4480. (MlB-tf-p)

1
tyPflTtfW MANAGER
training
\ u
We offer:
A career opportunity with one
of the larger restaurant
companies
Including:
Salary while training. Salary
plus bonus after training.
Excellent fringe benefits.
Requirements:
High school graduate, own
transportation and willing
to relocate.
r Contact Mr. Haynes for
personal appointment.
378-2481 376-2696
ijTf/ A*. II s 1U
Mf p ak Mmm e
I FRESH SEA TROUT OR SEA SQUAB
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
Including MM
French Fries HP e W
I Hush Puppies Pirates' Siaw
I SERVING DAILY FROM 5 PJI.
| I OCALA GANESVULE
I HWY. 301,441 OPEN SUNDAY 4-10
I 27 SOUTH "L N .TZ T-r
i/ u:ig South 3500 S. W. 13th ST.
urftolhn ON BIVAN ARM LAKE
PHONE 378-2931

I SERVICES I
Child care for 2-5 year olds. Home in
NE section. Playroom, fenced yard
with swings. Lunch and snacks
included. $lO weekly. 376-8523.
(M-3t-35-p)
Articulos de joyeria. Oro 18 K G Ran
surtido de medallas, escapularlos,
aretes, dijes, anillos. Diamantes y
perlas cultivadas. Relojes Ultramar.
Llame al 378-6498. (M-st-37-p)
FINE JEWELRY order now for
Xmas. 18 K gold items (watches,
rings, charms, medals, etc.) Diamonds
& Pearls also. Call 378-6498.
(M-st-37*p)
GATQR ADS SEUt

Page 13

Ruby's Alterations 376*3506 1126%
N.W Bth St. (M-2t-38-c)

I GREEKS I
I and I
I GRADS I
1 Pictures for the Seminole will be taken November 4-22 in J
1 Room 346 of the Student Union. Appointments must be made I
I in advance, hntwaan the hours of 12 and 5> and must
If: correspond to the weekly schedule below. Beginning October |
28, phone the Union, extension 2832 for an appointment. The
t attire for the pictures is dark coat and tie for the males, and 1
1 dark round-neck sweaters for the females. Pictures will be shot 1
j from 12-5 and 6-9 p.m. v
I DO NOT CAU BEFORE 12PM I
I NOVEMBER 4-8 1
I Alpha Chi Omega
§ Alpha Delta Pi
I 1 Alpha Epsilon Phi
All prospective graduates, last Alpha EpsUon Pi
| names beginning Alpha Gamma Rho
Alpha Omicron Pi
m\ [mm Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
I Chi Omega j
1 Chi Phi ft
Delta Chi
L NOVEMBER 11-15 1
I Delta Delta Delta B
i Delta Gamma "11
| Delta Phi Epsilon All prospective graduates, last
I Delta Sigma Phi names beginning |
Delta Tau Delta g a a
Delta Upsilon LJ |vl
Kappa Alpha | | "" I 1
Kappa Alpha Theta i
I Kappa Delta I
I Kappa Sigma I
Lambda Chi Alpha I
SMS ' pgl|
I NOVEMBER 18-22- 1
1 Phi Delta Theta I
| Phi Epsilon Pi J
1 Phi Gamma Delta I
I Phi Kappa Psi 1
Phi Kappa Tau
I Phi Mu I
H Phi Sigma Sigma
IAH prospective graduates, last J^PP 8 ha 1
1 names beginning Pi Kappa Phi J
I be ,nn,nfl Pi Umbda Phi
1 W Sigma Alpha Epsilon I
II M t Sigma Chi
Sigma Kappa
I 11 Sigma Nu
II Sigma Phi Epsilon
Tau Epdon Phi
Tau Kiq>pa Epdon
§ Theta Chi
Zeta Tau Alpha

SERVICES

X^soj
ALACHWi COUNTY
GtNHIATOR SERVICE



i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 13, 1968

Page 14

RENTZ STARTING QB

Eckdahl Injured Again

Gator Coach Ray Graves
donned a new outlook on life
yesterday, but part of that
outlook will have to be the
resoluf : that the Kentucky
game be played without
Jackie ahl.
Ecka t s condition for the
week we iii from temporarily
sidelined to out of game.
The bandages on the lefty
quarterbacks hand spread from
just the area of the sprained
thumb, to wind up in a cast-like
structure covering most of his
hand.
Jackie couldnt handle a ball
right now, Graves said, much
less throw it. The doctors dont
give him a chance, so I guess Ill
just have to do without him.
The injury will move Larry
Rentz to starting quarterback.
Harold Peacock again will be
back-up quarterback.
Another injury will also put
Tallywhackers
Beat English
The Tallywhackers, led by
the 17 point performance of
Kevin Suffern used a third
quarter rally to top the English
Department 46-33, and win the
Independent League basketball
championship.
Joe Meigs of the English
department was the high scorer
with 21 points.
Leading by only one at half,
the Whackers outscored the
Department 11-3 in the third
period to move away and win
the game easily.

*>.
MGUM Bhot/im
GAINESVILLE MALL
ANNUAL PRE-CHRISTMAS
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Accessories and shoes ... in all the newest fashions and colors! Additional sales people will be here to
serve you and make your shopping easier! Come early for best selections!

new faces on the starting lineup.
Tight end Jim Yarbrough is
suffering form a tom groin
muscle, and will be out for the
game. In his place, George Dean,
who ordinarily backs up
Yarbrough, will start. Gene Peek
will play second behind Dean.
Some good news is that Larry
Smith is expected to be ready
for the Kentucky game. Smith
has suffered from strep throat
the last week and a half, and has
had his speed cut back because
of a sprained arch. Both ailments
have disappeared, but in
a precautionary move against a
relapse, Smith did not dress out
for yesterdays session.

I p*p 1
I FESTIVAL I
I AT &OXFSTHSAM FARE I
A Thousand Wonders and a Three Cay Collaoe of Eeautiful Music

I SATURDAY, DEC. 28 lpm 10 pm
I Jose Feliciano Country Joe and the Fish
I Buffy Sainte Marie Chuck Berry The Infinite
I McCoys John Mayalls Bluesbreakers
I Booker T. and The M.G.S. Dino Valente*
I Fleetwood Mac
I SUNDAY, DEC. 29 1 pm -10 pm
I Steppenwolf Jr. Walker and the All Stars
Butterfield Blues Band Flatt and Scruggs
I Marvin Gaye Joni Mitchell The Boxtops
Richie Havens James Cotton Blues Band
H. P. Lovecraft

Graves moved Coaches Gene
Ellenson and Ed Kensler back to
their respective positions as
defensive and offensive coaches
on Monday. Yesterday, the head
Gator explained his reasons for
reversing his week-old decision.
I cant say it was a mistake,
Graves said, but I know it
didnt work. When you see that
something doesnt work, you
change it.
Actually, I would have liked
to have made the change back
on Thursday, when Fred
Pancoast went into the hospital,
but by then, it was too late for a
change it was too close to the
game.

MONDAY, DEC. 30*1 pm-10 pm j
Jose Feliciano Canned Heat The
Turtles Iron Butterfly The Joe Tex Revue
lan and Sylvia The Grassroots Charles
Lloyd Quartet Sweet Inspirations The
Grateful Dead
PLUS EVERY DAY:
The 1968 Invitational Walking Catfish Derby; The Giant
Ti-Leaf Slide; Hundreds of Arts and Crafts Displays; The
Warm Tropical Sun and a Full Miami Moon; Meditation
Grove; Wandering Musicians; Blue Meanies on Parade;
Things to Buy and Eat; 20 Acres of Hidden Surprises in
Beautiful Gardens; World's First Electronic Skydive rs;
Stratospheric Balloons; Kaleidoscopic Elephants

RAME HAHt STYUST
319 W. UNIV. AVE.
20% discount with
this coupon
ph 372-5549

I ROBBIE'S ]
Best In
Meal^^^ojj^ndwiche
P COLOR TV & BILLIARDS^
1718 W. University Ave.
'On The Gold Coast*

r "5% dlscountcoupon"
MIAMI POP FESTIVAL
IP.O. BOX 3900 MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
NO. TICKETS SAT.. DEC. 28 @ $6.00 Ea.
I NO. TICKETS SUN.. DEC. 29 @ $6.00 Ea.
NO. TICKETS MON.. DEC. 30 @ $6.00 Ea.
1(6.00 Includes all-day admission (tickets at the door,
if available: $7.00)
1 I have enclosed $ in check or money
order payable to "Miami Pop Festival."
I I understand that the management does not
~ guarantee delivery on orders postmarked
| later than Dec. 9, 1968
Name
Address
| City
Zip jj

GA T OR
GIRLS



Punjab Cant Kill,
But Is He A Candy?

By 808 PADECKY

Alligator Special Writer

Most people wear their shoes.
But for Jim Yarbrough wearing
them isnt good enough he is
supposed to stick his into
somebodys face and draw
blood.
Most people criticize me for
my lack of the killer instinct,
said Yarbrough. When youre
6-8,258 pounds, you are
supposed to put somebody on
the stretcher every time you hit
somebody.
If you dont annihilate
somebody every game, they call
you candy.
They start saying, lf I were
as big as you, Id be an
All-American. They expected
you to do something
superhuman because youre
bigger than everyone else. But
Im not the violent type. When I
play I try my hardest. If some
people dont like it, thats their
opinion.
Jim Yarbrough, whether he
smashes anybody in the near
future or not, has done the job
at tight end for the UF.
He is the best tight end in
the South, said his coach,
Bubba McGowan. Hes as good
or better than any tight end
weve ever had at Florida.
McGowan, it must be noted,
played college football for
Florida.
I dont want the killer on
my team, McGowan said. He
just draws penalties. I want
Yarbrough, he gets the job
done.
Yarbrough really got the job
done against Tulane. He was in
on 82 plays, he did what he was
supposed to on 78 of them.
But four years ago,
Yarbrough wasnt even a tight
end. He was playing linebacker
for small Arcadia High School.
But Ray Graves and every other
major school in the South
competed for Yarbrough. He
signed with the Gators and was
ready to play defense.
Thats where Id thought Id
play, Yarbrough said. But
before my freshman year, I went
up to Coach Graves and asked
him if I could try tight end. If I
didnt make it, he could always
move me back. I guess I made
the switch okay.
Making the switch wasnt the
thing that worried Punjab, as he
is commonly referred to by his
friends. It was making it the
right way that cut Yarbrough
down to size.
I never learned the
fundamentals at Arcadia,
Yarbrough said. We only had
two coaches there and they
never had time to take us aside
and coach us individually.
I weighed about 230 then
and played linebacker. When
Gator Netters
Hold Practice
UFs SEC champion tennis
team begins its fall practice
tourney today at 3:45 p.m. on
the varsity courts.
The Gator netters play
Tuesday through Thursday of
this week and Monday through
Thursday of next week in the
double elimination action.

those 150-pound guards started
coming out I didnt have to use
technique, just size.
I knew up here that it was
going to be different. But I
didn.t know about the
competition. Up here guys
smaller than me were stronger. I
had to learn to lift weights, I had
to learn the fundamentals and I
had to get my confidence back'
again.
It took a little longer than I
thought it would.
In the spring of his junior
year he was transformed from
just a big player into a big, good
player.
YARBROUGH RECEIVES
. . Punjab ready to catch one
from Eckdahl in game against
Miss. State.
MAULDINS
AUTO
GLASS
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
FREE ESTIMATES
323 N.W. 6th ST.
376-2558
East Side ACL Depot

FIRST ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
TO END OUR FUST AND HBIALD OUR SECOND YEAR OF BUSNESS
PORE-BOY INVITES YOU TO TAKE PART IN OUR RRST BIRTHDAY
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2 FOR 1
BUY ONE PORE-BOY ORIGINAL-GET ONE FREE
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OF TAKE OUT FOOD %9 W 4k

My freshman and
sophomore years were learning
periods. But it was a little
.disappointing taking that long.
How about pro ball after this
season?
Id like to if anybody would
want me.
McGowan says: Hell be a
fine pro player. They can use
him at either tight end or
offensive tackle. He can block,
and catch passes well. Hes a
good one.
Not too bad for somebody
who cant kill.

GATOR
GIRLS
____________________

STUDENT CARS.
AT A DISCOUNT
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RAMBLERS DATSUNS TRUCKS TOO
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Wednesday, November 13, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

GOTASICKCAJL
Ming it to us. our 5 skilled mechanics.
HAVE OYER 80 YEARS EXPERIENCE
YouU drive safer with oar brake and
i tune-up service, too. |
E Wre the student's friend, so stop Jn
tandsave money. r -..~
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIALIST
1631 So. Mala PhoM 376-7771
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| $1.03 Value Only 85< plus tax |
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i

Page 15



Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Novumbf 13, 1968

*^ MlMmM __a g n esvi 11 e
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