Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Carol Knatift (top left) plays a "soldier's whore". Claude Pinkston
(top right) plays a deserter. Both retain a certain innocence. War is
th yi,ltan me ugly
Dan Jesse (middle), as Bargee, tells the story
AND me SERJEANT
Michael Beistle (bottom) plays Musgrave. It's his dance aqain
tonight as the Florida players present another performance of
"Serjeant Musgrave's Dance" at 8:15 p.m. Constant Theatre.

Flag Burning Suspect Held

John R. Claxton, 2UC, was
arrested by Gainesville Police
last night on a charge of defacing
a U.S. flag, a misdemeanor in
Florida.
Claxton was apprehended by
a city officer as he left a meeting
of SDS-SSOC in the Reitz Union
about 10 pjn.
Police were called to the

scene when an eyewitness to a
flag-burning incident last
Tuesday night notified police
and told them he saw Claxton
entering the SDS meeting.
Claxton is believed to have
burned a small American flag at
an SDS apolitical rally held
during national election returns
last week.

The
Florida Allierator

Vol. 61, No. 37 University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, November 12, 1968

O'Connell Deplores
U.S. Flaq-Burnina

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Despite the rain,
approximately 100 UF students
turned out for the Memorial Day
services in the University
Auditorium Monday.
On hand for the ceremony
were UF President Stephen
OConnell, Rev. U.S. "Preacher
| Gordon of the First Presbyterian
Church of Gainesville, president
of the UF Veterans Club, James
Hollis, and Dr. Robert P.
Marcus, faculty advisor for the
club.
OConnell spoke briefly to
the group.
"This ceremony in which you
salute and support the American
flag in honor of those who have
borne it and bear it proudly is a
i fitting reply to those who
| desecrate and defile the flag, and
I spit on its institutions while
claiming and enjoying fullest
benefits of citizenships in this
Nation.
| "Their only defense can be
1 that they do not know what
I they do, he continued,
i Commenting on the future of
war, OConnell, a World War II
veteran himself, noted that in
j the more than 5,000 years of
recorded history more than
14,000 wars have been fought
and that the "nature of mens
actions give no hope that more
. will not follow.
He concluded with this final
I plea:
f "The hands of those departed
with honor are now lifeless, our
country. .has no hands but
yours and mine, present day
I Americans to hold it on a
steady, proud, firm course. We
j must not fail them, our country,
i or those Americans yet unborn.
In the invocation

Student Senate Meeting
Over Election Controversy

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
In response to recent controversy concerning
student elections, the Student Senate will meet
tonight at 7:35 in room 349 of the Union to begin
procedures on an authorization of the establishment
of an election committee.
The election committee proposal, if adopted,
would consist of two members each from the Honor
Court, the Student Senate, the Alligator, Student
Government appointments by Student Body
President Clyde Taylor, and the Secretary of the
Interior, Ric Katz.
One result of the budget discussions will be the
changing of a student body statute.
When special requests reach the Senate, no
money will be alloted for food unless a 2/3
favorable vote is passed.
The budget will be passed, said Charles Harris,
majority leader.
A procedure requiring attendance for senators
will also go into effect.

America's Number 1 College Daily

immediately following
OConnells address, Rev.
Gordon asked God to "bless our
men in Vietnam, and to bring
"peace out of disorder and
confusion.
"Let not our forgetfulness or

jaOOOMOCCWKWX | O ENTRY C
I Poster Pasting I
| Rallying Point |
5 See Editorial Pg. 8 |
(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first of a two-part series on S
$ the case of La von Gentry, aUF student currently awaiting trial §
v on charges of defacing a building.) |
By JANIE GOULD §
ijj Alligator Staff Writer |
| A seemingly inconsequential act is becoming a rallying point 5:
: for such groups as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), \ I
Students for a Democratic Society Southern Students ijj
:j Organizing Committee (SDS-SSOC), and even the Gainesville jjj
: Sun.
ji That act, taping posters on walls of campus buildings, has i
: caused Lavon Gentry, a UF sophomore, to be charged with
i willfully and maliciously defacing a building,* and to face a i
: possible six months in jail and/or a SSOO fine.
: Last August, the Student peace Union held a Bust (the Draft
*: Bazaar one Saturday afternoon on the Plaza of the Americas. §
:j Besides the usual program of bands (Relatively Straight String jij
: Band) and skits, the rally featured modem poet Lawrence :j
Ferlinghetti, who has recommended going to jail for a good
: cause. From a distance, black militant Jack Dawkins watched the
: proceedings, which were peaceful and rather subdued. >j
: To advertise the happening, posters were put up on campus. jij
ji Two days earlier, Aug. 8, Gentry and a friend, Bobby Querns, jij
: were placing signs publicizing the bazaar on walls of buildings jij
ji and on a traffic sign, according to a police report. jij
Two officers from the University Police Department saw
them putting up signs, and took them to. the police station.
There Gentry and Querns were told they would have to put
signs on bulletin boards only; and they were instructed to seek jj;
: permission first from Vice President of Student Affairs, Lester >:
| L. Hale. §
Incidentally, UF President Stephen C. OConnell later denied %
v students are required to get Hales permission to put up posters, jj;
I (SEE DRAFT PAGE 2) |

Abo on the agenda will be several rules and
procedure changes within the Senate and the usual
senate replacements.
A Secretary of Finance and a Secretary of Food
and Vending will be appointed to cabinet offices.
Party caucuses will be held at 7:15 tonight.
The Student Senate recently acted on
replacement procedure for vacant senate seats.
In the past, replacements were simply
recommended to the Senate regardless of previous
experience or interest in the governmental
procedings.
Now, when a senator vacates his post, those
persons interested in filling the position will be
required to fill out an applicaiton form obtained
from the SG office, third floor Reitz Union.
Applicants will be interviewed by Majority Floor
, Leader Charles Harris or the Information and
Investigation Committee.
i The Alligator will run lists of vacant senate
positions.

dullness of conscious rob us of
the meaning of those fearful
years of war and strife, he said.
After a minute of silence the
cannon was shot and taps were
played while the auditorium
stood at attention.



Page 2

!, The Florid* Alligator, Tuesday, November 12.1968

Wagner Chorale:
Sacred, Secular
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Roger Wagner Chorale performs Saturday night in the Florida
Gymnasium as part of a series of musical programs planned by
Student Government.
The Chorale will open its program Saturday with sacred music of
the Renaissance period including Ave Maria by Victoria; Hodie
Christus natus est by Sweelinck; O admirable commercium by
Joclb Handl and Verre languroes by Victoria.
This will be followed by secular music of the Renaissance: II est
bel et bon by Passereau; Mon coeur se recommande a vous by De
Lassus and Au joli jeu by Jannequin.
Music of the Baroque period will be represented by a selection,
termed one of the most delightful compositions ever written, the
Aria-Duetto from Cantata No. 78 by J.S. Bach, We Hasten With
Feeble but Diligent Footsteps.
The first half *of the program closes with five movements from the
Requiem of Johannes Brahms. The year 1968 marks the
one-hundredth anniversary of the completion of the Brahms
Requiem which was first performed April 10,1868 on Good Friday.
The second half of the program opens with a recent composition of
Leonard Bernstein: the Chichester Psalms, and two additional
compositions by American Composers: Pueri Hebraeorum by
Randall Thompson and Vocalise by Wilbur Chenoweth.
The final part of the concert will be devoted to popular chanties,
folk songs, and spirituals, most of them arranged by Wagner himself.
Tickets for the event are on sale at the Reitz Union ticket box
office.
Foreign Employment
Interview Held Here

Persons wishing to work
overseas for one to three years
may arrange for a personal
interview on Tuesday, Nov. 19,
with Miss Anne Donnelly, Special
Services Representative, by
applying at the University
Placement Center in the Reitz
Union.
Positions are open to persons
with degrees in library science,
recreation, art, theatre arts,
music, social science and related
fields.
The majority of positions in
Europe, Korea, and Vietnam are
outside the Federal Competitive
Service and don't require a Civil
Service examination. Positions in
Japan, Okinawa, Hawaii, Alaska
and the Canal Zone are within
the federal service.
Positions offered are with the
Library, Service Club, Arts and
Crafts, Entertainment and
Sports Programs.

Seminole Photos Taken
During Morning Hours
Hours for Seminole senior and Greek section portraits have
been increased to include the morning hours between 9 and 11.
Appointments may be made in advance by calling 392-1681
from noon to 5 p jn.
Other hours for portraits include noon through 5 p.m. and 6
through 9 pjn.
Women should wear dark round neck sweaters with no
jewelry and men must wear dark coats and ties for pictures.
Hlmob Up T, s6o(i
9 a
Marion Finance Co,
376.5331
222 W. IMvmHy Av,
TB FLOWDA AL&JOATOR to totofflctol otvOout Mup*pr of to* Utoraralty of florldT
Ud to ptotoM fit* (fins wukty wrapt dartof Jm, July and Aufitto whan tt to pMiM
Mto-iMkly, uri firtf toM kolfcteya ud ww porkxto. Editorials npimd only to
ofitatol fitow of (Mr stolon. Addnu eorrpontonp, to to* Florid, Alllftoor, Rtots
Otou tofitotog. Utot*ratty of FlorVto, GolMotUl*, Florkto, 35601. Tho AMcator to utorad
u **M*d das*.patter to too United Statu Mat Oftteo to Galaaarilte, Florida, 01601.
Stoncriptiofi rate i SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.^
It* nortfi AOlptor rreerteo too ri*ht to ratotoo to* typographical tono of tol adrar adrarttooto
ttooto adrarttooto ud to rpttoe or tom aoay ec*y natch It ooutdara objoottooablo.
It* Florida Alligator toll *to ooooldor adjutaewto ot poymoto tor any adtorttoomoto
Uatottof Ijpifiiajtonal orrora *r orroooooa Insertion ulus aotte* to |lt*a to too Adt*r>
ttoftp **r t tottd* (1) teo day after adtoiUMorato appears. Tho Plorlda Alligator toll
I* ru oot*e*l Haras. Itottou tor oorracttoo a rat ha gltu briar* noto laurtto*.

Tours of duty are one year in
Korea and Vietnam; two years in'
Okinawa, and the Canal Zone;
and three years in Europe,
Japan, Hawaii and Alaska.
UF Directory
Lists Centrex
The 1968-69 student
directories for non-campus
residents are being distributed
Tuesday through Friday at the
information booth across from
the Hub.
The directories list the new
numbers of students, staff and
faculty, changed Friday with the
installation of the Centrex
system.
Too Cold
The birth rate in Canada in
1967, 18 per 1,000 was the
lowest on record, down from
28.5 per 1,000 in 1954.

Draft-Buster Busted

m me
After Gentry and Querns were released that night, the report
noted several people, among them Marion Flum o e en
Peace Union, and Richard Zucker, who had been involved m
civil rights demonstrations at a liquor lounge a few weeks
earlier, phoned to inquire about the case.
Later that night, the Gainesville Police Department also
became involved in the case. At 2 a jn., a city officer called t e
UF police to advise them two carloads of subjects were
apparently enroute to UPD (University Police Department).
Apparently trying to identify the people in the cars, the
Gainesville police said the primary troublemakers in the
group seem to be Miss Flum and Zucker. However, they did
not show up at the police station.
UF police noted posters were still being put up that night,
but it was not until the next night they made an arrest. They
onec again caught Gentry placing Bust the Draft signs on the
doors of Walker Auditorium.
After taking him to the University Police Department, the
arresting officers decided to book him at the Gainesville Police
Department. Charged with willfully and maliciously defacing a
building, Gentry was released an hour later on $25 bond.
Again, the police report noted Zucker called about the case;
he became obnoxious in his inquiries, the report stated.
Since August, Gentry has been awaiting trial, which wil be in
city court under Municipal Judge Wade Hampton. No date has
been set for the hearing because a motion for a jury trial is
pending. Gentry is to be represented by local attorney Richard
Wilson, while the city prosecutor is Allison Folds.
Nobody seems to know when Gentry will go on trial. There
have been rumors charges will be dropped, but no one wishes to
affirm or deny them.
Despite nearly four days of investigation, the Alligator has
been unable to reach Gentry for comments.
The Gentry case brought a flurry of criticism, both from
within the university community and from the outside.
A Gainesville Sun editorial, charging the UF police with
selective law enforcement, forced OConnell to reply in a
campus-widememo that there has never been any effort to
single out anyone for political beliefs.
The case brings to mind three crucial questions. First, is il
illegal to post placards on walls of campus buildings? Then, if it
is illegal, who should have jurisdiction, campus police or civil
authorities? And, perhaps more important, are the authorities in
fact practicing selective law enforcement, when it is common
practice for campus organizations to plaster the campus with
posters?

I I T* V
16 DATSUNS INVITED TO COMPETE AT THE
AMERICAN ROAD RACE OF CHAMPIONS
The nationwide Datsun racing effort has achieved its greatest success in history by qualifying
16 Datsuns in the year end runoffs to be held at Riverside International Raceway on November
23rd and 24th. Competing against the finest drivers and the best prepared cars in the country,
die results of the American Road Race of Champions will crown the 1968 National Class
Champion.
Congratuiations to the Datsun drivers and crews, and to their dealer sponsors who have won
this hard fought honor and who have helped bring Datsun to national prominence with their
racing efforts. We can all be proud of their successes, and of the Datsun cars they race.
I
Godding &Claik
SOONER OR LA TE J?
motors YOUR CHOICE IN A
COMPACT CAR"
"CLOSEST DEALER TO THE UNIVERSITY" I ) Tll I I .' I
1012 SOUTH MAIM LtoAl£4iil
Ph. 378-2311 Opwi Til 8:00 pm cyfPlfl SERVICE

j LAVON GENTRY CASE

w l^H
* "*M- / w
HHHMW '
ifr-xV- £ /&. £,. fl
H x> mKv * M
'ml y ij
IVMMRPIVVPk
* JSpj
LAVON GENTRY
. .leaving police station



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OCONNELL THROWS SWITCH
President Stephen C. O'Connell pulls the switch which placed the
new Centrex telephone system in operation Sat. Nov. 9,1968. It is
the largest Centrex system in the Bell Telephone companies, and has
been under planning for more than two years.
Storm Hits South
By United Press International
A wintry storm lashed the South with snow and rain Monday and
pointed northeastward up the Appalachian Mountain chain. The
Alabama mountains got up to 6 inches of snow.
Another storm battered the Pacific Northwest. It dropped rain on
coastal regions from Washington to northern California and snow in
the northern Rockies.
In New England and sections of the Midwest, residents dug out of
deep snows from weekend storms. New Englanders braced for more.
Arctic cold chilled the northern Plains and upper Midwest. The
mercury slipped to 3 below zero at Beulah, ND. A
The cold spread all the way to the gulf states. Freeze warnings were
up for eastern Texas and Arkansas to Georgia and northern Florida.
Tornadoes spawned in a squall line that marched across Florida in
advance of a cold front Monday, smashed homes, flipped a
shrimpboat and injured several persons.
Tornadoes were reported at Dunedin, Englewood, Panama City,
Indian Rocks Beach and Naples on the Gulf coast.
The Weather Bureau said that a twister which struck just north of
Naples during the afternoon destroyed six houses and sent at least
three people to the hospital.

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
The Student s Friend'
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
LFREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N Main St Phone 376-7581

March Has
Violent End
SWAN QUARTER, N.C.
(UPI) About 20 chanting
Negro children marched into a
room of the Hyde County
Courthouse Monday and police
hurled smoke grenades inside
and slammed the door shut.
A 17-year-old girl leaped
from a window of the second
floor room before police
reopened the door and allowed
the children to flee the building.
We ought to tear that place
down, yelled Johnnie Johnson,
17, leader of the Martin Luther
King Nonviolent Crusaders,
demonstrating against school
assignments.
After they cleared the
building, the children gathered
in front with about 130 others
and began chanting and singing.
The Highway Patrol sent for
reinforcemtnts.
The children had marched
into the building to demonstrate
against the County Welfare
Department, but it was closed.
They went into another room
instead.
Sheriff Charlie Cahoon and
three Highway Patrolmen,
wearing, gas masks, tossed several
smoke grenades into the room
and slammed the door shut. The
children inside screamed.
A girl identified as
17-year-old Mamie Harris
jumped out a window and was
carried away in an ambulance.
The extent of her injuries was
not immediately determined.
A few minutes later officers
opened the door and the
children streamed out.
After standing in front of the
courthouse for a while, the
crowd began marching back to a
Negro high school, using the left
side of the highway. But one
youth strayed over the center
line and was grabbed by a
waiting Highway Patrolman.
Good Sorvico Starts
at
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Lowly Worm
Although it has no eyes and
lives underground, the
earthworm senses the fall of
night and wriggles to the surface.

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Tueefey. November 12. IMA The FlorMe Ail-fr. I

GATOR
GIRLS

Page 3



Page 4

. The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Novwnbar 12.1988

Draft Information Bureau Opened By SG

By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writer
In the midst of another high draft call
and President-elect Richard M. Nixons
campaign promise to end the dn ft, UFs
Student Government has opener in office
to give students informatio on the
Selective Service.
The UF Selective Service Bureau was set
up by Secretary of Student Activities
Bruce Harlan.

IWHATSHAPPENINGI
_______ by DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer

IN CAESAR HAD
HIS BRUTUS, CHARLES II HIS
CROMWELL, ROTHLEIN HIS
PE,: And I my Forestry. The
Forestry Gub (which meets
tonight in room 410 of Rolfs
Hall) has duly informed me that
the group looks askance at my
snide remarks about Forestry
majors going back to nature. I
have seen the error of my ways
and will try not to cut anyones
major in the future.
Especially that of those
ignorant fools in journalism.
IN BONES OF
CONTENTION: Floridas
Players production of Sergeant
Musgraves Dance swings onto
the Constans Theater stage again
tonight at 8. The play will be
given every night this week at 8;
with a 2 p.m. matinee on
Saturday. (Go and see what I
mean by above.)
IN ROAMIN TO NORMAN:
The Badminton Gub does that
tonight at 7 when it meets in
Norman Gym.
IN MORE FROM UFs
GALOCRACY: Three of the
Bigs among women meet today.
Florida Cicerones gather in room
123 of the Reitz Union for a
cabinet meeting today at 4:30
pjn.; Mortar Board masses in
room 356 of the Union tonight
at 7:30; SAVANT slips into
room 118 of the Union tonight
at 6:45.
IN I HEAR ANN
LANDERS WROTE THE
SUBTITLES: The Department
of Foreign Languages presents a
movie entitled The Would-Be
Gentleman in the Union
Auditorium tonight at 6:45.
BSP To Fill
Seminole Post
The Board of Student
Publications will hold its first
meeting today at 2:30 p.m. in
room 316 Reitz Union.
Selection of a managing
editor for the Seminole will
be the primary agenda item.
All members are urged to
attend.
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The propam was started in an effort to
acquaint students with the draft and as a
campaign promise of Clyde Taylor,
student body president.
Harlan said SG was making no attempt
to personally council students or present
their point of view. The draft will be
viewed objectively through the literature
and individual decisions must be made.
In addition to the pro and con material
on the draft, there will be several surveys

AND SPEAKING OF FILMS:
The Christian Science
Organization shows one in room
361 of the Union tonight at
6:45.
IN FARM CLUBS. The
Agriculture Dames meet at the
home of Mrs. William
Mendenhall, 2021 NW 23rd
Terrace, tonight at 7:30.
AND SPEAKING OF
DAMES: The Education Dames
gather at the home of Mrs.
Joseph White, 1711 NW 10th
Ave., tonight at 8.
IN GARYLESS
GATHERINGS: The Student
Senate meets tonight at 6:30 in
room 349 of the Union,
deprived of the services of Gary
Goodrich as President of that
august (even in november) body.
Now that Gary has resigned his
duties in the Student Senate,
hell probably drop out of
politics, never to be heard from
again.

GATOR
GIRLS

NOTICE!! I
Yesterday's ad for
Antoine's Sandwich & Ice
Cream Shop was mistakenly
run, and was scheduled to
appear in Wednesday's
paper.
The special which
they're running takes place
on Wednesday, and lasts for
one day only.


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compiled from questionnaires to Honda
students who had taken the ROTC
program and others who had attempted to
stay out of the draft.
The program, scheduled to begin in two
weeks, is the only one of its type in
Florida, and the only one of this
magnitude in the US., Harlan said.
Students really dont know their rights
when it comes to the military_draft^^

Harlan said. No matter how they feel
about the military system, information
concerning all sides will be provided.
Harlan said that information for tk.
office, located on the first floor of the
undergraduate library, was supplied by the
Selective Service office in Washington D.C
and various conscientious objectors*
groups. The local Selective Service Board is
not only helping in the SG program, but is
very enthusiastic, Harlan said.



Barber Shop Customs Differ In Vietnam

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the fifth of a series by
Alligator Special Writer, B.
Rick Benson, recently
returned from Vietnam;)
By RICK BENSON
Alligator Special Writer
QUANG TRI, Vietnam
To the average American
soldier, a visit to a local
Vietnamese barber shop is a
neck-twisting experience
unlikely to be forgotten.
One shop in particular is
located on the outskirts of
Quang Tri in a tin-roofed
building about the size of a
double garage with no front.
It come equipped with three
barbers who seem to have

I** * -.miL
hMr aHs H
LvIW Ml II
:0v H WW.. vv Mr?m* M MW*''' B
<**f <&r, s ~, jJ 5 $
.yr X *" ,- : -'!r'; ... : r, :*
IN QUANG TRI
.. .off to a Vietnamese Barber Shop

Incurable
Disease
Hits UF
Coryza is the name of an
incurable disease and according
to Dr. Wilmer J. Coggins,
director of the University of
Florida Infirmary, more than
2,500 student cases of this
disease were reported last year.
Dr. Coggins also remarked
that this figure didnt include
the numerous other cases that
werent reported.
Coryza is the medical term
for whiat is commonly called the
common cold.
The term Coryza is seldom
used any more, Dr. Coggins
said, most doctors just call it a
cold.
In fact, the infirmary
director continued, the virus
which caused the cold is now
referred to as the cold virus.
Dr. Coggins stated that there
is no real correlation between
cold or rainy weather and a
persons chance for catching a
cold.
A person catches a cold
from someone else who has
one. Weather or temperature
changes dont really cause an
increase of colds, Dr. Coggins
said.
The cold virus is spread by a
person either sneezing, coughing
or talking, Dr. Coggins
explained.

GATOR
GIRLS

picked up the trade as a
whim, and would rather push
hand trimmers through a
bushy infantrymans hair
than a plow through a rice
paddy.
After you take off your
flak vest and lay your helmet
and rifle on the floor, you sit
down in a hard-backed
wooden chair while the
barber puts a towel around
your neck. As you try
explaining in sign language
how you want your hair cut,
the barber just stands there
nodding and grinning.
From there on in he runs
the show and rather than
endanger American
Vietnamese relations any
more than they are, you let

[a] Jean-Claude Killy talks shop...
WA*U 0 UCHUSCI
Chevrolet Sports Shop
(Freely translated from the French) I am a man who drives
for sport... for fun, you know? This is why lam telling you
about the brave new Chevrolet and its Sports Shop.
f Only in the Chevrolet Sports Shop do you find cars
like the Camaro Z/28. Ah, the Z/28. Camaro with
302 VB, more muscular suspension and Hurst
shifter. Only Z/28 offers 4-wheel disc^brakes
You win find, too, SS,
Spor s D ^ art^ ent d at yY r
Putting you us
B mk. /x/
Jean-Claude Killy, winner of three gold
medals in the 1968 Winter Olympics. '69 Camaro Z/28
Sw the Swptf Sporti at your Chwrotet dealer! gpom Department mow.

him chop, cut, and trim as he
pleases.
Next comes the shave, sans
lather, that includes not only
around the ears and neck, but
the hairline on the forehead.
The laconic barber takes a
shaving brush and spreads
water around your neck and
ears, and as he moves his
straight edge razor haltingly
down the neck you feel he is
getting back for the water
buffalo he lost in a bombing
raid in *66.

GRAND OPENING
I TO ACOUAINT OUR GAINESVILLE NEIGHBORS
I WITH THIS NEWEST A MOST ADVANCED METHOD
OF FABRIC CARE
WERE HOLDING THIS SALE DURING OUR GRAND
OPENING Ist GARMENT REG PRICE
2nd LIKE GARMENT lA
"4-DAY SERVICE >V
l MAKES* I laHaJjfr ftfflMnsi 1
>! OBSOLETE < FAUMMM
1 1104 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. 378-31191

As the blade comes nearer
the jugular vein you begin to
wonder about his political
allegiance (you grin and tell
yourself he must be on our
side) but you breathe a sigh
of relief as he puts his razor
away.
He then begins massaging
the scalp while adding a hair
tonic that smells strangely
like mosquito lotion.
The grinning Vietnamese
figured a change of hair style

Tuesday, November 12.1968. The Florida AHifator.

was due as he combed my
hair back a* la Kirk Douglas.
Then for the unforgettable
part as he twists you head
four times to the left and
then to the right with the last
movement to each side
making a cracking noise in
your neck. A sharp blow with
the hard of his palm to the
back of your neck finishes
the job, and yourself as well.
But for fifty cents you figure
it hardly covers the price of
the mosquito lotion.

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 12, IMS

Page 6

Planned Lawver Switch May Delay Trial

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UPI)
James Earl Ray had been
planning for as long as a month
to make a last-minute switch in
lawyers in order to delay his trial
for the murder of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr., sources
disclosed Monday.
But Ray apparently kept his
reasons for wanting a delay to
himself.
It appeared that the move
would succeed. Famed trial
lawyer Percy Foreman, brought
into the case Sunday, spent the
day drawing up the brief he will

Catholic Conscience
May OK The Pill
WASHINGTON (UPI) The nations Roman Catholic bishops
began considering Monday a pastoral letter that would permit
Catholic couples to use contraceptives if the practice does not conflict
with their conscience.
The bishops, more than 220 members of the National Conference
of Catholic Bishops, discussed the letter in closed session in the wake
of controversy over Pope Pauls encyclical condemning artificial birth
control as immoral.
No details of the proposed letter were made public, but a
spokesman said it dealt directly with the right of a Roman Catholic
couple, after examining their own consciences, to use contraceptives
despite the Pope's encyclical.

Nixon And Johnson
Meet For Briefing

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President-elect Richard M.
Nixon received a two hour
foreign policy briefing from
President Johnson and his top
advisors Monday. Nixon
expressed hope that within the
next 60 days there might be
significant development in the
search for peace because of the
cooperation between him and
Johnson.
Nixon and Johnson met
reporters in front of the west
wing of the White House after
their meeting which began with
lunch at 1:20 pjn. and
concluded at 5 pjn. Both men
expressed their intent to
cooperate with each other in
assuring that the business of
government continues in an
orderly fashion during the
transition from the Johnson
administration to the Nixon
administration.
In brief remarks, Nixon
stressed the need for continuity

tiismv STEAK SPECIAL
StF.M.
LONDON BROIL STEAK
r *ERVED WITH
CHOICE OF POTATOES
TOSSED GREEN
HOT
7 f c
1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
% BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

FOR MURDER OF MARTIN I UTHER KING

present to Judge W. Preston
Battle Tuesday at the opening of
the trial.
It will request a continuance
so he can prepare his case, and is
expected to delay the trial until
at least beyond Jan. 1 Battle was
reported ready to grant the
delay.
Tlie judge announced that no
jury venire will be called for the
9:30 a.m. EST opening.
Ray fired Birmingham
attorney Arthur Hanes, whom
he had hired upon his arrest in
London, and replaced him with

of government during the next
sixty days so that there might be
some significant progress
towards peace. There was no
indication from either man that
the president-elects remarks
involved anything specific.
Nixon said that the
government can meet its foreign
policy obligation only if the
parties on the other side realize
that the policy of this
administration is being made
with regard to the policy of the
new administration.
Nixon said that the nation
has several foreign policy
matters which cannot await
decision, that cannot wait for
two months. He said the
briefing which he received was
completely candid and most
helpful.
During the meeting with
Johnson, Nixon was briefed on
foreign policy matters by
high-ranking officials.

Foreman. It was learned that
Rays brothers, John and Jerry,
had been trying for months to
get the defendant to hire
Foreman.
It was learned that Hanes
contends Ray owes him $15,000
in legal fees and Hanes has told
Foreman that until the money is
paid, he will not turn over his
files and records in the case. He
told Foreman by telephone
Sunday night that unless he is
paid, Dont call me, Ill call
you.
Hanes had suspected he

GATOR
GIRLS

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in two button with deep side vents or three
button center vent models. May we show
you our selection soon?
regular, short, long, extra long
I FROM S6O to SBS
Number 6 Main Street South
THE HOME OF HICKEY-FREEMAN CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES

would be dropped from the case
and the suspicion was

Fast Color Film
Special
E H 135 20 reg. now
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strengthened at his last meeting
with Ray.



Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Tuesday, November 12
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Florida Cicerones Cabinet Meeting,
123 Union, 4:30 p.m.
Le Cercle Francais, 150 B Union,
2:00 p.m.
Christian Scientists Film, 361 Union,
6:45 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi, 361, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Bridge Lessons, 150 C, 7:00 p.m.
Supper Club, Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Beginning Oil, C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Agriculture Dames, Home of Mrs.
William Mendenhall, 2021 N.W.
23rd Terrace, 7:30 p.m.
Tupperware Party
Education Dames, Home of Mrs.
Joseph White, 1711 N.W. 10th
Avenue, 8:00 p.m.
Dept, of Foreign Languages, Movie,
"The Would-Be Gentleman".
Union Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Florida Players, Sgt. Musgrave's
Dance", Constans Theater, 8:00
pjn.
Charm Classes, 363 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Childrens Ballet, Tap 8i Modem
Dance, C-4 Union, 4:00 p.m.
Wednesday, November 13
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Spanish Conversation, 150 B, 12:00
noon
Florida Speleological Society, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Panhellenic Council Social, 235
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Motion Picture Technique, C-4
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Fencing Club, Fla. Gym, Basement
Rec Room, 7:00 p.m.
Theta Sigma Phi, 355 Union, 7:00
p.m.
International Circle K, 261 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Sailing Club, 150 D, Union, 7:30
p.m.
Arts 8i Crafts, Class in Beginning
Weaving. Arts 8t Crafts Center,
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Mensa Meeting, 118 Union,B:oo p.m.
Young Republicans, 349 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Florida Players, "Sgt. Musgrave"

********** *******
* l
* e
!*****************

bo
Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance ""
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement ~~
loans, and Share loans .-^** < ***^^^
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
sth Avenue ot Hie earner of 12th Street Hourt: 800 Qjn. -j^OjjriJAondgjMW^fridaY__!^fl_^g_

Thursday, November 14
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Presbyterian Univ. Student Center,
357 Union, 10:00 a.m.
Unitarian Student Forum Lunch, 150
C Union. 11:30 a.m.
Spanish Conversation, 150 B Union,
12:00 noon
Children's Ballet, Tap 8t Modem
Dance, C-4 Union, 4:00 p.m.
Christian Science Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 363
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Water Colors, C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Football Film, Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
0
Florida Players, "Sgt. Musgrave's
Dance", Constans Theater, 8:00
p.m.
Caribbean Lecture Series: Mr.
Michael R. Lennartz, "Forestry in
the Dominican Republid", Latin
American Colloquium Room,
College Library, 8:00 p.m.
Friday, November 15
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Choral Workshop, Union Ballroom,
1:30 p.m.
Union Movie, "HUD", 5:00. 7:00 8i
9:15 p.m.
Chess Club, 118 Union, 6:30 p.m.
Fencing Club, Basement Rec Room,
Fla. Gym, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Club Tournament, 118 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Afro-Americen Student Assoc., 355
Union, 7:15 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing, 214 Fla. Gym.
8:00 p.m.
Debate Society, Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
Florida Players, "Sgt. Musgrave's
Dance", Constans Theater, 8:00
p.m.

BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the SGP:
"ROGER WAGNER CHORALE",
1.D., $1.50, SI.OO and $.50. F S &
GP, $2.00, $1.25 8t SI.OO, the
Florida Cinema Society, $1.50 per
person, the Fine Arts Production,

STUDENTI
PUBLICATIONS
V \V| #392-1601
392-1682
392-1683
Alligator Staff (12 pm 5 pm)
Advertising Seminole
Classified (8 am 3 pm) Editor (12 pm 5 pm)
Display (8 am 5 pm) staff (12 pm 5 pm)
Business Office am 4 pm) Student Publications
Editor Managing Editor (8 am -10 pm) Centra| Busjness of{ice (8 am 4 pm)
News Room (8 am lO pm) Editorial Advisor (10 am 8 pm)
Production (5 pm lO pm) General Manager (8 am 5 pm)
Florida Quarterly Operations Manager (8 am 5 pm)
Editor (12 pm 5 pm) Production Manager (5 pm lO pm)
Effective Saturday,November9

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

"OTHELLO". $2.00, $1.50 end
SI.OO end the Florida Players
Production, "SGT. MUSGRAVE'S
DANCE." $1.50, $.75 and $.26.
NOTICE
Effective Monday, November 11,

Tuesday, November 12,1968, Tha Florida Alligator, I

1968, the Arredondo Room's
hours of operation will be 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Evening service
will be available only for special
parties.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Nowambar 12,1968

EDITORIAL
Drop The Charaes

Lavon Gentry has been had.
And the Alligator has drawn some bitter
criticism because it hasn't said so earlier.
The fact is, we agreed with many students
and faculty who said Gentry was a victim of
selective law enforcement.
We also agreed that if he is going to be
tried for willful and malicious defacing
of a building, then the hearing should be
before university authorities rather than city
authourities.
It is also a fact that the Alligator, along
with several student leaders interested in fair
application of the Student Code of Conduct,
has worked diligently but futilely behind
the scenes, trying to convince the
administration to drop civil charges against
Gentry and bring his case back on campus.
Unfortunately, for Gentry and the rest of
the student body who must live under the
sick joke called the code of conduct, the
students failed.
A classic example of administration
bull-headedness on the issue is the reaction
of UF President Stephen C. OConnell.
He told several students meeting with him
the other day:
The law is the law. If the law is wrong,
change it. But until it's changed, obey it.
Gentry broke a law, was warned, ignored the
warning and was arrested.
Why wasn't Gentry brought before the
Student Conduct Committee instead of the
Gainesville Municipal Court?
OConnell: Gentry was arrested and
detained for violating a law. He could not be
arrested for a violationof the conduct code.
Why was he arrested and detained rather
than later summoned to appear before the
conduct committee?
O'Connell: Apparently the judgment of
the arresting officer was that Gentry had
continued to violate the law even after
warning and that an arrest was in order.
Why cant the university now drop the

Staff Writings

Poor Timing In The Gator Band

Band President Mike Chesser
has labeled the Gator band,
some 230 strong, a closely-knit
family.
And so it should be. For any
organization that displays its
talents before thousands must be
able to count on group
cooperation, group
coordination, and in the case of
the Gator Band, group timing.
But a family members
timing was off... or was it? At
a time when the question of
Dixie being played by the band

The Alligator Inquizitor

If Good momin. I wanted to
8 tell you this morning about the
advantages of com. But the
(editor told me that this would
gbe yellow journalism. Ich. The
(response to the Inquizitorium
Jhas been fair, and remember,
(today is the last day to turn in
your answers. The winner (s)
will be announced Friday.
Todays questions:
1. In the film classic of 1956,
Rebel Without a Cause, James
Dean was the major star.
However, two other big names
in Hollywood co-starred with

was being tossed from black to
white from administrator to
band director, a fraternity
Homecoming float portrayed the
absurdity of the whole issue.
And a band family member
proved to be a two-timer. He
was also a member of the
fraternity who dared criticize
the closely-knit group. He
asked, and was granted,
permission to borrow a band
uniform for a pledge to wear on
the float.
But prim* to the parade the

By LEWIS ROTHLEIN

him. Can you remember who
they are?
2. What are the three
classifications of clouds? (Hint;
Nimbus is not one of them).
3. What is a gazebo?
4. In the Student
Government elections last year,
Forward Party had Bill Mcride
as their presidential candidate.
Can you remember his running
mate? And what else was this
running mate known for?
5. The Honeymooners
starred Jackie Gleason, Audrey
Meadows, Art Carney, and one

charges against Gentry and bring the case
back to campus?
O'Connell: Mr. Gentry violated a law,
for which he was arrested after being warned
to stop and refusing to do so. Law violations
are tried in the court which has
jurisdiction.
There was more. But the, point is Lavon
Gentry, arrested while tapeing posters on
buildings like scores of other students get
away with every day, will be tried by the
city.
It is likely he will be convicted. At any
rate, he will have a permanent police record
of his arrest.
All this because a couple of up-tight
campus cops didn't like the signs the
beanled Gentry was putting up, advertising a
Bust the Draft rally.
What's even sadder, though, is the
university's determination to push the issue
to confrontation, its refusal to think in any
other terms than the law is the law, etc.,
and its close-minded approach to the
question of selective law enforcement.
The first of those two administration
errors can possibly be overlooked, if
necessary.
The third error however, cannot be
ignored. Because it's a question of fairness,
not just law.
If OConnell or anybody else can really
believe Gentry wasn't singled out because of
his looks and the nature of the poster he was
displaying, then we defy them to show us
one shred of evidence that even one just
one other student of more accepted
political leanings has ever been arrested,
much less even questioned, for putting up
signs in unauthorized areas.
In short, the university should be big
enough to admit it made a mistake. And
charges against Mr. Gentry should be
dropped.
Period.

permission was rescinded and
the band member was forced to
tell the pledge to remove the
uniform. And he did. And the
pledge did. And all was happy
once again in the closely-knit
family. That is until...
Half-way through the parade
the pledge put the uniform back
on. And the next day the boss of
the family punished the band
member by removing his powers.
And his powers had been many,
for he had been head drum
major.

other lady. Who played Nortons j
wife?
6. Is it true that there will be:
a new TV series about a bam:
orbiting around the earth,:
entitled Loft in Space?
Yesterdays answers:
1. Clarence Frogman:
Henry 2.Abdul Gammel Nasser!
3. Mannerwald, by H.AJ*.!
Grieshaber, Germany!
4. Visconti, Bergman, Fellini,!
Resnais, Richardson 5. Double:
Or Nothing, Break The Bank. ;

i
Stifle a profanity today.
f* !

LOOK WHAT THE
ALLIGATOR^
k J
/ i
n
The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
A is ihe exercise of responsibility."
12*1 Dave Doucette
i ICHMAWV Managing Editor
All Raul Ramirez James Cook I
jAmU/UCOM. Executive Editor News Editor

And the one responsible for
his removal (the band director)
refuses to back his decision
before the public.
True, the head drum major is
a student leader. He is in
complete charge of field
leadership.
True, he leads the group
before thousands and thousands
of Florida fans.
And true, he was made to sit
out the most important game of
the year, Homecoming.
But the band director and
band president dont feel the
students have a right to know.
Its an internal affair, the
band director said.
When a star football player
doesnt play, no matter what the
reason, its news. The students
have a right to know. He is their
player, a member of their team.
When the president of the
student body fails to show at an
expected public appearance, the
students have a right to know.

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Bum Advertising off ieas in Room 330. Rsitz Union. Phono
382-1681,382-1682 or 382-1683.
Opfokxis aipmed in the Florida Al%atar an thorn of ths editors or of
of +

By Gayle McElroy*

He is their president.
When the head drum major
fails to perform, its news. He is
the students' drum major. He
heads their band.
But the band director and
band president dont think so.
For theirs is a family group and
they dont want to air their dirty
laundry.
Coverage is fine when the
laundry is unspoiled. But let it
g&t smudged just once and they
scream, unfair.'
Wake up family. Wake up
and look around. For reality is
here. It is in the form of
freedom of the press. It is in the
form of student rights. If
necessary, it is in the form of
dirty laundry.
And when your family
marches before the thousands of
screaming fans at the Miami
game, its more than laundry
that meets the students eyes.
Its their band.



Burn A Flag,
Show Disgust,
Love All Men
MR. EDITOR:
I would like to stand up for
the people who did their own
thing at the SDS-SSOC apolitical
rally. I am referring specifically
to those individuals who burned
a toy flag and their draft cards.
They should not be condemned
since they were showing their
disgust (which I share with
them) for the state this country
is in today.
I am sympathetic with those
who burned symbols
representing an immoral war,
racism, unfair draft, and a
corrupt governmental system.
Even though the flag was merely
a miniature replica, the idea was
put across that many people in
this area are dissatisfied with the
establishment.
I WILL condemn the beer
toting ATOs and other Greeks
who came to Tigert just to
disrupt the rally with chants of
war now and trying to incite
violence. The fact that there
were no fists thrown proved that
our goal is peace and love for
fellow men.
BURT BLOFSTEIN, 2UC
Mankinds
Gatorade
MR. EDITOR.
Earlier this week, at a
meeting devoted to an unrelated
topic, I learned that the
Gatorade controversy is about to
be resolVed. A representative of
the Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare let it slip
that DHEW is about to take over
complete rights to Gatorade.
However, it will be used for the
benefit of mankind . and will
be re-named Federal-aid.
C.E. ROESSLER
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
RADIATION BIOPHYSICS

#

Weary Os Words And Wanting Action

I told him I thought we had nowhere to go and
nothing for which to hope. I told him we were
unrepresented, unrespected, and blatantly abused. I
told him weve tried; God knows that; and weve
been trampled.
Maybe the great books have all been written;
maybe the great words have all been said. But we
had hope and it was a vision we saw. He had the
courage to work and wait, and toil again. I told him
plainly, we are disgusted.
How much patience does progress require? How
much tim*? can we afford to mark? Was ever a race
won without the initial stride?
Wen, perhaps the idealism of youth is, as they
say, lost on the young; and perhaps we dreamers

OPEN FORUM:
jAdffiao/id ViAAtot
"There is no hope for the complacent mm.

Speaking Out

Programs Are Sterile:
Dont Serve Students

I am sorry that you feel sad
and disappointed, Mr.
Rosenblatt. But I am also
curious about the way you see
your experience. Why not accept
it as part of life and honestly
examine why youre
disappointed and who is really
responsible.
Instead, you seem to be angry
with me and the rest of the
students on this campus. We
refused to play your game, with
your rules, your way. Now
arent we terrible, ungrateful
wretches! After you put in the
enormous total of 20 hours of
work to whip up a dandy little
program for the little tykes, for
their own good, of course, and
out of the direct concern of
your pure, noble heart.
Well, sir, Im a bit angry with
you and the rest of SG and your
presumptious attitudes toward
me as a student and human. If
you really want to perform some
useful functions for students,
why dont you begin by finding
out what a student is, his likes
and dislikes, what, he gets turned
on with and tunes out, what he
really is interested in. Instead
you and SG devise programs. A
program might be defined as a
set of policies and procedures
de by one man to control
anu _..cct the behavior of other
men. I dont need or want any
more programs to carry around

What Has Happened To Objectivity?

MR. EDITOR:
In reference to your headline exposee, Flag,
Draft Cards Burned at Rally, November 7,.1968,
what ever happened to our medias code of
objective coverage.
It is encouraging to know that with a motley
crowd of 400 students concerned enough about war
and politics to gather in mass and make their
feelings known, there are still Alligator reporters
capable of missing the point.
It is encouraging to find that while the
Politically disgruntled radicals cried we want
peace, a fraternity from across the street upheld
the establishment and put down the idealistic

on my back; I already have to
struggle with the myriad
senseless programs of the
administration, the department,
the Deans office, etc.
Youre upset because
students apparently behaved as
they are rather than as you want
them to be. People in this
country are very fond of quoting
the mythical free enterprise
system of the market as an
explanatory principle. Well, you
came to the market, displayed
your wares, and nobody bought.
Now youre upset with us for
exercising our option. Most
programs that eminate from
official offices such as yours and
SG demand that students leap
into lock step performance and
cheer wildly while doing so.
Youre probably right in
assuming that many students
dont wish to participate in
programs, at least I dont.
Since youre sitting about
reading morose stuff like John
Donne I suggest that you might
glance at some other books:
Alan Watts The Book, S.
Jourard Transparent Self,
Whyte Organization Man,
Hitler Mien Kampf, Koestler
- Darkness at Noon, P.
Goodman Growing Up
Absurd, portions of the Bible
dealing with statements
attributed to Christ, and just to

should lean back and sit a spell. I told him all of
this . and more. I told him he was unable to
recognize our impatience from our point of view. I
told him to give us a break.

The rigid pattern of existence to which every
citizen must subscribe has created the essence of
utilitarianism. Now this might sound fine to the
suburban businessman; but what about the
thousands in Watts? I told him I want a change for
my kids, a better world.
Im tired of these oppressions and prejudices. I'm
sick of the plastic programs for the poor and
dependent. We need help, and the times are not
changing fast enough to cope with the situation. I
told him Im weary of words and yearn for action.

By Charles Kaufman

children by yelling we want war. And the
Alligator missed that too.
It is encouraging to know that when these great
fraternity brothers sang Dixie to the
demonstrators (which incidently is not a song meant
to antagonize), the radicals joined in refusing to
start trouble. And although this was apparently
overlooked by the Alligator, a few scattered cries of
take Tigert were not.
And while the Florida Alligator may remain
number one in the nation it is encouraging to think
that they probably will not.
J. RICHARD JOHNSON, 3AS

cheer you up bit, Arthur C.
Clarkes Childhood's End.
Maybe these will help you to see
what many of us are concerned
with today and why we want
opportunities to become
involved, not wholesale
programmed involvement.
We, or 1 should say I, since I
cannot speak for the student
body (whatever body that is),
really wish to find these
opportunities wherein the
option of involvement to allow
interaction, knowing,
experiencing, discovery, can be
exercised to enable meaningful
occurences to happen. If SG and
you can move from producing
more sterile program exercises
designed for your benefit to
creating some atmospheres,
conditions, and circumstances
which allow things to happen
among students and everyone
else on campus for our mutual
benefit, then I think you will
find many welcoming responses.
It is a difficult task to succeed at
and, I feel, greatly in demand.
Whatever occurs, I wish to
leave you with a more pleasant
quote than the rather chilling
one from Donne. It sounds
corny, but I think much
relevance is contained within it,
Seek and ye shall find. I hope
youre feeling better soon, Mr.
Rosenblatt. Good luck.

Tuesday, November 12, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Equality and justice do not require legislation.
They are America, according to our grade-school
lessons. Can it be believed that we must legislate
civil rights? 1 told him I was apalled. You know I
told him.
I told him and he interrupted 1 had more to
say. I had so much to tell him; but he slowly rose,
and just as he left my sight, told me: Many before
you have sung this song to me. Many have sung,
recited, ranted, raved, and prophesized our mutual
damnation; caring little for positive action. And if
you are like them, you will dismiss these cravings of
yours in a few years/*
You*llcall yourself a pragmatist and a realist.
And if you are like them, it will be you then, as it is
them now, for whom the church bells toll.** 1

Sign Display
Covered UF
WHh Filth
MR. EDITOR:
My husband and I came to
Gainesville November 2 for the
Homecoming Game and took a
walk to look at the Homecoming
decorations. We were shocked
and upset by four of the signs
displayed on the boys*
dormitory, Fletcher Hall. Both
of us feel that these signs are an
indication of the type of
activities some of our college
students are engaging in all over
the country. We also feel,
however, that adults in charge
are at fault for allowing such
disgusting exhibitions to take
place. I am sure that you did not
know of the existence of these
signs or you would not have
allowed their remaining.
Both my husband and I hope
that disciplinary action will be
taken against the students of
Fletcher Hall who were
responsible for this vulgar
showing. It makes me sick to see
the walls of my Alma Mater
covered with such filth.
VIRGINIA DALY MCCLELLAN
Serenade
For Study
MR. EDITOR:
We suggest to whoever is in
charge of issuing permits for
groups to have bands in the
Plaza of the Americas on
weeknights, go sit in the library
and try to read a book on the
eve of the next such occasion.
STUDENTS IN THE LIBRARY
TUESDAY NIGHT
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers* names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

'By Bruce Greer

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS*

FOR SALE |
->XyX*X-X-X*XX***v.VX*XMX*X*; X*X*V.XX 2*!
3 bdrm, 2 bath, ang 7 utility rms,
screened porch, air-c. unit, tool shed,
washer, refrig, carpeted, %113 a mo,
SISOO down, 1611 NE 19th Lane,
372-2722, near elem & jr-hi.
(A-10t-32-p)
Factory made traitor fully equipped
14 ft. sleeps three, ideal for hunting
or camping $350, also 50 Cad. runs
good $95 Needs paint, call 372-0982.
(A-st-33-p)
1967 Solex Excellent condition.
$125 or best offer. 378-3823. 35 mm
Argus with light meter and flash S6O
or best offer. 378-3823. (A-st-34-p)
HONDA SSO Well cared for,
helmet, tools, new tire, book rack.
Call Richard. 376-4184 after 5.
(A-4t-34-p)
Honda 350 less than 2000 mi,
perfect cond., W/Bates shield and lug.
rack. Cost $787 new, now $689
call 372-7942 after 6:00. (A-3t-36-p)
Lovable Siamese kittens, 7 weeks old,
potty trained, males and females. Call
evenings 378-7638. (A-st-35-p)
2 IBM executive electric typewriters,
carbon ribbon. Typing attachments,
garnet rose color, modern typeface.
Call 376-0768. (A-3t-35-p)
.64 Chev. 327 Central air, 327 R&H.
Full power W.B. & st. New tires &
insp. sticker. $950. Phone 466-3567
after 5:00 p.m. (A-st-35-p)
Lambretta Motorscooter, 150 cc,
1964, 2 seater, 75mpg, good
condition, tools inaluded. $l5O.
3 78-6669. See at 284-1 Corry
Village. (A-3t-35-p)
Ref rig. -Freezer Norge customatic
delux. Separate doors, runs perfect.
SBO. Sacrifice to buy larger model.
Auto defrost. Great Buy I 376-7397.
P.M. only. (A-3t-35-p)
CARPETS a fright? Make them a
beautiful sight with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer. SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-37-c)
Trailer. 1 Bdrm. Furnished, AC, large
cabana. Asking SISOO. Call
372-9390. Rm. 566. (A-3t-37-p)
FOR SALE: 1966 Honda S9O.
Excellent condition. Just tuned. Tool
kit included. $225. Call Tim at
392-7951 anytime after 8:00 p.m.
Only 5000 miles. (A-3t-37-p)
| FOR RENT |
£'X.vx*x*x x-x x X>x M>wxsi x*x X"X Mv-*'
CAMELOT APARTMENTS: FOR'
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-2S-20t-p)
Furn Downstairs Apt. 2 br. Air Cond.
Call after 5:30 378-7845.
(B-32-TF-CJ
ficiency apartment, suitable for
two. $75 per month. 1829 NW 2
Ave. Call 376-8990. (B-st-35-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom Village Park apt.
for winter quarter. Call 372-9651.
Lease expires in June. (B-3t-35-p)
jfllME I s.
- M
I ire/an lr 1 |
5:40 BgHI
7:45
STRANGLER
\ | MMUK WOKNCtS 11
PmwMr* Cokx ov """ M
held overi
\

FOR RENT I
v
/. < .....;.;.;.;.;.;.:.;.:.:.:.x,X*XXX*X*X*X X* VSrb&Sf-
Must Sub-let: 2 Bedrm Furnished
Apt. at the Summit House. Rent paid
to Dec. Istmove in immediately.
Call 376-9688 between 9:00 A.M. &
6:00 P.M. (B-st-36-p)
Male roomate for house 2nd, 3rd
qrtr. Two sep. bedrooms, kitchen,
bath, livingroom, all furn. Pref. Grad,
or senior. $42 per mo! Call 378-5457
(B-3t-36-p)
XX-x-x-x-N%NVx*:-rX*X'X-x*x*x*:.x-v-'X*x->:-;.;
WANTED
' % <*x-x*x-x.x.xx*x*x*x-x-xiiixxyx*x*x*.j
Male Roommate for large mobile
home. 2 bedrooms, AC, CH, in
Andrews and Connell Mobileer. Call
Rory at 378-9642 after 8 p.m.
(C-3t-35-p)
Two female roomates to share two
bedroom French Quarter apt.
beginning winter quarter. 3769659.
(C-st-36-p)
Co-ed roomate wanted for rest of
term or year private room A/C, free
washer and dryer $37.50 378-3291
or 376-3582. (C-33-st-p)
Female roommate needed for 2nd
quarter. Apt. near campus. A.C.T.V.
Call 378-5803 after 6 p.m.
(C-st-36-p)
2 girls to snare 3 br/2 bath house.
Beautifully furnished, carpeted,
central//AC. Available Jan. 2. Ph.
378-6679 after 6 p.m.(C-10t-34-p)
Wanted: Female roommate for two
br. University Garden Apt. Begin
Nov. thru Spring Quarter. SSO mon.
Call 378-2729 or 378-8538.
(C-3t-35-p)
Lead Singer wanted for rock group.
Call 372-9303. Pete Armfield.
(C-3t-37-p)
: HELP WANTED |
\sxxyxy>x*x.v.v.%v.v:-:*x>x-x-x.x*xx*>2£
HELP WANTED MALE: Mens
clothing salesman, part-time,
Discount privileges, salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-35-st-c)
Help Wanted: Part-time RADIO
ANNOUNCER for top-rated
Gainesville station. WEEKEND work,
experience necessary, Call Mark
Fowler 372-2528 between 9 a.m. and
10 p.m. (E-35-6t-c)
Women Girls: Telephone & survey
work part-time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
WANTED: Carhops night shift.
Apply Jerrys Restaurant North.
1505 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
(E-37-10t-c)
am ENDS
Mal Mal:! 1 j THU.
rwiTw.in* st. v iyl&f
They just
iSjp a half-million dollars^^
#/ 'WD I But watch what happens
/njtt" when its time for The Spilt! | #
JIM DIAHANN !
IVi J* BROWN CARROLL I?
V JULIE ERNEST A
\ HARRIS BORGNINEiA
Winner
/ Academy Awards!
[ RICHARD HARRIS
l\ VANESSA REDGRAVE
Cjsme&qt
technicolor xe
WOM WARNER
ARTS-. JJ
|G| i 7SrsTf* s ii
ENDS
JHU.

Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 12,1 1

| HELP WANTED f
*:x:-xy^:-x*xrax:yx>x-x-x-x-xx->y-x.>
Ladies earn extra cash. Call for an
appointment. Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, Friday at 376-3185 from
10-12 a.m. and 1-4 p.m. (E-st-36-p)
Female dorm resident wanted to
deliver morning newspaper.
378-9058. (E-3t-36-p)
.HTGHLV QUAX-IMED SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent job, excellent
'oay. Do apply unless well
qualified. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)
WANTED: Experienced waitress,
night shift. Jerrys Restaurant North.
1505 NW 13th St. 378-2481.
(E-37-10t-c)
Need woman to sit with 5 months
old child 8:30 to 5:30 Monday thru
Friday in home. Tel. evenings
378-2767 daytime 392-2929.
(E-4t-37-p)
AUTOS |
1966 Triumph Spitfire; Hard, soft
Tonneau tops; radio; 28,000 mi.
SISOO. Call 376-7551 during day;
376-7161 after 6 p.m. Good
mechanical condition. (G-st-35-p)
1967 Volkswagen 16,500 miles.
Clean. Includes S2OO worth of extras.
$1550. Neeci to sell one car. Call
378-5381, ext. 3470 or 372-1583
evenings. (G-st-35-p)
VW Sedan 59 State Inspected. Clean
372-0033 after 5:30 and weekends.
(G-st-35-p)
5
1965 AH Sprite in top mechanical 1
condition. Top & new tonneau. Call
378-6792 after 5 p.m. for details.
(G-st-35-p)
Jaguar XKE CPE 1966 model. Fully
equipped with air condition, AM/FM
radio, front & rear bumper guards.
Only 26,000 miles S3BOO 378-8532.
(G-st-35-p)
GAINESVILLES LOWEST PRICED
USED CARS drive slowly on SOUTH
Main St. Look for the small
DATSUN sign. BIG savings.
Courteous men and women to answer
your questions. Gooding & Clark
Motors. 1012 South Main Street.
(G-st-37-c)
S:wx*x*x-x*x<*x<*>x*:x*xx*x*x*:-:-x*:-.>t^
PERSONAL |
Sc*
.v
s.x*yX'X*x-x-x-x.s:xs x x-x*x.xx-x-x-xcK
Bryson, Thank You Again For A
Fabulous Weekend. I Really Had A
Wonderful Time. I Hope I Can See
You Near Farragut When You Come
Home. I Am Real Sorry About Sat.
Nite, I Am Trying To Change. Be
Good. I Hope To See You Soon.
Love, Me. (J-3t-35-p)
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
Union.
RECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europes
most famous campuses. For info, call
392-1655 or come by 310 Union.
(J-18t-36-c)
HAPPY BIRTHDAY: TO JOHNNY
WITH MUCH LOVE. SOOSY.
(J-lt-37-p)
Thanks to Roundtrees, E.J., L.K.,
H.A. & I.L. 6B campaign was best.
A proud BSUer. (J-37-lt-p)
1 LOST & FOUND £
>
,'X-:.x*x*xx*x>x*x.x.x.x*x.v.nxx-xvx*x-:-X
Lost: Brown pocketbook from BSU.
Desperately need glasses, IDs, film
and sunglasses. Please return to BSU
or call Iris Logan at .372-9394.
(L-2t-36-p)
LOST: Girls gold wrist watch last
Tues. in music building. Teriffic
sentimental value. Please call
372-0175. Thanks. (L-3t-35-p)
Pewter mug with inscription SAE to
Chi O. Reward offered. No questions
asked. Phone 378-4758. (L-3t-35-p)
FOUNO: Tan cocker spaniel 6
months old. Call 392-7980.
(L-3t-37-nc)
UvJna
Coupkc
(AN ADULT MOTION MCTUM FROM SWT DIN)
LAST TIMES TODAY
SRffC
3,57,9

LOST & FOUND |
?>X*X-X-X-X*X*X-X.X-X-X-XX.V-v.v.v.vX'X>
Lost Sat. at law skits, game or Phi
Oelt house Father's hi school Alpha
Omega pin from gold disc on charm
bracelet. Call 392-0415. (L-st-35-p)
Black wallet and brown glasses lost
Tuesday in band building. Return to
Jennings desk. Keep money. No
questions asked. (L-2t-36-p)
.xx.x.x.v.v.v;wxyx*x-x*x.x.x.'.xx-x*x* : : ;
f SERVICES
jxy:.x.v.%x.v.*.xxyx*xafrv.vx*x*x.x.sv.*A
Mrticuios ae joyeria. Oro 18 K G Ran
surtido de medallas, escapularios,
aretes, dijes, anillos. Diamantes y
perlas cultivadas. Relojes Ultramar.
Llame al 378-6498. (M-st-37-p)
FINE JEWELRY order now for
Xmas. 18 K gold items (watches,
rings, charms, medals, etc.) Diamonds
& Pearls also. Call 378-6498.
(M-st-37-p)
I cot or Wm
ALSO I
I Inspector J
Xfao Clouseau I
Ul C 0( OR PAN A VISION Is;;

TONIGHT
LADIES DRINKS..I9C
for your ntuvtainmmrt
[Pleasure from 9pm to 1:30 cm
Roland Winters
Playing the 12-string guitar
ALIBI LOUNGE
I 3334 W. UNIV. AVE.
GREEKS
and
GRADS
Pictures for the Seminole are now being
taken in Room 346 of the Student Union.
Call 392*1681 AFTER 12 p.m., for your
appointment. The attire for the pictures is
dark coat and tie for the males and dark
round-neck sweaters for the females.
Pictures will be shot from 12-5 and 6-9 p.m.

-T
SERVICES |
?.
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto electric service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-ts-c)
Child care for 2-5 year olds. Home in
NE section. Playroom, fenced yard
with swings. Lunch and snacks
included. $lO weekly. 376-8523.
(M-3t-35-p)
Rame Hair Stylist 319 W. University
Ave. Introducing Miss Fleeta.
Limited time $15.00 permanent wave
for SIO.OO $18.50 frosting $12.50.
Free hair cut with price df shampoo
and set. Call 372-5549. (M3t-36-p)
Typewriters chemically cleaned.
Platen reconditioned minor repairs.
SB.OO. Call 376-9707 after 5:00.
(M-2t-36-c)
6:30 |
showingatToo^nlyi
HAYLEY HD33I
MILLS 'E33333
Technicolor
" A
A SECOND TO DIE!"



GaddumipsUp
Reid II For Title

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
Gaddum section of Hume
Hall stormed by Reid II last
week to take the Campus Dorm
football championship 26-7.
President OConnell was on
hand to witness this savage duel
and even flipped the coin to add
to the pre-game festivities.
Gaddum scored twice in each
period in a rare display of team
balance and precision.
Chi Phi managed to keep a
head of steam rolling in Blue
league football as they narrowly
UF Has Oldest
Gymnasiumln
SEC Bartlett
By JIM WAND
Alligator Sports Writer
Florida Gymnasium is a
little outdated, not adaquate,
and right now probably the
worst such structure in the
Southeastern Conference,
according to head basketball
coach Tommy Bartlett.
The gymnasium was opened
in 1948 and since that time
every school in the SEC has built
a new field house or
gymnasium, stated Bartlett.
The drive to build a
multipurpose sports coliseum
has apparently stalemated for
want of funds according to
James E. Devaney, Jr., president
of Inter-Fraternity Council.
The IFC donated $2500 to
the coliseum drive. This money
was profit received from the
Beach Boys concert held last
April.
The purpose of the concert
was to show alumni that UF
students want a new coliseum,
IFC treasurer Steve Uhlfelder
said.
Planning will be turned over
to the Order of Omega, an
honorary fraternity. It will
conduct a careful research to
judge the possibilities, and then
get the alumni to start the drive.
The IFC hopes to find a big
name group in order to sponser
another concert this year.
Approximately one-half million
dollars will be needed to start
thinking seriously about the
coliseum, Devaney said.

MiHBMBBRI NG COUPONHBI^MMHa|
waTI
M unarmmam 1 j|. 2 5 DINNER I
I
Mashed Potatoes with Gravy TUESDAY ONLY
and Rolls. 1
fefltuda)
TrW tfMrte* I
214 NW 13th St. 376-6472 I
2 Locations ||4 nw 34tn St. 372-3649 |
HHBnRING COUPONI"""^

defeated the AGRs 13-12. The
Chi Phis dominated the game
but it was one small extra point
that won it.
DU and Theta Chi did all
their scoring in the first half and
the DUs were on the upper end
of it 27-20. FIJI used one safety
and two extra points to top a
gallant Delta Chi team 16-13.
Phi Tau had little trouble in
disposing of Phi Ep 25-0 and
Delta Sigma Phi eased by Phi
Kappa Psi 12-6.
In independent football, the
AMFs bid farewell to the B.S.s
and then were destroyed as the
B.S.s dropped a 20-6 loss on
them.
The Bisons cut down the
Forestry Club as they tallied 33
points to 0 for the tree men.
Lagnaf whipped the
Tally whackers 12-6 in a game
that was fairly evenly matched.
The Keystone Kops spent aD
day chasing the Roadrunners but
never managed to catch them as
the birds scored 28 points to
shut out the cops.
The Purple Mooses found the
right prescription as they
destroyed Med II in a real
wingdinger. The Moose had a lot
to blow their horn about in a
30-6 win.
The Student Contractors
bridged their way over CLO with
a great come from behind win
25-12. The Contractors, trailing
12-6 in the first half put their
theories into practice in a big 19
point second half.
. c
Baby Gators
TopPupsl7-15
Floridas Baby Gators nipped
Georgias pups 17-15 yesterday
in a game played at Athens, Ga.
The game began in the rain,
and ended in sleet and snow.
Quarterback John Reaves threw
for one touchdown pass, and
Tony Durrance ran for another
to gain a measure of revenge for
Floridas weekend loss to
Georgia.

If T WBf I SUPER RIGHT FROZEN 1
CHOPPED |
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOU NS I D CCC 2LB. M 39
Two Convenient Locations I PKG. I
601 S.W. 2 Ave. ICTEAKC
1130 N.f. 16 Ave. 1 O I CMiXJ
FRESHLY
GROUND CHUCK 79<
ALLGOOD BRAND ... rA
BACON -59 C
OLDEN ripe
BANANAS 10<
lORIDA NAVEL
ORANGES - 49c
RRM RPE ANJOU
PEARS 25C
FRESH CRISP
FTTUCE head 2/45C
f JANE PARKER \
BREEN BEANS 3/79 I V
POLED APRICOTS n 3/79< APPLE PIES 1
GRAPEFRUIT SECTIONS 3 N 3/79$ 1 i
GREEN 1 /-/yf An
UMA BEANS 3/79< \ V JCk'
PEACHES 3/79<
SAURKRAUT can 3/79<
CREAM STYLE 303
WHITE CORN " 4/79C
IALL PEAS c 4/79C
bca H 301 A /7Qa
PEAS
SPINACH s 4/69C
REEN BEANS4/69C
?o R r S 4/69C
LX BEANS S. 4/69C

Tuesday, Novambar 12,1968, Tha Florida Alligator, I

Page 11



Page 12

E> Tha Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 12,1968

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888 B
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With college glasses, 3^
11 b\ 9 1
only 19c with _-
8-gallon fill-up.
I Next time you invite the gang over before or after the
I game for a cool one, make it an all-out support effort I
Each has the school seal and mascot imprinted on ip
the sides in orange and blue. m: 1 |f|^^f^|M||f^^M(
You can get one of these colorful tumblers for only K" t Ullsl ; J I i¥jr Ms
19C with each 8-gallon fill-up at participating Enco 1 lil# U **** M
stations. In no time at all you'll have a shelfful so you'll T B
be ready when entertainment is in order. = B
Drive in today and get a tumbler ,*> 9p T| I
"PuTa Tiger,in^Y^TankT' I / zv J
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Humble Oil & Refining Company I
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