Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 36

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BEFORE CENTREX WAS INSTALLED AT UF
...campus operators worked at old-fashioned switchboards J
Centrex Turns On, Tunes In

g By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writar
§
: UF students rejoice!
i No longer will dimes be scrounged and saved
: for on-campus calls.
|: No longer will patient telephone operators
§ have to listen to angry UF students who lose
: their dimes or dial wrong numbers.
S No longer will telephones be disturbing the
: entire floor of a dorm for the girl down the hall
* who is checked out for the evening.
I Happiness has arrived on the UF campus.
At midnight Friday Centrex switched on and
tuned in.
Were very pleased with the way things have
gone (since the switch Saturday), Bob Coleman,
district manager of Southern Bell in Gainesville,
said Sunday.
We had a few minor problems, but thats to
be expected.
This is the largest Centrex system in the Bell
Telephone companies, he said.
. The project to transfer to the Centrex system
has been under planning for more than two

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MIDNIGHT FRIDAY THEY SWITCHED

Florida Players Open Satire On Patriotism

The Florida Players in line
with the times open Sergeant
Musgraves Dance, a bitter
satire on patriotism tonight at
8:15 in Constans Theatre.
The war protest play is set for
a six-day run.
This is the first major
experiment in mixed media at
UF. The four chief figures
include a pacifistic deserter, a

The
Florida Alligator

religious fanatic, an AWOL
murderer and a soldiers whore.
An unusual music score was
prepared especially for the
production by two members of
the rock musical group, The
Certain Amount.
Jim Lanehan (percussion) and
T rantham Witley (keyboard)
devised renditions of classic war

University of Florida Gainesville

years, Coleman said. x
We know this gives UF a modem and £
up-to-date system in communications. It will
grow with the University, Coleman said. ;j
Centrex is more than a telephone system, it is y
a data processor students may someday use to y
register for courses, he said. The university will |
use it to handle bills and charge accounts and the
medical center will use it to page its personnel. $
The system services more than 7,000 $
telephones at the university and has the technical j
capability of processing more than 180,000 calls
a day. ||
Servicing the system for the university was jj
about the same as servicing Lake City, Coleman jj
said.
Over 30 technicians were on hand over the js
weekend to clear up any telephone problems that $
arose. j{
Friday afternoon a luncheon was held for key ||
UF officials and telephone personnel to officially 5
inaugurate the system.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell pulled the s
switch after the luncheon and started things j
ringing. \

Kiker 'lntense,
Very Precise,
Employes Say
By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writar
He was as fine a person as I know.
I think he was a good boss. He did a lot for the
University.
He was a very intense person.
He had a kind of repressive personality.
The he to whom these statements refer is John Kiker
Jr., the UF professor charged with the death of his wife.
Kiker, chairman of UFs bioenvironmental engineering
department (BEE), was arrested Oct. 21 when police were
summoned to his home and found his wifes body on the
bathroom floor. She had been shot once with a
357-magnum pistol.
We all thought very highly of him, said one BEE
faculty member, He was very active in the professional
society, and contributed a lot to the profession.
We are all at a lost as to why it

happened.
He was the type of person
that was married to his job 18
hours a day, said BEE professor
Herbert A. Bevis, this may have
been his undoing.
Bevis said Kiker was
completely dedicated to the
university and, in my opinion
his family suffered because of
it.
One source, who wished not
to be identified, doubted Kiker
was thought, well of within his
department.
I dont think he was
respected, the source said.
They resented his
over-exactness. The things he
was so fussy about did not
amount to that much at all.
He was extremely cynical
about small details, the source
continued and in my opinion,
he was overly afraid other
people were going to get his job
away from him.
Was Kiker depressed the week
of his wifes murder?
Yes he seemed depressed,
the source said. His daughter
had had an operation and
everyone attributed it (Kikers
depressed actions) to that.
Not everyone in the
department agrees Kiker was
depressed the week of his wifes
death. And not everyone feels
his over-exactness* was
unusual.
I dont think he was
depressed that week, said one
(SEE'KIKER', PAGE 2)

songs and patriotic anthems,
including, Rule Britannia,
Deutschland ber Alles, and
When Johnny Comes Marching
Home Again.
These are juxtaposed with
contemporary war protest songs,
such as Where Have All the
Flowers Gone, Cruel War,
and Blowin in the Wind.

Monday, November 11, 1968

Accent '69
Essays Due
More than SIOO prize money
is being offered by Accent 69
for articles in its campus-wide
essay contest The Dimensions
of Freedom.
Themes for the contest will
be separated into three divisions:
Freshmen, all-campus and
faculty. Deadline is Nov. 18.
Prizes for each group is $25,
with an additional $35 for the
best overall.
Entries may be turned into
room 323 Reitz Union.
Chorale Ducats
On Sale Today
Tickets for Saturdays
performance by the Roger
Wagner Chorale go on sale
today at 12 noon at the Reitz
Union Box Office.
Student tickets are $1.50,
sl, and 50 cents. Faculty,
staff, and general public
tickets are $2, $1.25, and sl.
The chorale, singing in the
Florida Gym, performs a
program of sacred music of
the Renaissance, music of the
Baroque era, and popular
songs, folk songs, and
spirituals of the modem era.

The combination of this
music with the unusual visual
effects and dramatic actions of
the play produce a bitter and
satiric portrait of the fruits of
patriotism.
There will also be a matinee
Saturday at 2 p.m. Tickets, now
available at the theatre box
office are 25 cents for students
and $1.50 for others.

Americas
Number I
Cottage
Daily



Page 2

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 11,1968

New Crocodile Will Appeal To Intellect

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
A new more dangerous
Crocodile will return to the UF
if John Sugg, student initiator of
the soon-to-be monthly
magazine, has his way.
Although named after the
humorous, but shortlived
magazine which was banned

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BUT THAT MUCH ?ll
Reflecting the despair thousands of Gator fans felt Saturday, head
cheerleader Roddy Grubbs looks fieldward and finds little to cheer
about. Grubbs, megaphone in hand, upstages one of the coed m
cheerleaders who decided a plastic raincoat was the better part of l
valor. I

'American Dream Tonight I

Edward Albees play, The
American Dream, will be
presented tonight at 8 in room
103 B of the Architecture &
Fine Arts Building.
Students are staging this
reading in conjunction with the
course Religion 365.
RN 365, Theology and the
Arts since 1940, is a study of

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the 'official student newspaper of ths University of Florida
aad Is puHlshsd five Haas weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
seal-weekly, aad during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Rails
Union Building, Uidvarsity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as swspd class aMmy at tin United States east office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
Ho Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertlseawnts
tlseawnts advertlseawnts aad to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be regomttls for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to ran several times. Mottoes tor correction must be given before next Insertion.

from sale on campus in the fall
of 1967, it is not a continuation
of the same, Sugg said.
The old Crocodile was a
hippy, trippy, lefty thing, he
said. This Crocodile will be
more dangerous to the cherished
institutions of administration
than its name-sake because it

how the novel, play and film
reflect basic concerns of the
period that take on religious
overtones, according to the
instructor Corbin Camell.
Approximately 50 students
are enrolled in the course,
offered for the first time this
quarter.

will appeal to the intellect.
The Crocodile, like the
University Report, will try to fill
a void of expression of views on
campus by publishing
substantial articles of solid
intellectual quality which are
thought provoking, Sugg said.
He feels the Alligator is not
truly representative of the
students at the university
However he said the Crocodile
wouldnt be a rival of the
Alligator.
The University Report has
already approached him with the
possibility of pooling their
resources, Sugg said. The
emphasis would be on quality of
articles, rather than the view
expressed, he continued. I
would love to see Harold Aldrich
(Alligator Editor) write an
article on freedom of the press,
for instance, he said.
The new magazine is going to
be sold off campus, but its
distribution policy on campus
was undecided as of Sunday

Kiker 'lntense, Precise/
Fellow Employes Recall

FROM PAGE Pit
BEE professor. He seemed to
me to be in high spirits. He had
broken his leg and was getting
the cast off that Friday.
He was a very demanding
person, said one BEE
employee. He did expect
preciseness, but this is in no way
unusual.
We all respected him a lot.
One professor, who also
wished not be be identified, said
Kiker was a good boss. He did a
lot for the University, the
professor said.
He was one for details. But,
whether he was afraid some of
us wanted his job or not, I dont
know.
He added that if Kiker was
fearful of his job, I dont see
why. None of us want it.
Gainesville Police Lt. Roy

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evening.
Its something Hurt has to be
worked out by the entire staff,
Sugg said.
According to dean James
Hennessey, of the office of
Student Affairs, if the magazine
is free, drop spots are allowed
almost anywhere on campus.
If it is to be sold at no profit,
or at cost which the Crocodile
will be then each issue must
be submitted to Hennesseys
office for approval of sale. We
approve for sale, not content,
Hennessey said.
The reason for this procedure
is merely to see if the content
complies with the stipulations
set down by the student
handbook concerning student
publications, he said.
The handbook states a
student is subject to all laws or
regulations of the University,
city, state or nation that governs
a person as a citizen.
Material must not violate
existing laws respecting

Thames said Kiker has been
arraigned for first degree
murder.
His lawyers have not asked
for a preliminary hearing yet,
Thames said, and its up to

Bs2s Smash VC Ammo Dump
In Jungle North Os Saigon

SAIGON (UPI) Air raids
Sunday by U.S. 852 jets sent
more than 1 million pounds of
bombs hurtling into jungles
north of Saigon where North
Vietnamese troops were
reported regrouping for a new
wave of attacks. The blitz
knocked out a huge ammunition
dump.
South of Saigon, in the
Mekong River delta, Communist
gunners ignored the terms of the
U.S. bombing halt over North

defamation, obscenity, violent
overthrow of the government,
inciting a riot, or any other law
validly limiting the exercise of
free speech.
In addition, the material must
identify its author and sponsor.
Nevertheless, Hennessey said,
the editorial staff is still
responsible for all the material
contained in the magazine.
Regarding this procedure,
Sugg said. After due
consideration we cannot submit
our magazine to prior restraint.
We recognize the limits, and
realize the responsibility which
is ours, he said, and we realize
the penalties we will incur,
besides censorship, if we violate
any of these laws.
There will be no obscenity,
he added.
This is Suggs first attempt to
start a magazine.
The first meeting of the staff
will be held Monday night, at
8:30 pjn. at 1608 S. W. 2nd
Ave.

them, not us, to ask for a
preliminary hearing.
Kikers lawyers are Chester
and Mason Bedell of
Jacksonville. They could not be
reached by the Alligator Sunday.

Vietnam and fired two 75 mm.
recoilless rifle shells into the city
of Can Tho. Two women and
three children were wounded.
In announcing the bombing
halt on Oct. 31, President
Johnson said Communist troops
were expected to stop
indiscriminate shellings of South
Vietnamese cities. Can Tho,
biggest city in the delta with a
population of 85,000, was
shelled Saturday and again
Sunday morning.



America 'Remembers WWI Armistice Today

By United Press International
At the 11th hour of the 11th
day of the 11th month the guns
of August were stilled.
At the same hour today-50
years latermillions of
Americans recall the hopes of
that moment and relive the
sorrow of sacrifice for a
vanquished dream.
White haired men who once
strode proudly among the trees
of Belleau Wood through tom
streets of St. Mihiel and climbed
the hills of the Argonne are
marching, just as proudly, but
with less certainty, along
American avenues to remind
those who may have forgotten
that his is the golden
anniversary.
It was The Great War, the
War to End Wars, the War to
Make the World Safe for
Democracy. The slogans are
tarnished now and the dreams
behind them broken on the field

Justice Warren Proposes
Student, Faculty Confab

NEW YORK (UPI) Chief
Justice Earl Warren Sunday
proposed a national conference
of college students and faculty
members to search for program
of conciliation among our age
groups.
Such a conciliation was vital,
he said, if the nation and world
civilization were to survive in an
age of increasingly rapid
scientific and technological

IN THE MALL
N -W-i3th s. We proudly present our new menu and
f cordially invite you to dine with us in
6 (tarmtitpUa b vi . f i
CjtvHrn our relaxed 9 continental atmosphere
u £ Our Shoppers Specials From Our Italian Kitchen
- Spaghetti
lam to 8:30 pm No. j Ham ane ch**e on Sosam* Roll 85
CLOSED SUNDAYS *end with potato salad Spaghetti with mwrt bolls 1.50
Appetizers 2 Super Sub ....... ....... ...........75
ham, salami, knoiuwurst, cheese and saiad garnish Spaghetti with maat sauce 1.50
Mushroom Salad 65 No. 3 Super Meat Bailer
served with potato salad (only above two in child's portion) 1.00
Kosher Barrel Cured Pickles 35 No. 4 Mini Meat 8ai1er............................ 1.00
Kosher Pickles and Assorted Olives 60 No. 5 Pasta Fazool" The Poor Mans Spaghetti with mushrooms... 1.75 with meat bails-- 2.25
Gourmet Dish 1.00
Antipasto Treat -55 served with tossed salad, roll and butter Spaghetti ovan baked in casearole
No. 6 Chili Con Carne 85
Soup Os the Day served with tossed salad and crackers with cheese 76
r y No. 7 Spaghetti with Meat Sauce 1.00
M.. Fresh O.II,! serv*d with mlad, poll and butter MMK.nl.ta. 2.26
Pnu/ | 55 Cud .40 Sdlud PldttCTS
with shredded chicken and cheese ............. 2.50
c I 1. Antipasto Salad Platter 1.50 All Spaghetti orders served with
balaas Italian Tossed Salad, roll and butter
2. Fresh Shredded Chicken Salad. Nestled
Tossed Green Salad Bowl, with our herb and seasonings 55 _ . ...
. .. _. __ m a bed of our own tossed d 1.60 HOME BAKED LASAGNE..... 1.50 with meat balls2.oo
Mixed Greens with cho.ce of french or roquefort dressmg 55 3 Shrimp Nest|#d |n of our
Antipasto Salad Bowl 85 own to ss*d H ld 1.75 HOME STYLE CHEESE RAVIOLI with meat balls ZOO
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Chefs Pride Tossed Salad Bowl 1.00 4. Cn#f $ Pride salaa Planer I.oD
Potato Salad, or Macaroni Salad.... .40 5. Fruit Salad Platter with Cottage Cheese 1.25 Desserts
Sm.ll Fruit S.lad with Cott.,. 75 ( Hot Platters Ommtom, Crum Run C*. 60
C/I I f Homemade from our gourmet kitchen Cheesecake .60
zanawicnes Prepared Fresh Daily ... 75 Home Baked Apple Pie .35
Roast Top Sirloin of Beef 1.15 Imported Swiss Cheese 65 with Cherries
MO p Beef Stew, The Stew with Authority! 1.50
Hot Pastrami .85, with cheese.. 1.00 Imported Ham .85 Bavarian Chocolate Pie .60 French Vanilla lea Cream... .35
Knockwurst and Sauerkraut, (Pride of Milwaukee)
Turkey (all white meat)............. 1.15 Imported Ham and Cheese ..... 1.00 ._ .. .. 1,50 D
* Above served with Tossed Salad, Roll and Butter Beverages
Hot or Cold Corned Beef 1.00 Chicken Salad (Fresh Daily).... 1.00
I Pizza Menu coff.. 16 s->k. ....20 l>wd 25
(Small Only)
Milk 25
Pizza with sauce and cheese 1.00 ******
Pizza with pepperoni and cheese 1.25
CARMINEt-LA*S DUO Beef and Chicken sauted in peppers and cok w Sprite 20
onions in sherry sauce served on double rolls ..................... 1.25 Pizza with meat sauce and cheese 1.50 Beer
Pizza with mushroom* and cheese 1.55 Lowenbrau on Draft .55 Budweisor, bottle .....45
IBAR-B-Q DUO Beef and Chicken prepared in a savory bar-b-q sauce
served on double rolls ....lmported Hemiken, bottle.. .70 Schlitz, bottle .........45
Please AUow A Few Extra Minutes For Above Specialty Hot Sandwiches Combination of any 3 1.95 We also have a large selection of Domestic and Imported wines.

rnnnirMTnfrMnrinrMnii-Mnh i
pF Ceremony At Century Tower

UFs ceremonies to
commemorate the fiftieth
anniversary of the armistice
which ended World War I will
take place today at 12:15 p.m. at
Century Tower.
In a break with tradition, the
events are scheduled during the
noon hour instead of the usual
11 aim. time to allow students to

of a hundred other battles but
once they were as shining as
Camelot, as glorious as ancient
Greece.
Once it was time for all
Americans to pause at 11
o'clock in the morning of each
11th day of November to fact
east and say a silent prayer for
those who failed to return from

advancement.
The student revolt on the
college campus is hardly away
to achieve wisdom, although it
may prove effective in shaking
the establishment out of
complacency and smugness,
Warren said in a speech at the
Louis Marshall award dinner of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America at the Essex House
Hotel.

the trenches of France. But that
was before an even greater war
and several smaller ones.
Now, even the name has been
changed. It is no longer
Armistice Day, to mark the
moment when mankind put

FEATURING:
Italian Foods
Specialty Sandwiches
Delicious Salads
Domestic and
Imported
Wine and Beer
CONGENIAL
CONTINENTAL
ATMOSPHERE
Serving Continuously
11 m B*3o pm
CLOSED SUNDAYS

attend the 11-minute ceremonies
between classes.
The Rev. U.S. Preacher
Gordon, of the first Presbyterian
Church of Gainesville, will
present the invocation and UF
Pres. Stephen OConnell will give
a four minute address. ROTC
units will present the colors.
The event is sponsored by the
Veterans Club.

IN THE MALL
)#4
6 GLarmittfUaa \
QnKfca of Bating 3

aside war. It is Veterans Day, for
how else could Americans honor
those who have since died in
conflict and explain what
became of that dream.
And so, when the old men
march in their out of date

Monday, November 11, 19M, The Florida Alligator,

OUR SHOPPERS SPECIALS
"Potto FosooT
Bowl .75
served with tossed salad,roll and
butter
Ham and Chcnc on
Sosamo Roll 85
served with potato salad
m Chili Con Corn* 85
W served with tossed salpd and crack crack-3
-3 crack-3 Tho "Submarine'... .75
r "a meal in itself"
SuperMeatballer ...75
an eld favorite
Spaghetti with
Meat Sauce 1.00
served with tossed salad, roll and
butter

uniforms Monday through the
streets of Chicago and Detroit
and Cincinnati and Boston and
Louisville, many who watch may
not even recall the significance it
once had, just as their fathers
and mothers once watched
unknowingly and without
understanding the parading
remnants of earlier armies.
To some, it would be a time
of opportunity. In Los Angeles,
a group called Veterans for
Peace in Vietnam" planned a
parade and rally to denounce
Insanity in Asia** and Murder
f r K the old men who once
knew the agony of trench
warfare and the ecstacy of its
end on that gray in 1918, it will
be a time of pride of happiness,
and of sorrow for those who
didn*t live to experience the joy
of the 11th hour.

Page 3



Page 4

\, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 11, 1968

Student Unrest Prompted Johnson To Resign

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Student unrest is a new wild
card which has upset some
smooth poker players,*' like
President Lyndon Johnson for
one, a Princeton University
professor told a Gainesville
audience Thursday.
This force, which caused the
premature resignation of
Johnson last March, may be
traced to a relentless
present-mindedness in
American universities, a trend
which is anti-historical and
anti-humanistic.
Humanity itself is losing its
memory, said Dr. James
Billington, professor of history.
We are experiencing a loss of
roots froir the past, and this is
making the present more and
more mechanized.
Billington was addressing a
national conference of the
Association for General and
Liberal Studies, in the Reitz
Union Ballroom. His speech
opened a three-day conference
UF Debaters
Place Fifth
At Tourney
UF novice debaters stole
the show from the varsity team
at the Carolina Forensics Debate
Tournament, Nov. 7-9, held by
the University of South
Carolina.
Debaters Dee Scarr and Bess
Roberts placed second in the
novice affirmative division, with
a 5-1 won-loss record. They
defeated Emory University, the
University of Georgia, Clemson
University, Citadel University,
and East Tennessee State
University, and lost to Duke
University. Emory University
won the novice affirmative
division with less than a 15 point
speakers point margin over the
Florida team.
Dee Scarr was fifth place
speaker in the novice division,
and received a trophy for that
accomplishment.
The UFs varsity team of
Ralph Glatfelter and Dave Rouse
had a 6-2 won-loss record,
defeating Emory University, the
University of South Carolina,
Wingate University, University
of North Carolina, the
University of Georgia, and
Belmont University, and losing
twice to the University of
Alabama. They placed fifth in
the tournament.
Ralph Glatfelter was awarded
a trophy for being third-place
varsity speaker.
Next week the UFs novice
squad will be competing here in
Gainesville, at the UF-sponsored
Gator Invitational Tournament,
Junior.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
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376-5211
bOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins. 5 mins.

on general education and was
entitled The World Crisis in
Higher Education.
The typical American
university, rather than
transmitting knowledge, teaches
problem-solving techniques for
the society; and the
characteristic college
administrator is a pragmatic
problem-solver, something like
a labor mediator.
This rat race has replaced
the search for truth, Billington
said.
What we are facing now is a
world crisis in education, he
said, citing incidents of student
unrest in the U.S. Red China,
Checkoslavakia, France, and
Sweden.
He blamed the unrest on the
university population explosion
- There are ten times as many
students in Italy as after World
War II the rising expectations
of new societies, and a new
solidarity and internationalism
among college students.
But the protests and
problems are essentially
American It is a world
problem that is being fought out
here and even in Europe the
protests stem from American
influences.

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PRINCETON PROF SAYi

The Lolita Complex, present
in many students, intensifies
student protest in the United
States; and pressure in American
universities caused by aggressive
competition, pre-professional
specialization, and overly high
expectations, brings the crisis to
a head in the United States.
To overcome what Billington
described as the specter of
autocratic administrators and
anarchist students locked in
sterile combat, five steps must
be taken:
There should be created three
distinct types of educational
institutions; pure research
universities, liberal arts
institutions, and the university
Senate Groups
To Meet Today
The Student Senate Excuse
Committee meets today at 6:45
p.m. The room number will be
posted on the Student
Government window, third
floor, Reitz Union.
The Rules and Calendar
Committee meets today at 3:30.
A meeting of the Information
and Investigating Committee of
the Student Senate will be
posted in the Student
Government office.

itself a corporate body of
communicating scholars.
They should be free from
strict hierarchy and rigid grading
systems for both students and
professors. Billingtons remark
that I dont evern trust football
ratings anymore brought a
laugh form UF faculty in the
crowd.

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Leading these institutions
should be aggressive
spokesmen, a people-confront people-confronting-people
ing-people people-confronting-people brand of leadership,
he said.
Renewed community effort is
essential, both between varying
groups on camrus and between
the campus and its immediate
outside environment.



Budget Gripes Bog Down Senate Meeting

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Budget gripes. Budget gripes.
Budget gripes.
Little important business was
conducted at Thursday night's
Student Senate meeting, but
most senators did release their
financial gripes and discussed
budget cuts for the greater part
of two-and-one-half hours.
Even with the letting loose
of opinions and gripes, nothing
was accomplished in the way of
present or future budget
problems.
This budget will sail through
again, said Majority Leader
Charles Harris. But by God,
next year it wont.
This budget is a farce, said

Agree With Our Terms,
S. Viets Tell Diplomats

PARIS (UPI) South
Vietnams chief Paris Diplomat,
Pham Dan Lam, returned from
consultations in Saigon Sunday
and said it was up to the United
States to get North Vietnam to
agree to South Vietnamese terms
for a full-scale peace conference.
Lam said he was carrying
new instructions from Saigon,
but declined to elaborate other
than to declare he had no orders
to negotiate with the
Communists.
Lams return from 10 days of
urgent consultations in Saigon
with President Nguyen Van
Thieu sparked speculation in
diplomatic circles that South
Vietnam was softening its
conditions for peace talks.
Thieu has said that South
Vietnam and North Vietnam

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One check, for SI,OOO, is for the support of the soil mechanics and
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GARY GOODRICH
...moves out
Harris during one of several
debates on its inadequacies. The
majority of the Senate agreed.

must be the keystones in such
talks, with the United States and
the Viet Congs National
Liberation Front (NLF) taking a
back seat.
Since the United States is
conducting exploratory talks
with the North Vietnamese it is
up to them to get North
Vietnam to accept, Lam told
newsmen at Orly Airport when
asked about Thieus terms.
Nhan Dan, the official North
Vietnamese Communist
newspaper, Sunday reiterated its
opposition to the Thieu plan and
described it as a scheme to
sabotage the conference.
North Vietnam and the Viet
Cong insist that the meeting be a
four-sided conference between
Hanoi, Washington, the NLF and

JACK VAUGHN
...steps in
This is the third meeting in a
row that budget problems have
been aired out.

Saigon with each party having
equal status.
Thieu rejects this on grounds
that NLF participation as a
separate entity would constitute
political recognition of the Viet
Cong.
Lam said Sunday his talks in
Saigon have been productive.
I certainly have new
instructions, Lam said. I do
not have instructions \to
negotiate.
Both Western and Communist
sources are certain that Saigon
will join the talks once a
face-saving formula has been
worked out.
There was no indication when
full-fledged talks would resume.
U.S. and North Vietnamese
diplomats were known to be
continuing secret consultations
during the weekend in an
attempt to reach an agreement
which would bring Saigon to the
conference table.

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Since the first appearance of
the proposed budget, only one
of two items have been changed
in the budget though students
passionately swore at several
meetings that they would attend
the Budget and Finance
Committee meetings and clear
up the budget problems.
Budget and Finance
Committee Chairman, Bob
Fleishman said about six or
seven senators were in
attendance at the last meeting.
Besides griping about the
ridiculous stiuation the budget
is in, several special requests
were proposed on the floor,
discussed, cut and passed.
Little else happened.
Vice-President Gary Goodrich
made an official good-bye
speech to the Student Senate.
Goodrich termed this years
Senate as excellent and
wished the senators continued
success in their fields of

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leadership.
After his speech, Goodrich
turned the Senate over to
President Pro-Tem, Jack
Vaughn.
Proceedings began on several
bills to relieve the vice-president
of the student body of all
officiating powers in the Student
Senate, except on official
occasions.
Committee appointments
were approved and reports were
given.

ABSENT SENATORS
These senators were not
counted on the role at Thursday
nights Student Senate meeting.
Their excuses were not known.
Harriet Halperin, Nick Nicosia,
James McGrady, Daniel Eckert,
Kipp Johnson, Ann Curran, and
Bernie Barton were not there
when role was called.

Page 5



Page 6

k The Florida Alligator, Monday, Novamfaor 11,1968

Plot To Kill
Richard Nixoi
Thwarted
NEW YORK (UPI) three
Arab Immigrants -a shipping
clerk from Yemen and his two
sons- were jailed Sunday in lieu
of SIOO,OOO bond each on
charges of planning to
assassinate President-elect
Richard M. Nixon in a plot the
prosecutor hinted may have
been controlled from abroad.
New York City police and
federal Secret Service agents
arrested the three in a raid on
their apartment in the East New
York section of Brooklyn
shortly before 5 p.m. Saturday.
The raid also netted two rifles
and ammunition.
The motive for the alleged
plot was thought to be
opposition to Nixon's view that
Israel, in a state of war with the
Arab nations, should be kept
strong to maintain the Middle
East balance of power.
Nixon was vacationing at Key
Biscayne, Fla., when the arrests
were made, but was due back in
New York City Monday. He had
no comment on the arrests.
Aides said he knew of the plot
before the raid.
The arrest immediately
brought to mind the assassination
of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy in
Los Angeles in June. It is
believed that he was killed
because of his pro-Israeli views,
and a Jordanian Arab, Sirhan B.
Sirhan, goes on trial for the
killing next month.
The three suspects, identified
as Ahmad Rageh Namer a
46-year-old shipping clerk who
has been in the United States
nine yean, and his two sons,
Hussein, 20, and Abdo Ahmad,
19, were arraigned in Brooklyn
Criminal Court Sunday and
ordered held in lieu of the high
bond.
Acting Brooklyn Dist. Atty.
Elliott Golden asked Judge T.
Vincent Quinn to hold them
without bail because the men had
strong ties outside the country,
familial and perhaps otherwise.
Golden refused to elaborate,
saying only that they had very
strong ties outside the
country.. .family ties, if not
other ties that 1 will not
comment on.
This statement and a
newspaper report of the arrests
led to speculation that the plot
may have been hatched and
controlled outside the United
States.
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CHARGED IN MARTIN L KING ASSASSINATION
James Ray Trial Starts Tuesday

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UPI)
The strictest trial security in
American history went into final
effect Sunday for the trial of
James Earl Ray, the former
convict charged with the
assassination of Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr.
The 100 block of Washington
Street housing Rays
steel-plated, television-monitor television-monitored
ed television-monitored suite of cells and the
courtroom where his trial begins
Tuesday was put off limits late
Sunday.
No one was allowed beyond
five wooded white painted guard
houses especially built for the
trial unless they had special
permission from Sheriff William
N. Morris of Shelby County.
Among final security steps
taken Sunday was a detailed
search of courtroom Number 3
and the newly refurnished jury
dormitory for such things as
hidden cameras, microphones,
and even time bombs, said the
spokesman, Charles Holmes.

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Rays cells are almost directly
above the courtroom. When he is
brought from the third floor
cells to the second floor
courtroom, not only will he
never be exposed to the outside
but he also will walk a corridor
cleared of all persons except
sheriffs deputies.
When Ray enters the
courtroom at 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday, it will be the publics
first glimpse of the 40-year-old
pale and paunchy defendant
since his arraignment in the same
courtroom last July.
More than 150
representatives of national and
foreign news media have been
photographed, fingerprinted and
issued special identification
passes for the trial. The
courtroom, which originally
seated but 45 persons, has had
its long, hard pew benches
removed and replaced by 72
cushioned theater-type seats, 42
of them reserved for reporters.
The jury quarters were

BY HOWARD POST

refurnished for the trial. A pool
table was donated for the jurys
recreation room. Cubicles were
built in to insure privacy for the
jurors' beds, which replaced
rows of cots that had been in
use.
In most major trials here even
though the jury is locked up
each night, it usually is taken to
a suite of hotel rooms under
special guard. However, Judge S.
Walter Battle, who supervised
most of the strict security
procedures, had the jury room
refurnished so the 12 persons to
judge Rays murder trial will
never leave the building until the
trial ends, probably near
Christmas.
Ray is accused of first degree

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murder for the April 4 shooting
of the Negro civil rights leader..
King was killed by a single
.30-06 caliber Remington rifle
shot that struck him in the
throat and jaw at 6:01 p.m. that
Thursday evening as he stood on
the second floor balcony of the
Lorraine Motel in downtown
Memphis.
Ray was arrested at a London
airport June 10 and ordered
extradited to Memphis in July.
He has entered a plea of
innocent to ths charges through
his lawyer, Arthur S. Haines, Sr.,
former mayor of Birmingham,
Ala.
Jury selection was expected
to continue from Tuesday
possibly through the end of the
week.



Lower Requirements Mean Poor Grades

By CARON BALKANY
AMgrtor Staff Writer
Despite recent Action Conference
recommendations that the UF accept more students
who do not meet entrance requirements, results
from a recent experiment show the odds are against
these students passing even a year.
UF admission policy requires a score of at least
300 of the Florida Twelth Grade Placement Test
and a minimum high school average of 3jo.
As of 1967, however, the Board of Regents
allows 5 per cent of the entering freshman class at
the UF to be below these minimum requirements.
As part of an experimental program with this 5
per cent quota, 41 students who had met one but
not both of the entrance requirements were
admitted to the UF last fail; 239 other students
with below minimum scores and averages declined
toattemL
'They were admitted to the mainstream of
average and above-average students with no special
counselling other than advising them of the risk,
said Richard Whitehead, director of admissions.
"The university recognized the total number of
students who had applied and met the minimum
requirements for admission would not fill the
September 1967 quota of 2,800 assigned by the
Board of Regents for the freshman class,** he said.
"We decided to experiment with a group that did

Grants Awarded EG Students

Seven outstanding UF
undergraduate engineering
students have received a total of
$3,250 in scholarships.
Terry Day, Delray Beach;
Thomas Smith, Ormond Beach,
and Donald Hayden Jr. received
SSOO electrical engineering
grants, and William Colter, Boca
Raton received a $250 civil
engineering scholarship, from
the W. Austin Smith scholarship,
in honor of the chairman of the
board for Smith & Gillespie

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The Monsanto Co. of St.
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engineering grant to Charles J.
Stone of Miami.
Hewitt-Packard, the outlet
for electronic instruments and
systems in Orlando, awarded a
SSOO scholarship to electrical
engineering student David C.
Hoffman, a Jacksonville senior.
Mechanical engineering
student, Geoffrey Hart received
a SSOO scholarship from the

not measure up to each of these minimum
requirements. We did not exclude any qualified
students, however,*' he said.
The 41 students were not chosen from any
particular minority group; every student who had
applied and failed to meet only one of the entrance
requirements was invited.
The students were given no special attention,
their grades were scaled with those of the other
students, and die work was the same.
The average scores for these students on the
Senior Placement test was 280. The average for the
rest of the 1967 freshman class was 421. The
avenge high school grade point avenge for these
students was 1.8.
At the end of the year, 11 of the 41 students, or
27 per cent, had finished with a passing average of
2.0 or better, although 58 per cent showed by their
test scores they had the ability, despite lack of
achievement in high school.
Os the other 35 students, eight were on academic
suspension and five were on scholarship probation
by the end of the year, many by the end of the first
quarter. Four others withdrew before the end of the
year.
Morton Wolfson, University College counsellor,
explained some of the difficulties these students
faced.
All were in competition with students of higher

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ability, he said. Not only did this make the grade
scales difficult for them, but it was hardly
encouraging psychologically to be on the bottom all
the tune.
Td love to see a special program set up for
academically disadvantaged students,** Wolfaon mid.
But the UF is not the place for this.**
Most students who do not meet minimum
requirements show a tremendous lack of
communications skills, he said. Many cant speak
fluently or write, and they wont pass college until
they can.
I would like to see a program instituted in the
junior colleges all over the state where by all
students who do not meet the entrance
requirements of the universities can receive remedial
training in the language arts,** said Wolfson.
This would be without college credit, although
they could take some courses for credit in areas
where they show sufficient ability. I have a plan for
this and I*m willing to go to President (Stephen C.)
OConnell with it,** he added.
These disadvantaged students just arent ready
for dm competition, dfflftculty, or strain of college,**
he said.** The test results show this. A similar
program would only fail again.**
Its just too hard.
The Universitys plans for similar experiments are
not definite at this time, Wolfson said. i

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Monday, November 11. 1968, Tbe Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator, Monday. November 11,1968

The Florida Alligator
. 'The price of freedom
'* the xercise f responsibility."
IpH 3 ml Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
: Dave Doucette
PftC i/kcJu/i/ Managing Editor
vAm Mifftn Raul Ram rez James Cook
__ -ExecutivcLEditpr News Editor

Watching

Quiet In The Tomb

Dont ever go to Tigert Hall.
Dont ever set foot in the tomb
that passes for an administration
building. Unless your mother has
just died you wont be prepared
for the overwhelming tide of
sorrow that sweeps over you.
I walked through the stately
halls and was nearly overcome
with the sense of doom that
covers the spotless walls.
Only your footsteps click on
the ominous quiet that dithers
into every crack and comer of
the mortuary that passes for the
administration building. The
halls are always deserted as if
radiation had just wiped out
every trace of life in the place.
If you should ever meet
someone in 'he corridors on the
top floors, neither of you dares
to speak. Your eyes must never

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
392-1681,392-1682 or 392-1683.
M Optaions expressed in the Florida A life* tor are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article end not those of the University of Florida.**

At a wake the room is
subdued and the lights are low,
but in Tigert the glare of the
lights is blinding. The floor is
like a mirror, the door knobs
meet, for the other fella might
be one of them. An
administrator. Shhh.
One of them has emerged
from his inner sanctum and is
striding through the passageway.
Dont smile dont glance; his
stare will turn you to stone.
Relief, he passed by without
noticing and again you are alone
in the labirinth. Again the
silence has enclosed you. Again
the footsteps echo off the walls.
In the glaring quiet crazy
thoughts amble through your
mind. I wonder if there are any
germs on these walls? Where are
the dismembered bodies hidden?

iPITORIAL
/ Died For You

(EDITORS NOTE: The following
editorial, written by Student Publications
Operations Manager Ed Barber when he was
an Alligator staffer, won a national award
for editorial writing several years ago. We
reprint it today, with thanks to Mr. Barber,
because it says brilliantly all that can be
said.)
I died at Bunker Hill. Grapeshot tore
through my body at New Orleans. Crushing
hooves with riders as swirls of blue and grey
and red crashed down upon me in
strange sounding places like Chickamauga,
Antietam and Shiloh.
The heat and swamp sucked at my last
moments in the wilds of Cuba. A green fog
of poisonous gas slithered over the side and
into my trench, where water stood, mixed
with slime and blood.
I lay face down in fetid pools, clogged
with jungle vines, felt the hot sands of Africa
burning through my back, lay with cold
cheek against wet beachsand, and fell from
gingerbread doorways into cobblestone
streets.
Snow clung to my lashes and ice formed
on the corners of my mouth as a tiny wisp
of steam wafted from the cold attacking the
crimson flow of life out of my ears and
stomach.
I felt the jagged pain of bamboo beneath
the water tearing at my flesh as I fell
forward.
I fought and died when I didnt know
why. I was killed before being old enough to
vote. I never knew the pleasure of savoring
the memories that come with old age. I left
mothers, fathers wives and children to weep
after me. I lay where names and faces and
landscapes were all foreign to me. To this
day, no one knows the place where the earth

By Jeff Alford

gleam, and the walls throb with
light. Even a hospital is
Friendlier and has more life than
this.
You begin to feel that the
building resents your presence
and you have violated her inner
secrets. Youre a student and
you dont belong within her.
Halt! Identify yourself.
State your business student.
Whatever your reason for
being on the 3rd floor, it no
longer seems important for
terror has overcome you. The
Place has drained the courage
from every part of your body
and your only thought is to get
out as quickly as possible. Panic
is setting in.
But its too late again the
footsteps are approaching, only
faster this time. One of them
has stepped out into the hall and
is walking toward you!
His sleeves are rolled, his tie is
loose, and he is looking straight
at you. He approaches and the
last drop of energy is gone you
cant escape.
Ml kmd jabs out at you and
A Bnule, Hi, Im Steve

Gov. Warren Not Here

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to correct a
slight error in last Fridays
Alligator concerning the Veterans
Day Memorial services to be
held on campus today.
Gov. Fuller Warren will speak
downtown at 11a.m. on the
square in a program sponsored
by the American Legion. The
services held on campus will be
at 12:15 pjn. and the American
Legion has been invited to bring
Gov. Warren to campus to

| Alligator Inquizitor |
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN |j
*
was a rou gh weekend. Rough on the mind and bod. But|:
mi^ erms a re over and like the proverbial silt, its time to settle down.:;
g Munch a bunch of questions: :
$ [ "S You Always Hurt the One You Love? j:
A at s Nassers first name? (And a toughie, what is his middiet
g name?) \
A For Ulte some time now, on the first floor of the Union on thet
A n ar Snack Bar, there is a large woodcutting hanging on the
ere ] 1S a podium which explains the work, its name, its*
A U r nd where its from. Can you tell either a) its name b) itsj
| author c) where its from? ij
4 ur )yi a r the directors f these movies? a) THE LEOPARD|
uSrnu^* 8 C) LA DOLCE VITA and
S' rur t MON AMOUR and LAST YEAR ATMARIENBAD}
5 s 7; LONELINESS OF THE LONG DISTANCE RUNNER jj
I mmo es > even Bert Parks was the emcee of aTV quiz show. Do you $
S remember its name? g
16. Where was the Geneva conference held? ij
vou ? Friday s contest will be printed Friday. For any of f
I- i Hft ln t l iat t^iere s a eud going on between David Chafin and
^

swallowed me.
I was called wop, gringo, nigger, dago,
spic, kike and mic. 1 was tall and short and
thin and heavy and young and old and
happy and sad. I was a shop foreman, an
insurance agent, a writer, an orange picker
and the head of a grocery chain stretching
from Baltimore to St. Louis.
I lived around the comer, up the street
over the garage, across the tracks, on the hill
and out of a suitcase.
I came from college campuses, factories
new car agencies and Broadway.
I died that FREEDOM would remain,
that LIBERTY would not perish, that
women and children would be free from
terror, that my home would be safe, that an
idea would be proved right, that my friend
might live, that my people back home could
make overtime in the plants and a sagging
economy might be helped.
Sometimes I served my country,
sometimes my ideals and sometimes my own
ego. But I served.
I was an American fighting man.
Today you will pause for a few moments
to reflect on these things. And you will be
able to think ... and speak ... and publish
whatever you want because I gave the VERY
most I had . my very all.
Veterans of wars have come home,
knowing my pain, my tears and the sickness
of my soul for the waste of human life.
And yet, the giving of my life was not
wasted, and perhaps somehow, in some way,
men will do something I dont know what
- to end my dying.
My death has extended the time given to
you to do that something.
Because after the next war, there may be
no veterans.

observe the student sponsored
program if time permits.
For those who are interested
in paying their respects, the
services will be held from 12:15
to 12:26 today near the century
tower. President OConnell will
be the guest speaker and
Preacher Gordon will offer the
invocation for this, the 50th
anniversary of Veterans Day.
JAMES L. HOLLIS PRES.
UF VETERANS CLUB



Tilting Windmills!

The love generation has corriehome. it nas
learned to hate.
Following a summer of political frustration, four
years of shallow promises that the war would
end, and months of empty appeals to youth for
faith in the American system, the love generation
has stopped loving. It, has turned from gentleness to
severity it has sold out to the worst characteristics
of man.
Certainly there is nothing worse in man than his
animal-like ability to destroy without reason and
fight from fear and frustration. Certainly where the
love generation just a few short months ago
appealed to mans best side man's ability to love
that same generation has now come full circle and
become a symbol of hate.
No doubt what has happened is that the gentle
people, the people who wanted to do their own
thing and be left in Peace, have been thwarted too
many times. And, because of their own philosophy,
they could not return to the system to work for the
rights and improvements which they sought of our
society.
Hence they have turned on themselves and their
ideals. They now have joined the revolutionaries,
the professional haters of the left, the people
whose methods are' worse than those which are so
unfortunately enforced by our slow-changing
society.
Last week this campus witnessed a symbolic hate
rally of the former love generation. On the Plaza of
the Americas a small group of frustrated,
disenchanted and, nevertheless, idealistic members
of the left burned an American Flag because that
flag represented to diem an oppressive and hardened
system of wrong.

Florida Living In Past;
Gurney's Win A Disaster
MR. EDITOR:
November 5, 1968 was the day Richard Nixon became
President-Elect of the United States. The state of Florida gave a
plurality of votes to Mr. Nixon. Two other events of signifigance
occurred on that date. On the right hand (far right), the voters of
Florida elected Ed Gurney to the U.S. Senate. On the left hand, an
apolitical rally, sponsored by the Southern Student Organizing
Committee, took place on the U. of Fla. campus. These two latter
events may well have more meaning to the university population than
the election of Richard Nixon.
Mr. Nixon, an able politician, fought long and hard in the years of
his Presidential campaign. His years as Vice-President and his many
more years in politics qualify him for the highest office in the
country. The election over, the liberal faction will do well to give Mr.
Nixon a fair chance and help him rather than hinder him in his duty.
The election of Ed Gurney could be the worst disaster in Florida
history since Chester Ferguson was named Chairman of the Board of
Regents. The majority of voters showed their true feelings in defeating
a man who has devoted his entire career to the betterment of
Floridians and all mankind. It is now too late to do anything about
this, the best thing being to pray that the other ninety-nine Senators
are not molded along the same lines as Mr. Gurney.
The apolitical rally was a refreshing change from the political scene
and from the usual activities of the SSOC. The election of Gurney,
however, could rapidly polarize the population and put organizations
such as the SSOC in the position of preserving what freedom we now
enjoy. The implications of the Gurney win are horrifying. Beyond a
doubt, the bulk of Floridians are still living in the past. Modem
America may well have by-passed Florida as well as Georgia,
Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Arkansas.
As a concerned liberal, I hope my fellow liberals (radicals) give Mr.
Nixon his chance, while on the other hand, I beg the people of Florida
and of this University to wake up before it is too late. Ed Gurney, as a
reactionary, is far more dangerous to the safety of Mr. Citizen than
those who back him would make us believe the SSOC is.
ALAN JACOBSON, 2UC
_ A-f. HY- M

Birth Control Is A Personal Affair

MR. EDITOR:
As one campus newspaper to
another, we of the Jennings EYE
wish to protest your series on
birth control at U.F. Our
objections are these:
A. You are creating needless
and unqualified controversy by
violating and airing the very
personal and private affair
between doctor and patient.
B. You have sent reporters to

The Gentle PeoDle Turn To Hate

misrepresent themselves to a
practitioner. In the past you
have editorially protested such
actions upon the part of others,
specifically the police, private
detectives and the CIA.
C. You are treating the topic
as though it were an issue for
public discussion, while in
reality it falls within the realm
of the qualified physician, who
is bound by good medical
practice to make decisions as for

An American tlag burned because our country,
like all nations, is not perfect. And with the flames
growing heat on the stars and stripes there came to
this campus, as to more and more of our nation, an
increasing polarization between the forces of
so-called liberalism and so-called conservativism.
Few people, be they patriotic or passive, lack
emotion for their flag. True, some hate that flag for
there are flag burners. But, a larger number of
persons love that flag when aroused and with that
love, comes a hate for those that seek to bum and
destroy it.
In the flames of hate comes greater hate. For
those that nominally can support a movement
which they cannot personally join and many
certainly cannot join the movement though they
see much wisdon in some of its goals are repelled
as something they seek to see improved is
symbolically destroyed in flame.
Perhaps these nominalists are misguided. The
movement doesn't want nominalists. The
movement wants extremists.
Make no mistake, the burning of a flag represents
the burning of a nation. It is an act of defiance to
the very foundation upon which our nation is built.
The burning of a flag is notice that the nation is
regarded as beyond reform. Flag burning means the
nation will bum next.
Where does this leave those of us who view our
nation as less than perfect but better than any
other? Where does this leave the Black man who has
suffered under years of oppression and who,
nevertheless, is more gentle than the so-called love
people? Where does all this leave all of us who don't
wish to see our nation reformed in a bath of blood
and a sauna of flame?

OPEN FORUM:
Adoiuml VliAMt
"There is no hope for the complacent mam /*

MR. EDITOR.
We, the undersigned
concerned scholars, have decided
to help settle the Union Board
Crisis. In our considered opinion
the J. Wayne Reitz Union should
be reconstituted as office space
for the neglected professors who
are wallowing in the filth and
decay of Buildings E and I.

MR. EDITOR:
Your series on the birth
control policy at the UF
Infirmary depressed me no end.
The tone of the article seemed
to say that the practice of
dispensing pills fairly freely was
going to ruin the morals of all
the nice, pure, innocent young

whom (he) prescribes
contraceptive medication.
D. You are not qualified to
comment upon any specific of
medical procedure, such as the
presence or lack of a pelvic
examination. An equally valid
statement upon your part could
easily read Neither girl was
given a lie-detector test.
We protest your treatment of
the topic, your lack of
qualification to treat the topic,

No Union No Crisis

Tm All For It

Monday, November 11,1968. The Florida Alligator,

Wc die lea logane.i and yet alone on an island
of faith in ourselves and our fellow citizens and yet
without a doctrine. For we are the people of love,
we are the gentle generation, who seek a better
America without burning or destruction.
And gentleness is not an easy task when our very
beliefs are put on the pyre.lt is all too easy to turn,
to hate, to wish to meet hate with hate.
That is a mistake.
The Flag burners of our nation are the
disaffected, the disillusioned, the truly sad and
unhappy people of our society. We could meet
them, we could beat them.
That, however, would only add to the unhappy
polarity which is now tearing our nation asunder.
And, too, that would only be playing into the hands
of the extremists.
So let us enforce our laws as we must but
without any unnecessary brutality and without
malice. Those who bum our flag can and will
destroy our nation only if and when we all stand as
haters, hating each other for our differing opinions
and politics, ready to leap on our fellow man like
animals in protection of our time-worn beliefs and
ideals.
These are hard times for men to live in. The
entire politics and essence of our age is shrouded in
philosophy that many of us fail to understand. And
even those of us who think we understand are
bewildered by the contradictions.
Therefore, let us learn a lesson from our foes.
Let us act in our own best interests in our most
human manner. Let us love the former love
generation and, most important of all, let us not
hate them or one-another

Concluding that the Union, as
now established, has become an
enigma in its own time, we
would propose that it be turned
over to the professors who make
a legitimate contribution to this
university in their teaching and
research capacities.
Furthermore, the present
expanse of office space now
known as Student Government,
should be relegated to the prior

women at the UF.
Os course there will always be
those who uphold to the word
Christian morality... I'm all for
it but they shouldn't tell me if I
have sex I should pay by having
an unwanted child.
NANCY LEWIS, 4ED

and the unsuitability of the
topic; i.e., medical practice and
physician-patient relationships at
U.F., as one for journalistic
treatment.
Please stop this eternal trying
to create issues; your journalistic
duty is to report and comment
on those already existent.
JAMES C. FISH
EDITOR

By Harvey Alper

home of the Anthropology
Department, namely Building
08. In this manner* we hope
that the present crisis can be
resolved: by eliminating the
Union, you eliminate the Union
Board Crisis.
MIKE BLAKLEY, 3AS
MYRON HAUBEN, 3AS
MARK HENOWITZ, 3AS
HENRY JACOBSON, 3AS
FRED POLLACK, 3AS
Hume Players
Thank Pres.
MR. EDITOR:
We, the Intramural Football
Campus Champions, wish to
express our appreciation to
President Stephen C. OConnell
for his presence at our
championship game against the
fine athletes of Reid II this
Thursday. By his presence
President O'Connell showed
once again his sincere interest in
the students and in student
affairs. We believe that the
University is indeed fortunate to
have the dedicated man it has
for Chief Executive.
We hope you enjoyed the
game President OConnell. And
thanks again for your interest
and presence.
GADDUM SECTION
HUME HALL

Page 9



Page 10

I, TIN Florid* Alligator, Monday, Novambar 11,1968

GATOR CLA SSI FI E DS*

| FOR SALE |
HONDA 50 4000 miles electric
starter Excellent shape S9O or best
offer. Also extra tough visored
helmet sl2. Call Mickey 378-5744 or
372-9479. (A-st-32-p)
3 bdrm, 2 bath, dng 7 utility rms,
screened porch, air-c. unit, tool shed,
washer, refrig, carpeted, %113 a mo,
SISOO down, 1611 NE 19th Lane,
372-2722, near elem A jr-hi.
(A-10t-32-p)
Factory made traitor fully equipped
14 ft. sleeps three, ideal for hunting
or camping $350, also 50 Cad. runs
. good $95 Needs paint, call 372-0982.
(A-st-33-p)
1967 Solex Excellent condition.
$125 or best offer. 378-3823. 35 mm
' Argus with light meter and flash S6O
or best offer. 378-3823. (A-st-34-p)
HONDA SSO Well cared for,
helmet, tools, new tire, book rack.
Call Richard. 376-4184 after 5.
(A-4t-34-p)
1968 Honda 565. High tailpipe for
street or trail use. Show-room new,
driven only to class. $175. Butler
Apt. 940, opposite Sin C. (A-3t-34-p)
Camera 35MM practica single lens
reflex with F 2.8 interchangeable lens,
case, 2x telextender, skylight, yellow
and rad filters. Complete outfit, $65.
Call 378-7329. (A-lt-36-p)
Treat rugs right, they'll be a delight
if cleaned with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowly
Furniture Co. (A-lt-36-p)
65 Honda 90very good condition,
helmet included. Call David R. after
5 p.m.376-9129. (A-lt-36-p)
2 IBM executive electric typewriters,
" carbon ribbon. Typing attachments,
garnet rose color, modern typeface.
Call 376-0768. (A-3t-35-p)
Honda 350 less than 2000 mi,
perfect cond., W/Bates shield and lug.
rack. Cost $787 new, now $689
call 372-7942 after 6:00. (A-3t-36-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom Village Park apt.
for winter quarter. Call 372-9651.
Lease expires in June. (B-3t-35-p)
Lovable Siamese kittens, 7 weeks old,
potty trained, males and females. Call
evenings 378-7638. (A-st-35-p)

I
i m mm Mi am MHM
jBl
| n
jg mmim§ MU 111 lD | ami |lml S^H
I Jr II I 'I *1 nil |f F II
HI I I-b lv H J j f 1 i i
INK
hml^V
B
BB^^

.
'
_______MM.MM____I

FOR SAIE_ l
HAMS HQ 180 AC good condition.
S3OO. Call 378-8433. (A-2t-35-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies.
Custom Reloading. HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)
Air Force Mess Dress complete &
new condition. $75 call 378-8433.
(A-2t-35-p)
.64 Chev. 327 Central air, 327 RAH.
Full power W.B. A st. New tires A
insp. sticker. $950. Phone 466-3567
after 5:00 pan. (A-st-35-p)
Lambretta Motorscooter, 150 cc,
1964, 2 s eater, 75mpg, good
condition, tools included. $l5O.
378-6669. See at 284-1 Corry
Village. (A-3t-35-p)
Ref rig. -Freezer Norge customatic
delux. Separate doors, runs perfect.
SBO. Sacrifice to buy larger model.
Auto defrost. Great Buy I 376-7397.
P.M. only. (A-3t-35-p)
% FOR RENt" |
CAMELSr ?e >OR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Cameiot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Poo ley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
Furn Downstairs Apt. 2 br. Air Cond.
Call after 5:30 378-7845.
(B-32-TF-c)
Efficiency apartment, suitable for
two. $75 per month. 1829 NW 2
Ave. Call 376-8990. (B-st-35-p)
Must Sub-let: 2 Bedrm Furnished
Apt. at the Summit House. Rent paid
to Dec. Istmove in immediately.
Call 376-9688 between 9:00 A.M. A
6:00 P.M. (B-st-36-p)
Male roomate for house 2nd, 3rd
qrtr. Two sep. bedrooms, kitchen,
bath, livingroom, all furn. Pref. Grad,
or senior. $42 per mo! Call 378-5457
(B-3t-36-p)

WANTED §
Will pay sl4 for two gen. admission
tickets to Georgia game. Call Cheryl,
378-1502, room 1301. (C-3t-35-p)
Male Roommate for large mobile
home. 2 bedrooms, AC, CH, in
Andrews and Connell Mobileer. Call
Rory at 378-9642 after 8 p.m.
(C-3t-35-p)
Two people to ride to Boca Raton
area. Leaving Nov. 27, return Dec. 1.
$lO each round trip. Call 378-9664
evenings. (C-3t-34-p)
Female roommate needed for 2nd
quarter. Apt. near campus. A.C. T.V.
Call 378-503 after 6 p.m. (C-st-36-p)
Two female roomates to share two
bedroom French .Quarter apt.
beginning winter quarter. 3769659.
(C-st-36-p)
Co-ed roomate wanted for rest of
term or year private room A/C. free
washer and dryer $37.50 378-3291
or 376-3582. (C-33-st-p)
2 girls to share 3 br/2 bath house.
Beautifully furnished, carpeted,
central//AC. Available Jan. 2. Ph.
378-6679 after 6 p.m.(C-10t-34-p)
Need a roommate, male, to share two
bedroom apt. with 3 others.
Presently living at 3910 NW 6 St. For
the Winter Quarter phone 378-1909
all day Tuesday or Thursday.
(C-3t-34-p)
Wanted: Female roommate for two
br. University Garden Apt. Begin
Nov. thru Spring Quarter. SSO mon.
Call 378-2729 or 378-8538.
(C-3t-35-p)
HELP WANTED |
Nv.s*x-;&->>>t.vv.-.-a-.-:-;-:-:->:x.x.:.x.x-xx-£3
Ladies earn extra cash. Call for an
appointment. Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, Friday at 376-3185 from
10-12 a.m. and 1-4 p.m. (E-st-36-p)
Female dorm resident wanted to
deliver morning newspaper.
378-9058. (E-3t-36-p)
Someone to teach me to play drums.
Maybe, possibly, like Ringo Starr.
Even?? Call Ricky 378-9826 Peace.
(E-lt-36-p)
HELP WANTED MALE: Men's
clothing salesman, part-time,
Discount privileges, salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-35-st-c)
Help Wanted: Part-time RADIO
ANNOUNCER for top-rated
Gainesville station. WEEKEND work,
experience necessary, Call Mark
Fowler 372-2528 between 9 a.m. and
10 p.m. (E-35-6t-c)
Women Girls: Telephone A survey
work part-time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 A 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
7QSn ENDS
waKliai:! 11 THU.
st. vyl^ja^
They just
VJ9V a half-million doliarsVe
JBw But watch what happens \*
when it's time for The Split! L
JIM DIAHANN U
XiPBROWN CARROLL I*
\ JULIE ERNEST /
*\ HARRIS BORGNINEifr
Winner
/ Academy Awards!
I RICHARD HARMS 1
l\ VANESSA REDGRAVX |
ftUMMOT
*v technicolor y
(ZF&iyJ* o ** WARNER BROS>f*
|B| 4*l7#?*
2 ends
thu.
I m A. ~
^J^jjThog straddling

I HELP WANTED f
Sports Department of the Alligator
needs experienced writers for
features and event coverage. Contact
Marc Dunn at the AHigator
Office.(E-tf-nc-34)
rfTQHLV QUALIFIED SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skiHs
essential. Permanent Job, excellent
'pay. Do not apply unless well
qualified. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)
Listeners wanted WiK pay $1.50
for 1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
Univ. Ext. 2049. (E-25-lOt-C)
| AUTOS |
1966 Triumph Spitfire; Hard, soft
Tonneau tops; radio; 28,000 mi.
SISOO. Call 376-7551 during day;
376-7161 after 6 pan. Good
mechanical condition. (G-st-35-p)
1967 Volkswagen 16,500 miles.
Clean. Includes S2OO worth of extras.
$1550. Need to sell one car. Call
378-5381, ext. 3470 or 372-1583
evenings. (G-st-35-p)
VW Sedan 59 State Inspected. Clean
372-0033 after 5:30 and weekends.
(G-st-35-p)
Jaguar XKE CPE 1966 model. Fully
equipped with air condition, AM/FM
radio, front A rear bumper guards.
Only 26,000 miles S3BOO 378-8532.
(G-st-35-p)
Middle aged sportscar for enthusiast.
1964 Alfa 2600 Sprint. Excellent
condition. $2400. Full race tuned
exhaust system for corvairs, $25. Ed
Hopson, 378-7803. (G-3t-30-p)
1965 AH Sprite in top mechanical
condition. Top A new tonneau. Call
378-6792 after 5 p.m. for details.
(G-st-35-p)
;sss*;*x x-x*;*X'C ;*x*x*x-xxx>X"W-.>r^
PERSONAL |
&NssN ; :*x-x-x*x-;-MiYWYX*x*;x!.ww*>>x*xiK
Crick, thanks for a wonderful H.C.
weekend. I miss you horribly and
love you bunches. See you at T.G. I
love you, Judi. (lt-J-36-p)
YOU can win a 1969 BRIGHT RED
MUSTANG FASTBACK, sports roof,
351 cubic inch V-8 engine, special
racing tires valued at $3,004! HOW?
LISTEN TO WDVH 980 On your
radio dial, for clues to find the
hidden keys, in the WDVH GOOD
GUYS MISSION NOT IMPOSSIBLE
CONTEST. Where are the keys? IT'S
UP TO YOU! (J-36-3t-c)
Bryson, Thank You Again For A
Fabulous Weekend. I Really Had A
Wonderful Time. I Hope I Can See
You Near Farragut When You Come
Home. I Am Real Sorry About Sat.
Nite, I Am Trying To Change. Be
Good. I Hope To See You Soon.
Love, Me. (J-3t-35-p)
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
limited space available on charter
flight from N.Y. to Milan, Italy. June
to Sept. 10 wks. Price form $250.
Call 392-1655 or come by 310
Union.
RECEIVE CREDIT for your
TRAVEL IN EUROPE. Travel with
the American International
Academy. Six weeks at Europes
most famous campuses. For info, call
392-1655 or come by 310 Union.
(J-18t-36-c)
.X.X-SXt.M-W.W.V.v.v.v.v.v.v.w>:*'--'-.*.
| LOST & FOUND |
SX-X-X-X^X-X-J-X-X-V-M-V-SV.NSVX-X-X-X-X-X
LOST: Girls gold wrist watch last
Tues. in music building. Teriffic
sentimental value. Please call
372-0175. Thanks. (L-3t-35-p)
Pewter mug with inscription SAE to
Chi O. Reward offered. No questions
asked. Phone 378-4758. (L-3t-35-p)
Lost: Brown pocketbook from BSU.
Desperately need glasses, IDs, film
and sunglasses. Please return to BSU
or call Iris Logan at 372-9394.
(L-2t-36-p)
UvJna
Couples
(AN aOuLT MOTION PICTURE FROM SWEDEN)
LAST 2 DAYS
ARTE
3,5,7,9

| LOST & FOUND |
fc//%sy.y.v.%SWW*%NVWvMWvX'X K
LOST: Black wallet after Fri. parade.
Ten dollars reward for return. Call
372-0035 or 51 Colonial Manor.
(L-3t-34-p)
Lost Sat. at law skits, game or Phi
Oelt house Fathers hi school Alpha
Omega pin from gold disc on charm
bracelet. Call 392-0415. (L^t-35-p)
Black wallet and brown glasses lost
Tuesday in band building. Return to
Jennings desk. Keep money. No
questions asked. (L-2t-36-p)
! SERVICES r j |
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto electric service
603 SE Second Street. 376-7330.
(M-10-ts-C)
Child care for 2-5 year olds. Home in
NE section. Playroom, fenced yard
with swings. Lunch and snacks
included. $lO weekly. 376-6523.
(M-3t-35-p)
Charcoal portrait sketches- 16x20*\
matted. SIO.OO. For appointment
call Connie 378-0659. Rame Hair Stylist 319 W. University
Ave. Introducing Miss Fleeta.
Limited time $15.00 permanent wave
for SIO.OO $18.50 frosting $12.50.
Free hair cut with price of shampoo
and set. Call 372-5549. (M3t-36-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next eye
glasses at University Opticians 526
SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound Bus
station 378-4480. (M-18-ts-p)
x.
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489.
Typewriters chemacally cleaned. P.
Laten reconditioned-minor repairs
SB.OO. Call 376-9707 after 5:00.
(M-2t-36-c)
HAYLEY |B
Technicolor
196$ wa*i o.vw*
** A
kW D T D.Er |
I ,'fgwnr|
I ALSO I
I W* Inspector J
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|% m PAMVI.lf*
in a
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5:40
9:50,
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STRANGLER I swasram* il
l I MAIU AUOIENCfS 11
Co/j* 0 1 Dl ,> v """ 1 1



W Campus Crier
fc" Sponsored by Student Government. 1
S. HUROK presents
The internationally acclaimed
fJBS
Chorale UM
The Roger Wagner Chorale is widely recognized as Americas
finest singing group, not only across the U. S. but in
Latin America and in Europe, where they have performed
with great success. Leopold Stokowski has called the Chorale *'
second to none in the world, and Eugene Ormandy described it as M
the finest chorus I have ever conducted. Its numerous recordings
for Capitol have been among the industrys best-sellers for many seasons.
Now S. Hurok brings the Chorale and
to audiences across the continent in programs ranging with impeccable
style from great religious music of the past, through the secular |
choral music of the masters, to folk songs, spirituals, v
and other airs familiar to everyone.
FLA GYM. Sat. Nov. 16, B:lspm
U of F Students General Public
SI.OO, $1.50 SI.OO, $1.25, $2.00
... .... Reitz Union Box Office, Belk-Lindsey,
The Record Bar and at door
A Student Government Production. 'BBSHHImBp
THE NATIONAL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY PRESENTS?
Monday, Nov. 18, 8:00 pjn.
UNIVERSITY AVI ir-i a A
AUDITORIUM OTHELLO
Tlolfti Rate Union Box Offtoa.
U of F Students SI.OO, Faculty $ Staff $1.50, General Public $2.00.
~ 0
J. Wayne Reitz Union Board of Student Activities

Nov. 18, Dec. 2:
The Gator Amateur RaJkijClub
dMiTroomSaS E8I Building
at 8 pm Contact 4m Olirsubeun
378038 far information.
Deadline:
AN popart to bo onterod m tho
Acoont Huy contest, must bo
turned in to Rm. 325 Roiti
Union, by November 18,1968.

DATES TO REMEMBER

Annual Christmas Sale:
Doeombor 3,4,5. Second floor of
tho Reitz Union. IliOdwa-^m-
Annual Childrens Christmas
Party:
December 7. Second floor of the
Reitz Union, at 2 pjn. Santa win
be there to give out gifts and taNc
with the children. All children of
the University community are
invited to come.

Subscriptions for the ppM student
bleacher section are stHI available at
$6.00 for the Student Government
Concert Series. The aeries include:
Roger Wanner Chorale
Sat. Nov. 16,1968
8:15 pjn.
Carmen (Goldovdcy Opera Co.)
Fri. Nov. 22,1968
8:15 p.m.

Special $6.00 Student Subscriptions

Hague Philharmonic Symphony
Sun. Jan. 12, 1968
4:00 p.m.
Man of La Mancha
Tim. Fab. 4, 1969
8:15 p.m.
Ruth Pago Intomationai Ballet
Tim Mar. 4, 1969
8:15 p.m.

Monday, November 11, 1968, The Florida Alligetor,

Van Clibum, piantet
Sun. Mar. 16, 1969
8:16 p.m.
Jan Pierce, tan or
Sun. Apr. 13, 1969
4:00 p.m.
For further information contact the
Reitz Union Box office, ext. 3484

Page 11



Page 12

!. Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Novombar 11,1968

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UF HUMILIATION
Nothing more can be said
about Saturday's humiliation at
the hands of Georgia. For the
football team the Year of the
Gator has ended, what remains
now is the salvation of the
Gator. These pictures tell part of
the story, but you had to be
there and suffer the wet cold
rain.
PHOTOS BY
TOM KENNEDY
Good Sgrvicg Starts
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'Camel of
By SUSIE HALBACK
Alligator Reviewer
i .- *
Extravaganzas of the cinema all too often seem to
over-spectacularize themselves. This unique method of theatrical
self-destruction leaves a lamentable remainder which is lacking, to say
the least. Such a production is Warner Brothers Camelot now
playing at Center 11.
In contrast to the bright and cheerful magnificence, and
happily-ever-after mood of the Broadway production, the cinematic
version of Camelot is disappointedly dreary and somber, *nd at
times, quite barren. Music, by Frederick Loewe, seems to be an
after-thought in many spots, despite the familiarity of most of the
tunes.
But ladies, if youve missed your afternoon soap operas, dont
despair. Camelot has enough tear-jerking potential to suffice. Its
mood of romantic depression is begun with the very first frames.
Camelot is an attempt to depict the pageantry and revelry of King
Arthurs Round Table, as envisioned by director Joshua Logan. Logan
tampers with history quite a bit, but then Arthurs story is only a
legend anyway.
Arthurs marriage to Guinevere (Vanessa Redgrave), his formation
of the Knights of the Round Table, the arrival of Sir Lancelot (Franco
Nero), and his subsequent love affair with Guinevere-all these are
portrayed in beautiful color, accentuating the black and gray hues of
Arthurs court.
Acting performances were a little more varied. Vanessa Redgrave
made an intriguing queen, while Lancelot was portrayed as a bumbling
do-gooder, rather that the world's greatest knight. Richard Harris, as
Arthur, though, gave a tremendous performance. Camelot is truly
his show, and I can think of no one more capable than he to fill the
tragic role of the righteous, yet ill-fated king.
Although the appearance of Arthurs legendary kingdom must
ultimately depend upon each individuals own imagination, this
cinematic interpretation of Camelot does succeed admirably in one
respect.
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Friendly management will guarantee your
continued enjoyment of your CAMELOT
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STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS
ksszJ? 392-1682
392-1683
Alligator Staff (12 pm 5 pm)
Advertising Seminole
Classified (8 am 3 pm) Editor (12 pm 5 pm)
Display (8 am 5 pm) Staff (^2 pm 5 pm)
Business Office (8 am 4 pm)
Editor Managing Editor (8 am -10 pm) Su en u ica ions
/o Central Business Office (8 am-4 pm)
News Room (8 am -10 pm) Editorial Advisor (10 am 8 pm)
Production (5 pm -10 pm) Gen eral Manager (g 5 pm)
Florida Quarterly Operations Manager (8 am 5 pm)
Editor (12 pm 5 pm) Production Manager (5 pm lO pm) j
Effective Saturday,November9

Monday, November 11,1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 13



Page 14

\. The Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 11,1968

Dooley.-'We Were Outfoxing Florida

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Aacwtant Sports Editor
, Jacksonville Vince Dooley,
tall, angular Georgia head coach
has had a lot to celebrate about
this year, the Bulldogs are 6-0-2,
and Saturday's win over Florida
may go down as his biggest
victory ever.
Dooley's idea of a celebration
is to tight up a pipe, and
Saturday, he seemed to be
having trouble keeping it tit. A
. crowd of sports writers waited
reverently until the pipe seemed
to be going well. Then, after the
first deep draw, Dooley began
telling why he won.
I guess there's a lot to be
said for hindsight,*' Dooley said,
but right now, Id say we
couldn't have played better.
I don't think 111 regret

TOM KENNEDY
READY OR NOT
...Georgia's Woodward (32) carries the ball behind the blocking of
Farnsworth (46) and Paine (31) on long gaining play.

Coach Rather
Switch, Fight
By DICK DEW
UPI Sports Writer
Worcester, Mass,- A little
under two years ago, Holy Cross
football coach Mel Massucco
asked for a new contract. He
didn't get it and promptly
shifted several miles from his
alma mater to tiny Worcester
Polytechnic Institute.
Today, Massuccos tech team
has 5-1 record and a shot at
matching the institution's
all-time victory record. And the
Holy Cross Crusaders have a
1-4-1 mark.
Under the circumstances,
Massucco could be permitted
time out for a small chuckle. But
he'd rather talk about his
Engineers who, he confesses,
amaze him.
How many college football
squads, for example, will study
math, science and latin
textbooks quietly and
continuously on the four hour
bus trip to and from a road
game? How many of them
operate successfully without
athletic scholarships, spring
practice, or more than eight
hours of practice during most
weeks?
Massucco, a record-making
halfback as a player who turned
down a pro bid to launch a
coaching career, was varsity
coach at Holy Cross for two
years.
Tech won only one game in
Mel's first season, 1967, but that
didn't really surprise anybody
because the Engineers had
managed a total of only five
wins in the preceeding three
seasons.

having made that statement
either.
Ive never seen a better first
half of football oat of my team,
and I'm not going to complain
about the second half either. I've
never seen a greater effort
anytime, anywhere.
Dooley never underestimated
UF, but said that he was ready
for anything they were able to
dish out.
First, let me say that Florida
is still a great team, Dooley
explained. From my point of
view, they just came up against
the wrong team.
They threw quite a few
interesting plays at us, said
Dooley, grinning. It took us the
first offensive series to
remember how the T used to
be combatted, but in the end,
we were ready.

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Ray Graves said last week, I
believe, that he was counting on
a low scoring defensive game.
Well, this game might well have
turned out exactly that way,
except for one break.
Os course, Im talking about
our sedond punt return. Florida's
offense was starting to move,
and that defense of their's had
stopped us cold. The return by
Jake Scott was the turning point
in the game, 59 yards is nothing
but a piece of luck, and from
then on, we had the game in our
pocket.
Dooley praised his own
team's efforts, and explained
that it was his team's excellence,
rather than UFs weakness that
accounted for the lopsided
victory.
Again, I say we were playing
as perfect a game as I've ever
seen. I like to look at it this
way: We were outfoxing Florida
at every turn. They would gear
for a certain play, and we'd
throw them for a loop. If we had
gone as they anticipated, it
might have been a different ball
game, but this is all a part of
strategy. We just had it.
Finally, Dooley registered
surprise when asked how his
team prepared for the rainy
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game in Jacksonville.
You can look this one up in
the records. This is my fifth year
coaching here, Dooley said,
and every boy on this squad
has started college under me.
This is the first time I have ever
coached a game in the rain, and

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none of these boys have ever
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fint Prison
The first prison constructed
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Brown: Home Doesnt Exist

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Feature Writer
(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second of a two part series
on Johnnie Brown.)
Johnnie Brown, the first
black athlete to compete at UF
in intercollegiate sports, has
gone through the usual freshman
traumas and feelings of being
lost.
His impression about UF is
that its too big and, if you mind
your own business you can get
along with everyone.
If it wasnt for the guys in
the athletic department and Yon
Hall, Id be lost. Home is a place
that doesnt exist when Im here.
Florida is a whole other world.
He continues, My first few
weeks here I was down on
Florida. All the freshman
athletes had to wear beanies
down to the dining table.
We couldnt stop wearing the
beanie until we won first place
against Auburn.
Theres a bond of unity
between individual teams as well
as athletes as a whole. The track
team does not have one leader
this year as it has in previous
years.
I think this is good because
it shows we have an all-around
team, Brown said. Everyone
has their bad days, and this way
we dont have to depend on just
one person to keep the team
going.
When he found out that
everyone is interested in
everyone else, he didnt feel as
alone.
The idea of associating with
All-American athletes used to
scare me, but Ive found out that
theyre guys like me. Im not at
all lonely. Whenever I have a
problem I take it to Ron
Coleman (the first Negro to sign
a contract for the UF) or to one
of the five guys who came from
Rams Win
By DAVID MOFFIT
URI Sports Writer
ATLANTA The heavily
favored Los Angeles Rams,
unable to get their offense
unleashed, capitalized on two
fumble recoveries and a pass
interception Sunday to beat the
tougher-than-expected Atlanta
Falcons 17-10.
The Rams and the Falcons
went into the final period in a
10-10 deadlock but Los Angeles
won in the opening seconds of
that final period when
quarterback Roman Gabriel
threw a 10-yard touchdown pass
to end Jack Snow.
The Falcons, who suffered
their eighth loss against a single
victory, battled toe and toe with
the Rams, who picked up their
eighth victory against a single
loss.
The Falcons drew first blood
with 3:34 left to play in the first
period when Bob Etter kicked a
35-yard field goal after
quarterback Bob Berry had run
45 yards after apparently being
trapped while attempting to
pass.
The Rams finallymoved into
the lead after earlier missing two
field goal attempts when, 5:50
into the second period. Jack
Pardee picked off a Berry pass at
the Atlanta 29 yard line and ran
it in for the touchdown.

UF WHOLE OTHER WORLD 7

Pslm Beach High with me and
wlro are also living in Yon.
Brown is a practical joker and
likes to kiddingly brag about
himself.

m ****** HI
R
' m
v
>4 M
RANDY BASSETT
TEAM SUPPORT
...Johnnie Brown (center) held up after a hard run and first place
finish.
ENTER THE
j&ljnp
FOOTBALL CONTEST
PRIZE: $25 n Men's or Ladies' Wear I
EXTRA $lO if winner is a girl
Place an "X in the box of the team you think will -i
win Saturday, Nov. 16. Estimate total yards to be
gained by Florida, which will* be the tie breaker.
Home Team Visiting Team
AUBURN VS. GEORGIA
D IOWA VS. P OHIO ST.
D KENTUCKY VS- FLORIDA
P MIAMKFLA.) VS- ALABAMA
N.C. STATE vs. D FLA. STATE
P S. CALIF. VS. OREGON ST.
TENNESSEE VS. Q MISSISSIPPI
O YALE VS. D PRINCETON
0 DAYTON vs a TOLEDO
P MICH. STATE vs D PURDUE
by FLORIDA l I
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Winner's Signature Must Agree With
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Entries must be deposited in the "U" Shop by Fri.,
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among winners.
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
sbr Hntwrafg
1620 West University Avenue UNIVERSITY Plaz*
SIGNATURE
ADDRESS
CITY STATE
ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSON

The basketball players call
me Rap Brown. It has
something to do with the way I
stick one hand in the air. The
name got started because I told

them I could beat them any
day.**
The guys on the
crosscountry team are always
asking me when Im going to
start practicing regularly. But
when 1 got worker of the week,
the guys kidded me about how 1
got it, I told them that you just
have to keep your cool.*

I GREEKS I
I and I
GRADS
I Pictures for the Seminole will be taken November 4-22 in X
Room 346 of the Student Union. Appointments must be made I
in advance, between the hours of 12 and 5. and must I
S correspond to the weekly schedule below. Beginning October S
I 28, phone the Union, extension 2832 for an appointment. The I
1 attire for the pictures is dark coat and tie for the males, and 8
dark round-neck sweaters for the females. Pictures will be shot ft
8 from 12-5 and 6-9 p.m. 8
I DO NOT CALL BEFORE 12PM I
I NOVEMBER 4-8 1
I Alpha Chi Omega 1
X Alpha Delta Pi I
1 Alpha Epsilon Phi
All prospective graduates, last Alpha Epsilon Pi ft
names beginning Alpha Gamma Rho I
Alpha Omicron Pi
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Omega
Chi Phi
1 Delta Chi B
I NOVEMBER 11-15 1
1 Delta Delta Delta 8
Delta Gamma I:
1 Delta Phi Epsilon All prospective graduates, last 8
8 Delta Sigma Phi names beginning X
Delta Tau Delta _
Delta Upsilon LJ I
Kappa Alpha li I
Kappa Alpha Theta
8 Kappa Delta 8
8 Kappa Sigma 8
I Lambda Chi Alpha 8
I ( 1
I NOVEMBER 18-22 1
8 Phi Delta Theta 8
8 Phi Epsilon Pi 8
8 Phi Gamma Delta
8 Phi Kappa Psi I
1 Phi Kappa Tau 8
1 phi Mu 1
8 Phi Sigma Sigma 8
8 All prospective graduates, last Pi Kappa Alpha 1
8 names beginning P Kappa Phi 8
Pi Lambda Phi m
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
ass Sigma Chi 8
Sigma Kappa
* -4 Sigma Nu m
I Sigma Phi Epsilon 8
8 Tau Epsilon Phi 8
8 Tau Kappa Epsilon 8
Theta Chi 8
8 Zeta Tau Alpha 8

Monday, November 11,1968, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 11,1968

IBS
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This week's Player of the Week award goes to w
Johnnie Brown, freshman cross-country runner and first
Negro ever to participate in intercollegiate athletics at QTnlCwQSir ||OVRf
the University of Florida.
Brown, from West Palm Beach came up with the
,x second fastest time in UF history, Monday, as he paced nKKIw VOa
\ the frosh cross-country team to a 22-33 win over u
\ Florida JC. MAAMA
Brown took first place in the meet Monday with a J*"** M
- \ time of 19:47 over the university course. The school
mar k is 18:47.8, set by Frank Lagotic.
Trtr.THifchells £ something like miniature
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