Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 35

Gainesville Echoes. 'Where Is Jack?

.. .where?
*
The Ghetto:
No Dreams-
No Dawkins
By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Gainesvilles Black
ghetto is a hub of shattered
dreams, eroded hopes and
lost heroes.
NW sth Avenue, the central
street of the ghetto, winds its
way through block after block
of dilapidated houses and worn
store fronts.
Here and there, evidence of
the plight of dreams and hopes
can be seen.
There is a small beer tavern
on one corner the dream of
some ambitious Black man
which is now closed with a large
window sign advising that the
place is now for rent.
Further down, a freshly
painted drive-in diner marks the
hope of another Black man and
the place where the dream of
several others a drive-in bar
failed.
Chaos has no color in the
ghetto. The Rose Theater and
Hendrixs Furniture store are
examples of what the ghetto can
do to white dreams also. Both
now stand unused and
unappealing, but blending in
well with the unappealing
scenery around them.
No one knows for certain the
number of dreams shattered, or
the number of hopes eroded
during the ghettos existence.
But nearly everyone knows
the name of the latest hero lost
Jack Dawkins..
Irvin Lee Jack Dawkins was
not considered a hero by
everyone in the ghetto. Many
adults interviewed Thursday feel
he was sincere but disagreed
with his methods and the group
he associated with.
Yes, I believe he was sincere
in what he was attempting to
do, said one adult. He had a
pretty rough way of doing things
but, he was a young fella. And
young people dont believe in
talking about something but
doing it.
(SEE 'DREAMS' PAGE 15)

The
Florida Alligator

Copyright, 1968, The Florida Alligator
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Editor
Wheres Jack Dawkins? Wheres Jack Dawkins?
The Gainesville Police would like to know. They have
two warrants for his arrest from the states attorneys office.
The charges: first degree arson, a felony which carries a twenty year
prison term, and possession of a firebomb.
The Bth District Circuit Court would also like to know where
Dawkins is. It wants him for skipping out on a contempt of court
conviction, the appeal of which was turned down by the U.S.
Supreme Court recently.
And the Federal Bureau of Investigation may also be interested in
Dawkins whereabouts soon, although it currently has no warrant out
for his arrest.
Even a chanting crowd of about 50 local activists, most of them

BRIAN GOODHEIM
1 1 1 i ok H
h i v
LIES IN THU I ACT TIAT H S|
HE WAS ENSLAVED ffi
in
ifWSfj? 1-|
.TUE FACT THAT
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I iKTk has MiLLDfT*Ja.|
IlH|b Hit As
DEMONSTRATORS (TOP) CAN'T FIND JACK BR,AN GOODHEIM
.. .a sign (bottom) spells out fear for Dawkins' life

Drum Maior Suspended


See Editorial Page 8
By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
Ex-head drum major Lamar Sawyer will not lead
the Gator Band for the second straight time this
year during half-time performances against the
University of Georgia Saturday.
Sawyer, a member of Phi Kappa Tau, was
suspended from his responsibilities prior to last
weeks Homecoming game after loaning fraternity
pledge Charlie McMullen a Gator Band uniform to
wear on a float during Fridays Homecoming
parade.
With participants made up as black minstrels, the
Phi Tau float portrayed the absurdity of protests
against Dixie being played by the Gator Band.

University of Florida, Gainesville


During preparations for the float, Sawyer askc' 1
Band Director Richard Bowles for permission to
check out a uniform for the pledges use.
Bowles granted permission.
According to Phi Tau Vice President Ted
Reinley. Bowles rescinded permission after viewing
the float during the pre-parade line-up. He told
Sawyer the pledges 'borrowed uniform must,
come off.
McMullen removed the uniform and Sawyer left
the float to lead the Gator Band in the parade.
Halfway through the parade McMullen put the
plain blue jacket back on. He did not wear the
overlay identifying it with the Gator Band. Renilcy
said.
When the parade was over Band President Mike
(SEE 'DRUM'.PAGE 61
mu i 1 i l mi ammi I fcifci.H.li. l n 1 i 1

All iLjator
k.

UF students, marched on the city and county jails a few weeks ago to
find out where Dawkins was.
The drumbeat of their voices shouted:
Wheres Jack Dawkins? Wheres Jack Dawkins?
The protestors demanded and received an opportunity to search
the jail premises. They accused police of murdering Dawkins and
secreting his body somewhere in the jail.
They found no trace of him.
And Irvin Lee Jack Dawkins is mildly amused by all the
ruckus.
That was his reaction to the fears of many local black militants

Friday, November 8, 1968

EXCLUSIVE

who think he is dead.
Because he was very much
alive when the Alligator, after
several weeks of tedious
investigation, contacted him and
requested an exclusive interview.
Dawkins, who says he doesn't
really consider himself a fugitive,
took the opportunity to explain
briefly why he left Gainesville,
despite the fact that local
authorities are holding three
warrants for his arrest.
Apparently unperturbed by
the warrants against him, he
implied that he left the
University City because of a
white conspiracy to get him.
He claimed several attempts have
been made on his life.
I thought Id better cool it
for a while, he said
unemotionally.
The 34-year-old black
militant first came to the
publics attention last December
when he and Mrs. Carol Thomas,
wife of Dr. Billy Thomas, a UF
physics professor, publicly
condemned the Gainesville City
Commission for its alleged
inaction to charges that city
jailers had sexually abused
female Negro inmates.
The pair also blasted the
commission for refusing to take
action on claims that several
Negro suspects had been brutally
beaten by Gainesville police.
A grand jury was assembled
to look into the charges.
While the jury was in session
(SEE 'ECHO' PAGE 4)

k ** I
I
IB
LAMAR SAWYEH
it' vvon't lead band
**,. s' 1< t .' 4 i$ i "* <
America's
Number I
College
Daily



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

Page 2

Camous Police Update Their Training

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
i
University police officers are
updating police policies in an in-service
training program which began Monday.
The required Police Standards Council
Basic Recruit Training program is given
nightly at the campus police station.
Department education and training officer,
Lt. Dudley D. Goulden is conducting the
200-hour course.
During the orientation class, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell expressed
the deepest appreciation of the university
for what you did in making last weekend
(Homecoming) the pleasant success it was,

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RANDY BASSETT
KICKING A BULLDOG
Bulldogs (dummies that they are) have been set up around campus for
the express purpose of being kicked. A large Bulldog will be on the
Plaza of the Americas today for kicking. Coach Ray Graves will take
his kick at a noon-time ceremony.
Hm
Loans Up To S6OO
Budget Boydoy Ant*
Signature
Prompt Courteous
Confidential
Marion Finance Co.
376-5333
222 W. Univarsity Ava.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when lt Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Rattx
Union Building, Untw -slty of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is entered
as second class, matter at the United States Popt Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
iiw rionaa Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertise
tise advertise meats and to revise or turn sway copy which lt considers objectionable.
The Florida Auigator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is given to the Adver Advertls
tls Advertls log Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

except for The football game Saturday
afternoon.
No group of individuals in public life
has had more demanded of them today
than the police officers, OConnell,
former state Supreme Court Chief Justice
said.
At no time has the role of the police
been more difficult or more important,
particularly on this campus.
OConnell offered his fullest support to
the department saying, You will never
find me attacking you and I hope I wont
find you attacking me. If you do, you will
have to wait in line.

| Armistice Services
! Scheduled Monday
I The Veterans Club will sponsor an eleven minute Armistice Day
( service Monday to allow students to attend memorial ceremonies
I without missing classes.
Ceremonies for the 50th anniversary of the end of World War I will
be held in the plaza outside the Century Tower from 12:15 p.m. to
1 12:26 p.m.
The Rev. U.S. Preacher Gordon, of the First Presbyterian
| Church of Gainesville, will present the invocation and UF Pres.
Stephen C. OConnell will give a four minute address. ROTC units will
I present the colors.
| The American Legion has invited all UF students to hear former
I Governor Fuller Warren speak at memorial services on campus.
The traditional time for starting all Memorial Day Services is 11
I a.m. that is the time the armistice was signed. However, in
deference to Gov. Warrens address, we have moved the Veterans
Club services to 12:25 p.m. to allow students to attend both, said
| Jim Hollis, Veterans Club president.
Campus Memorial Day services had been presented in the past by
\ the ROTC administration.
Major Russell Ramsey was arranging the services for this year,
j Hollis said. We told him we thought it would be more appropriate for
| us as students to present the services. Since students are the ones
requesting more and more freedom, we should be the ones to pay
| homage to the men and women in the armed services who are
| protecting with their lives the freedom we already have.
[r- - 1
Welcome Class Os 1969
Creative Hair Styling Complete Beauty Care
V W 9 Sa,es and Service
1 1 2)iedre 5
£> HAIR STYLING STUDIO
1516 NW 13th ST.
INTRODUCING
GLORIALAS VEGAS
PHYLISS- PENSACOLA
SALLY- -GEORGIA
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7
" /

Campus Police Chief A. I. Shuler angled
out lack of training as the fact which he
believes has hurt the police image most.
1 think the people are demanding law
enforcement to be better qualified in order
to do a better job. This training is our
answer to it, Shuler said.
This recruit training program is part of
our three-point approach to in-service
training by the university police officers,
he said.
Goulden outlined the projected training
program for the year beginning with the
recruit training course, required of all law
enforcement personnel hired in the state

after July 1, 1967. The other points in the
program are in-service training on
university problems, and procedures for
working shifts.
The recruit course includes a study of
administration of criminal law, as well as
investigation, patrol and juvenile
procedures. Defensive tactics and firearms
training are part of the course.
The next phase of the training will
center around the problems police officers
encounter on the campus and how they
may be best handled,Goulden siaa.
Another part of the training will focus
on specific duties of the police officer
while working on a shift.

dreaming
about
your future?
then stop!
Here's a once in a lifetime
opportunity for adventure and
challenge.
A civilian career with the
Army Recreation or Library
Program in Europe or the Far
East.
If you are single, a U S. citi citizen
zen citizen and have a degree in
Recreation P*
Sociai Science jow
Arts and Crafts
Music j|
Dramatics or
Library Science
ON CAMPUS
INTERVIEW
NOVEMBER 19
SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION, IRCB
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
WASHINGTON,D.C. 20315



Lost Face Found In Union Closet

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
William Jennings Bryan is still on campus.
No kidding! The great golden-tongued
orator of the populist era has turned up at
the Reitz Union.
You shall not crucify mankind upon a
cross of gold, Bryan said at the 1896
National Democratic Convention in
Chicago.
Bryan had been missing since the old
Florida Union began renovation and the
Reitz Union opened.
Bryan was found hiding in the Reitz
Union basement and is now in union
director Bill Rions office closet.
But, wait a minute. Bryan died in 1925
in Dayton, Tennessee after heading the
prosecution at the Scopes Monkey trial.
Well, now you know. Bryan isnt
actually at UF, obviously. He isnt even
buried here.
But, UF has the closest thing to Bryan
when he died.
His death mask.
It hung over the door of the Bryan
lounge on the first floor in the old union

Giving UpLuxurious Da Nang For War

EDITORS NOTE: This is
the fourth of a series by
Alligator Special Writer, Rick
Benson, recently returned
from Vietnam. In this article
Benson describes the journey
from Da Nang to Quang Tri,
only 15 miles from the
Demilitarized Zone.)
By RICK BENSON
Alligator Special Writer
QUANG TRI, Vietnam
Our two day motor convoy
through the mountains and
along the coast of northern
South Vietnam, from Da
Nang to Quang Tri, proved
more exciting than, a road
picture with Bob Hope.
The news of moving from
the relative security of the
Marine camp at Da Nang, was
received with a mixed feeling
of fear and anger. Fear,
because Quang Tri is located
15 miles from the DMZ, and
40 miles east of the
beleaguered Marine post at
Khe Sanh. The anger may be
classified as somewhat selfish,
since moving would mean
giving up daily showers, fresh
milk, a PX, and in the war is
hell department, an enlisted

t? 4. fc^
RICK BENSON
WATER BUFFALO TENDERS VIUNCH CRACKERS
... bulges under clothing are stolen C-ratons

How did UF get it? Well, thats a part of
UFs history.
Part of the story unfolds in an article by
UF political science professor Samuel
Proctor in the July, 1960 issue of the
Florida Historical Quarterly.
Bryan first spoke on campus in 1916
after he had resigned as Woodrow Wilsons
secretary of state the year before.
He had come to Florida during the
Spanish American War as a colonel with
the 3rd Nebraska Volunteers. Bryans
home state was Nebraska.
In 1921 Bryan moved to Florida
permanently and became interested in UF.
He and UF president Albert A.
Murphree became close friends, and both
men had the idea of erecting a student
religious activities building.
Bryan went on a speaking tour of the
state to raise money and get pledges for the
building in 1923.
After the first ten weeks only $27,000
had been collected although more than
$135,000 of the necessary $250,000 had
been pledged.
But, the Florida land boom bubble

All ifjator

BACKGROUND REPORT

mens club that sometimes
featured acts like an all
Korean girl band on Saturday
nights.
On the evening before our
trip, most people were in the
tents enjoying part of their
newly acquired beer supply
for the journey. It was about
two in the morning when I
was awakened by nearby
explosions that didnt sound
like our outgoing artillery.
The alarm siren went off
in the distance, and machine
guns started firing on the
perimeter. Half-dressed we
stumbled in the darkness to
the bunkers. The whistling
sound could now be heard
before the explosions;
Rockets! Everyone huddled
close to the sand bag walls
and waited. At breakfast we
found out that the closest
rounds had hit two blocks

away near the PX wounding
three men.
While we were still
discussing our first rocket
attack in the country, they
started coming in again. We
found out later that a
daylight attack was
uncommon in that area, but
it didnt slow anyone down in
getting to the bunkers.
The diesel engine of our
five ton truck groaned as we
winded arounded the narrow
single lane mountain road,
overlooking the placid blue
water of Da Nang Harbor. We
passed disheveled Army
reconnaissance teams resting
by the roadside, as well as an
occasional waterfall flowing
down the lush green
mountainside.
Coming out of the
mountains, we came upon a
small fishing village on the
coast that looked as though it
had been transplanted from
the South Seas. Everything
from the waves rolling onto
the white beach, the palm
trees surrounding the elevated
straw huts, to the fish nets
drying in the breeze near the
small lagoon,, spoke of
tranquility and complete
innocence of the war.
The concrete kilometer
marker noted the distance to
Hanoi: 101 Kms, as we drove
inland past the fertile rice
paddies and grazing water
buffalo.
Our convoy raised a smaii
cloud of orange dust as it
stopped in the midst of a
crowded village. As usual,
kids were waving and asking
for candy, when a combat
weary Marine walked up and
asked if we were headed
towards Hue.

H W v;
W ; "5 Lr f
WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN
.. .death mask
burst and most of the hard money
collected went down the drain. The pledges
were never kept.
Bryan, however, contributed SI,OOO of

As we got underway, the
scarred Leatherneck related
that he was looking for a
truck he had left along the
road a week before as his unit
cleared the land we were
passing through of VC.
The serenity of our trip
was short lived as a muffled
sound and a low black cloud
of smoke erupted near the
roadside four trucks ahead of
us. The Marine immediately
recognized it as incoming
mortars. A small Vietnamese
bus coming in the opposite
direction stopped, and its
passengers were running for
protection to the railroads
tracks built above and parallel
to the road. Rather than
become a sitting target, the
convoy speeded up and drove
straight through. The attack
was soon silenced as jets and
helicopters in the area zeroed
in on the source.
Every blown out bridge
resting in river bottoms
testified to the heavy
destruction during the' Tet
Holidays. Navy Sea-Bees were
repairing or constructing new
bridges as we drove over the
temporary pontoon spans.
One thing that was
surprising, was the large
number of French
fortifications and bunkers
throughout the country. Built
alongside entrances to major
rail and road bridges, the
round concrete bunkers are
now used by U.S. and South
Vietnamese guards. Roofless
railway stations and narrow
gauge cars, once a major link
of transportation, now sit idle
as the cars rust on the tracks
along Highway 11
Also of peculiar interest
were the swastikas on
gravestones. As I learned
later, the twisted Greek cross
is used as a mystic symbol in
Asian countries and among
various American Indian
tribes.
As we drove down the
tree-shrouded boulevard filled
with rubble in Hue, it was

Friday, Novambar 8, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

his own money, and this was used to
furnish the Florida Union when it was
finally built in the 1930*5.
Bryan Lounge in the old union was
named in his honor, and a private lounge in
the Reitz Union also bears his name.
In 1949 Bryans daughter, Ruth Bryan
Owen Rhode presented then UF President
J. Hillis Miller with the death mask and a
portrait of Thomas Jefferson which hung
in Bryans office when he was secretary of
state.
Rion said Miller asked him to do
something with the momentos.
The death mask was hung over the
lounges west door, Rion said. The
portrait hung on the wall above the rich
wood paneling.
The portrait now hangs in the new
Bryan Lounge, Rion said.
But, the death mask is still in Rions
closet.
It has not found a spot in the new
union.
William Jennings Bryan please come
home.

apparent that the former
royal capital once sat
majestically on the Perfume
River before the Tet Holiday
offensive. A green Marine
helicopter looked
incongruous in front of a
cathedral, while Marine
infantrymen and Army tanks
still wandered about the city.
Hardly a building or home
escaped destruction as the
shell marked and fire
scorched walls mutely
attested to. Driving past the
outskirts of Hue, groups of
people were coming back into
the city walking, others in
mini-buses, with the more
affluent in black
foreign-made limousines of
1950 vintage.
Under a blazing noon day
sun, our 100 truck convoy
pulled alongside a huge rice
field for lunch. As we began
taking our c-rations out of
the boxes, young boys who
were tending water buffalo in
the field came over to see us.
They wore life guard type
helmets, and had enough
mastery of the English
language to tell their ages,
and that they would like to
have a Coke and some
cigaretts.
With a little more
Americanization, well get
them used to billboards, TV,
and smog. Regrettably, our
presence is already seen by
the number of Coke and
Pepsi cans that litter the
highway.
The city of Quang Tri off
limits to military personnel
except on official business,
read the sign as we turned off
Highway 1 towards our new
home a mile south of the
city. :
Single files of Army of the
Republic of Vietnam
f (ARVN) troops shouldered
weapons as they walked on
the roadside near our new
base camp shared with
helicopters and artillery of
the Ist Air Cavalry Division,
on a scenic mud-caked hill 15
miles from the DMZ.

Page 3



Page 4

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

Echo: 'Where Is Jack?

at the county courthouse, a
crudely-printed newspaper
entitled Black Voices accused
the jury of being racist and
Klan-infested. Negro members
of the jury were branded as
Uncle Toms by the paper,
which was reportedly written by
Dawkins and Mrs. Thomas.
Circuit Judge James C.
Adkins Jr., elected this week to
the Florida Supreme Court,
convicted the pair of contempt
of court, citing the newspaper as
inflammatory and an
obstruction of justice.
He sentenced Mrs. Thomas to
four months and Dawkins to six
months in jail. Adkins denied
them bond while their case was
under appeal.
After appeal of the bond
denial was granted by the U.S.
District Court of Appeals in New
Orleans, Dawkins returned to
what he says hes been doing all
his life: fighting racism.
But while he and Mrs.
Thomas, who is white, were in
the county jail, the home of
Judge Adkins was firebombed,
causing about S3OO damage.
After Dawkins release, there
was a series of other
firebombings in Gainesville, 16
in all between Jan. 1 and March
15. Police claimed at the time
that they were fairly certain
who is behind all this but that
they had no conclusive proof.
But an editorial in the
Gainesville Sun rebuking police
for their failure to stop the
firebombings prompted quick
results.
On March 18 Dawkins and
five other Negroes were arrested
and charged with arson for the
firebombing of Genes Grocery
244 West Depot Ave., on the
night of March 13.
Dawkins was released on
SIO,OOO bond and then slipped
into relative obscurity.
He reappeared in Mid-summer
when black militants
demonstrated at the ABC Liquor
Lounge because blacks were
refused service. Similar protests
took place at a local laundromat.
Dawkins was arrested for
trespassing and was almost
immediately released. Further
action is still pending.
It was during the ABC
protests, Dawkins says, that an
attempt was made to kill him.
He did not go into details.
He then left Gainesville.
Sitting in a dingy,
dimly-lighted room in a
rundown three room house,
Dawkins talked about himself
and about the racial situation in
Gainesville.
Ive been on the move most
of my life, just moving from
Alligator Meets
There will be a mandatory
meeting of the Alligator
editorial staff today at 4 p.m.
MS

All i(L£citor

place to place fighting racism.
Im a black man and I believe in
freedom for all. I will fight or
die for it, he explained,
speaking slowly, carefully.
He noted that he came to
Gainesville from Belle Glade,
where he led a drive to unionize
migrant workers.
Dawkins has long been
involved in the problems of
migrant workers. He was once
one himself.
He was born in New York
City and orphaned at an early
age. He lived in an orphanage
until his early teens, when he ran
away and joined a migrant
workers train.
Looking back, he says it was
his years as a migrant worker
that turned him to militancy.
I died every day when I saw
what was being done to my
people. Blacks do the hardest
work for the least pay. They
cant even live where they want
to.
Im going to fight to live in
this country as a free man. Im
going to try to get every other
black man who believes in
freedom to do the same, he
said passionately.
Then, As long as there are
people in America who use
racism and oppression to gain
their ends, I will fight
them ... or die trying.
I have nothing to lose.
He lapsed into silence. His
forehead creased with wrinkles.
His eyes penetrated the
interviewier, blazing with the
fervence of his self-chosen cause.
About Gainesville:
Both the city and the
county have promised so many
things. They said they would do
their best. And you know what
theyve done?
Not one Goddamn thing,
he blurted.
Black people in Gainesville
should put an end to their
beliefs in whitey and his

GRAND-OPENING-PARTY I
TONIGHT*
HEAR, IN PERSON, THE FABULOUS
*
"Purple Underground
ADMISSION SI.OO
BIKINI CONTEST CASH PRIZE
TRADERS SOUTH
Gatorland

EXCLUSIVE

stinking lies, he continued.
If the hunkies really want to
help, he urged, then let them
speak out against racism in their
community. Let them condemn
the loan sharks and white
merchants who feed on the
blacks who are locked in the
dilapidated ghetto.
He said black Americans must
unite to fight for our rights as
human beings. Blacks must
take the power that whites
wont give them, he added.
He repeated his vow to help
lead the fight, to join the
revolution.
Dont worry, he promised.
Ill be back. You can bet on it.
Ill be back.

ITT If
ml \ U'i > i
n-SANMMPORTrn
506 E. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
Gainesville Sports Car Club meets every second Wednesday, 8:00 PM. at
CRANE IMPORTS

New State Constitution
Next f Awareness Topic
The new constitution passed Tuesday by The Florida voters
will be the subject of the next Operation Awareness program,
Howard Rosenblatt, director said Thursday.
The program will take place Wednesday at 3 p.m. in the Plaza
of the Americas. In case of bad weather it will be moved to
University Auditorium.
mm mm mm mrn 1 *" V*
#sTflK SHfIKC \
Student Special
(With The Coupon) 1
I Our Regular 88t Steakburger |
Luncheon And Any 15$. Drink |
I $1.03 Value Only 85< plus tax
I Steak n Shake |
* 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville I




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Ulifff JM 1 HmM|
jhhk|s /Ail i HI
Jolly Qvintot N,CK ARROYO
A jolly quintet poses at the SDS rally Tuesday night. Victory
smiles?
* Add A Pinch ,CKARROYO
SDS rallyers seem to be discussing a recipe. "Add just a pinch of
salt," maybe?

W
Y c/gfon&l I
I
GAINESVILLE MALL I
2546 N. W. 13th Street I
'^P
Bp I
| I
y, v > LS Id E
/WOfl/V/A/GS QG/Z7 I
ROBES, PLAIN OR
M/VC/. SIZES 2 to 14.
$3.99 to $6.99 H

Friday, November 8, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

Gator Band To Salute Jacksonville

-' j. m : . .. *i ~
I %' y * /'.. ft v ** 'ft **'**#
AT GATOR BOWL
... UF Band will salute the state.

Centrex Debut Set Tomorrow

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
The UFs CENTREX
Telephone system makes its
debut tomorrow. The system
will provide service for some
7,000 telephones, eliminate
dorm, campus and health center
switchboards.
Operational dialing
instructions are:
* Listen for dial tone before
dialing
* TO CALL ANOTHER
EXTENSION DIAL THE LAST
5 DIGITS OF THE NUMBER
* For CENTREX OPERATOR,
Dial o
* TO CALL OFF CAMPUS

Band Drum Major
Relieved Os Duties

HOM PAGE Ollf T
Chesser demanded the pledge
turn over the jacket. McMullen
did.
Later Sawyer, received a
message to see the band director
and was suspended the morning
of the Homecoming game.
He was told his leadership
image was questionable,
Remley said.
Sawyer sat out his first game
of the season.
When contacted by the
Alligator, Sawyer declined to
make any comment.
Remley said that after the
incident Sawyer then made an
appointment to see Bowles. He
was told he could dress out with
the band, but that he was
relieved of his powers as head
drum major.
Band President Chesser said
Sawyer never really was in
command of the Gator Band to
begin with.
But the 1968-69 Gator Band
pamphlet says of Sawyer: As
Whistle Major, Lamar is directly
responsible for field leadership
of the Gator Band.
It lists Charles Warren,
personnel major, .. .as assistant
?to the directors and to the

LOCAL NUMBERS, dial 9
and wait for second dial tone
and dial numbers for Gainesville,
Alachua, tjrooker, Hawthorne,
High Springs, Melrose,
Micanopy, Newberry, Waldo.
* DIRECT DISTANCE
DIALING, (station to station
calls), Dial 9, wait for second
dial tone and then dial 1 plus
the area code if different than
904 and the telephone number.
Calls will be automatically billed
to the calling number.
LONG DISTANCE CALLS
(person to person, collect, credit
cards), Dial 9 and wait for
second dial, tone, then dial
Operator. Give her the Area
Code, telephone number and

Whistle Major in the direction of
the band on the marching field.
The head drum major is
responsible for leading half-time
performances. His assistant has
charge of pre-game activities.
Sawyer because of his removal,
now merely marches with the
band,
Chesser, who described the
band as a closely-knit family,
refused to talk about the
incident, labeling it an internal
affair.
He declined to say whether
he had taken the jacket from the
pledge following the parade.
I feel no injustice has been
done, Chesser said. If there
had been, I would talk about it.
The band president didnt
stand alone on his refusal to
comment.
Im not going to discuss the
incident at all, said Band
Director Bowles.
He did say it was his
professional responsibility to
hire, fire or temporarily suspend
drum majors.
The Gator Band pamphlet
backs his authority to select
drum majors. Drum majors are
selected from upperclassmen
after rigorous tryout by the
directors.
It says nothing of dismissal

AT UF-GEORGIA GAME

any special instructions. Wait for
Operator to ask for your
number. Give her YOUR seven
digit extension number.
TRANSFER DIRECT-IN
DIALED CALLS: to transfer
calls from outside campus,
depress the switchook ONCE
firmly and release. When the
Centrex Operator answers,
inform her of the transfer and
hang up.
Extension-to-extension or
outgoing calls cannot be
transferred.
LOCAL INFORMATION,
Dial 9, wait for second dial
tone and dial 411.
REPAIR SERVICE, Dial 9,
wait for second dial tone and
then dial 372-9066.
INWARD CALLS, Dial seven
digits of the number.
LONG DISTANCE
INFORMATION (no charge for
this service), Dial 9, listen for
second dial tone and then dial
1 plus Area Code (if different
from 904) plus 555-1212. Tell
answering information operator
the city you are calling and give
Information Operation the
listing of the telephone number

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
The Students Friend
10%
DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
'EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET

A Salute to Jacksonville
will be the theme of the Gator
Band halftime program during
Saturdays UF-Georgia football
game in the Gator bowl.
Opening the program, the
band will recognize
Jacksonvilles beaches with the
melody, By the Sea. Banking
and insurance institutions will be
honored with the song, Pennies
From Heaven.
Tribute to Jacksonvilles
consolidation will come in the
song, This Could Be the Start
of Something Big, and forming
3 jet airliner, the band takes note
of the citys new international

SitivebmanZ-
Ladies Dept.
Mezzanine Floor
Sate/
Transitional And Early
Fall Models
11
Suits |
Dresses I Up
Slacks I To
Skirts y\/
Blouses I / v
Al! Weather I
Coats J ff
Assorted Groups ... All
From Our Regular Stock
Free Parking At Rear Os Store
Silvermans .. 225 W. Univ. Ave.

airport playing Night Right to
Madrid. In the conclusion, the
band will transform the airliner
formation into the state of
Florida.
In additiofv to performance
during the halftime, the band
Ivill entertain at the pre-game
Fla.-Ga. Alumni Barbeque in the
Coliseum.
The Gator band and the
Georgia band will combine in
pre-game ceremonies playing
Golden Friendships March
under the direction of Roger
Dancz, director of the Bulldog
band.



FilmAbout Drugs
To Be Shown

UFs Office of Student
Affairs will present two films on
drugs Tuesday through Thursday
in the Jennings, Hume, and
Murphree areas respectively.
Dr. Ann Lynch of the UF
Mental Health Department said
the two films, A Trip To
Where and LSD, will be
followed by question and answer
sessions marrated by UF
doctors.
WEEKEN
DOINGS
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
SPECIAL EVENTS
FISH FRY: L.D.S. Institute,
1220 SW 5 Ave., tonight, 6:30.
Open to all students and faculty.
Price: one dollar.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST: Alpha Delta Pi
Sorority House, Sunday, 9:13
p.m. Speaker, door prize,
entertainment.
SANTA FE JUNIOR
COLLEGE VEST POCKET
PLAYERS THREE ACT
COMEDY: Marriazebheel,
Santa Fe JC Auditorium,
tonight, 8.
APPLIED SCIENCE
SEMINAR: McCarty
Auditorium, today, 3:30 p.m.
REITZ UNION DANCE:
Union Ballroom, Saturday night,
9. Band: The Certain
Amount.
v
....
CLUBS
LAMBDA IOTA TAU: Apt.
408 Olympia Apts., Sunday
night, 7:30.
RUGBY CLUB:
Organizational meeting, Union
room 349, today, 12:15 p.m.
MENSA: Luncheon, Union
cafeteria, today, noon.
AMERICAN CIVIL
LIBERTIES UNION: Union
room 349, tonight, 7.
CHESS CLUB: Union room
118, tonight, 6:30.
FLORIDA FOLK
DANCING: Room 214 of the
Florida Gym, tonight, 8.
INDIA CLUB: Union room
349, Saturday night, 7:30.
KAPPA EPSILON: Union
room 357, Sunday, 3:30 p.m.
UNION HOSTESS
COMMITTEE: Union room 363,
Sunday, 4 p.m.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE:
Union room 150 C, Sunday, 1
p.m.
FLORIDA CINEMA
SOCIETY: Union room 347,
Sunday, night, 7 p.m.
SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY: UF vs.
University of South Florida,
away, today, 5 p.m.
FOOTBALL: UF vs. Georgia,
Jacksonville, Saturday, 2 p.m.
FOOTBALL FILMS: Union
room 150 C and D. today, noon.
Films of Auburn game.
Take warning, Rothlein: I
shall not countinence any more
of your unprovoked attacks
upon my person.
Remember: Lifewithout
honor-is honorless.

CLUBS

The films were loaned to the
university by the Department of
the Navy. They are
documentaries compiled by
Navy researchers on such drugs
as LSD, grass and speed.
Dr. Lynch said the program
was not an attack on drugs or a
result of a known rise in drug
use on the UF campus, but
rather a presentation to inform
studnets of the effects of drugs.
We are more interested in
helping students than reporting
them said Dr. Lunch. We
think we have a responsibility to
help students.
Dr. Lynch said that students
were welcomed to talk to any
Mental Health Department staff
member in regard to drugs. She
stressed the fact that
information given a doctor is of
the same nature of conversation*
between a lawyer and his oUent.
UFs Mental Health
department has the facilities and
staff to deal with students who
are having problems incuered
from drug use.

nt 1
For tto Liberal Arte Major,
PQT can open a whole new world
of opportunity...
r m

Each year, NSA oflgpf ehallenging
career opportunities If Liberal Arts
majors through peMMMtion in the
Professional QuatMjjmm Test.
This year, NSA tdKMfe**ed the PQT
for Saturday. Qgd M f, 1968.
Completion of We Liberal
Arts major is a MMMI to
consideration for MBfVployment.
The Career SoMMIUSA:
The National SeeMdtarAgbilcy is the
U.S. Government ag wktff responsible for
developing invulnsraMe communications
systems to transmitjpd receive vital
information. As an lain professional,
you will be trained to work on programs
of national importance in such
areas as:
Cryptographydeveloping & logical
proving of new cryptologic concepts
Research the gathering, analysis,
and reporting of substantive data
Languageused as a basic tool of
research into a number of
analytical fieldfe
Programming Dutfados data

, % 1
a, t it ~ >
Xrjf/Vv : V. -'***,' *\s %
... where imagination is the essential qualification
N '' ''

HOW MUCH DOES A GOOD
MEAL COST?
TODAYS WONDERHOUSE SPECIALS ARE
BRISKET OF BEEF WITH A POTATO PANCAKE
SALAD
HOT ROLLS AND BUTTER
SMALL K. C. STEAK rr\
BAKED POTATO S|.so
SALAD T
HOT ROLLS AND BUTTBt
THOSE ARE GOOD MEALS
WONDER HOUSE
RESTAURANT
14 S.W. Ist St.

systems program writing, and
development of mechanical and
administrative procedures
Documentation technical writing
in Its broadest sense, including
rasMMfc, writing, editing,
illustrating, layout and reproduction
Your specific academic majdr is of
secondary importance. Os far greater
importance are your ingenuity,
intellectual curiosity and perseverance
plus a desire to apply them in
assignments where "imagination is
the essential qualification."
SALARIES start at $6981.00 and are
supplemented by the benefits of
career federal employment.
ADVANCEMENT AND CAREER
DEVELOPMENTNSA promotes from
within, and awards salary increases as
you assume greater responsibility.
NSA also is anxious to stimulate your
professional and intellectual growth in
many ways, including intensive formal
as well as on-the-job training.
Advanced study at any of seven area

Friday, November 8. 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

universities can be partially or wholly
reimbursed through NSA Fellowships
and other assistance programs.
The deadline for PQT applications is
November 22, 1968.
Pick up a PQT Bulletin
at your Placement Office. It contains
full details and the necessary test
registration form. College Relations
Branch, National Security Agency,
Ft. George G. Meade, Maryland 20755.
Att: M 321. An equal opportunity
employer, M&F.
national
security
agency

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

EDITORIAL

Lamar Sawyer was a victim of
circumstance.
Sawyer was relieved of his duties as head
drum major of the Gator Band because Band
Director Richard Bowles said he lacks
leadership capabilities.
Sawyer, a member of Phi Kappa Tau
fraternity, asked permission to check out a
band uniform to be used by a pledge on the
fraternitys Homecoming float.
Bowles approved the request, stipulating
that the uniform be used in good taste.
The fraternity member who wore the
uniform was blackfaced.
When Bowles learned of the members
makeup a few minutes before the parade, he
ordered Sawyer to retrieve the uniform.
Sawyer went to the float and asked the
member to remove it.
Sawyer remained while the member
removed the overlay and coat. He then
returned to the band and led it in the
parade.
That may have been the last time he will
ever lead the Gator Band.
The fraternity member rode half of the
parade without the coat, but midway
through put it on.
When Bowles found out the uniform had
been put back on, he told Sawyer he was

The Rational Observe

Nerve is telling Leoy Collins,
well, at least he got to be
governor.
**
Nerve is giving perries to the
.janitor.
***
Nerve is a gas.
***
Nerve is reminding Harold
Aldrich that the opposite of
permanent press is the Florida
Alligator.
***
Nerve is telling a prisoner that
crime doesnt pay.
***
Nerve is blowing your nose
before you kiss her.

I f Ur~ 1
f J U Jkj **-
'*' X- 1
"fa*
Okay, Who Swiped My War?

Is This Fair ?

It Takes A Lot Os Nerve

Nerve is going into Humphrey
Headquarters and saying, Gosh,
wouldnt it have been great if
you won?
**
Nerve is looking your girl over
and then breaking into a
discussion about evaporated
milk.
***
Nerve is telling your girl that
you want to live with your
mother if you get married.
***
Nerve is telling the iceman tnai
he is blowing his cool.
*
Nerve is telling your girl that
you love her, but then again,
you love everybody!

relieved of his duties and would not march
in the Homecoming show.
Sawyer made an appointment with
Bowles for Monday morning to discuss the
matter. Wednesday he marched with the
band in practice.
Saturday he will march with the band.
But he wont be leading it. He has been
stripped of all duties.
Personnel Manager Charles Warren will
lead the band and give all the commands.
Sawyer will only be there for show.
Too bad. He made an honest error in
judgment. He even tried to correct his error,
and thought he had succeeded. He had not,
however.
Bowles then overreacted.
Bowles was offended by the questionable
actions of a fraternity pledge. And he vented
his anger on Sawyer, whom he considered
responsible.
Bowles decision was, in our opinion,
hasty and unfair.
If the band director prides himself in
being a man of fairness, he will recognize
that the incident although unfortunate
was not completely Sawyers fault.
And he will then return a hard-working
student leader to his rightful position.

Nerve is taking a hemophiliac to
a Marlon Brando movie.
***
Nerve is taking a flask to church.
***
Nerve is humming The Shadow
of Your Smile while youre
kissing her.
'***
Nerve is making obscene phone
calls in Kings restaurant.
***
Nerve is telling a nudist that hes
a real no-wear man. (Ya-a-a-h!!)
**
Nerve is asking your girl if her
grandmother enjoyed wearing
those clothes as much as she
does?

The Florida Alligator 'll
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Pumim Managing Editor
AttlAmMM H3U Han reZ James Cook
"S' ___Executjv^drt2j^ fcMaaiiiiMiit||^MM^^w^Edjtor____

( Alligator Inquizitor

Yes. This is it. The day. The
I contest. THE INQUIZITORIUM
JOF THE MONTH!! I list fifteen
£ questions of great difficult-ness
£ (this months category is
£ TELEVISION, the winner will
ft be qualified to enter the
ji INQUIZITORIUM OF THE
5 YEAR in June). He who
£ submits the most correct
£ answers wins. Im expecting very
: few perfect replies. In fact, Im
; expecting hardly any replies.
£ Maybe somewhere in the future
? Ill run a poor mans
£ Inquizitorium.
'.VMV.V.VAV.^V.VWV.V.V/AW/A*^

By Lewis Rothlein

Nerve is going up to a girl
walking a female dog and saying,
Hello, bitch!
***
Nerve is telling a Broward girl
that your name is P.J. Gladnik
(only for people with
memories).
***
Nerve is putting a carton of eggs
in a Goodwill box.
***
Nerve is laughing after youve
kissed her.
***
Nerve is accepting the fact
calmly that if Nixon was
assassinated, Spiro Agnew would
be our next president.
**
Nerve is telling an actress shes
got bad Brecht.
**
Nerve is telling your girl her
platitudes are showing.
***
Nerve is making ape calls around
Yon Hall.
***

Nerve is going into Wallace
headquarters and saying, boy,
isnt it great the election didnt
go into the House?
***
Nerve is telling your girl that
you identify strongly with the
Boston Strangler.
***
Nerve is telling your girl her
mustache is getting as big as
yours.
***
Nerve is walking up to a girl and
saying: I like your National
Liberation Front!
***
Nerve is kicking a Georgia
Bulldog. 5

By LEWIS ROTHLEIN

The prizes? Well, (heh-heh):* I
PRESTIGE!! A chance to£|
become the first member of theS I
Inquizalumnus. Also thrown in? I
, is all the Alligator could muster: $ I
a Buck Owens 1968 fan b00k,5 I
three spirit shakers, two salt:* I
shakers, a free subscription tos
the Alligator if youre a student.:*
THE QUESTIONS: jj
1. Who was Jackie Gleasons £
Ist wife on THE HONEY- 1 :
MOONERS? ji
2. Who played Rochester:*
on the Jack Benny Show? £
3. Who was Groucho Marxs:*
§j sidekick on THIS IS YOUR:*
£LIFE? (He now does Lipton :
§ commercials). :
£ 4. What is Charlie Weavers :
jjjreal name? :
5. Who was the TW3 girl? :
| 6. Who was the key man of :
the TODAY show before Hugh*:
Downs? And before him? :
7. What was the name of the*:
starring Robert Goulet? :
8. Who played Mama on the :
| Mama show? :$
9. What was the name of the
STV series starring the Marquis *i
Chimps?
10. Who plays Elly May on
the Beverly Hillbillies? jj:
11. What was the name of;j
jthe series starring Peter Falk as a i;
lawyer?
12. Who played Sergeant jj;
first sidekick onj|
£ Dragnet? What was his name in
£ the show? ft
£ 13. Who are U.N.C.L.E.s|
£ enemies?
£ 14. Who played the Lone>:
£ Ranger? Tonto? >:
§ 15. Who emceed SAY*
gWHEN,
i| SWEEP, and TIC TAC DOUGH? Jj
: 16. (Bonus. This could bej
£the deciding one.) WhoJ
: discovered the wheel? ft
ft $
: Answers must be in the:%
>: Alligator office by Tuesday. §
ft :
Here are yesterdays answers:
:*:1. Jack Bailey 2. Civil War,:;:
:!French Revolution, War between :%
jj France and Germany 1870:;:
§3. Periods, Rounds, Chukkersx
Nigeria, Lamumbas. Mickey:;:
i^Dolenz
| Dont fall behind this |
S weekend v
&OOOOOOOOOOWOM&&fWWVyVV* v v V V
TEe
Florida
Alligator
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial. Business, Advertising offices
in Room 330, Reitz Union, Phone
Ext. 2832.



Speaking Out

Living On French Fries And Cigarettes

Remember the good old days of the high school
Greasers? The Greasers were a rather distinct group
and often went by other names such as Hoods or
Hooples. The Greasers were easy to identify; in
fact you didnt even have to look at a Greaser since
he could be identified merely by hearing the
metallic sound of taps on the floor.
It was the Greaser wardrobe that set them apart
from all other groups. Greaser shoes were black
Italian that were an inch wide at its greatest width.
Their socks were always white. They wore skin-tight
continental pants that could be taken off only with
the use of shaving cream and a razor. Their shirts
were always untucked, unbuttoned at the top, and
the collar was always tumed-up on the back. The
sleeves served | functional purpose; they were
rolled-up in order to make it easy to hide cigarettes
and cheat-sheets.
Greasers had training programs for apprentice

OPEN FORUM:
jAdvia tud ViAAmt
There is no hope for the complacent man."

Tilting Windmills

Tell Them V/ere Tired

America and her people lost
Tuesdays election.
Richard Milhouse Nixon,
unless he can suddenly rise to
greatness, has won a victory in a
vacuum.
In a year that saw America
torn asunder by issues of race
and war, questions of social
goals, economic philosophy and
student unrest one man has
emerged the victor in an election
which never discussed or decided
the issues.
Worse than that, one man has
emerged the victor out of a field
of primary contenders who may
all have been more highly
esteemed by the public than
himself or his final opponents.
But because of the nature of
American power politics,
because of the public-be
damned and onward to
victory attitude of Americas
major political parties, the man
without any cause is our next
president.
Certainly, it is too early to
judge what type of president
Nixon will make. The pressures
of circumstance could make this
average man great.
But one thing is sure.
Between Tuesday night and
early Wednesday morning the
fragile counterbalances of
American democracy were
revealed for all their weakness.
With frantic newscasters busy
predicting the breakdown of the
American electoral process all
too many Americans had secret
thoughts about what they would
do if the government really did
break down in a presidential
deadlock.
Because of an election
Americans made contingency
plans for anarchy and
revolution.
It is an unfortunate fact of
life that our society rarely acts
until pushed to the wall.
We call for social welfare
legislation when our cities are in
flames. We question the wisdom

of cii

of our well armed society when
a president and a senator are
shot. We create federal agencies
to deal with the problems of our
cities when those same cities are
dying under the burden of
pollution, crowding, slums,
transportation bottlenecks and
local governmental collapse.
We think from fear. We act
from desperation.
Will we now wait to reform
the national system of elections
until our very government
buckles under the force of a
constitutional crisis of the first
order? Will we reform our
Constitution after it has literally
been tom to shreds in the wake
of governmental collapse
because we could not elect a
president?
Unless we take positive action
this could all come to pass.
Certainly we must at the very
least amend our Constitution to
allow for the direct election of
our president by the people
not by some unknown electors.
Just as important to the
future of this nation is the
establishment of a uniform
system of national presidential
primaries. We need not have our
presidents selected in giant
cattle-barns. We need not let the
political bosses always determine
the direction of our nation.
Americans are smart enough
to know where they wish to go
and what they seek.
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
tetters in the interest of
space.

Greasers known as Punks. These Punks were
usually aged from 11 to 13 years old and learned
the tricks of the Greaser trade by hanging around
the Greasers. It was in these training programs that
they learned the proper method of styling their hair
with three quarts of grease.
They learned how to put a sneer on their face
and make their eyes look like they hadnt had three
nights of sleep in a month. They learned how to
mumble incoherently and learned such Greaser
vocabulary words as fuzz, rumble, and
wheels. Just before becoming a full-fledged
Greaser, a Punk must undergo Greaser survival
training where he must subsist on nothing but
french fries and cigarettes for six months.
In the classrooms, Greasers were barely
noticeable. This is because they sat in the back of
the room and slouched so low that only the tops of
their head would stick up from the desks. Typical

By Harvey Alper

Lest Americans relax,
however, the same people who
sat in two huge bars and decided
how we shall live during the next
four years are the same people
who now control our nation.
If we wish to reform our
electoral process were going to
have to put the heat on. Were
going to have to let the
politicians know were tired of a
system created in the 18th
Century to keep the people in
line. We can think for ourselves.
A privileged and powerful
few need not think for us.

REMEMBER HIM?

You are the number three
quarterback for the Florida
Gators. You are a senior and you
had really hoped to see some
action this year.
In high school you were
named the best quarterback in
the schools history and at
Northeastern Oklahoma Junior
College you earned All-America
recognition after throwing over
forty (40) touchdown passes in
two years.
Always wanting to be a

A Word Os Thanks
To all students, staff, faculty, and to all the many campus
organizations -for your efforts that made Homecoming 1968 the
biggest and the best ever, and a special word of thanks to Florida Blue
Key, President John Ritch and General Homecoming Chairman
Manny James for their leadership. Lastly, the great demonstration of
support for our football team, both at the Growl and at the Auburn
Game, is a tribute to the spirit of the students of this University. It
made everyone who witnessed it proud of you. Let's do it again
Saturday.
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
PRESIDENT

Introducing Harold Peacock

Greaser courses in high school were automechanics
or metal shop. In Basic English and Arithmetic
classes they were taught to read and write and to
count up to ten. Occasionally, an intellectual
Greaser would learn the multiplication tables but
this was quite rare.
Greasers usually never participated in any
extracurricular activities in school except maybe the
Future Farmers of America. Outside of school, they
formed such social groups as The Cash Gang* or
The Little Capones. These groups engaged in
community projects such as collecting hubcaps to
raise cigarette money for underprivileged Greasers.
At about the time that I left high school, the
Greasers began bleaching their hair and turning into
Surfers. Thus it came to be that the Age of the
Greaser came to an end. Once in a while I still get
pangs of nostalgia for the old days when I pass by
GHS and see an occasional Greaser or two.

Buying Grapes
Wont Help Now

MR. EDITOR:
Being a Californian for the
past 18 years, I was very
disappointed to read your article
on The National Boycott of
California Table Grapes.
Although your study seemed
quite complete in this subject, it
missed the main problem! This
problem is between the farmers
with the grape pickers against
Chavez.
Chavez came in and started
discontentment with the grape
pickers. He set up his own little
dictatorship and forced the
pickers either by bribes or
general threats to join his union,
called the United Farm Workers
Organizing Committee. When
this was formed, he started a
strike which effected the farmers
and the grape pickers. While he

Gator, you gladly accepted a
football grant-in-aid from UF in
1967.
You got your first chance to
play last year against Tulane. In
just a few plays you chalked up
34 yards on offense (without
fumbling once!). However you
were again relegated to the
Gators' bench where you
remained until the 1968
Vanderbilt game when you were
allowed to run the team for
three plays.

Friday, November 8, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

By P.J. Gladnick

You werent used in the
Homecoming game against
Auburn after Eckdahl was hurt
and Rentz was ineffective
because, as Coach Graves said
afterwards: Peacock is ... a
dropback passer. The other two
are rollout quarterbacks, and we
cant put in a separate offense
for the number three man.
Since you need a separate
offense, its a good thing that
Rentz didnt get injured too.
There wouldn't have been an
offense for you, and the
Gators would probably have had
to forfeit the game!
Well, we wish there was
something we could do but
were only students. But we do
have faith in you, Harold
Peacock, and along with many
other UF students and alumni
we realize that the Gators
number three quarterback
couldnt do much worse than
the other two quarterbacks;
indeed we think he could do
much better.
OMAR J. ADAMS lUC
ANTHONY J.EPIFANO lUC

never felt the strike the farmers
were losing their crops and the
pickers were losing the money
they would have been paid for
their work.
The majority of these pickers
were groups of Mexicans or
Mexican-Americans who follow
the rippening fruit crops up and
down the state. It is true that
these highly unskilled workers
do not receive holidays or
vacations with pay as you said,
but this filth they live in is made
by themselves! This isn't very
nice to say, but it does put more
light on one of your main
points.
This whole world is being
stained by politics and buying or
not buying grapes wont help
anyone!
NAME WITHHELD

Page 9



Page 10

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

Correct Forms
Requested
The Home Insurance
Company which handles Student
Governments student insurance
requires that their own forms
not the patients hospital forms
- be used whenever a student
files a claim.
Some students in the past
have not been using the correct
claim forms.
Hospital claim forms do not
give the company sufficient
information to determine
benefits, a company spokesman
said.

AT EMORY

Debate Team Wins Berth

The UF varsity debate team
won a berth last weekend for the
final rounds at Emory
Univerisitys Peachtree
Invitational Debate Tournament,
considered by participants as the
most difficult tournament in the
South.
The difficulty of the
Peachtree Invitational
Tournament is indicated in the
fact that for three of the past
five years, the team winning
Emorys tournament also won
the National Debate
Championship.
This was the finest
performance of any UF team
since Ive been Debate
Director, said coach John
Wittig, regarding the teams high
placing.
Debaters Steve Rosin and
Gregg Mathews, holding a 6-2
won-loss record, qualified for
the elimination rounds by
defeating Ohio State University,
Wayne State University, the
University of Miami, East Illinois
University, Ohio University, and
Princeton University. They were
defeated by the University of
Georgia and Kansas State
University.
However, after defeating
ACLU To Moot
Tonight At Union
The Florida chapter of the
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU) will hold a meeting
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Reitz
Union room 349.
Discussion will be centered
i'
around the pressing problem of
funds. Because of teh expansion
of UFs ACLU program, the
burden of added expense, paying
court costs, filing fees, printing,
and travel expenses, has depleted
/the chapters treasury.
* To meet the needs of the
program, ACLU is sponsoring a
Fund Raising Party to be held at
1005 S.W. 13th St. tomorrow at
9 p.m.
* I

DROPOUTS

( its a CpAOJtksHj I. I BETTER j /^WVRLING?/1
r Iflk

Rutgers University in the
Octafinals, they lost a 2-1
decision to Northwestern
University in the Quarterfinals.
Harvard University defeated
Dartmouth University in the
tournaments championship
round.
Floridas Gregg Mathews
placed high in the individual
speakers bracket, seventh out of

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250.
The topic for intercollegiate
debate this year is: Resolved:
That Executive Control of
United States Foreign Policy
Should Be Significantly
Curtailed.
The debate team will
compete at the University of
South Carolina debate
tournament next weekend.

BY HOWARD POST

When you eome on in a
Van Heusen shirt...
the rest come offlike
a bunch of stiffs.
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GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER



Orange a nd

BLUB BULLETIN

Administrative Notices

GENERAL EDUCATION
SEMINAR: The Association
for Ganarai and Libaral Studios,
moating on campus this woak, will
hear Dr. William Arrowsmith,
professor of classics and university
professor in' arts and letters,
Univerisity of Texas, discuss on
"Towards a Now University," Friday
at 8 p.m. On Saturday Dr. Byron S.
Hollinshead, dean emeritus of

Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
*>
NOV. 8: AMERICAN OIL CO.
AMCO CHEMICAL ME, CE, ChE.
FORD MOTOR CO.- ME, Eng.
Mach, MBA with tech, undergraduate
degree in ME, EE, IE, ChE, MetE or
Chemistry. TENNESSEE EASTMAN
CO.* IE, ME, ChE, EE, Math, Stat.
Acctg, Chem. GENERAL FOODS
CORP. Chem, Food Tech, ChE,
EE, IE, ME, Acctg, Bus. Ad, Lib.
Arts. COCA-COLA CO. Marketing,
Acctg. BECHTEL CORP. Engr,
Constr, CE, ChE, EE, ME. DOW
BADISCHE CO. EE. IE, ChE, ME,
Chem, Acctg. MITRE CORP. Math,
EE, Physics, Oper. Research &
Computer Sci. BUNKER RAMO
CORP. EE, ME. UNION CARBIDE
CORP. NUCLEAR DIVISION
Chem, Phys, Math, Stat, ChE, EE,
ME. MetE, NuE, Engr. Mech. TRW
SYSTEMS GROUP. AE. EE. EE.
Math, Computer Sci. AGENCY FOR
INTERNATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT Econ, Bus. Ad.
Educ, Acctg, Fin, CE, EE.
NOV. 11: AMERICAN CANCER
SOCIETY Lib. Arts, Educ, Soc.
DEPT. OF NAVY-AIR SYSTEMS
COMMAND CE, IE, ME, EE, Sanit.
E, AE, ChE, MetE, Chem, Phy, Math.

I Low Interest Rates Still Available I
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance
I Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement I
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
I GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION I
I sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours : 800 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Fridoy |

Placement Interviews

H Excited?
It could be one of a thousand things. College is that kind of
life . Excitement, challenge and varied interests.
Why does she. like thousands of others, read the pages of
stories, its photos. Its advertising?
Because The Florida Alligator is an important part of her
t ___ t

University'College, will moderate a
discussion of "Where Education is
Pertinent" at9a.m. Bothskssiohsare
in the second, (loor ballroom Os Reitz
Union.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS
TEST: The Law School Admissions
Test scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 9,
will be held in Walker Auditorium
instead of Little 101.
o
--.o -- r

Ad. Mkt. GEIGY CHEMICAL CORP.
- Chem. ChE, ME. U.S. DEPT. OF
COMMERCE Acctg. ATLANTIC
RICHFIELD CO. Acctg., juniors or
grad, studants for summar
employment. FEDERAL RESERVE
BANK OF ATLANTA Bus. Ad, IE.
WASHINGTON NATIONAL
INSURANCE CO. Bus. Ad.
WATSON & CO. Arch, Egr.
Planners. CHICAGO BRIDGE &
IRON CO. normally interviews CE,
ME. COMMONWEALTH OF
PENNSYLVANIA- DEPT. OF
HIGHWAYS normally interviews
CE.

Friday, November 8,1968,
k
' Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Mensa Luncheon, Union Cafeteria,
12:00 noon.
Football Film, 150 C&D Union,
12:00 noon.
Union Movia, "Darling", Union Aud.,
5:00, 7:00 8t 9:15 p.m.
Chess Club & Tournament, 118
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movies, Ist
show. "PT 109", 7:00 p.m., 2nd
show, "The Time Travelers", 9:30
p.m., 3rd show, 'The Horrors of
Dracula", 12:00 midnight. South
Hall Rec. Room.
Fencing Club, Basement Rec. Room,
Fla Gym, 8:00 p.m.
Santa Fa Junior Coll age Vest Pocket
Players, 3-act comedy, "Marriage
Wheal", SFJC Aud.. 8:00 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing, 214 Fla. Gym.
8:00 p.m. .
Rugby Club Film and Inaugural
Meeting, 349 Union, 12:15 p.m.
Saturday, November 9,1968
Football, Univ. of Fla. vs. Georgia at
Jacksonville.
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "Farhrenheit 451",
Unio
Tolbert Area Council Movies, Ist
show, "PT 109", 7:00 p.m., 2nd
show, 'The Time Trevelers". 9:30
p.m., 3rd show, 'The Horrors of
Dracula", 12:00 midnight. South
Hall Rec. Room.
India Club Meeting, 349 Union, 7:30
p.m.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Santa Fa Junior College Vast Pocket
Players. 3-act comedy, "Marriage
Wheel", SFJC Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Union Dance, 'The Certain Amount,"
Union Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
Sunday, November 10
Program Office, Duplicate Bridge,
Union 150 C, 1:00 p.n^
Florida Cinema Society Meeting, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society Movie,
"Nights of Caberia". Union Aud.,
7:00,8i 9:15 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ Meeting,
Alpha Delta Pi House, 9:13 p.m.
Monday, November 11
Seminole, Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Freshman Football, Florida vs.
Georgia, Athens, 3:00 p.m.
Tau Chapter of Alpha Phi Omega,
361 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 245 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Florida Cicerones, Home of Mrs.
O'Connell, 7:30 p.m.
Pre-Vet Club Meeting, 347 Union,
7:30 p.m.. Speaker: Dr. David
Meeks.
Self Defense Lessons, 349 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Florida Players, "SGT.
MUSGRAVE's DANCE",
Constans Theater, 8:00 p.m.

Friday, November 8, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

A.I.E.S.E.C. Meeting. Lobby, Tower
A, 7:30 p.m.
Religion 385 Production, Albee's
THE AMERICAN DREAM*',
AFA 103 B, 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, November 12
Florida C ice rones Cabinet Meeting,
123 Union, 4:30 p.m.
La Cerda Francais (French Club),
Informal Coffee Hour, 150 B
Union, 2:00 p.m.
Christian Scientists film showing, 361
Union, 6:45 p.m.
Program Office, Bridge Lessons, 150
C Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi, 361 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Program Office, Beginning Oil, C-4
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Super Club, Buffet supper. University
Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Dept, of Languages Movies, 'The
Would-be Gentlemen", In French,
Union Aud.. 8:00 p.m.
Florida Players, "SGT MUSG RAVES
DANCE", Constans Theater, 8:00
p.m.
Education Dames Meeting, Home of
Mrs. Joseph White. 1711 N.W. 10
th Ave., 8:00 p.m.
Program Office. Charm Classes, 363
Union, 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the SGP:
"ROGER WAGNER CHORALE ',
1.D., $1.50, SI.OO & $.50 F, S &
GP, $2.00, $1.25, & SI.OO, the
Florida Cinema Society, $1.50 per
person, the Fine Arts Production,
"OTHELLO". $2.00, $1.50 and
SI.OO, and the Florida Players
Production, "SGT. MUSGRAVE f S
DANCE", $1.50, $.75 and $.25.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE I
:.x-v.vxvx-x-:-x-.v.v*%sv.v:x-x-x-x*:-x.v.v
HONDA 50 4000 miles electric
starter Excellent shape S9O or best
offer. Also extra tough visored
helmet sl2. Call Mickey 378-5744 or
372-9479. (A-st-32-p)
3 bdrm, 2 bath, dng 7 utility rms,
screened porch, air-c. unit, tool shed,
washer, refrig, carpeted, %113 a mo,
SISOO down, 1611 NE 19th Lane,
3 72-2 722, near elem & jr-hi.
(A-10t-32-p)
1966 Harley-Davidson 250 cc, hot
cam, new parts, helmet, excellent
condition $325. Call Bob Mason at
376-9450, Delta Chi hbuse.
(A-3t-33-p)
A
Factory made trailor fully equipped
14 ft. sleeps three, ideal for hunting
or camping $350, also 50 Cad. runs
good $95 Needs paint, call 372-0982.
(A-st-33-p)
1967 Solex Excellent condition.
$125 or best offer. 378-3823. 35 mm
Argus with light meter and flash S6O
or best offer. 378-3823. (A-st-34-p)
Zenith Circle of Sound System with
record collection. Had 3 months.
$l7O. Call after 6. 378-9171.
(A-2t-34-p)
1967 Yamaha 60cc 180 dollars.
Extra work done on it. See Mike
room 16 TEP house or call 372-9353.
(A-2t-34-p)
HONDA SSO Well cared for,
helmet, tools, new tire, book rack.
Call Richard. 376-4184 after 5.
(A-4t-34-p)
1968 Honda 565. High tailpipe for
street or trail use. Show-room new,
driven only to class. $175. Butler
Apt. 940, opposite Sin C. (A-3t-34-p)
2 IBM executive electric typewriters,
carbon ribbon. Typing attachments,
garnet rose color, modern typeface.
Call 376-0768. (A-3t-35-p)
SOUP'S on, the rug that is, so clean
the spot with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-35-lt-c)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies.
Custom Reloading. HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)
Air Force Mess Dress complete &
new condition. $75 call 378-8433.
(A-2t-35-p)
HAMS HQ 180 AC good condition.
S3OO. Call 378-8433. (A-2t-35-p)
.64 Chev. 327 Central air, 327 R&H.
Full power W.B. & st. New tires &
insp. sticker. $950. Phone 466-3567
after 5:00 p.m. (A-st-35-p)
4
Rummage Sale: 100 books (social
sciences; lit. in English and Span.)
pup tent, assorted camping equip. All
Saturday, 9 Nov., 203 NW 15 Terr.
(A-lt-35-p)
Lambretta Motorscooter, 150 cc,
1964, 2 seater, 75mpg, good
condition, tools included. $l5O.
3 78-6669. See at 284-1 Corry
Village. (A-3t-35-p)
Ref rig. -Freezer Norge customatic
delux. Separate doors, runs perfect.
SBO. Sacrifice to buy larger model.
Auto defrost. Great Buy! 376-7397.
P.M. only. (A-3t-35-p)
CAMERA, KONICA auto S 2 35mm
F/1.8, with IGL, Cds electric eye,
coupled rangefinder, hood; fully or
semi-automatic or manual. SSB.
376-0036. (A-lt-35-p)
SUN. MON.
TUES. ONLY
lovjna
Caupks
(AN ADULT MOTION PICTUM FROM SWIDtN)
STHTC
3-5 -7 9

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

GUNS

f FOR SALE |
^x-x-xc-x-x-X'X-w.M.y.v.vivxYX-X'X-x-v-v
Camera, pacemaker 4x5 Speed
Graphic. Film holders, pack adapters,
hangers & trays. 2 flash & 1 slave.
Solenoid release. $2 50. 378-0159 or
378-7124. (A-st-31- >)
Lovable Siamese kittens, 7 weeks old,
potty trained, m es and females. Call
evenings 378-76 8. (A-st-35-p)
j:-:-;-:.>%%w.v.vx-;-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-:.v.
FOR RENT
XXA%V.XX X*>;*X*X*X # XX*>XX XX*X*X%X**
Furn Downstairs Apt. 2 br. Air Cond.
Call after 5:30 378-7845.
(B-32-TF-C)
CAMELOT APARTMENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
To sublet 1 bdrm. furn. apt., carpet,
$125 mo. Will pay half of Nov. rent.
Call 376-6720. 700 S.W. 16 Ave.
Apt. 203. (B-33-3t-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom Village Park apt.
for winter quarter. Call 372-9651.
Lease expires in June. (B-3t-35-p)
Efficiency apartment, suitable for
two. $75 per month. 1829 NW 2
Ave. Call 376-8990. (B-st-35-p)
V.;*x*X*X XX*V***X*# # X # X l e*X*X*X*! t XV # # X*?l*'V
WANTED
>:
iXvX-X-V.V.v.viX-X-X-X-X-X.IiiNVXvX-XXX
2 girls to share 3 br/2 bath house.
Beautifully furnished, carpeted,
central//AC. Available Jan. 2. Ph.
378-6679 after 6 p.m.(C-10t-34-p)
Need a roommate, male, to share two
bedroom apt. with 3 others.
Presently living at 3910 NW 6 St. For
the Winter Quarter phone 378-1909
all day Tuesday or Thursday.
(C-3t-34-p)
Co-ed roomate wanted for rest of
term or year private room A/C, free
washer and dryer $37.50 378-3291
or 376-3582. (C-33-st-p)
Need 1 male roommate. Share l or.
Summit House Apt. Call Managers
Office anytime before 6 p.m. at
376-9668. (C-st-31-p)
Two people to ride to Boca Raton
area. Leaving Nov. 27, return Dec. 1.
$lO each round trip. Call 378-9664
evenings. (C-3t-34-p)
: 1,11 **
I ,m I
I I
I isve I
ofiy I
ALSO 913 GAYLE HUMUCUTI RAYMOND BUM I

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C ***** 9mon 9 r/>9 goddesses i M W || 1
| LAURENCE HARVEY I fA \ I { | JVt |
EXCELLENT GREAT V II V\ | J // \ S
m He turns in § glittering /ob end is \ I I I / M ft JJ.
C I better then I hive ever seen him One *1 § M I ~
m of bis best performances- s the test 1 m M I
jp publictv men on the make l\ W m 1
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| FRIDAY, NOV. 8 5:00, 7:00, 9:15 PM SATURDAY NOV. 9 5:00, 7:00, 9:15 PM |

.8
9
cc

>;vXXw^^^
I WANTED I
jC>;.;.;.;.:.:.:.v.v.v.vx*x-x-x-x-x*x-v.
Will pay sl4 for two gen. admission
tickets to Georgia game. Call Cheryl,
378-1502, room 1301. (C-3t-35 : p)
Male Roommate for large mobile
home. 2 bedrooms, AC, CH, in
Andrews and Connell Mobileer. Call
Rory at 378-9642 after 8 p.m.
Wanted: Female roommate for two
br. University Garden Apt. Begin
Nov. thru Spring Quarter. SSO mon.
Call 378-2729 or 378-8538.
(C-3t-35-p)
w
Desire roomate for winter and spring
quarters. Close to campus (1 blk).
Prefer studious person with humor.
See Bob or Stu 1125 S.W. 7th Ave.
After 4. (C-3t-33-p)
.v.;.v.-.-.-;w.-;-;v:-x-x-:*:-x-x-:-:-:-:-xiv-s-xx:x: : ;
HELP WANTED J
Sports Department of the Alligator
needs experienced writers for
features and event coverage. Contact
Marc Dunn at the Alligator
Office.(E-tf-nc-34)
SHOWING AT 7:00
j WAIT
I Jfe DISNEY
i^KiwrLmiiLu
Y Ir 7 ;) ||l
Technicolor
'a minute AT 9 !
to
a second\s*) j
to die!" j

PHI
FELLINI
FEDERICO FELLINI'S FELLINI
SB
ECHINI
presented by Florida Cinema Society 1 fcfcfcll^a
Sunday Union Aud. 7:15 & g p m FELLINI

JGames Jamie plays]
Min GO WtoTHE
IWLBERRtf
jggtga BUSH
I HfCOMMiNriO FOR TS ONLY ] COLOR DeLuxe PLUS
3 7 5 9 SHITI SKATER PATERS
MANAGER
training
Q
We offer:
A career opportunity with one
of the larger restaurant
companies
Including:
Salary while training. Salary
plus bonus after training.
Excellent fringe benefits.
Requirements:
High school graduate, own
transportation and willing
to relocate.
r Contact Mr. Haynes for
personal appointment.
378-2481 376-2696
Gainesville. Florida



CLASSIFIEDS
:r.:.;.%wiv:*>Mc:<*sw:w!*!wS!33^ ,^dSCSSSsH?!SSSlSSSsswiW!K?r>>.v,, J*:*:

ovrmwAW W.*i*A
HELP WANTED |
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent job, excellent
pay. Do not apply unless well
qualified. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)
Listeners wanted WiU pay $1.50
for 1 hour session, must be native
Engiish speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
Univ. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-c)
LUM'S restaurant waitress,
must be over 21 yrs. of age. Apply
1621 SW 13th Street. (E-2t-34-p)
HELP WANTED MALE: Mens
clothing salesman. part-time,
Discount privileges, salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-35-st-c)
Help Wanted: Part-time RADIO
ANNOUNCER for top-rated
Gainesville station. WEEKEND work,
experience necessary, Call Mark
Fowler 372-2528 between 9 a.m. and
10 p.m. (E-35-6t-c)
Women Girls: Telephone & survey
work part-time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue,
upstairs offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
| AUTOS
Jaguar XKE CPE 1966 model. Fully
equipped with air condition, AM/FM
radio, front & rear bumper guards.
Only 26,000 miles S3BOO 378-8532.
(G-st-35-p)
Middle aged sportscar for enthusiast.
1964 Alfa 2600 Sprint. Excellent
condition. $2400. Full race tuned
exhaust system for corvairs, $25. Ed
Hopson, 378-7803. (G-3t-30-p)
1965 AH Sprite in top mechanical
condition. Top & new tonneau. Call
378-6792 after 5 p.m. for details.
(G-st-35-p)
1966 Triumph Spitfire; Hard, soft
Tonneau tops; radio; 28,000 mi.
SISOO. Call 376-7551 during day;
376-7161 after 6 p.m. Good
mechanical condition. (G-st-35-p)
1967 Volkswagen 16,500 miles.
Clean. Includes S2OO worth of extras.
$1550. Need to sell one car. Call
378-5381. ext. 3470 or 372-1583
evenings. (G-st-35-p)
VW Sedan 59 State Inspected. Clean
372-0033 after 5:30 and weekends.
(G-st-35-p)
1960 Pontiac Ventura 4-door
hardtop automatic transmission. In
excellent condition, reliable,
inexpensive transportation. $325 Call
376-9034. (G-st-31-p)
PERSONAL
Bryson, Thank Vou Again For A
Fabulous Weekend. I Really Had A
Wonderful Time. I Hope I Can See
You Near Farragut When You Come
Home. I Am Real Sorry About Sat.
Nite, I Am Trying To Change. Be
Good. I Hope To See You Soon.
Love, Me. (J-3t-35-p)
ATTENTION DAVID CHAFIN:
Dont you know better than to tinker
with the Inquizator? Keep your door
locked today. Signed, Lug, -His
Bodyguard. (J-lt-35-p)
Mr. Z with- the Moloy head. The
green winged Hell's Angel and Mrs.
Murgatroyd thank you for the fifth
and now we are unlimited. Welcome
always. (J-lt-35-p)
ATTENTION GATORS! WDVH 9oC
on your dial, has a MISSION for you,
which is not IMPOSSIBLE. The
WDVH GOOD GUYS "have hidden
the KEYS to a 1969 FORD
MUSTANG FASTBACK somewhere
in the Gainesville area. YOUR
MISSION, should you accept it, is to
find the KEYS and CLAIM the
MUSTANG valued at $3,004. CLUES
are given HOURLY on WDVH 980.
Good Luck. (J-3t-31-c)
WANTED AND NEEDED: 6
TICKETS FOR GEORGIA. ED
NASH, 372-6579. | LOST & FOUND §
Lost on campus during
Florida-Auburn game, one cuff link,
black onyx with small diamond m
center. Reward. A.W. Graessle. Jr..
206 Duval County Courthouse,
Jacksonville, Florida. (L-35-lt-c)
LOST: Girls gold wnst watch last
Tues : in music building. Teriffic
sentimental value. Please can
372-0175. Thanks. (L-3t-35-p)
Pewter mug with inscription SAE to
Chi O. Reward offered. No questions
asked. Phone 378-4758. (L-3t-35-n)
Lost Sat. at law skits, aame or ri
Delt house. Fathers In school Aipna
Omega pin from gold disc on charm
bracelet. Cali univ. ext. >6oJ.
(L-st-35-p)

| LOST & FOUND f
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto electric service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-ts-c)
Child care for 2-5 year olds. Home in
NE section. Playroom, fenced yard
with swings. Lunch and snacks
included. $lO weekly. 376-8523.
(M-3t-35-p)
LOST a ladys navy blue umbrella
in Anderson Hall. If found please
return to 406 SE Broward or call
392-9611. Reward. (L-2t-34-p)
COST: Black wallet after Fri. parade.
Ten dollars reward for return. Call
372-0035 or 51 Colonial Manor.
(L-3t-34-p)
i;x*x-yY.*.v.v;v;ss x*x*w-:v-v.v.w;'X x*.;.
;i SERVICES if
Charcoal portrait sketches- 16x20\
matted. SIO.OO. For appointment
call Connie 378=0659. (M-32-st-p)
BBgR
Ih.w. 13th St. at 2Jrtf M 0 A
THE STORY
OF THE
SELF-CONFESSED
lOSTON
STRANGLER IS
EASED ON FACT.
I
STRANGLER I
Tony Curtis |m]
Henry Fonda
George Kennedy I
Panavision Color bv Deluxe 1
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IN W. 13th Si x 23rd RP |
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Unlike other classics
'West Side Story'
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B |gjN|gAL TEoaciirrMHmios*FH)M un ms.-sna on tff r
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m jam 11 mnwwi
JULIE HARRIS
DIAHANN
ERNEST BORGNINE t3S& l *kk'2i


Friday, November 8, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



I, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

Page 14

RUSSIANS GO HOME
Czechs Destroy
Soviet Banners
PRAGUE (UPI) Thousands of jeering, shouting, whistling young
people destroyed Russian flags in the streets of Prague and Bratislave
Thursday. They clashed with police in both cities as they carried their
demonstrations against the Soviet bloc occupation into the second
day.
Russians go home! Russians go honie! the youths shouted.
Only a few Russian jeep patrols appeared in both cities. The Red
army soldiers took no action against the demonstrators. When one
Russian jeep wheeled into Wenceslas Square in Prague, it was met with
a roar of jeers and boos.
In both cities, demonstrators ripped to shreds or burned Soviet
hammer and sickle flags which had been posted to mark the 51st
anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution, Nov. 7, 1917. In Prague, at
least two small flags were chewed and eaten by demonstrators.
An estimated 300 Prague police clashed violently with the
rampaging youths. Police tried to restore order with water hoses and
billy clubs.
In Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, UPI correspondent Robert
San-Pierre estimated 10,000 youths lined the streets, stopping traffic
and shouting anti-Soviet slogans. Police and Czechoslovak soldiers
tried to defend the crimson Soviet banners with water hoses and mild
use of billy clubs, but youngsters kept climbing up flagpoles or into
buildings to yank down the flags.
Demonstrators jeered when Soviet jeeps raced through the streets
of the Slovak city. The soldiers made no move to stop the disorder.
An undetermined number of demonstrators were arrested in both
Prague and Bratislava. There were no reports of serious injuries.
The day also saw two pro-Soviet demonstrations in Prague. Some
500 sympathizers grouped around the heavily guarded Soviet embassy
to present a resolution. At Olsany Cemetery a crowd of 500
pro-Soviet Czechoslovaks cheered Soviet officers and defiantly
chanted Long live the Soviet' Union directly into the faces of
Czechoslovak leaders.
Some tugged and yanked at Communist party leader Alexander
Dubcek, whose liberalization drive led the alarmed Soviet Union to
launch* its invasion Aug. 20.
Dubcek and other Czechoslovak leaders attended a reception to
mark the anniversary given by Soviet Ambassador Stephan
Chervonenko. With Dubcek was Josef Smrkovsky, president of
Czechoslovakias National Assembly.
The anti-Soviet demonstrations in Prague were conducted by mobs
of high school age boys and university students.

UF Receives
Kodak Grant
In Chemistry
A $6,000 grant has been
awarded the UF for a graduate
fellowship in chemistry as part
of Eastman Kodak Companys
1968 educational aid program.
Joseph E. Kouba of Chicago,
recipient of the fellowship, is a
doctoral student in quantum
chemistry and is conducting
theoretical studies of atom-atom
and atom-ion interactions.
One of the basic problems in
chemsitry is finding a theoretical
description of how atoms
interact to form molecules; it
ties in with the fundamental
problems in the study of
chemical reactions. Dr. Y.N.
Orhn, associate professor of
chemistry and physics, and
director of Koubas research,
said.
The UF is one of four
Southern universities receiving
graduate chemistry grants
sponsored by the firms
Tennessee Eastman Company.

Yoill Need hi
Gfe jy after sampling Parker's
fire XT7S/ famous Super Sabre Jet
D Bpr. L sauce!
V/Yjr Real Southern Bar-B-Q
r
8 SAUCES
mildmediumhot red hot
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PARKERS BAR-B-Q
372-9292
Open 'tjl Way,Late 1214 N.W. sth Ave.

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Capstan drive, monaural, dual track. Push but- jL tJ
ton controls for fast forward, forward, record, HF
stop, and rewind functions. Dual purpose VU
meter indicates recording level and battery 1
condition. Cartridge release lever. Record level 1 "JW/ ML \^r=7====^r-=-^=^-
and volume controls. Power source: 4 "C cell \ Ui fli
batteries or converts to standard AC house- \Br cVyl -
hold current with optional AC-603 adapter or 1 ** 11
to DC car current with DC-605 adapter (op- --
tional extra). Complete with all accessories in including
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Dreams Dead In Ghetto,
Dawkins Hero Os Young

ROM PA6t ONE
It was the teenagers of the
ghetto the people tired of
too much talk and not enough
action that Dawkins
appealed to. And to them he was
a bonafide hero, perhaps the
first in their lives.
He was my hero, man,' one
Black teenager said. He was my
thing. There wasnt anything I
wouldnt do for him.
In spots, I see where he did
a lot of good here, the teenager
said. He specifically noted
violence and fear.
The teenager said he
believes that Dawkins, by
opposing city police with threats
of violence, eliminated much of
the fear ghetto residents have of
police.
Now I notice that there
arent too many cops around
bugging us all the time, he said.
Now they have a little more
respect for us, and we still
respect them a lot. So we just do
whats best. We try to stay
within the law.
Oscar Gilbert operates a shoe
repair shop in the ghetto. Gilbert
had many talks with Dawkins
before he left. Putting his work
aside, Gilbert talked with sharp
bursts of expressions about
Dawkins and his effect on
Gainesville.
I couldnt say Im glad hes
gone, Gilbert said, because I
dont understand his reasons for
leaving. I dont even understand
the cause for him being here in
the first place.
He seemed to be for the
Negro people, but I would say
he had the wrong people
working with him.
The wrong people Gilbert
referred to are, the hoodlums
that dont believe in working
and go out stealing and robbing
from anybody.
Was Dawkins wrong in trying
to reach these people?
Those are the type of people
you should try to reach if you
have a program, Gilbert said,
If you are trying to encourage
them to change their way of
living. But, from my talks with
him; Id say he wasnt.
I dont say he was telling
them to steal and rob, but I
dont think he was trying to
change them.
Gilbert is typical of the adult
view of Dawkins. While many of
them admire his courage, they
almost outrightly condemn him
for the groups he associated
with.
Both adults and teenagers
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All ii^ator

jjBACKGROUNc|
I REPORT

Dawkins
Tribute
Irvin Lee Jack Dawkins
was considered a
trouble-maker by most
Gainesville city officials, but
at least one prominent
national figure did not think
so.
The late U.S. Sen. Robert
F. Kennedy (D-N.Y.), wrote
Dawkins a personal letter in
February, 1968 thanking him
for his observations on the
urban crisis that year.
The letter reads:
I want you to know that
I appreciated hearing from
you last summer at the time
we were experiencing
violence and disturbances in
our cities.
The problems of our cities
and the priorities we assign to
solving them deserve the
consideration of all
thoughtful Americans, and I
was therefore especially
pleased to have your
observations.
The letter was signed;
Robert F. Kennedy, U.S.
Senator.
agree, however, that Dawkins
did something good while he
was here.
He was good in carrying out
demonstrations, one adult said.
City ordinances should have
compelled these places to abide
by law, and he wouldnt have
had to demonstrate at these
places.
But the city never did take
that much concern about its
Negro people. Not only the city
but the country as a whole never
hss lived up to constitutional
rights. one ghetto resident said.
RAME HAIR STYLIST
319 W. UNIV. AVE.
20% discount with
this coupon
ph 372-5549

r HAMBURGER SPECIAL
6 FOR 990
Upside down nr nghtside up, our Burger Chef hamburgers
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only now you can get 6 of thorn for only 99C Any way
y y OU took at it it's your chance to treat the whole family to
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OFFER GOOD SAT.,SUM.,NOV., 7, , 9, *o^^
715 N.W. 13th St. pSW
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* *4* +.* t4*i\ mil 111 I' iim I I

Rev. T.A. Wright, local
NAACP leader and a frequent
critic of Dawkins, also conceded
that Dawkins had accomplished
something during his stay here.
I think he played a
significant part in arousing the
community to some of the needs
that we had been mentioning for
a long time, Wright said.
He got a lot of action
started but, as far as results; I
havent seen much of it yet.
Wright blames city fathers
for failing to act on the ills that
Dawkins actions point out.
I had hoped he could have
established better rapport with
other groups, Wright said, he
didnt communicate with the
(Black) middle class and they
didnt care too much about his
plight.
But the responsibility goes
both ways, Wright continued,
the middle class should have
tried to communicate with him.
And maybe we would all have
been better off.
No one in the ghetto knows
where Dawkins has gone. At*
least not many will talk about it.
One resident said that
Dawkins had gone somewhere
else to fight fqr the liberation
of the Black mat}.
He was a nationalist
liberator, the reridnet said, his
work was to fight for the
liberation of the Balck man
throughout the world.
Hes in Russia, another
ghetto resident said. And so it
goes.
Irvin Lee Jack Dawkins
appears to have vanished into
the shattered and eroded air that
prevails Gainesvilles Black
ghetto.
Maybe Dawkins had a dream.
A dream of piercing the ghetto
air with wind of success. A
dream that would have replaced
the signs of failure, with signs of
success.
If Dawkins had such a dream;
then maybe it was shattered by
what Gainesvilles Black
militants call white racism.
And NW sth Ave. has
evidence of what can happen to
shattered dreams.
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UF Professor Appointed
To WHO Disease Panel

A UF professor has been
appointed to The World Health
Organization's Expert Advisory
Panel on Bacterial Diseases.
Dr. Leighton E. Cluff,
chairman of the Department of
Medicine at the UF College of
Medicine, was appointed by Dr.
M. G. Candau, director-general
of the World Health
Organization (WHO) in Geneva.
Panel membership is
honorary and commits selected
experts to review important
developments in their own fields
Applications
For FBK Due
Applications for Florida Blue
Key (FBK) must be in the FBK
ffices no later than 4 p.m.
today.
Undergraduate and graduate
Florida men are eligible for
membership if they have a 2.0
overall on 84 hours of college
work. They must have
completed seven quarters of
college work, four of which
must have been at the UF.
New members will be tapped
before the end of the quarter.
jWATCH & JEWtLRYjREPAIRj
itAMMV MMONAtM 09 AMIMM
GORDON'S
GAINESVILLE Center
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM-9:00 PM Mon-Fri

HUM
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FRIDAY NOV. 8
8:00 PM
THE
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ADMISSION 25c
iiiMiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiimiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiimiiimiinmmiiumiimiiiiuiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiHiiiiiiiiiiuii

Friday, November 8, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

and to make the new knowledge
available to WHO; to make
technical recommendations and
offer leadership in initiating
research in their fields for the
benefit of WHO.
Ability and technical
experience form the basis for
membership
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
I 0 I N.MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins. 5 mins.
ii
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GALLEY
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SEAFOOD & CHICKEN
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A SPECIALTY
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SEAFOOD AND CHICKEN FOR OVLR SO VIARG.
309 N.W, 13th STREET 231 N.W. 10th AVENUE
3724311 J72'3b4#

Page 15



>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8,1968

Page 16

N.Viets Study Impact
Os Nixons Election Win

PARIS (UPI) High diplomatic sources
said the United States had secret new
contacts with the Hanoi delegation in Paris
Thursday in an effort to get expanded talks
on a Vietnam peace started quickly. There
vas speculation President-elect Nixon
might visit Paris or send an observer team.
American sources said North
Vietnamese diplomats acted in a
businesslike manner in the discussions held
on neutral grounds in a private Paris
residence.
Both Hanoi and UJS. sources told UPI
they were keeping in continued contact
to work out procedural matters for
expanded negotiations which were
postponed this week when South Vietnam
refused to send a delegation to Paris.
Diplomatic observers said the
perseverance with which the outgoing
Johnson administration was pressing ahead
reflected Washingtons firm belief that
Saigon ultimately will agree to attend the
Paris negotiations.
Xuan Thuy, the North Vietnamese chief

VIETNAM VISIT PLANNED?

Cmon Down, Thieu Tells Nixon

SAIGON (UPI) President Nguyen Van Thieu
Thursday warmly congratulated President-elect
Richard M. Nixon and invited him to South
Vietnam for a personal assessment of the war.
Nixon said last Sunday he would go to Saigon if the
mission would help peace efforts.
Thieus cable of congratulations to Nixon was
extremely cordial and reflected a general feeling of
delight in official Saigon circles that Nixon had
defeated Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.
There is a sense of relief that Nixon was
elected, one high-ranking South Vietnamese
official said. A lot of Vietnamese drank champagne
last night.
The impression among many Vietnamese was
that Nixon would take a harder line on prosecution
of the war than Humphrey had planned.
In his cable to Nixon, Thieu said he was
confident that the establishment of a durable
peace with honor and justice would be achieved
during his administration.

Alligator Meets
There will be a mandatory
meeting of the Alligator editorial
staff today at. 4 p.m. in the
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In the days ahead you will be most welcome in
Vietnam if you wish to make an on-the-spot
assessment of the war and the situation in
Vietnam, Thieu told the President-elect.
The Vietnamese government, the Vietnamese
people and our soldiers fighting on the front line
against Communist aggression will be most happy to
receive on Vietnamese soil a staunch defender of
freedom which you have been for many years.
January Draff Call Up
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Defense
Department Thursday issued a January draft call for
26,800 men, the highest one-month quota since last
May and more than double the level for this month.
The monthly calls of 25,000 or more are
expected to continue during the first half of 1969
to make up for low induction totals in the last six
months of this year.
The January figure compared with 17,500 for
December and 10,000 this month. The November
figure was the lowest in 18 months.

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Process Engineering
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Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineers B S
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Project 1 Engineering Industrie Engineers-B.S.
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At these locations:
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Research and Development Princeton, Carteret, N.J.
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negotiator, was reported to have spent
much of Thursday studying the impact of
the election of Republican Richard M.
Nixon to succeed Johnson.
Diplomatic sources said they believed
that Nixon might visit Paris but refrain
from going to Saigon where he was invited
Thursday by President Nguyen Van Thieu.
Informants said that if he did ultimately
go to Saigon, as he had suggested during his
presidential campaign, Nixon almost
certainly would advise the Saigon leaders
to go to Paris rather than encourage them
in their present boycott.
The Saigon government has objected to
the presence of a separate Viet Cong
delegation at the Paris talks that would also
include the United States and North
Vietnam. It wants Viet r Cong
representatives to be included in the Hanoi
delegation.
Nixon .v*vas expected here to name a
personal delegation to the Paris talks in the
near future in an effort to assure a smooth
transition from the outgoing Johnson
administration.

SATURDAY, NOV. 9 8:30 P.M.
j JACKSONVILLE COLISEUM
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THE 69
MOTOWN REVIEW
STARRING
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I Greek
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PHI MU
Eleven new pledges have
joined the ranks of Phi Mu. They
are: Diane Eason, Cathy Lane,
Kathy Gay, Marylin Miller,
Kathy Shewchuk, Frenchi Ford,
Cathy Sudduth, Bobbie
Osguthorpe, Susan White, Kris
Whitehurst and Gena Anders.
Six others girls were recently
initiated. They are: Margaret
Byrd, Linda Hill, Celia McCall,
Carrie Guritz, Pamela Kanuisky
and Wendie Smith.
Janie McCrillus has been
tapped by Angel Flight, and
Shirley Starling has been chosen
ATO Little Sister. Patrice
French has been asked to join
the rolls of Delta Sigma Phi
Little Sisters.
ALPHA EPSILON PHI
More than twenty AEPhis
are involved in Project Gray at
the Boys Club and the AEPhi
pledge class recently joined the
TEP pledge class in a community
service project at Sunland
Training Center. Instructors will
be the guests at Professors
Night dinners at the AEPhi
house this week.
New Little Sisters are Carol
Colton and Susan Wynne, Pi
Kappa Phi; Phyllis Singer, ATO.
Arlene Margolis was recently
appointed pledge mom of Angel
Flight, and Dee Dee Walshun
was made an area officer.
Sister Karen Kruglick was
recently named the outstanding
student of the College of
Education and received a SIOO
award.
Cydney Aronson is the new
Miss Fall Uniroyal.
SIGMA cm
Homecoming 6B was good to
Sigma Chi. They carried home
three new additions for the
house trophy case, the most
awards won by a fraternity for
Homecoming decorations in one
year. The trophies were for the
most humorous decoration, the
best over-all and Orange League
first place. Decorations were
designed by alumni brother Jack
Kemp, Jacksonville, for the
ninth consecutive year.
Sigma Chi has pledged 35
members during the Fall rush,
bringing the total pledge
brotherhood to 48.
Brothers Jacob Stuart and
David Holbrook, and pledge
brother Jim Fort are coaching a
city league football team. The
team won its first game 7-0, but
has been defeated in its last four
encounters.
Progress is underway in the
chapters J. Wayne Reitz
Memorial Library. Carpet has
been layed and furniture
ordered. A picture of Reitz, a
Sigma Chi alum, is also on order
for the library.
vood Strvict Start*
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CARRYING OFF SILVER
... Jackie Jedel (left) and Alpha Delta Pi, Mary Jo Holland (right)
Sororities Capture
National Awards
Activities from A to Z paid off as eight UF sorority chapters
carried home top honors from their national conventions this year.
Alpha Delta Pi was presented with the Best Chapter in the
Nation award at its national leadership convention. The UF chapter
was selected on the basis of enthusiasm and spirit.
Awards for scholarship, inter-sorority communication, service and
the triangle award for outstanding achievement were presented to
Delta Phi Epsilon.
Delta Delta Delta received the national scholarship improvement
award and was cited with highest honors as one of the top 10 chapters
out of 112 in the nation.
Sigma Kappa was awarded the scholarship improvement award at
its national convention in San Diego. The Sigma Kappas went from
10th to second in sorority scholarship standing at the University.
Phi Sigma Sigma sister Jackie Jedel received the pyramid award for
outstanding service to her sorority. The division achievement and
parents club awards also went to the UF.
Alpha Omicron Pi sister Beverly Matson of Jacksonville was named
most outstanding collegiate in District 5 at the regional convention.
Phi Mu received honorable mention tor scholarship improvement at
its national convention.
Delta Gamma was given two regional awards, most improved
scholarship and the province scholarship award.
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New Wipers Indicted I
DETROIT (UPI) Hidden windshield wipers, a new styling trend
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an item that could add millions of dollars to the annual repair bills on
American cars.
Automobile Club officials say the new hood design hiding
windshield wipers could become a horizontal guillotine for car
passengers involved in a serious head-on collision.
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EV << V
v v#
After youve met
the challenge?
If you're the kind of Civil Engineer
we're looking for, you'll start search searching
ing searching for another one to conquer. Here
at the Pennsylvania Department of
Highways, we offer a host of chal challenges
lenges challenges to the right man. But, to be
that right man, you've got to be pretty
special.
You see, we search out and encour encourage
age encourage Civil Engineers whom we consider
capable of grasping a challenge;
skilled men, comparable to the great
Engineers who are "building Tomor Tomorrow
row Tomorrow today in Pennsylvania. If you
can measure up to the standards
necessary to fulfill Pennsylvania's $lO
billion plan to lead the nation in high highways,
ways, highways, we'd consider it a challenge just
to get to know you.
A Pennsylvania Department of
Highways Career Representative will
visit your campus. To arrange for an
appointment, or if you desire
additional infor- v-- a
mation, contact the <==£ /*- g
placement office. \\ f
INTERVIEW DATE: WVjjlS
November 11,1968 1 J
Pennsylvania
Department of Highways
Bureau of Personnel
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17120
-

Friday. Novmbor>B. 1968, Tho Florida AHigotor, I

Page 17



. The FladpkAHigator, Friday, November 8, 1968

Page 18

EAPTgINS OUTRAGEOUS
11
IMPOSfWLE
This is impoHpH Three lost in the Towers parking
tot? ;,,

SpiAHigh Meets Low
In Mctimn IWaht Rally

jp; BK
B By LE HW R
HB Alligator
Win anti-wa&BEpihc band
Mfeilting yoBHR' hippies
diking, straigiaHlWng at the
and and the
WP S
At was UF WHppen night.
Bbout 500 fllimthered in
41f Plaza of Blliericas to
that thei/ppPilts did not
in what waCTNKIftg place in
tit voting boottaHrif America. It
w| an apolititti poy for the
abated and tfepityiteenchanted
w|th the etftflft* and its
aitmatives. (Xfc
For some, mgM had been
snuffed out wfpfepg death of
Bobby Kennedf !S 4|(|lhc barring
of McCarthy fttijjj. ie people.
For others. hope has
been a long pvjgptten 'deal.
They came that tight to have
fun and show they didn't care.
There were people moving,
talking, feel ** expressing
themselves in words they
spoke and in tfi.ffothes they
wore.

Polifrip Forgotten,
Truepixon Emerges

WASHING'iMk (UPI)
Those who Hpi wondered
during the cannmi what the
real" Nixon vy||upk arc about
to find out. victory
freed him of jfttraints and
gave him a muw freer hand to
act.
Richard M. Nixon is not as
cautious and as he
appeared to many voters. He had
to campaign in the shadows of
two celebrated defeats -for the
presidency in 1%0 and for
governor of California in 1%2.
He felt he had to be right this
time. That meant alienating as
few voters as possible and
stringing along with local and
state Republican organi/ations.
If Nixon's campaign is am
guide, he can be expected to be
a crisp administrator and
no-nonsense organizer. But
critics argue that he has been
known to improvise a great deal
and react angrily, even
impulsively, under attack.
Nixon fired no direct
criticism at the administration.
He chose instead to take
circuitous route of citing the

t There wat 4&jttK wearing a
ture of Mafe liStoned to the
nt of his 4H& Helmets with
peace and *l44* inscribed on
them in covering
the army waving its way
in and out of 4lt crowd was a
dancing line, picking up
passengers as It moved on its
erratic journey. 4 tall hippie was
dressed up as fjlncle Sam. He
wore black *** two dogs
smelling of alcohol
came tumbling and fighting their
way through the people.
All the * the band
screamed an4|i|4*ded out its
sounds as listened
and felt the Hpind loved it
more the loudnvgot.
Then the mt ceased. Time
it was now tiake on Tigert.
They picked iqjp their candles
and moved otflM* symbolically
assault the t'jfdministration.
Taking the snppT fights into the
darkness, the 4|wtters of peace
now formed a hand-holding
circle around flic hall. Voicing
their frustrate desires for an
end to the waCand all wars, they
were one in spkpit.

rumors and then adding that he.
for one, did not believe them.
Now that b? has won the
presidency in Iw own right, any
lingering inHburity about
criticism even less
obvious. For l(|(Ffkst time since
his 1%0 defeat by John F.
Kennedy. Nixon can afford a
certain tolerance of Ins political
enemies.
There is little of fun or
frivolity about the new
President, but conceivably this
could change. In the argot of the
new generation, he .has been up
tight about the Presidency. Now
that he has it. lie conceivably
could enjoy life more.
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'Marriage Wheel Spins
In Vest Pocket Production

By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Santa Fe Junior College Vest
Pocket Players present their first
play of the season, Marriage
Wheel, tonight and Saturday.
The 8 p.m. play is being
presented in the SFJC
Auditorium. Student tickets for
50 cents and SI adult tickets are
sale at the school box office.
Players derived their
. trom the fact that all their
equipment can be carried in a
vest pocket, according to Players
President Chad Reed.

The fraternity boys across the
way must have gotten wind of
the loud demands for peace.
They came en masse, carrying
their beer mugs and responding
to cries for peace now! with
their own war now!
Nobody seemed to want to
get violent, so it was all right.
The frat boys were even willing
to discuss Vietnam and war in
general with anybody who cared
to take them on.
Were protecting American
interests in Vietnam and halting
forceable takeover of
Communism, was one brothers
position.
Are we protecting American
interests by having our young
men killed in the process of
forcing our hallowed democratic
system upon a people and a land
who may in reality have no use
or desire for it? responded an
SDS member.
And so it went. At least until
a girl broke up the discussion,
insisting upon the apolitica'
nature of tho rally.
Gradually the rally started
breaking up. People began
drifting their different ways to
who-knows-where. Some moved
back towards the Plaza of the
Americas, talking about the war
and about Chicago.
It was election night 1968.
but nobody said much about it.
Perhaps they were thinking of
72. But with some of them you
could tell it was different.
Looking into their faces you
knew somehow. You knew that
they felt they had been let down
somewhere. And you knew that
they wouldn't care about
another election foi a long time.

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The 3-act religious comedy
takes place in the late 1800s.
The characters are members of
the Amish sect of the
Mennonite religion and believe
in marriage through lists.
At appropriate ages, men and
women have their names placed
on a list. The people at the top
of the list are required to marry
each other after meeting for an
hour in the bishops home.
Either the man or woman can
object. If either does, the mans
name is returned to the list but
the woman must remain
unmarried for the rest of her
life.
Lukes (Chad Reed) and
Marthas (Ann Cowles) names
come to the top, but Luke
refuses to marry Martha before
the hour starts. His sister had
previously been refused by
Marthas brother. The plot
thickens into complicated
hilarity with everyone wanting
to marry some unwilling person.

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Marriage Wheel is a new
play by the modem playwright
Joel Climenhaga.
The players have converted
the auditorium to accomodate a
three-quarter round stage. The
audience will be seated on three
sides of a temporary modern
structure.

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STUDIED UNDER FATMFP

Mantovani: Musical
Brilliance And Discipline

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Feature Writer
Just as Bach studied under his
fathers guidance, Annunzio
Paolo Mantovani studied music
under his father.
In an interview after his
performance here Wednesday
night, Mantovani said:
My father had hopes for me
becoming an engineer, but I
wanted to study music and he
gave me a good education. The
elder Mantovani was the concert
master for opera composer
Toscanini.
As for my children being
musicians, they wouldnt have
been good enough. My son is an
electrical engineer, Mantovani
said.
The English maestro may not
have become a good engineer,
but there is no question that his
total control over an orchestra is
magnificent.
The swelling crescendos of
What Now My Love and the
trombone solo were beautifully
done. The use of an electric
guitar added variety to the
composition.
Unlike most conductors,
Mantovani is composed, every
note played clearly as his baton
led the orchestra through
harmonic cacophony.
An unusual composition was
March in Mantovani told the
audience, I was listening to the
Dave Brubeck Quartet playing
Take Five and thought, Why
not a march in three-fourths
time? The composition was a
march with a different twist.
Mantovani studied music in
England at Trinity College with
his father. He did his first
motion picture sound track in
1940 for the movie French
Without Tears.
The musicians who played
Wednesday were highly skilled
although only five of his own
orchestra came to America with
him.
Mantovani said, I expect
discipline from my ensemble
players. Sometimes they are
only with me for one tour. The
French horn player will be
leaving for Vietnam after this
show.
As a contemporary musician,
Mantovani is not influenced by
other musicians.
I use my own ideas, he
said. I do listen to what is going
on. I listen for nice sounds that
fit my style. The addition of the
electric guitar adds color to
todays music.
The music, like Can Can
from Orpheus in the
Underworld, was alive with
brilliance. The violins, clear; the
reeds, deep and vibrant,
conjured up high-stepping
dancers at the Moulin Rouge in
Paris.
As the master led 46
musicians, his body movements
talented force
through each measure of music.
The movements were
demanding, brought out the
finest in each string, reed, flute
or drum without being
violent.

A
MANTOVANI
.. the master of sound
Mantovani was poised and
witty. As the orchestra readied
to play More (from Mondo
Cane), people walked in.
Quipped the mater, More, and
Welcome.
The audience was captured
by the melodious strains. The
world of pop music was left

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outside the gym. And Mantovani
isnt impressed with pop music.
Its in the doldrums. It all
sounds the same. You cant tell
the Beatles from anyone else,
he said.
The second show combined
the music of George Cohan,
Richard Rogers and three
arrangements by Mantovani, and
was as enjoyable as the first.
When the orchestra played
the overture to Kismet, which
combines Stranger in Paradise,
Baubles, Bangles and Beads
and other melodies into one
complete score, the versatility of
the musical ability of Mantovani
and the musicians was well
demonstrated.
Mantovani is one of the most
distinct personalities in the
world of light music.
His career skyrocketed 18
years ago when London Records
released Charmaine, which he
has adopted as his theme song.
The lush string sound and
disciplined orchestra is uniquely
Mantovani.
He has sold over eighteen
million records and was the first
artist to sell a million stereo
albums.
This is Mantovani, the master.

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-riday, November 8, 1968, The Florida AMigator, I

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

mmm

Jamie Leads A Chase
In 'The Mulberry Bush

By TIM STERLING
Alligator Reviewer
If it has to be explained, forget it, is the
attitude of Barry Evans when he stars in his first
motion picture, Here We Go Round The Mulberry
Bush, playing at the State Theatre through
Saturday.
.. Filmed in London, Mulberry Bush is the story
of a teenage boy, who like most young men, spends
a great deal of time pursuing the opposite sex.
Evans, who portrays Jamie, pursues a number of
* girls Linda, Paula, Caroline and Mary until he
finds one he likes.
His hopes are shattered and the girl sets him back
on his chase around the Mulberry Bush.
This is it, Jamie says as he roams about on his
girl watching journey. As his experience grows, he
becomes more and more confident of his mission.
He is cautious and bashful at first, but his
adolescent fears give way to a more mature game of
chase. The Mulberry Bush takes him from parties
and Methodist camp socials to nude swims in the
lake and even an overnight stay at a girl's house.
Jamie does about everything a young man would
dream of doing around a Mulberry Bush. His
revealing style is typical of British motion pictures.
Technically, Mulberry Bush is a superbly
colorful display of English landscape. The
screenplay was taken from a novel by Hunter
Davies.
Here We Go Round The Mulberry Bush is a
beautiful example of the free and unspoiled

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expression of youth. Throughout the film, the
viewer is told of Jamies desires and expectations in
the boys own speech.
He tells his story as he goes about acting his part,
but his explanation is unlike the narration that takes
place in many of todays movies. Jamie speaks at
times like perhaps a Hamlet or a Henry IV in a
Shakespearean classic.
Yet Jamie does not stop to speak his lines and
then commence with the business of acting. He is a
more livable character. He tells about the thoughts
and frustrations of his own human emotion. The
v
viewer does not have to guess the boy's course of
action merely through the filming technique: he is
guided by both sound and sight.
The typical bedroom scene which appears in so
many of todays motion pictures is there, but it is
clouded by the permissiveness of youth in their
quest for free expression. Although the adult world
is close at hand, it is relatively unconcerned with the
emotional adjustment of the young people.
At one point, Jamie and Mary find love so
irresistable that both undress and go for a swim. At
first, Jamie objects to this act, but Mary soon
assures him that the situation will allow for it. The
scene portrays an art. not a sinful act, almost as if
Jamie and Mary were Adam and Eve hidden from
the thoughts and expectations of the rest of the
world.
The Mulberry Bush is a beautiful portrait of
untarnished human emotion. The tragedy of the
film is that it would be labelled a sex film and
therefore undesirable for the majority of the
American people.

Anti-War Play
Opens Monday
Sergeant Musgraves Dance, an anti-war play, is being presented
by the Florida Players Monday through Friday at 8:15 p.m. in the
Constans Theatre.
There will be a matinee at 2 p.m. Saturday.
Advance tickets are now on sale at the theatre box office. UF
student admission is 25 cents and SI .50 tor all others.
As an experiment in mixed media, the play was first devised by the
chairman of the UFs Theatre Department, Dr. L.L. Zimmerman. The
experiment is being fully exploited by the productions-designer,
Malones Annex
SALE on discontinued
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assorted styles and colors
Used and new paper back books.
Also reference books.
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I I I I



Gators Geared For Upset

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
The Gators are upset minded
again.
UF goes up against Georgia, a
nationally ranked powerhouse,
Saturday at 2 p.m. in the Gator
Bowl. Georgia is a seven point
favorite.
Gator chances have been
brightened by the return of
All-American fullback Larry
Smith. Smith did not play all of
the Auburn game, carrying the
ball only eight times.
Sophomore Mike Kelley is
expected to see some action at
linebacker, now that he has his
knee out of a cast.
Georgia has in my opinion
the best team in the South,
Head Coach Ray Graves said.
They have tremendous balance,
in that they can win with either
defense, offense or kicking
game.
UF will pit its number one
passing defense against a Georgia
offense that has gained an
average of 188 yards per game in
the air. The Gators have held all
their opponents to an average of
117 yards per game in the air.
Mike Cavan, the Georgia
quarterback, has the best passing
percentage in the SEC,
completing 81 or 141. He passes
about 30 times a game.
Georgia uses a pro style
offense, with an I-Formation
backfield and a close wing
formation part of the time.
Running back Bruce Kemp is
currently second to Smith in
SEC rushing, averaging 4.4 yards
a carry*
Bill Stanfill, All-American
defensive tackle, is big and
strong at 6-5, 245 pounds. The
secondary is lead by
All-American Jake Scott, who
leads the nation in punt returns
and is ranked high nationally in
interceptions.

Brown Worries: University, Running Track

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Feature Writer
EDITORS NOTE: This is the
first of a two part feature on
UFs first black athlete to
compete, Johnnie Brown.
Johnnie Brown worries about
the same things other freshmen
do: making grades and getting
out of University College. He
doesnt worry about being UFs
first black athlete to compete in
intercollegiate sports, and he
wishes others wouldnt either.
Brown is more interested in
running track or cross country
and having those sports get
proper recognition.
As far as being the first
Negro to compete, I never
thought about it much; not until
everyone started making a big
scene over it. If I worried about
it when I run Id never get any
place, Brown said.
A first quarter freshman from
West Palm Beach Brown said
track and cross-country are all
that he cares for.
I love track and really will
do anything for it. I dont care

'GEORGIA FINEST IN SOUTH

The kicking game is handled
by Jim McCullough. He
consistently reaches the goal line
on kickoffs and can make field
goals from 40 yards.
I am positive that our kids
will once again bounce back and
give it everything theyve got,
Graves said. We got half of this,
the effort, against Auburn. The
mistakes got us beat, you just
cant make six crucial errors
against an outstanding team and
expect to win.
Linebacker David Manns
return to the starting team has
bolstered the defense. Mann
made 13 tackles against Auburn
and was all over the field making
big plays.
Our defense has really done
a good job this year, Graves
said. Id like, to have seen them
have Kelley and Mann in there
all fall like we planned.

Peacock, Back-up Signal Caller

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Ray Graves put together a limping Gator squad yesterday, reviewed
the offensive and defensive game plans, and announced that he was
ready for Saturdays game with Georgia.
Several of Graves walking wounded were back out on the field,
but even those players returned to the sidelines every few plays.
High on the extremely doubtful list for Saturday are Larry
Rentz, Jerry Vinesett, and Larry Smith. Quarterback Rentz was
carried off the field Wednesday due to a foot injury. The extent to
which the senior will be impaired is still not known.
The injury has moved Harold Peacock up to second quarterback
behind Jackie Eckdahl, according to Graves.
Earlier this week, Graves said, we had moved Peacock over to
running back as a complementary action because of Smith. When
Vinesett was injured, it became critical that he fill that position. Now,
with Rentz out, it is just as important that he be ready to take over as
quarterback.
Peacock will play both spots. There are five prospects named to
play tailback during the game, and three to fill in at fullback,
including one interchangable player.
Peacock has worked with all of the squads enough to know the
backfield moves well, said Graves. We worked him independently at
tailback two days before Vinesett was injured, so hes fully competent

for things like physical science,
so I never worry about it. My big
dream in life, as is for most
athletes, I guess, is to one day
race in the Olympics.
Coach Jimmy Carnes, the UF
track coach, offered Brown a
grant-in-aid after seeing him run

,/ // .. >t-Z* *->£&£* 4'
RANDY BASSETT
STUDY, STUDY, STUDY
Brown hits the CEH 131 books in his dorm room at Yon Hall.

- 4. L3 //mm 1 ill Mm i "
NICK ARROYO
NEMESIS
... Jake Scott (13) intercepts a Rentz pass intended for Yarbrough (88) in last year's UF-Georgia game.

RENTZ PROBABLY OUT

in high school. Browns record
then was a 4.27 for the mile and
9.55 for two miles.
I thought my times were
good until Jack Nason, a good
friend of mine here, and
probably the best runner in the
Southeastern Conference ran a

there. Os course, he has worked in the quarterback slot all year.
The five tailback hopefuls are Gary Walker, the only healthy one
with game experience, Tom Christian, who can be expected to play,
but not much with his broken nose, and Jerry Vinesett, who will also
play little or none at all with his toe injury. In addition to Peacock,
Buster Brooke has been brought up from the B team to share the
load.
At fullback, Brian Hipp is top prospect among three hopefuls to
take over for Smith. The junior has sat on the bench most of the year
behind Smith. Also, Tom Christian may see action at the spot.
Finally, Bill Mcride has been promoted from the B team for the
occasion. This will be his first trip onto the varsity squad this year.
Graves could not say who would start at either position. He did,
however, name Eckdahl as starter at quarterback.
The coachs other injured players; Jim Hadley and Jim Yarbrough,
both are expected to start this weekend. Yarbrough, however, did not
dress out yesterday on doctors orders. He is recovering from strep
throat.
Commenting on the game prospects Saturday, Graves anticipated a
defensive struggle for the most part, but said that two touchdowns
and a field goal would be neccessary to win.
Weve got quite a bag of tricks in store for Georgia, said Graves,
but its going to take blocking and tackling to win this game. Were
going to be ready.

4.13. If you know anything
about track, a 4.27 cant
compare with a 4.13.
When I first started running
for the UF I was fighting for
first place on the freshman team.
Now Im in third place.
English, institutions, logic,
physical science, and AF ROTC
take up a lot of time, which a
good athlete needs to practice.
At first 1 was having a hard
time getting adjusted, Brown
said. Practicing for 2 x /i hours
every day takes up time that I
should be studying. By putting
athletics and grades first, and
sacrificing my social life, 1 hope
to make at least a 2.0. This is
what I need to keep my federal
grant. Ive heard its pretty easy
to flunk out here. If I make it
past my freshman year Ill be
okay.
I dont mean that I never
take any breaks. I like to play
basketball and football
sometimes. Saturday mornings I
usually watch the basketball
team practice, Brown added.
Practice, practice, and even
more practice. But where does it
lead to? Brown is one of the few

Friday, November 8, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

freshmen on the varsity
cross-country team. The only
awards for members of the
cross-country team is that the
top seven will win a letter.
Brown said four of the seven
this year will be freshmen.
Freshmen are better for running
cross-country because theyre
used to running over l A mile
distances. The varsity team will
do better in outdoor track.
Track is run all year around
but is one of the least known
about sports at the UF.
Cross-country is run in the fall,
indoor track until April, and
outdoor track is run through the
summer.
Last year Florida placed
second in the SEC in
cross-country and track. This
builds up the overall conference
records greatly, but it never
receives the amount of
recognition other sports do. Do
you know that even other
athletes arent aware when we
win meets? There are probably
some people on campus who
dont even know we have a
cross-country team, Brown
said.

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

FRESHMEN TAKING PROGS

Harriers Lose To FSU

By JIM WARD
Alligator Sports Writer
Florida State toppled the
Gators Tuesday in a Cross
Country Meet held in
Tallahassee.
Ken Mizener and Frank
Thomas placed first and second
to lead the Seminoles to a 26-29
(low score wins) victory over the
Gators.

UF Baby Gators face the
Georgia Bullpups Monday in
Athens, Georgia, wrapping up a
weekend of football between the
UF and Georgia.
The Baby Gators sport a 1-1
record, defeating Auburn 54-17
and losing to Miami team 20-17.
Georgias freshman team tied
Clemson and lost to Auburn.
Quarterback John Reaves, a
product of Tampa Robinson,
will lead the Baby Gator attack.
Reaves has passed 74 times in
two games, completing 34 for
419 yards.
IHK]
ONE OF 22
... Baby Gator receiver Carlos
Alvarez heads upfield against
Auburn after catching the ball.
At your
newsstand
NOW
BtfHiMl
raMH
More on the War Against the
Young: Martin Duberman says
those in power in our universi universities
ties universities are blind to student
principles.
James Dickey on Allan Seager
and Theodore Roethke.
No More Vietnam*? is it even
realistic to insist on this? ...
Where does the Vietnam ex experience
perience experience leave us in our rela relations
tions relations with the U.S.S.R. and
China? (The first of two ex excerpts
cerpts excerpts from a conference at
the Adlai Stevenson Institute in
Chicago.)

Frosh Face Georgia

Steve Atkinson and John
Thomas placed third and fourth
respectively and Ken Burnsed,
Chris Hosford and Bob Lang ran
6,7, and 9th for the losing UF
team.
UFs hopes were somewhat
dimmed before the meet started
as the freshmen had to remain in
Gainesville for progress tests.
The Gators hopes for the season
rest highly with the freshmen

Carlos Alvarez, a 5-11,
185-pounder, has been on the
receiving end of 22 passes, 13 of
those receptions coming in the
game against Miami. He has
gained 283 yards in the two
Gator games.
Reaves and Alvarez have
been very effective in our first
two games, said freshman
coach Jimmy Haynes. Both
boys have outstanding ability
and should have great futures at
the UF.
Tailback Tommy Durrance

Parking lots are places
where people
bang up car doors.
Help wanted:
Can you design
a door that eliminates
this problem?
Situation: It is often difficult to get into and
out of todays cars without bumping
into the car beside you.
Question: Can you design a door that uses
minimum out-swing space
when opening?
Disciplines: It can go over the car, under it,
slide into the frame, swing parallel
to the body . AS LONG AS
ITS NOT TOO EXPENSIVE TO
MASS PRODUCE. Door must
also provide an electrical channel
to the chassis to provide for power
operated windows. Need your ideas
in time for meeting next month.
Thanks.

v*.
Want to work on a challenging assignment like this?
A new member of an engineering team at Ford Motor Com Company
pany Company does. Today his job may be designing new car door
hinging. Tomorrow it might be solving cab vibration in
semi-trailer trucks. Or designing a different approach to
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figuration. configuration.
To help solve assignments like these, our people have a
giant network of computers at their service. Complete test testing
ing testing facilities. The funds they need to do the job right.

members of the team.
We could have beaten the
Seminoles with our entire
team, Coach Jimmy Carnes
said.
The loss evened the Gators
record at 2-2 for this season. The
next meet is Nov. 8 against
South Florida at Tampa and we
face the Seminoles Nov. 23 in
the Florida Intercollegiate. Meet
also held in Tampa.

has proven his ability as a
running back, carrying the ball
30 times for 195 yards and five
touchdowns. Against Auburn he
gained 164 yards and hit paydirt
four times.
Freshman football is so
unpredictable, said Haynes.
Even though Auburn defeated
Georgia, I know the Bullpups
will be ready for us. We have
seen their game films and we
respect them. We know it will
take a good effort on our part to
win.

Barbecue, Pep Rally j
i UF-Georgia Game j
j A patriotic salute to U.S. soldiers stationed abroad and a :
: gigantic Gator pep rally will highlight the annual UF-Georgia
: Barbecue, to be held before this Saturdays game between the :
: Gators and the Bulldogs in the Gator Bowl. :
: Special guests at the barbecue will be wounded Vietnam
j veterans. Featured will be color guards representing all the
armed services together with the UF band, glee club, and |
: cheerleaders. :
: Tickets may be purchased at the door at $2.50 each. The
j barbecue is scheduled for 11 ajn.-l: 15 p.m. in the Jacksonville :
Coliseum..
I ROBBIE T S I
The Best In
Meals^^^|^^M^^^dwichet
rCOLOR TV & BILLIARDS]
11718 W. University Ave.|
[ *On The Gold Coast I

J f bett er.ideas to contribute, and youre looking
fmm IK 9 GSS gnmenfs and the rewards that come
from solving them, come work for the Better Idea company.
tfnH representative when he visits your campus. Or
send a resume to Ford Motor p
Company, College Recruit Recruitmg
mg Recruitmg Department. The
American Dear-



Betas Continue To Win
Chased By Four Others

Teps Phi Delta, Betas Pi Kappa Phis, and SAEs moved closer to the Orange League's football title
winning decisive games m their brackets. B League s iooioau une,
Teps whipped Kappa Sig, 52-6 boosting its record to two wins against no losses.

at jSHk
TOM KENNEDY
TEPS FIRST TD
.. .Sam Harris scores Teps first TD against KA in Orange League
action.

SEC Race Tight,
Georgia Has Lead

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA lf you think
the Southeastern Conference
grid race is tight now, wait until
Saturdays action ends.
If the weekend follows form,
the lOth-ranked Georgia
Bulldogs will have moved into
the lead and present leader
Auburn will be locked in a
three-way tie for third.
Saturdays key games find
Auburn facing sth-ranked
Tennessee in the nightcap of a
twin bill at Birmingham and
Georgia paired against UF in the
Gator Bowl Stadium at
Jacksonville.
Louisiana State plays
Alabama in the day half of the
doubleheader that is drawing
14,0,000 to Legion Field in
Birmingham and Mississippi, the
other member of the SECs first
division, steps outside the
conference to play independent
Chattanooga unbeaten and
unranked No. 3 among the
nations small college teams.
If Georgia, Tennessee and
LSU win, heres how the SEC
race will look: 1-Georgia, 4-0-1
2- 2-0-1
3- 3-1
4- State, 3-1
5- 3-1
Auburn, 5-2 over-all, has been
a real surprise up to now but its
hard to see how the Tigers can
Game Highlights
Florida Football Highlights
will review all of this weeks
game action at 12 p.m., Sunday,
on Television Four. With the use
of game films, WJXT
Sportscaster Dick Stratton and
Gator Coach Ray Graves will
give gridiron fans a close-up look
into the preceding days strategy
and information about each
important play.

keep it up. Even if they should
beat Tennessee 5-0-1, theyve
still got Georgia 5-0-2 and
Alabama 5-2 ahead.
Tennessee, which opened by
scoring eight points in the final
seconds to tie Georgia and has
since won five straight, offers a
balanced offense featuring
quaterback Bubba Wyche,
fullback Dick Pickens and
tailback Richmond Flowers.
Gators Larry Smith, the
SECs No. 1 rusher, is back and
Georgias Bruce Kemp, the No. 2
rusher, is out. But even so, the
unbeaten Bulldogs appear too
strong for the Gators who were
picked to win the SEC crown
but who havent won a game in
the past three weeks.

I ELECTRIC HEAT IS jj

*

c j. m
your GAINESVILLE UTILITIES

/. : j
- --

Phi Delts remained
undefeated winning over KA,
14-6.
In bracket two, Sigma Chi
shut-out ATO, 12-0 and Betas
defeated Pi Lams 32-13.
Pi Kappa Phi defeated Sigma
Nu, 13-6 and Sig Eps and Delts
tied 12-12, but Sig Ep won on
first downs.
In a game now under protest,
SAE and AEPi tied 12-12 with
SAE winning on first downs and
Lamda Chi Alpha edged by the
Pikes, 21-18.
In Engineering League,
Metallurgy defeated ES*l, 18-8
and Ag beat AIIE, 19-13.
In the Independent League
action, CSCE 40 smashed Chem
Cats 7. Owls defeated BCN
Bandits 20-6.

NEVER Tod late
-UNDERSTANDING COMES
FASTER WITH I
CLIFF'S NOTESf |
OVER 175 TITLES $1 EACH
AT YOUR BOOKSELLER
LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 68501
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Rugby Club To Organize

An inaugural meeting will be
held today to form a Rugby
Club at the UF. A film on rugby
in Australia will be shown. Any
person interested in playing
rugby is urged to attend or to

| Otlifllo |
Camelot APAR ENTS
on your own private patio or balcony. Relax in the
CAMELOT Clubhouse or by the pool. Enjoy the
park like atmosphere with an abundance of
comfortable, custom designed lounging furniture
perfect for sunbathing or just relaxing while you
admire the landscape.
Friendly management will guarantee your
continued enjoyment of your CAMELOT
apartment home.

iCiiinclot apartments
I 3425 Southwest 2nd Ave. j
(at Westgate) I
Professional management by 1
ERNEST TEW REALTY, Inc. I
378-0296 or 376-6461 I

Friday, Novambar 8, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator. I

contact Tony Barker at
378-8401.
The meeting will be held at
12:15 p.m. in room 349 of the
Reitz Union.

Page 23



Page 24

1, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8, 1968

* Paga 24. The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 8. 1968
/ / 11
* I The Harmon Football Forecast '\* |
' DATSUN ' I TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 1,027 Right, 299 Wrong,. 36 Ties 775) I
*' I IKANSAS 6TEXAS 11 NOTRE DAME 16 ARKANSAS ~ ~
I 2TENNESSEE 7MISSOURI 12 CALIFORNIA 17 ALABAMA Town Collar -it looks great
I 3SOUTHERN CAL BPENN STATE 13-AUBURN 18 COLORADO
OT< OF KllfF I 4-OHIO STATE 9HOUSTON 14 MICHIGAN 19 MICHIGAN STATE
LU,J wr rnvx I SPURDUE ioGEORGIA 15 MIAMI, FLA. 20-MISSISSIPPI with or without a collar pin.
TPADF INSTOO AND I Saturday, Nov. 9MAJOR COLLEGES
irmuc ina vw | Alabama 17 l.s.u. is There's one on the West Coast, another in ...
Arizona 21 Air Force 20 ... ... .. . Heres why. Gant tailoring. The flair
AT GAINESVILLES fl Arizona State 28 Utah IS the Midwest, Still another in the East, andH 6f the collar. The way it gently slopes
I Army nsas 21 Boston College 7 two in the Southeast. We're speaking, to eliminate fullness on the sides. The
LOWEST PRICES I I Boston V. 26 Rhode Island 14 naturally of outstandina football games on manner in which the points stay in
LUOTC3I rKILU! Buffalo 31 Northern Illinois 14 naturally, ui uuuidnumy iwwa.. un place, no matter hQW you turn or
California 24 Southern Cal 21 this big November 9th weekend Os collage move with pin or without. This is
I Colgate 24
Colorado 30 Oklahoma State 15 n l,- uiill on patently Gant. In white or blue
I Corned 23 Brown 7 O ne * t ,e biggest spotlights Will fOCUS On cotton oxford, stripes and tattersall.
I oavldson h !i vM i! ,bia is Trojan-Bear fracas in the Pacific Coast
| "FRIEND OF THE I Georgfa Stat 28 Mississippi state ij Conference ... 3rd-ranked Southern Cal and
UAINIJN iPOCKETBOOK" I Georgia Tech 28 Navy* 13 12th-ranked California. The winner might 9
wwr 1 I Ho[y a cross 24 Massachusetts 20 just end up with all the rose-colored marbles. a (c\
EXCELLENT SERVICE I
II; A r \ I I E, s Is OK'2s?m ,n picking California to upset Southern Cal by 4n| ||Ljl
wOOQInCI 0t VwlOlK I Kent state 21 Marshall 12 three points. Oregon State will keep pace a R v3r
Louisville 27 Cincinnati is with whoever wins, beating U.C.L.A. by six A ¥TY>
Motors | ss.r 101 s ass ? points. DONIGANS
.. r|n - Tr .,. |l:BTri I SiwiSSpi B*' 8 *' S Chattanooga .5 The thriller in the Midwest is the Big 8 I
L LUbtb UtALtH IU | Missouri 34 lowa state 13 Eiaht Conference struaale between i n 1111 in
tuc I IMIVPRCITV"' Nebraska 24 Kansas State 7 ... i a awl Jl >
me umvenou r New Mexico state 26 Wichita is top-ranked Kansas and Oklahoma. Though 11 If *1 1012 SOUTH MAIN North Texas" 8 State 32 Texas (Ei Paso) 23 the Sooners are un-ranked, they'll make the!
OPEN I oh^ 6 state" 16 5? wfsconsfn 7 Jayhawks prove they belong at the top of ti
TIL 9PM Ph 378 23 5. ZVs,ZhF*m. S the heap. Kansas will win by 11 points. 1129 Wo. UsiV. At#.
iW rn 4/0 1 Oregon state 21 u.c.l.a. is And that little muddle at the top of the
Pacific Santa Barbara 0 ...
Penn state 23 Miami, Fia. 21 Southeast Conference will clear a bit after a
suSe?s 24 Connecticut iJ couple of games this Saturday. 2nd-ranked
The Collfidd Life Mi ' i|,Pi w*i!i.m e iM S .T Tennessee meets 13th-ranked Auburn; FLORIDA
Tampa 26 East Carolina 7 they're both undefeated in the conference. 1 VIXI
m m Tennessee 24 Auburn 16
Football Forocost fr- !! E,, i! 2£ *£ QUARTERLY
Tulane 22 Tulsa* 20 its all over, Tennessee and Georgia, those
u .? h state 22 Brigham Young 20 two bunk-buddies who tied back on the
Villanova 30 Quantico Marines 6 ... OO A n II
. ~ Virginia 25 North Carolina 20 opening day of the season, will be in the lead joU KGITZ UIHOII
/ wake Forest 25 soutiT'caroiina 17 by themselves. The Volunteers will beat
wesf'Texas 29 western Michigan 17 Auburn by 8, and the Bulldogs will whip
* a ft? vir,ini it KImw!;!. IJ Floridabyei 9 h,een Campus
\ A 4th-ranked Ohio State and 14th-ranked HMHBBBHMBBBHHBHHBi
Michigan are heavy favorites to remain in
&L' command of the Big Ten conference race. I \A/ AKIT TQ
Other GamesEAST The Buckeyes are favored over Wisconsin by
mterna-ai 22 southn Connecticut 17 3Q r and the Wolverines should rap Illinois by
Amherst 17 Trinity 6 r r l I n r /* n n r
tjjp /%Aurr Bates 18 Colb y 13 23 points. SUBSCRIBE
THE GAMES Bridgeport 27 Glassboro 0 L., . .... JVVJ\,|\IUL
California state 30 Edinboro o That big one in the East will be as
Fla. vs. Ga. cfarion'* Me,lon 32 slippery Rock 13 important to two strong independents as any Snd M tn
F.S.U. vs. Miss. St. Delaware valley 30 western Maryland i! league race is to a conference team. October Issu
7 ; lTu SS& 1! && !! Sth-rated Penn State m M ts a Miami team
Auburn w. Tenn. K," Hcpbip, S ?i"S!Si re '5 that plays red hot and then jce colci This
Calif. vs. Southern Cal. Lafayette 21 Kings Point 20 week the Hurricanes are no. 15. Penn State, | copy $1.25
Vandy vs. Kentucky MuhienbeTg 2? Lycom?ng 1 ? playing as consistent football as Miami plays
Mich. St. vs. Ind. North eastern 1 ire ?J Sittond" is inconsistent, should win it by two points. year (3 issues) 3.00
Duke vs. N. St. Norwich 14 Worcester Tech 13 But who knows mavbe it'll be Miami'r .
Purdue vs. Minn. Rochester 42 Coast Guard I V V 3 Vears(9 SSUes) 800
Temple 20 Gettysburg o red hot day! io.w
TM.p aaar Elsewhere. sthranked Purdue will gum Heres mv check
\ Tufts 23 Bowdoin 17 up the Gophers of Minnesota by seventeen.
; i upsaia is Moravian 14 . 7th-ranked Missouri will top lowa State
Lspwp< ' S:rcS:S.r 1 by 21 ... and Houston, no. 9. is favored I
v Your CLICA Representatives in Gainesville: I B Bml
Jg| Hugh I I IMIUI
Sam Darby I BTpKKff!pKBHHB!IB
Guest Prognosti Gators f MCA Breece Me Cray I
Bob Peterson I IHHHPHIIf
George Herzog I I I V
IBfli UHyutJ
Miami Penn St. Miami LITC |
I 888 l
Company of America I Ml Ml
b fl I 111 MB
Duke Duke Vic MeKenze & Associates I Ifli IflH
Purdue Purdue Purdue 411GN. \V. 13th St. I _ fl BMI BPI
New Phone number is 378-2476 | BTBBHIBBIHfHBB^!IWIfMW!iW!WPI4PWPPNWPPIONNI
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