Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
GUS MUSTELIER
DIME STORE FLAG
.. goes up in flames

UF Officials Reflect National Pill Dispute

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the third
of a three part series on birth control
at the UF. This installment presents
the oonfligring opinions at the UF and
throughout the nation on whether
college health services should provide
contraceptive drugs for coeds.)
By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
UF coeds, under an individual
case philosophy, have received birth
control pills for contraceptive
purposes from Student Health Service
physicians.
And UF President Stephen C.

O'Connell is opposed to the practice
because prescribing and dispensing
contraceptive drugs should not be a
function of the Student Health
Service.
OConnell contends that prescribing
contraceptives could be construed as
university approval of premarital
sexual intercourse, which, he says, is
against Florida law.
(< The treatment of student illnesses
and medical problems is the only
reason for operating a student
infirmary, OConnell said.
I dont see that contraception is
encompassed within student health,
he added.
Mmmarmmmmmmmimam m m m m M m m m A S M

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol. 61. No. 34

BY POLITICALLY DISGRUNTLED

Flag, Draft Cards
Burned At Rally

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Assignments Editor
An unidentified man burned
a small American flag during an
anti-political rally in front of
Tigert Hall Tuesday night, and
then faded back into a motley
crowd of more than 400.
The burning came during an
apolitical rally held for those
who didnt care to stay home
and listen to the election
returns, and sponsored by
Students for a Democratic
Society Southern Students
Organizing Committee.
University Police, the
Gainesville police officers and
the Federal Bureau of
Investigation ware present, but
stood away from the lights.
Were aware of the action
(the flag burning) and we are
investigating the incident, said
W. D. Joiner, Gainesville Police
chief. We will present our
findings to the city attorney.
An official at the FBI office
in Gainesville said defacing an
American flag carried a
maximum fine of SI,OOO and a
years imprisonment.
Several cards, supposedly
draft cards, were burned, but
Joiner said the state had no
jurisdiction, and would not press
charges.
Before the flag and cards
were burned, the crowd gathered
at the Plaza of the Americas for
the rally, which included a
pantomine showing an American
military man killing a
Vietnamese peasant.
Following an hour of blues
music many members of the
crowd lit candles and sat down
in a huge peace symbol.
They then decided to march
on Tigert to show their
discontent with the present
political situation.
A few cries of Take Tigert
were heard, but no attempt was
made to enter the locked
budding.

University of Florida y Gainesville

\I I i i_ r ; 11 <> i v


DEPTH REPORT

OConnell said the prescribing of
contraceptives is not the proper.
responsibility of the university.
Any policy at the infirmary on
both control would have to have the
approval of the president and the
Bond of Regents, he said.
There vtauld have to be some
sound arguments from health service
physicians to justify the prescribing o£
such medication, O'Connell said.

* '-*rn^mk
IN DEFIANCE OF DRAFT N CIC A,1,,0v0
... what appears to be a draft card is burned
Illinois: Nixon's
Winning Margin
WASHINGTON (UPI) Richard Milhous Nixon won the
Presidency of the United States Wednesday in the political
comeback of the century.
Shortly after noon EST, Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, his
voice choking but a smile on his lips, conceded defeat on the basis of
unofficial returns and offered his Republican opponent help in uniting
the country.
Only after Humphreys concession did Nixon make a statement on
the election. He promised to try to unite a divided nation and to work
for peace.
Nixon won his second battle for the White House in Illinois, which
gave John F. Kennedy his margin of victory over Nixon in 1960. Its
26 electoral votes put the former vice president over the top after he
had captured the 40 votes of his home state of California.
With 93 per cent of all precincts reporting, the national popular
vote was:
Nixon 29,565,052 43 per cent
Humphrey 29,539,500 43 per cent
Wallace 9,181,466 13 per cent.
The electoral vote was 299 for Nixon, 181 for Humphrey and 45
for Wallace, the American Independent Party candidate. It takes 270
electoral votes to win.
Contests remained undecided in Alaska, where Nixon was leading
for 3 electoral votes, and in Maryland, where Humphrey was leading
by 19,000 votes. Maryland will count 35,000 absentee ballots on
Thursday.
(SEE 'NIXON' PAGE 10)

Thursday, November 7, 1968


Dr. Wilmcr J. Coggins, director of
the campus health service, defends the
practice of prescribing both control
pills as a professional decision*' and
as a personal and private matter
between physician and patient.**
The different philosophies
expressed by Coggins and OConnell
on the subject of birth control for
college coeds are indicative of a debate
going on throughout the country over
the role of university health services.
The Committee on Ethical and
Profesnonal Relationships of the
(SEE/NATION'S* PAGE 31



!, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, November 7,1968

Page 2

TrooDS 'Hit The Beach\ At Da Nang

i §i|
(Editors Note: This is the third of a series by Alligator
: special writer Rick Benson, recently returned from Vietnam. In
: this article Benson describes his units arrival in Vietnam.)
By RICK BENSON
Alligator Special Writer
DA NANG, Vietnam Training for two months in
i the snow for Vietnam at Fort Carson, Colorado, was
an ironic start for our battalion, so it followed that our
j arrival in that country shouldnt be any less comical.
As we stood bobbing up and down in a Navy landing craft
; along side the troop ship in Da Nang harbor, the ships
loudspeakers carried the Beatles tune Love out over the water
as jets roared overhead on their way to bombing missions in
North Vietnam.
The harbor was crowded with several American freighters

waiting for dock space, as
well as the hospital ship
Repose, serving the seriously
wounded in the northern
combat areas.
Our craft soon came to a
grinding halt on the beach,
and when the plank went
down, off we went loaded
with cameras, transistor
radios, and combat gear.
Unlike the movies, the only
thing we hit after coming
ashore was the PX truck,
staffed by Vietnamese, selling
Cokes and sandwiches.
I scanned the hills for any
evidence of enemy positions
since we received reports on
the ship that, with our

tB $ ¥ x^^B
NICK ARROYO
A. DIDIER GRAEFFE
... plays his sanssa

(Greek, Senior Pictures I
Taken For Seminole I
Seniors and Greeks are having individual pictures taken for the
Seminole now through Nov. 22.
All students who will graduate by August, 1969, and all members
of fraternities and sororities are eligible. They should call the
Seminole office from 12-5 p.m. during the week to make an
appointment. The number is 376-3261, ext. 2832.
Pictures will be taken in room 346 of the Reitz Union. Dress is
dark coat and tie for men; women should wear a long-sleeved round
neck sweater, with a plain blouse.
To find out when their group is scheduled, students should consult
the Seminole ad in the Alligator. The photographers hours are 12-5
p.m. and 6-9 p.m. Students are charged a $ 1.50 sitting fee.
THE FU)HDA ALLIGATOR l* the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and to published five Urn weakly except during June, July and August when It to published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Holts
Union Btoldlng, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 92601. The Alligator to entered
as seeped class natter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 92601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3 .SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advert
t advert las wants and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Fieri* Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
lnvolvtag typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice to given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not he mpoasfele for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to ran several times Mottoes for correction must be given before next Insertion.

relative nearness to the DMZ,
we would see combat within
24 hours. Looking about the
complacent faces of the
Marines landing on the beach,
I guessed that they meant we
would see Combat via the
Armed Forces Television
Network which beams a full
schedule of American shows
to Vietnam daily.
We received word that our
new home was to be a Marine
camp outside of Da Nang.
During the 45-minute ride to
the camp I received my first
look at the country and the
people: women walking
alongside the road supporting
baskets with poles over their

New Black Humanities Discovery

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Neither white Americans or
for that matter Black Americans
know anything about African
humanities. humanities
professor A. Didier Graeffe said.
Graeffe will be teaching a
course in African humanities
next quarter as part of the
course, non-Western humanities,
CHN 254.
Africans are born
storytellers, Graeffe said.
For this reason, Graeffe said,
the course will study current
African literature and to some
extent music, along with other
products of civilization.
African art has deeply
influenced contemporary
western art, Graeffe said for
example.
What needs to be made
clear, he said, is this is not a

B . W 11 b* II B
4 If i BJBnil
ONE IN DA RICK BENSON
...beginning of a long road

shoulders filled with vegetables
and grains; bare foot kids
flying home-made kites; tin
makers pounding out their
wares; motor bikes and
mini-buses moving along the
narrow highways.
Clapboard houses with
sheet metal roofing line the
highway belonging to
refugees who have flocked to
the security near the camp.
Numerous churches and
orphanages have also been set
up to take care of the people.
Base camp is a
combination of plywood

A HUMAN LABORATORY

course in Afro-American
humanities.
It is a study in African
heritage, Craeffe said.
However, I will emphasize the
areas where American Blacks
came from, he said, and this is
West Africa.
But the course will study all
Africa and will probably begin
with Egypt, Graeffe said.
He said he wants an
integrated audience.
lt will be a human
laboratory, he said, and to my
knowledge this has not been
Hone.
The course will be for five
hours credit and will meet two

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buildings and metal huts, all
linked by dusty dirt roads,
which become a second skin
to buildings and people alike.
Vietnamese men and women
work at the camp doing
everything from filling sand
bags to doing wash for the
Marines Its not uncommon to
run into a Vietnamese girl in
a mini-skirt or the traditional
black slacks and silk gown
walking around the post, to
and from their jobs.
Radio seems to go
everywhere with Americans.
The soldiers, whether they be
on a lonely guard post or
driving in an ammo cnnvnv.

times a week on Tuesdays and
Thursdays, he said. The section
number will be 0789 C.
Graeffe said he really became
acquainted with American
Negroes during a summer
performing arts workshop in St.
Petersburg.
He said he first visited Africa
in 1936 and has several artifacts
of African lore that are now
unobtainable.
One of these is a sanssa
from French Cameroun, a string
instrument used by men in the
jungle at night to keep leopards
from jumping out of trees.
The sanssa is actually a
stylized woman and is played bv

listen to the latest music
from the states. At 6:30 in
the morning Armed Forces
Radio comes over the air
waves with Good morning
Vietnam, and other items
like: The weather for Da
Nang and vicinity...
Reminders to take the
weekly malaria pill, road
closures, and tips on how not
to shoot yourself come over
the radio throughout the day.
Watching bomb bursts
from jets in the nearby hills,
.virile listening to the
Doors sing one of their
latest hits is an unforgettable
experience. Something like
the enHino of Dr. Straneelove.

m
plucking her multiple bamboo
breasts, Graeffe said.
There is a kind of racism in
Africa, he said. This is
negritude which is best
translated in English as pride,
A presentation of the course
will be held in room 117, Little
Hall today at 3:30 p.m. Anyone
can come, he said.
The course will be a brand
new discovery, Graeffe said.
five till nine dining room
curb
J carry
?99c\ y
\/CHICKEN
DINNER
% Golden Pried
Chicken, served with
potatoes and tangy
coleslaw kX
a regular |
\ $1.25 I
2310 S.W. 13th St. 376-2696
1505 N.W. 13th St. 378-2481



SURVEY MADE

Nations Schools
In 'Pill Dispute
American College Health Association surveyed 323 members of the
association on the birth control issue.
Os the participating institutions, 180 health services do not
prescribe the pill for contraceptive purposes regardless of marital
status and 143 health services prescribe the pill at least to married
women.
Two hundred and forty six of the 323 colleges surveyed will not
prescribe birth control pills to unmarried coeds.
Os those colleges offering contraceptive medication, 13 will
prescribe to unmarried coeds; 12 of these prescribe to unmarried
minors.
Os those colleges prescribing the birth control pill, only 13
prescribe it for contraceptive purposes to unmarried students over 21
years of age while 12 prescribe to minors.
Those health services which prescribe the pill for contraceptive
puposes supported Coggins assertion that contraceptive drugs are like
any other mediation and that prescribing them is a matter of
individual judgment and responsibility between the patient and her
physician.
The UF infirmarys no policy policy was also indirectly
defended by results of the survey.
Some health services reported that a public policy was
undesirable and that all statements on the prescribing of birth
control pills should indicate it is a doctor-patient matter.
Os the 143 colleges prescribing birth control pills, only 19 reported
having a written policy regarding the pill.
One reason given for not making contraceptive drugs available at
student health services was that the long term use of the birth control
pill requires medical supervision by personal physicians.
The University of South Florida and Florida State University both
have official policies stating that birth control pills will not be
prescribed because of a lack of facilities and personnel.
Senate Function Abolished
For SG Vice Presidency

A bill to totally eliminate
functions of the SG
Vice-President in Student Senate
affairs will be presented at
tonights Senate meeting to be
held at 7:20 in the Student
Activities room of Reitz Union.
The bills are so constructed
that future vice-presidents will
not be able to involve themselves
in any way in Student Senate
affairs, said Student Body Vice
President Gary Goodrich.
Tonight Goodrich will make

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0 Pep set, new dangle ear-rings, 3 pr. for sl.
# Regular ear-rings, 4 pr. for sl.
# Cocktail rings sl.
# Lots more
BUY NOW FOR X-MAS
Phone 376-1211
EXT 104

his last official speech and allow
Jack Vaughn, elected president
pro-tem to begin his term for
office.
Alligator
Staff Meets
There will be a mandatory
meeting of the Alligator
editorial staff Friday
afternoon at 4 in the
Alligator newsroom.

FEATURING: N T^^ ALL OUR SHOPPERS SPECIALS
Specialty Sandwiches fry served with tossed salad,roll and
Delicious Salads jm Ham and Cheese on
Domestic and Sesame Roll ........85
served with potato salad
imported £ OtenttUtriUB 8 SSSriSS;-"
CONGENIAL \ o< gntfcg
CONTINENTAL y Super MeatbaNer ...75
ATMOSPHERE % Wjf S^*Hh
Serving Continuously Meat Sauce 1.00
11 am to 8:30 pm Jp served with tossed salad, roll ond
CLOSED SUNDAYS
STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS
(VA 1392-1681
; 392-1682
Jirnm? J 92-1683
Alligator
Advertising
Classified (8 am 3 pm)
Display (8 am 5 pm)
Business Office (8 am 4 pm)
Editor Managing Editor (8 am 10 pm)
News Room (8 am lO pm)
Production (5 pm lO pm)
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Editor (12 pm 5 pm)
Staff (12 pm 5 pm)
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Staff (12 pm 5 pm)
Student Publications
Central Business Office (8 am 4 pm)
Editorial Advisor (10 am 8 pm)
General Manager (8 am 5 pm)
Operations Manager (8 am 5 pm)
Production Manager (5 pm lO pm)
Effective Saturday,November9

Thursday, Novambar 7. 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 7,1968

Page 4

SAMSON
Project SAMSON will hold its
second orientation and
recruitment meeting this evening
in the Reitz Union. The meeting
is scheduled for 7 p.m. in room
121. Students engaged in the
tutorial program and those
interested in assisting the
disadvantaged through all the
various programs, are invited to
attend.

Kammerer: Change The System Slowly

(Editors Note: This is the
fourth of a series examining the
UF Action Conference. This
article studies the avenues of
change considered by members
of the Action Conference with
regard to Faculty Senate power.)
By RICHARD THOMPSON
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Gladys Kammerer, Action
Conference member and past
president of UFs AAUP, points
out the special importance of
last springs AAUP faculty
restructuring proposal and the
current similar task force
proposal.
We were looking to devolve
some presidential power so there
could be change and
modernization, Kammerer said.
What is being objected to is
the authoritarian and strict
hierarchial nature of UF power,
she said.
The current senate is
nothing more than a rubber
stamp and everyone knows it.
Kammerer said she and most
moderate-liberals accept the
long range view of change.
Theres no need to change the
structure, she emphasizes,
expressing a fear of ttet kind of
change. If you change the
Education
Examined
Educators from around the
nation will meet on the UF
campus for a three day seminar,
General Education: Pertinent
or Peripheral? Nov. 7-9.
Included in the program will
be Dr. James H. Billington,
author of The Icon and Axe;
and Dr. William Arrowsmith,
described as a radical educator
by Dean Franklin Doty of the
University College.
Billington is professor of
history at Princeton University,
and will speak on The World
Crisis in Higher Education.
Arrowsmiths topic will be
Towards A New University.
He is professor of classics and
university professor in arts and
letters at the University of
Texas.
Arrowsmith is a constructive*
critic of U.S. higher education
because he makes the radical
proposal of cutting away the
embroidery of education,
Doty said.
The meetings, open to the
public, will all be held in the
Reitz Union. Billington will
speak in Ballroom A at 6:30
Thursday night and Arrowsmith
in Ballroom B at 8 p.m. Friday.

DROPOUTS

' HAVE A ] r Z2LKRP- \ I \
! f*<3LzZTL/) HA-HAH/J
I OF ARDUOUS / YWW'V I V ~"~\l
research to / /A V \
UNDERSTAND.' I A\ \ V \
H ISsi
M-*] f&Gf* *** W N **-* l c

Alligator

personnel eventually you change
the structure.
A great many faculty agree,
even those holding otherwise
politically-antithetical views.
Whether one believes change
possible within the current
system becomes critical to a
consideration of the whole
power-interest-faculty
restructuring issue.
The key to faculty thinking
on change is evolutionary not
revolutionary. Both
conservatives and liberals (but
not all of them) fear a South
American system, where the
students and administration have
gotten together and rendered the
faculty powerless.
Agriculture economics
professor, John Greenman said it
was an inaccruate image
projected by some professors
and groups, and continued
attempts to erode the presidents
authority that left him with
no other choice but to defend
the UF and the administration.
Greenman says there were
two other major factors leading
to his active involvement in
campus politics during the last
year.
First, he said, and I think
this feeling became a source of
increasing concern for the silent
majority, there was a tendency

ELECTRIC HEAT IS
CLE A N

your GAINESVILLE UTILITIES

OBJECTS TO UF HIERARCHY

INTERPRETIVE

of certain groups to defend
people who shouldnt be
defended.
Second, he said, there
appeared to be an attempt to
have academic freedom defined
as entitling a professor to say or
do anything as long as it was not
illegal.

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BY HOWARD POST

This was brought out in the
Jones case.
Greenman says all of these
factors were eroding the
presidents power and this
could have led to an
unworkable situation. Its time
to support the administration.
He predicts the task forces
proposals would lead to, in
effect, A takeover of
administrative power. It*
wouldnt per se lead to anarchy
but anarchy if steps of this nature

were to continue.
Dr. Manning Dauer, chairman
of the political science
department, callfe the need for
changes critical and important
at this time.
Dauer takes a position
encompassing the spectrum. He
favors an increased faculty
senate role, but with deans and
some administrators. I also think
some students should sit on the
senate.
Dauer favors FTE student
enrollment.



AAUP Condemns Campus Militants

A resolution condemning militant student
actions which disrupt the educational process at
UF was tabled Thursday by Acting Faculty
Senate Chairman F. W. Conner.
Dr. R. W. Fahien and Dr. Gladys M.
Kammerer, president and past president of the
UFs American Association of University
Professors (AAUP), said the proposal had not
gone through the Senate Steering Committee and

This is your new
University of Florida
Telephone Book

i 1
USE IT BEGINNING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9On that vidual numbers of faculty and staff, call 392-2431. For
day, all departments and frequently caHed offices will have student numbers, call 392-2441. Please note that after
their own individual telephone numbers. For your con- November 9, the old central telephone number for the
venience, and to help make your calls faster, clip out this University will no longer be in service. J

advertisement and keep it near your telephone. For indi indi
indi
i
i
a
s


a
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
ALL OFFICES (Not listed below) 392-3261
Academic Affairs, 233 Tigert ...392*1301
Alumni Services, G-l Reitz Union 392-1691
Architect, Board of Regents, Bldg. E 392-0621
Athletics, .Intercollegiate
Information, 102 Stadium 392-0664
Business Office, 102 Stadium 392-0654
Golf Club, Newberry Road 392-0689
Sports Publicity. 102 Stadium 392-0641
J Ticket Office, 102 Stadium 392-0648
Bookstore & Campus Shop, The Hub 392-0194
Business Affairs, 202 Tigert ..; 392-1336
Computing Center, NASA Bldg 392-2064
Continuing Education, Director's Office 392-0625
Correspondence Study, 707 Seagle Bldg 392-1713
Special Programs, 505 Seagle Bldg 392-1701
Credit Union, 1200 SW sth Ave 392-0393
Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Bldg. OG 392-1821
Gator Boosters Club, 105 Stadium 392-0637
Housing
Administrative Offices, Towers Bldg 392-2161
Married Housing, Towers Bldg 392-2175
Off-Campus Housing, Towers Bldg 392-2181
Information Desk, Tigert Hall 392-1268
Information Desk, Reitz Union 392-1649
Information (Patient), Teaching Hosp 392-2641
Institute of Food & Agricultural Sciences
Agriculture, College of, 261 McCarty 392-1961
i Editorial Department 140 McCarty 392-1771
Experiment Stations, 240 McCarty 392-1784
Extension Service, 230 McCarty 392-1761
i Administrative Services, 346 McCarty 392-1764
Field Services, 106 Farm Area 392-1984
Forestry, School of, 305 Rolfs 392-1792
i Austin Cary Memorial Forest. Waldo Rd 392-1751
Provost's Office, 256 McCarty 392-1971
Administrative Services, 338 McCarty 392-1733
J. Hillis Miller Health Center
ALL OFFICES (Not listed below) Information 392-3261
Admissions and Patient Registration, THC ... 392-3121
i Blood Bank, Room A-100, THC 392-3581
Central Appointments, Room A-151, THC 392-2801
Chaplain, Room H-148, THC 392-3024
Clinics, Teaching Hospital and Clinics
Children's Mental Health :..... 392-3641
a Diagnostic, Room A-218, THC 392-3561
Ear, Nose and Throat, Ist Floor, THC 392-3431
Eye, Ist Floor. THC 392-2794
i General Medical, Ist Floor, THC 392-3431
Pediatric, Room A-168, THC 392-3671
Psychiatric, Ist Floor, THC 392-2662
i Rehabilitation Services, Ground Floor, THC 392-2954
X-ray Therapy, Room A-25, THC ~ 392-3161
Emergency, Room A-126, THC &92-3591
> Patient Bills. THC 392-2711
Patient Information, THC 392-2641
Patient Telephones (in the rooms) 392-3261
Patient Referral Information
Anesthesiology 392-3441
Medicine. General 392-2881
Chief Resident 392-3486
Cardiology 392-3482
Chest Disease 392-2666
Endocrinology 392-2612
Gastroenterology 392-2877
Hematology 392-3301
Infectious Diseases, Allergy & Arthritis 392-2871
Kidney Disease 392-3757
Neurology 392-3491
Nights & Weekends Only, All Divisions 392-3536
Li......

failed to gain enough votes for discussion in the
meeting.
The resolution was presented on behalf of the
National Executive Committee of the AAUP.
The resolution supports the rights of students
to free speech and dissent, but emphasizes that it
be done in an orderly fashion. It condemns
students efforts to interrupt the speeches of
speakers invited to campus. The proposal also

m

I
a

Obstetrics & Gynecology 392*2892
Ophthalmology 392*2794
Pathology 392*3742 I
Pediatrics 392*3671
Psychiatry 392*2662
Psychiatry, Child 392-3641
Radiology 392*2961
Therapeutic Radiology 392*2971 §
Surgery 392*3711
Ear, Nose and Throat 392-3374
Neurological Surgery 392-3371
Orthopedics 392-2741 j
Pediatric Surgery 392-3711
Plastic Surgery 392-3395
Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 392-3711
Urology 392*3391 I
Nights & Weekends Only, All Divisions 392-3711
Physical Plant and Maintenance, Room A-l, THC 392-3765
Provost's Office, Room M-I'ol, MSB 392-2761
Public Relations, Room M-121, MSB 392-2621
Purchasing, Room H-5, THC 392-2814
Receiving and Stores, Room H-l, THC 392-2854
Security Office, Room H-BA, THC 392-3750 i

J. Wayne Reitz Union
Information Desk, First Floor 392-1649
Box Office, T-110 392-1653
Guest Rooms ...392-2151
Reservations Office, 101 Reitz Union 392-1645
Libraries, General Information 392-0341
After 5 p.m. call 392-0361
Museum, Florida State, Seagle Bldg 392-1721
Personnel Division (Employment), The Hub 392-1201
Physical Plant Division
Administrative Offices 392-1141
Central Stores 392-1115

Placement (Career Planning) Center, G-22, Reitz Union ..392-1601
Police Department, Bldg. A, Radio Road 392-1111
President's Office, 226 Tigert 392-1311
Purchasing Division, 204 Tigert 392-1331
Registrar & Admissions Office, Tigert Hall
Information 392-1374
Admissions 392-1365
Records & Registration 392*1381
Shands Teaching Hospital (See J. Hillis Miller H.C.) 392-3261
Sponsored Research, 309 Tigert 392-1291
i
Student Affairs, 124 Tigert 392-1265
Dean of Men, 129 Tigert 392-1261
Dean of Women, 123 Tigert 392-1271
Teaching Hospitals & Clinics (See J. Hillis Miller H.C.) ....392-3261
WRUF (Radio Station), Stadium 392-0771
WUFT (Television Station), Stadium 392-0426
Southern Bell

i a


Thursday, November 7,1968, The Florida Alligator,

recognizes the disruptive effects of
demonstrations at other campuses which have led
to the occupation of campus buildings.
Were not trying to ram home our ideas, but
offer constructive steps towards problems which
have plagued other universities,* Fahien said.
Dr. Kammerer was unavailable for her
comments on the resolution.

Page 5



1, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, November 7,1968

Page 6

Under SI.OO
CHURCHILL: Taken from the
Diaries of Lord Moran. The
sensational, eye-opening diaries of Sir
Winston's long-time personal
physician, friend and confidant
from the dark days of 1940 to the
great mans death in 1964 revealing
Churchill's real thoughts on the
momentous political issues of our
time as well as his fears, doubts,
duplicities, ambitions, etc. Photos.
76 pp. Pub. at SIO.OO. Sale .99
THE WORLDS OF ROBERT E.
SHERWOOD: Mirror of His Times.
By John Mason Brown. Stunning
biography of the four-time Pulitzer
prize-winning playwright and
speech-writer for FDR, and his
literary and political career in the
supercharged New York of the 30s.
Here, also, are the renowned wits of
the "Algonquin Roundtable Set
large as life Dorothy Parker,
F.P.A., Benchley, Broun, et al.
"Brilliant, readable, rewarding book
John Gunther. Pub. at $6.95. Sale
.99
BEHIND THE LINES HANOI. By
Harrison E. Salisbury. N.Y. Times
reporters eye-opening account of the
Vietnamese war as seen from the
enemys side, that became, in itself,
front-page news throughout the
world. Illus. Pub. at $4.95. Sale .99
The Massie Case RAPE IN
PARADISE. By Theon Wright.
Fast-moving true story how an
alleged rape attempt exploded into a
ritual murder and race riots in the
Hawaii of the 19305. Bizarre,
violent, shocking, this world-famous
case (involving the wife of a U.S.
Navy officer) has been called the
Dreyfus Case of the Pacific. Photos.
Pub. at $5.95. Sale .99
THE LAST YEARS OF A REBEL: A
Memoir of Edith Sitwell. By
Elizabeth Salter. Intimate portrait of
a complex, always fascinating woman
considered by some to be one of
the few great poets of our times.
Here is Dame Edith, cloaked and
bejewelled, at her celebrated readings
and TV appearances, conducting her i
ferocious literary feuds, entertaining
Marilyn Monroe and Noel Coward,
etc. Photos. Pub. at $5.00. Sale .99
Louis Auchincloss THE
EMBEZZLER. Scandalous and
pulsating novel of a Wall St.
manipulators act of betrayal that
brought down the delicately balanced
structure of the Stock Exchange.
Follows Roy Prime, golden boy of
the financial world, from rarified
heights to ignominious downfall and
public disgrace. Pub. at $4.95. Sale
.99
THE IDEA OF EUROPE. By Denis
de Rbugemont. Magnificent
anthology spanning 2,000 yearsl
Profiles the, spirit of European
its*greatness as a seedbed
of ideas, innovations and humanism,
from Dante and Sully to Ortega and
Valery. Pub. at $8.95. Sale .99
CHARLES CHAPLIN MY
AUTOBIOGRAPHY. Everything in
this book by the greatest comic
genius of our time makes for
fascinating reading. 512 pages, over
100 priceless photographs. Pub. at
$6.95. Sale .99
BASIC PSYCHOLOGY. Lucid,
introductory text. Over 700
double-columned pages, profusely
illustrated. Pub. at $8.25. Sale .99
THE LOVES OF GEORGE
BERNARD SHAW. By C.G.L. Du
Cann. A must for Shavians and all
those who enjoy reading about the
love affairs of the famous. Reveals
Shaw as ladies man, husband, and
philanderer. Photos. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale .99
Was HE James Bond? THE LIFE OF
IAN FLEMING. By John Pearson.
Describes his personality, loves,
travels, friendships, adventures and
careers. Incredibly, Fleming outshone
James Bond in every department!
Photos. Pub. at $6.95. Sale .99
THE TATTOOED HEART OF
LIVINGSTON. By Marianne
Greenwood. Intimate memoirs of the
famed photographer of Picasso at
Antibes. Photos. Pub. at $6.95. Sale
.99
MYRA WALDOS TRAVEL GUIDE
TO EUROPE. Sophisticated, packed
with information you really need on
most interesting sights, hotels and
restaurants on and off the tourist
track, in every country. 673 pages.
Pub. at $5.95. Sale .99
THE OSWALD AFFAIR An
Examination of the Warren Report.
By Leo Sauvage. Over 400 pages of
detailed probing into the glaring
contradictions and ommissions.
Photos. Pub. at $6.95. Sale .99
GANDHIS EMISSARY: Sudhir
Ghosh. Vivid inside story of India's
past twenty years by a well-known
in Indian politics,
Sudhir Ghosh, whose courage and
independent qualities of mind led
Mahatma Gandhi to favor him as
unofficial emissary between England
and India in negotiations which
resulted in his countrys
independence. Pub. at $6.00. Sale .99
THE WITNESSES. By M.W. Waring.
Huge, panoramic novel of life and
people between 1902 and 1917;
portrays, with dazzling sweep and
color, a world of medieval luxury and
starvation, of noblemen and
Bolsheviks as Czarist Russia
collapses and Lenin takes over. 695
. pp. Pub. at $7.95. Sale .99

I V and Aa \. v y
I located in the Htj \ 1*

Balt tells the true story of his descent
into madness -* while undergoing
psychoanalysis.is. Describes with
unflinching honesty, how he killed
his wife; of his imprisonment,
treatment, recovery, trial, and
acquittall Pub. at $5.50. Sale .99
THE SCOPE OF THEOLOGY. Ed.
by Daniel T. Jenkins. 13 leading
Protestant scholars relate religion to
science, philosophy and the arts a
unique up-to-date guide to religious
thought that shows modern theology
at work, grappling with issues and
problems testing Christian faith in
our times. Pub. at $4.95. Sale .99
Pink Tights & Champagne QUEEN
OF THE PLAZA. By Paul Lewis. Life
and times of actress Adah Isaacs
Menken, international symbol of
glamour and wickedness. Swinburne,
Edwin Booth, hundreds of lovers and
admirers and four husbands
rounds out the cast. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale .99

i

Child-Stealing LITTLE CHARLEY
ROSS. By Norman Zierold. Shocking
story of Americas first kidnapping
for ransom. Illus. Pub. at $5.95. Sale
.99
John Herseys WHITE LOTUS. Riots,
crimes, secret plots and WHITE
people in violent rebellion against a
yellow "master race! 683-page
triumph of fantasy fiction that
combines the best of George Orwell
and Ray Bradbury. Pub. at $6.95.
Sale .99
ON THE GREEK STYLE: Essays in
Poetry and Hellenism. By George
Seferis (1963 Nobel Prize-winner for
Literature). First collection of the
Greek poets essays to be published
in English eminent lyrical writings
inspired by deep feeling for Hellenic
culture; others, of equal interest,
exploring international themes; art
and engagement, "theatre of
Pirandello, poetry of Cavafy and T.S.
Eliot, etc. Pub. at $5.95. Sale .99
THE LONELIEST CONTINENT:
The Story of Antarctic Discovery. By
Walker Chapman. Exciting
Adventures, ingenuity, courage and
physical stamina; early whaling men,
famous explorers, the IGY and more.
Photos. Pub. at $4.95. Sale .99

FROM
SEA DIARY: HEMINGWAY ALL
THE WAY. No-holds-barred
reportage on the brothels, saloons,
by-ways, caves, and cages of the
Orient written as an essay in
defense of Hemingway and with
"Papas spirit hovering over every
red-hot page. Pub. at $4.95. Sale .99
The Gay" Boys REGGIE. By
Stanlye Weintraub. Affectionate
portrait of Reginald Turner, gay wit
and raconteur, intimate of Max
Beerbohm, Oscar Wilde, Somerset
Maugham, others. Illus. Pub. at
$6.00. Sale .99
U nder $2.00
S P N. iehrmans; THE SUSPENDED
DRAWING ROOM. Collection of
vintage pen-portraits from The New
Yorker, written with great style and
perspicacity; Shaw Molnar, Robert
Sherwood, et al. Pub. at $6.00 Sale
1.98

Irving Wallace's SUNDAY
GENTLEMAN. Best>selling author
reveals strange people, places and
things inhabiting his personal
adventures and literary career the
French Sherlock Holmes, a Geisha
Girl union, the worlds most elegant
bordello, personalities from Huey
Long to Picasso. 441 pages. Pub. at
$5.95. Sale 1.98
Edwin Way Teales WANDERING
THROUGH WINTER. With 49
spectacular nature photographs.
Triumphant finale to beloved
American naturalists Seasons
books the record of a 20,000 mile
Journey of adventure through the
North American winter: fascinating
wo. J-pictures of whooping cranes
and migrating whales; Texas
longspurs and Maine caribou; Death
Valley pupfish, Mississippi eagles and
hundreds of other phenomena
ranging over the deserts and
deeryards of the American terrain.
Pub. at $6.50. Sale 1.98
VICKY. By M.M. Marberry.
Hilarious, lusty saga of Victoria C.
Woodhull, Free Lover, Suffragette,
and publisher, who precipitated the
great Rev. Henry Ward Beecher sex
scandal. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 1.98

SARAH! By Cornelia Otis Skinner.
Dazzling, dramatic biography of
Sarah Bernhardt, the tempestuous
Frenchwoman many consider the
greatest actress of all time. Recreates
her glorious career, many love affairs,
notable friends and enemies. 28
photos. Pub. at $6.95. Sale 1.98
Jefferson- to F.D.R. POWERS
HUMAN FACE. By Arthur T.
Hadley. A unique American history
that uncovers the shocking truth
about the public and private lives of
fifteen Presidents and public figures
Jackson, Lincoln, Gen. Sherman,
Teddy Roosevelt, Wilson, Truman, et
al. Pub. at $5.00 Sale 1.98
The New Left A PROPHETIC
MINORITY. By Jack Newfleld.
Incisive analysis of origins, beliefs,
weaknesses of todays young radicals,
from the activist groups like SDS and
SNCC to sociocultural movements
represented by Dr. Timothy Leary
and Bob Dylan. Pub. at $4.75 Sale
1.98

COUNTERPOINT. Compiled and
edited by Roy Newquist. Foreword
by Mark Van Doren. Penetrating
comments on life and living, writers
and writing by 63 leading authors,
critics and play-wrights. Fascinating,
amusing, often startling
self-revelations by Joy Adamson,
Truman Capote, Bruce Catton, Peter
2Ly/' e i\ T y rone Ben
Hecht, A.J. Liebling, Harper Lee,
p I ." wufir nnes > Diana Trilling,
Emlyn Williams, et al. 653 pages.
Pub. at $6.95 Sale 1.98
?ivior ER N BY AS A By
Taylor.. New revisedi edition of
acclaimed book. Intimate, sensitive
an intel, '9nt Americans
eooounter with Eastern
values, exotic ways of life Headv
scenes* atmnsnh SCriptions '"t 11 *"
scenes, atmospheres, people and a
P K fOUn K d ana, y sis of P Gandhis
THE dpsfo l 2? s6 so Sa,e 1 9
THE DESERTS DUSTY FACE. Bv
2. 1 ?., Ghenevix Trench. Dynamta
personal of an Englishmans ten
Comm?L~ ork and travel as District
2SS"Sr Ken y* Treats the
before. Pub. at $3.95. Sale

FDR & de Gaulle -- hostile
ALLIES. By Milton Viorst. Close-uo
eyeball-to-eyeball account of the
bitter duel between two giants of the
20th Century. Interprets their
personalities and temperaments
motivations, failure to understand
each other, etc., revealing roots of
differences that separate France and
the U.S. even today. Pub. at S 6 95
Sale 1.98
Thomas Jefferson TO THE GIRLS
AND BOYS. Selected letters with
notes by Edward Boykin. Here is the
delightful, little-known
correspondence between our third
President and his two daughters and
twelve grandchildren, providing a
welcome glimpse into the personal
life of the author of the Declaration
of Independence from 1783 until
his death in 1826. Charmingly
illustrated. Pub. at $5.00. Sale 1.98
SECRET DIPLOMACY: Espionage &
Cryptography 1500-1815. By James
W. Thompson & Saul K. Padover.
Engrossing, documented study of the
seamy underside of European
statecraft three centuries of
diplomatic Lie, Spy and Bribe.
Illuminates the machinations of such
master conspirators as Cardinal
Richelieu, Cromwell, Talleyrand,
Casanova, Cagliostro, etc. Illus. Pub.
at $6.50. Sale 1.98
THE STORY OF AMERICAN
STATEHOOD. By Dana Lee Thomas.
Thrilling story of the men and events
that shaped our fifty states and
territories into the nation we are
today. Illus. Pub. at $4.95. Sale 1.98
DOCTOR KERHOVEN. By Jacob
Wassermann. Powerful psychological
novel of epic proportions that pits
bewildered youth against the myriad
ramifications of modern life, and
subtly evaluates the tendencies of our
times. 646 pages. Pub. at $5.95. Sale
1.98
Jean Starr Untermeyers PRIVATE
COLLECTION. Frost, tne Sitwells,
Sandburg, the Barrymores. these
and many other colorful figures
inhabit these personal reminiscences.
Fascinating reading, rare photos. Pub.
at $5.95. Sale 1.98
RUSSIA IN REVOLUTION:
1890-1918. By Lionel Kochan.
Dramatically presents Russia in
transition, from an almost feudal
monarchy into the first totalitarian
Communist state. Crackles with the
snap of Cossack's whip, the explosion
of the assassins bomb, the
excitement of the Bloody Sunday
massacre, from sporadic clashes to
open civil war. Pub. at $6.95. Sale
1.98
THE ODYSSEY OF HOMER. Trans,
by Ennis Rees. The story of the
wanderings of Odysseus (Ulysses)
encompasses mankinds central
myths. Brilliantly done in natural,
free-flowing verse, this version is
perhaps the most rousing and
readable one available. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale 1.98
Alexandre Dumas JOURNAL OF
MADAME GIOVANNI. First English
translation. Dazzling Frenchwoman
of the 1850's and her Italian
soldier-of-fortune husband Journey to
exotic lands, finding adventure
among cannibals of New Zealand
and among gold-hungry San
Franciscans. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 1.98
Under $3.00
John Gunthers PROCESSION. 50
brilliantly evocative profiles of
Gandhi, Churchill, Stalin, Hitler,
FDR, Truman, Ike, Schweitzer, de
Gaulle, Khrushchev, Nasser, other
dominant figures of our century
based on personal friendships and
"inside interviews. Much new
material completes or brings the
story of each up to date. Pub. at.
$7.50. Sale 2.98.
BALLOTS & BANDWAGONS. By
Ralph G. Martin. Eye-opening
dissection of men, maneuvers ana
machinations behind five nnajor
political conventions from Teddy
Roosevelt to JFK backdropped l by
hoopla and shenanigans, wheeuns
and dealing, vote-switching, battle
between "bosses in smoke-filleo
rooms, pros and amateurs, winners
and losers, etc. 480 pages. Pub. at
$5.95. Sale 2.98



BOOK SALE
NOV. 7 & 8

Under $3.00
TABOO: SEX AND MORALITY
AROUND THE WORLD. By Armand
Denis. Uninhibited look at the
abandonment of sexual restraints
today. Reveals the sex customs of
Belgium's hippies, topless Tokyo,
communal love in Borneo, Tahitis
unashamed hedonism, hashish and
the sex in the Moslem world, much
more. 25 eyeopening photos. Pub. at
$5.95. Sale 2.98
GREEK MYTHOLOGY. By Felix
iuirand. Over 220 reproductions of
Greek sculpture, pottery and
paintings, plus text by one of the
foremost experts on Greek
mythology. B%xll. Only 2.98
TRADITIONAL BRITISH
COOKING FOR PLEASURE. By
Gladys Mann. All the mouthwatering
favorites, including recipes for roast
beef, hams, Yorkshire Pudding,
jugged hare, scones, pies, chutneys,
home-made wines, etc. Illus. in color.
BV2 ,, xU. Special Import 2.98
Charles Neiders MARK TWAIN.
Masterly revelation of the novelist,
humorist, and social critic
passionate, bitter, witty and
mysterious Samuel Clemens.
Penetrates to the core of his complex
character, explores in depth the
virtuosity and variety and his
achievement, including all major
works, travel books, short stories,
sketches and essays, little-known
pieces, previously suppressed
material. Pub. at $6.50. Sale 2.98
ROMANTIC REBELS. By Emily
Hahn. What was Bohemia and
why? How did it get to America?
What was the link between the Paris
of Henri Murger and the
Provincetown of Eugene ONeill?
Where is "Bohemia now?
Fascinating throughout, this subtle
history traces its rise and fall,
flamboyant characters, and the
narrow line between eccentricity and
genius, from Poe to Ezra Pound,
from Amy Lowell to Alien Ginsberg.
Illus. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 2.98
MEXICO CITY A Book of
Photographs. By Bob Schalkwijk.
194 spectacular pictures, several in
color, with an introduction by J.M.
Cohen and informative captions
throughout. Thrilling keepsake for
the tourist, armchair traveller.
9 ,, x12. A $5.00 value. Special
Import 2.98
VENUS UNMASKED: Collection of
18th-Century Bawdry. Compiled by
Leonard De Vries & Peter Fryer. A
pre-Victorian potpourri of erotic
riddles, divorce court reports,
primitive sexology and tales of
sporting ladies definitely not for
prudes. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 2.98
ONCE LONG AGO: Folk Tales &
Fairy Tales of the World. Retold by
Roger Lancelyn Green. Jumbo-size
treasury of 70 entertaining stories
from places as widespread as China
and Iceland. 300 pictures in color.
8xll. Pub. at $4.95. Sale 2.98

theX m /
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I Jbb WWm mLmMm Mik ll#iri I f ftl
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#and bookstore |
located in the Hub
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CASTLES OF EUROPE. By
Geoffrey Hindley. Lavishly
illustrated view of medieval history
and culture as seen from the
battlements of twelve famous
fortresses. Describes in lively detail
how castles were built and organized,
attacked and defended; their role as
focal points in the great power
struggles of the time, centers of art
activity, etc. 180 illustrations. Special
Import 2.98
THROUGH INDIAN EYES A
Journey Among the Tribes of
Guiana. By Colin Henfry.
Anthropologist's chronicle of a
sojourn among the Amerindians of
the coastal region and remote jungles.
Fascinating descriptions of the
Hallelujah cult that combines
paganism and Christianity, native
myths, songs, sex customs. 28 exotic
photos. Pub. at $6.00. Sale 2.98

I Save up to $3.00! I
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[Hundreds of records! Come early for best selection! [

SHAKESPEARE IMPROVED. By
Hazelton Spencer. Indispensable
study of the bards plays, as adapted
and produced for the Restoration
stage. Examines the liberties taken by
editors such as Dryden, Shad well,
Tate, and D.Urfey, reflecting
changing times, tastes and fashions,
theatrical innovations, political and
artistic embroilments, much more.
Fully covers dramatic companies of
the period, from the reopening of
licensed theatres to the death of
Betterton 1660 to 1710. Illus. Pub.
at $7.00. Sale 2.98
A. L Rowses WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE. Extraordinary
biography, highly controversial
analysis of the unsolved problems of
the Bards life and work. Includes
remarkable portraits of Shakespeares
contemporaries and the Elizabethan
world. Illus. Pub. at $7.50. Sale 2.98

MEXICAN & CENTRAL
AMERICAN MYTHOLOGY. By
Irene Nicholson. Brings to life the
fantastic myths and legends of
pre-Hispanic America, the
supernatural world of the Mayan,
Olmec, Zapotec, Mixtec, Totonac
and Toltec cultures and their brilliant
culmination, the Aztec civilization.
Over 100 stunning photo-illustra photo-illustrations,
tions, photo-illustrations, 24 pages in color, of art,
architecture and sculpture ranging
over 2,000 years. 8Vtxll. Special
Import 2.98
JUBILEE: 100 Years of the Atlantic
Monthly. Ed. by Edward Weeks &
Emily Flint. Treasury of prose,
fiction and poetry, the work of 128
authors who have given their vitality
to Atlantic: Thoreau, Sandburg,
Mark Twain, Robert Frost, Dylan
Thomas, Virginia Woolf, many other
incomparables. Pub. at $7.50. Sale
2.98

CHINESE MYTHOLOGY. By
Anthony Christie. Glowing tapestry
of epics, legends, folklore and fables,
reflecting the grotesque and the
beautiful, the crude and the exquisite
in Chinese culture and civilization
superbly illustrated by over 100 b&w
and color reproductions of Chinese
art and artifacts of all styles and
periods. Charming bucolic tales
contrast with horrific accounts of
creation, human sacrifice, cruelties of
gods, tyrannical emperors, much
more. 8Vixll $5.00 value. Only
2.98
CHOPIN SELECTED
CORRESPONDENCE. Collected by
B.E. Sydow. Commentary by Arthur
Hedley. Contains every letter to,
from, or concerning the life, loves
and music of that most fascinating
and enigmatic Romantic
personalities, Fryderyk Chopin. Pub.
at $7.50. Sale 2.98

Bunker HIM to Vietnam
UNCOMMON VALOR. Ed. by James
M. Merrill. The American soldier
private to general speaks his piece,
via letters, diaries, field reports, etc.,
about army service in peace and war.
Unmatched accounts of combat,
victory and defeat, POW camps; roles
in exploring and mapping America's
West, Indian fighting and settler
protection, aiding victims of disease
and natural disaster reflecting
un pa railed toughness, courage and
dedication. 512 pp. Pub. at $6.95.
Sale 2.98
THJE ADOLESCENT IN THE
AMERICAN NOVEL, 1920-1960. By
W. Taker Witham. Critical survey and
reference guide to adult fiction in
which teenagers and their problems
play a principal part. Love, sex, the
meaning of life; family, environment,
friends; handicaps, delinquency and
rebellion Dreiser and Fitzgerald to
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A GUIDE TO THE SOCIAL
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anthropology, economics, social
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the ground they cover, basic ideas,
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Contributors include Profs. James
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THE HOL M E S-E IN S TEI N
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Thursday. November 7,1968, The Florida Alligator. I

David Douglas-Ducan's YANKEE
NOMAD: A Photographic Odyssey.
A lifetime of adventure, war
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Page 7



EDITORIAL

Time For Greatness

Thank the Lord for smafl favors.
Like it or not, Richard Nixon is the one
the 37th President-Elect of these United
States. Hie Republican andidate was
declared winner Wednesday n a race which
brought out the largest ote in modem
times; yet he barely squeaked by Democrat
Hubert Humphrey with one of the smalles.
pluralities of all time.
Make no mistake about it. The Florida
Alligator opposed Nixon throughout this
election year. We favored liberal candidates
in both parties. We lost.
Yet still it seems fitting to us that the
electioh falls so near the season of
Thanksgiving.
Why? Because the nation, by giving a
clear victory to Nixon in the electoral
college, avoided the disaster of delaying the
choice of a president.
Had neither Nixon nor Humphrey gotten
the necessary majority of 270 electoral
votes, the office of the presidency would
have been humbled as never before in this
century.
The winner no matter who would
have been subjected to such political
dealings for votes in the U.S. House of
Representatives that his prestige would have
been permanently damaged.
The Nixon victory distasteful as it has
been to liberals has prevented that much at
least.
And when a new and unpopular Nixon
received only 43 per cent of the vote
president faces a country as splintered as this
one, the chief executive needs all the
prestige he can get.
Nixon faces a nation more divided now
than at any other time since the Civil War.
The radical left clamors for peace and
political and racial reforms. The radical right
wants a return of national honor and

The Alligator Inquizitor

By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Goad mornihg. I feel
obligated to tell you of my
escape from death. You know, I
almost died the other day, but I
escaped from it. There. I said it.
Now I ask you:
1. Who was the host of
Queen for a Day?
2. What are the chief
historical events referred to in
THE RED BADGE OF
COURAGE, A TALE OF TWO

Staff Writings

Saturday.
And he woke early, for it was an important day.
The early rays of the morning sun warmed his
hardened feet as he walked to the stadium. Today
was his first Florida football game and today he
would earn his first real money.
For he was eight and he would sell soft drinks
while watching the hometown team.
He stood in line several hours with others, mostly
older, and tightly grasped the worn bills for
purchasing the drinks. And his thoughts were on the
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida
under the auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising otrices in Room 3CP, Reitz Union.
Phone Ex;. 2JIZ2
Opinions ir th-. r 'lnricn Alligator are those of the
editors or of Uic \vritei ot the article and not those of me
l niversitv of Moriah
/S.

Ridicule For A Nickel A Drink

CITIES, and Zolas THE
DEBACLE?
3. As football is divided into
quarters, what are the division of
play in the following:
a. Ice Hockey
b. Boxing
c. Polo
4. Within what African
country is Biafra located? Who
was the leader of the Congo who
was assassinated in 1962?
5. Who played the little boy
w.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v

security at home.
Both groups have desirable goals. But
they cannot be reached through emotional
and doctrinaire methods. Such methods are
the tools of demagoguery and despotism.
Neither peace nor reform can be achieved
by burning an American flag in the UF s
Plaza of the Americas, as happened Tuesday
night. Nor does the road to law and order he
in chasing VISTA workers out of Micanopy
(as also happened recently) or in cracking
the heads of idealistic American youths in
Chicago parks.
Both goals can be reached only through
sane, workable solutions to critical national
problems. Such solutions will come only
through cool, dispassionate leadership from
Nixon, his cabinet yet to be announced
and a predominately Democratic Congress.
Ills distort the face of the nation:
Our cities are burning. Their neglected
citizens are rioting after decades of neglect
and abuse;
Crime is at an all-time high and rising
every year;
The cream of American youth is dying
in Vietnam while the Paris talks drag on and
our prestige in the international community
lessens.
Many of Americas blacks
poverty-stricken, frustrated and politically
ignored are turning increasingly to more
and more violent methods of protest.
These ills like the plague of old- cry
out for cures.
While we have no great liking for Richard
Nixon, we believe he is the nations last best
hope for leadership for our national sickbed.
Like it or not, Nixon is now the one. And
it is a true time for greatness not
emotionalism or political dealings from
him, our national leaders, and all the
American people.

in CIRCUS BOY? What was his
name in the show?
6. If Sybil Rival married Bing
Crosby, would she be Sybling
Rivalry?
Peeyuke! Yesterday's
answers:
1. L. K. Edwards, Irvine Fla.
2. Philadelphia, Denver
3. Beulah 4. Owens, Miller,
Leatherwood, Walk, McElroy;
Rollyson, Vasquez 5. Harold
Wilson
Write a limerick today.

60 cents he would make on each tray and the team
he had never seen play.
The money he would give to his mother to put
towards a pair of shoes for him. And the memories
he would keep.
The tray was heavy to his inexperienced arms,
but its weight was forgotten with the excitement of
the afternoon. The crowd was arriving.
His shouts of Cokes for sale seemed lost
among the many laughing, shoving, preoccupied
people. But occasionally someone would throw
down a quarter, pick up a drink and he would smile
thinking of the nickel he had just earned.
The crowds, the excitement and the newness of
his surroundings would temporarily cause him to
pause and catch a few glimpses of the game.
Then shouts of Hey Leoy, git yo self over
here, would bring him back to reality and he
would smile and hurry to the aisle where someone
wanted a soft drink.
No one had called him Leoy before.
And they would hand him a large bill and laugh

The Florida Alligator"
'The pries of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.'*
fc Dpve Doucette
PftCMwJtM/ Managing Editor
All Atom* Raul Ramirez Jam es Cook
. £xecutjye_EdiiQC New? fw.w..

IGNOMINY
There seems to be a continual conflict between students and the
establishment on this university. Once again a group of students has
been skewered this time the residents of the top floors of the
Towers are forced to live in a near primitive state because their toilet!
didnt work.
Is it fair to subject civilized people to these indignities? After all,
the problems students have in getting tickets for football games is bad
enough without being subjected to this ignominy.
********************************
TALK ABOUT STRANGE CATS,
MV MARKETING PROF THINKS
I I I g

when he couldnt make change, pushing him out of
the way so they could see the game.
Leoy, oh Leoy, ahs wants a Coke, and he
would pass one down the row to the one who yelled
and wait for his money to be passed back. And
usually it was. But when it wasnt his protests went
unheard and Leoy was forgotten for an
important play.
They imitated him that day, they cheated him,
but he benefitted.
For he learned that this is the South and his dark
skin made the ridicule acceptable to the crowd.
He walked home slowly that day, his newly
earned change lay heavy in his jeans.
He entered the yard and his mother called him
by name but he didnt answer. He fought back the
inevitable tears.
Then he faced her. He squared his shoulders,
forced a smile, and replied:
Im Leoy.

Page 8

!. Th. FtorfcH Alligator, Thawhy.

By Gayle McElroy



Speaking Out

Off They Go To The Kings Dungeon

After a long time had passed,
some came to question the idea
that five years in the dungeon
was a just punishment for
partaking of the foul weed. The
good king heard of this and said,
Lets be reasonable.
Obviously the best way to find
out if a law is bad is to enforce it
vigorously. Why. the only other
alternative is to try to reach a
rational conclusion based on the
facts at hand. And besides, if
someone sutlers illness because
of the foul weed, it is society
that must pay. Doesnt it seem
more reasonable to pay to keep

Regents Say
No Prayers
At Meetings
MR. EDITOR.
Recall how Chester Ferguson
was target for everyones blasts
this spring after his pro
compulsory ROTC stand? Well,
more than likely liell get fired
upon now by those on the other
side of the fence, for refusing to
entertain a motion establishing
prayers at Board of Regents
meetings.
Coming from the
establishment, this was an
unexpected stand, and one
which should be applauded.
Invocations, benedictions, and
the like do not belong in
heterogeneous groupings where
they offend minorities and are
merely tolerated by the bulk of
the membership.
I can think of no way in
which state universities would
have benefitted from the Lester
Maddoxization which had been
proposed.
Thank you. Chairman
Ferguson.
>
DONALD GUTTINGER, 6AG

Atlanta Fans Cheer Gators On

MR. EDITOR:
Why arc we here in Atlanta
still loyal Gator fans in this the
year of the Tiger (Detroit or
maybe Auburn) and the year of
the Gators.
This is the eve of the needless
to say upset tie ot Fighting
Gators and the Vanderbilt
Commodores and we here, the
loyal fans from Emory Dental
School, have taken another
weekend on the chin. It is tairly
difficult to remain a loyal fan
and come back after a loss and a
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The edftor
reserves the right to edit aS
letters in the interest of
space.

people in the dungeon for five
years than risk a slight chance of
having to give someone free
medical help?
The entire court marvelled at
his wisdom.
And it came to pass that
many people were cast into the
dungeon as a result of the wise
kings aforesaid vigorous
enforcement of the law in
question.
After three more years had
passed, everyone realized what
had been known for a long time.
Then the king said,
Behold, my method of

OPEN FORUM:
jA(L/iuomiL ViMMt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

New Decision Gives Faculty
No Summer Session Vacation

MR. EDITOR:
Our geriatric Senate of the University of Florida
adopted a calendar last Thursday that reversed its
position adopted last spring and represented a
surrender to the prefercrice of the council of
presidents of the state system. Without any
consideration of the needs of the younger faculty or
of the married graduate students who may have
young children of school age, the body, heavily
dominated by grandfathers, bachelors, and old
maids like myself, adopted a calendar that had a
summer session of nine weeks of classes, thus
eliminating any time for vacation between the end
of the summer session and the opening of the public
schools.
The university could most assuredly have a
summer session of eight Weeks of classes with each
class period longer and therefore equal in actual
classroom hours to a quarter during the regular

tic to far inferior teams. What
have we to come back to?
We are in the heart of, for the
most part. Bulldog country and
the talk here is Were number
one. Orange Bowl and
Conference Champion and the
only thing that will put the
Dogs down is a Gator victory
in Jacksonville. Mention a
possible Gator victory this
weekend what a joke! We all
know the Gators will come back
- don't we?
One loser to root for during
any one season is enough for
anybody. We have the Atlanta
Falcons. We thought at the first
of the season wo would have a
winner in the Fighting Gators.
The season isn't over yet but it
might be in two weeks.
We here in Atlanta will
remain loyal fans through the
Georgia game maybe just a little
quiet and not so obnoxious. We
need a victory in Jacksonville for
a winning season. If the Gators
lose to the Buildout it could be a

be bad. I must go to the
dungeon a* once to tell the good
news t|) the prisoners!
The king assembled his court
and processed to the dungeon.
As the doors were flung open he
cried, Hark, you are free!
Spring forth like a sunrise, for I
have given you back your
freedom!
The people in the dungeon
came out very slowly and
quietly and the only noise they
made was a curious rattling
sound the rattling of skeletons
- skeletons of dreams and hopes

real long season especially in
the year of the Gator.
A 6-3-1 record and a Bowl
bid? Not this year, please.
We remain for two weeks
loyal Gator fans.
Go Gators,
ROBERT G. ALDRICH
PAUL W. KING
DOUG BROWN
DAN RF.NTZ
Courtesy Keeps
A Bicycle Dry
MR. KDITOR:
I wou'd like to thank the
groundskeeper who moved my
bicycle from the wetting area of
the sprinklers in front of Rolfs
Hall, Oct. 30th. Its too bad that
such thoughtfulness is not
common here at the University.
SAM SMITH. 4FY

academic year. To say that accrediting bodies would
not accept such a quarter which offers the full
quota of contact hours is a contradiction of the fact
that all kinds of summer session courses with all
kinds of doubled or trebled contact hours are
offered by universities around the country and
course credits are accepted at full value by
accrediting bodies.
Significantly, out of a total membership of over
550 in our house of lords, only around 150 were
present last Thursday and these included an almost
full contingent of university administrators and
non-teaching personnel who, unlike most teaching
faculty, can take their vacations at any time during
the year.
.U
No wonder that our younger faculty colleagues
refer to the hardening of our institutional arteries!
GLADYS M. KAMMERER, PROFESSOR
POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

and that part of a person that
cannot survive three years in a
dungeon.
The court praised the king's
goodness so loudly that the
rattling sound was not heard by
the king. And the king was
happy, because he liked to be
reassured that he was a good
king.
A traveler from the North
Country happened to be passing
through the town. He thought to
himself, I can scarcely believe
that such ideas concerning the
law are held by a man who was

{GATORS WANT WIN!
Â¥: $
V. A
:: :
''Last year's win over Georgia was the biggest thrill I've §
g: had. It's the best proof I've seen that you have a
chance to win as long as you fight." Split End Gene 8
8 Peek §
Â¥:
X* >;
$ "We gave it all we had last week, so did our students in
support. We'll do the same this week and I know our ijij
support will be just as good." Offensive Guard Mac :j:|
Steen
4
:* %
v "This is my last college game in my hometown. It
means a lot to me for this reason and because a victory :§
Saturday can get us headed back in the rights |
direction." Defensive End Mike Healey §
§ "This isn't the time to hang your head, it's a time to
| dig in and fight a little harder." Defensive Tackle Bill f
£ Dorsey &
I 1
:£ "We'll have to play the best game we are capable of
:| against a great team like Georgia. I think we will do |
$ just that." Cornerback Steve Tannen s

Thursday, November 7. 1968, The Florida Alligator.

By Dick Levins

once the head of the highest
court in the land. But then
again, strangers always have
difficulty understanding alien
customs and values.
DicK LEVINS, 2UC
Buy Grapes;
Help Pickers
Win Baffle
MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Lewis Rothlein either
forgot or purposely avoided
telling the whole story about the
grape pickers of California.
First, there are about 5,000
workers in this category. More
than 4,000 of them have
organized as the Agricultural
Workers Freedom to Work
Association. About 90 per cent
do not want the benevolent
help of a Union. v
Secondly, the boycott on
grapes is being financed with the
help of SIO,OOO a month from
the AFL-CIO and $7,500 a
month from the UAW, not by
the grape pickers themselves.
Thirdly, presidential
candidate Richard Nixon has
termed it clearly an illegal
boycott. Governor Ronald
Reagan says, The boycott is an
attempt to compel employers to
force farm workers to join the
United Farm Workers against
their wishes. Hugh M. Burns,
(Dem.), President pro tern of the
California Senate, said it was a
strictly politically motivated
campaign inspired by a tiny
unrepresentative groups of labor
bosses.
Let me urge everyone to go
out and purchase a bunch of
grapes and help the California
grape pickers win their battle for
the Right to Work.
G.D. THORNTON
ASSISTANT DEAN,
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

Page 9



Page 10

L The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 7,1968

jjjjjl l*bd! Shi* ...rt tt||||lll nnnnnnnnnnin to iioit quantities...
Golden Com .. .' 2 Z (Limit I plto,e with other purchases of 55.00 or more, excluding f re m <% 4" #
F4P Flavor Perfect Cream Style cigarette*l GraHamS pfc,. 49* WOKC KOIIS 3 *1
Golden Com *. 3 19* Borden'* Asst. Flavors (limit 2 please) ??" Pipi"' Hos! Aver Nellies' #JOJ Lody Betty Healthful C
Tomato Catsup 2 '££ 39* ttO o*lllll. 79 4 £ f fe,. Juice
Maxim Coffee ..*£ 99* f-..M 0.. f( #J oj m< ,~ ~, Pineapple Juice 3r *1
* *** W * W lT ato SaUC 2 ~ 25 **'"" '* l H.
Mac Lean's "S' 59* Cfcoi /feIWW ..2 VS 25' l 2^ P fi!L 2 * £ l,n 9 Peaches 3*2 89
Hstfiaater Preserves 3 '£- *1 Brr ,. Fruit Cocktail # ri9
D| l a pkg. QQs a a a a W trs Peanuts 3 cans $1 Nutritious Hill's y
Gillette Blades ..., ,0 77* AU Good Cooks Use Ceei Weofher Treat! Nesfles |V C J ll
KcedrinmtTHV Wesson Oil tr 79* ***c*< w Dog Food 6 d l i
* ... .1 I 1... bar a
SheS* £ Bonus &£§&*. .it >/.
3£. $1 Pork
SF " K* SiX. 59- ft** * *'
Pound" Cake 59 Sliced Bacon '£ 59 on ,h page Potatoes... 10 & 65'
MSTM
KhStic kT" Xs9* swf' ""g, / -'~* fcS£?Srfad ....* 39 m STRS *,
,. S "Brown N Serve >£. 63* Medium Shrimp ...Z *1 Bologna V 79*1 Jim D.ndy
Margarine St 47* * d.* m..i
Bordoa'. Delicious BoIOOHO
Rlcniltc 4 "t 9 (I (J Krone Try **** Tomow's Fomous Whole-Hog II
aaygt. *; Sa.*s*r 69< IPUBUXI M ,N 51 opS3i
5^ Sl e l % w 47 Braunschweiger 7 k 49* J 125 s.w. 34th st. t I
Muenster Cheese C 89* c *-Bue r., P ., s.k, Kv I C.n.h Cam. H.n. |
Cheddar Cheese 'J.T 63* Cube Steak U't 89* 2630 M.W. 13th ST. |
si-oo
P | Chiken-o#-the-S* ]| Swift's Premium Boneless it c -* *tei*
Golden Elegance Chunk Tuns If Canned Hostess Hams 1 ora ?* e -J | Chef Boy-Ar-Dee
n* thr # Vi-o*. cans II 4-lb. can il '"?*"* W,e " || Pi**a with Cheese
17 in netware ** || *. <.- ., N . *. iou> || 4 (t || 121/2-01. pkg.



jaatHi/n M USDA CHOICE SPRING LAMB
pmssid and drawn fresh W a mtm a# >.
' FRYERS A LEG 0 LAMB 89'
\Bg lfc I SHOULDER CHOPS 69 < SIRLOIN CHOPS $1.19
OjSK* I SHOULDER ROAST 59< LOIN CHOPS.... $1.39
J§Sm, I LAMB BREAST I9 LAMB PATTIES....39<
VVKJIMAt \ M QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED /
vH lJ HHy LB. m prices gooo thru nov. 9th /-,
lb. lo COPELAND FEESH HOT
KEF SAUSAGE 3T USDA CHOtCI W-D BRAND CORN BID T-BONI. CLUB M
sirar. .. s fkez: Sirloin Steak $ l O9
Plote Stow3 M 99* uioese if inwwHWU 3r*J:ir kT! _e. C a< S^rri^
Franks 45' Cheese Food 4y^ u HP* ......
am.., it'if.iSih Roast... 69* Short Ribs.. *49*
sii. Bacon n biscuits o/Ot hiqiv .m.ii.
slL*iacM....H'%*M* yyjgm J?*LJ y asaHffi?- : *>
ISIIM.ErBSSZI.ItH9!". Ste* *1 Gr. leaf 5 *T
FROZEN FOOD "^(K* ,- *ReK HARVEST
6raNSe juice 6/si. jngf/' 7X ¥ fresh
rrrVA m a T%
mitmjkT::.99 Bgftjgg- *] w I*ll I CAULIFLOWER... 3?
mgcshu 3/Si.VIHL n/A / Rg? s *!
P&taToes.. 3/si. mm& 07/ **** */si.
CgRN-ON-COB 2/Si. W !*§* */**
Plf SHELLS 3/sl. VWIP LETTUCE 2 -4V
COFFEERICH....4/sla POTATOIS 3-39*
RABAT |%||JA|BDC AAi w TiiiaflM ii *f!!!!!!!!L"' ~-~ir
mEAI i/innEKD.MM oy !twextwa {Mrwextbai
IKroH Porkoy |H| Soft jHR JUstT!. J
Margarine
, 00, ||awiwKfflwl|awwKaaPi
jW/ IBS ss.'c£~ tmm *&s'sr
*r 4r ; Mae #1# *^* ,H "*' "* 10 E #J# "" TH U **.
ekkhbhmkkkmeekbeeikkkmkkmeeeek mmmmmmmmmmmmmhm L

Thursday, Novambar 7,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



*GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

F.
FOR SALE |
1968 Bultaco racing motorcycle,
125 cc Sherpa. & 3-bike trailer. Buy
both for only $550. Call 372-3947.
Also 1966 Honda 50. $125.
(A-3t-31-p)
Camera, pacemaker 4x5 Speed
Graphic. Film holders, pack adapters,
hangers & trays. 2 flash & 1 slave.
Solenoid release. $250. 378-0159 or
378-7124. (A-st-31-p)
HONDA 50 4000 miles electric
starter Excellent shape S9O or best
offer. Also extra tough visored
helmet sl2. Call Mickey 378-5744 or
372-9479. (A-st-32-p)
3 bdrm, 2 bath, dng 7 utility rms,
screened porch, air-c. unit, tool shed,
washer, refrig, carpeted, %113 a mo,
SISOO down, 1611 NE 19th Lane,
372-2722, near elem & jr-hi.
(A-10t-32-p)
1966 Harley-Davidson 250 cc, 'hot
cam, new parts, helmet, excellent
condition $325. Call Bob Mason at
376-9450, Delta Chi house.
(A-3t-33-p)
Factory made trailor fully equipped
14 ft. sleeps three, ideal for hunting
or camping $350, also 50 Cad. runs
good $95 Needs paint, call 372-0982.
(A-st-33-p)
1967 Solex Excellent condition.
$125 or best offer. 378-3823. 35 mm
Argus with light meter and flash S6O
or best offer. 378-3823. (A-st-34-p)
Zenith Circle of Sound System with
record collection. Had 3 months.
$l7O. Call after 6. 378-9171.
(A-2t-34-p)
1967 Yamaha 60cc 180 dollars.
Extra work done on it. See Mike
room 16 TEP house or call 372-9353.
(A-2t-34-p)
HONDA SSO Well cared for,
helmet, tools, new tire, book rack.
Call Richard. 376-4184 after 5.
(A-4t-34-p)
1968 Honda 565. High tailpipe for
street or trail use. Show-room new,
driven only to class. $175. Butler
Apt. 940, opposite Sin C. (A-3t-34-p)
.j.y.y.y.v.v.v.v^'/XvXvX'XvX'V'V.v.v.v.*.
FOR RENT
, !-.V.v.v. .v>/A X XvX X.Xw.'.X.!.X ;.XvV i !'
CAMELOT APARTVIENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
Furn Downstairs Apt. 2 br. Air Cond.
Call after 5:30 378-7845.
(B-32-TF-cJ
To sublet 1 bdrm. furn. apt., carpet,
$125 mo. Will pay half of Nov. rent.
Call 376-6720. 700 S.W. 16 Ave.
Apt. 203. (B-33-3t-p)
House in 6 Acre field. 3 mi. from
campus. No hassles from neighbors.
4 1 /? rooms, cone, block, carport. $55
a month. Take over lease. Available
decol. Contact John 107 Grove Hall
or call 372-7676 anytime. (B-33-6t-p)

pffPf|&Gaiife Jamie Plays
yLJPS?itiI rei^we
pgpra GOWdtoTHE
U|BS#I MMBHWg
BgBL, bush
3 7 5 9 S1WI" SKATER PATERS
S^^^^HFfTHELDOVER|
£|Q2blM&KUi3fl'VlpONT MISS IT! |
- AT 7:00 ONLY
WALT : The
i mmit- / £
if -: rVUttNI U/
Mmniechnicolor j I TRAP!
V i llll "" l ,^^^ lll M^
a minute to pray,
a second to die!" w&P
-Q"= EASTMAM-COIWI vSE |

rrre rrrrrrvp*...
WANTED |
Will pay sl4 for two gen. admission
tickets to Georgia game. Call Cheryl,
378-1502, room 1301. (C-st-30-p)
Need 1 male roommate. Share i Dr.
Summit House Apt. Call Manager's
Office anytime before 6 p.m. at
376-9668. (C-st-31-p)
2 girls to share 3 br/2 bath house.
Beautifully furnished, carpeted,
central//AC. Available Jan. 2. Ph.
378-6679 after 6 p.m.(C-10t-34-p)
Need a roommate, male, to share two
bedroom apt. with 3 others.
Presently living at 3910 NW 6 St. For
the Winter Quarter phone 378-1909
all day Tuesday or Thursday.
(C-3t-34-p)
Desire roomate for winter and spring
quarters. Close to campus (1 blk).
Prefer studious person with humor.
See Bob or Stu 1125 S.W. 7th Ave.
After 4. (C-3t-33-p)
Will trade 12 v. auto radio for 6 v.
one (preferabl y V.W.). 376-5774.
(C-2t-33-p)
WANTED: 2 Georgia game tickets.
Phone 378-8643 evenings.
(C-lt-34-p)
Please Help! Need ride to Pensacola
or general area this weekend. Call
378-5585 after 3:30. (C-2t-34-p)
VferfMlcv* I
* awl 1,1 * I
I tg7 for I
>SFV|
jj ALSO M 3 GAYIE HUMMCUTT RAYMONDBURITH
I Tflrsfcw nil /HI Ir I
1:30
9:50,
STRANGLERfeno^II
Colo* Dy
lUWiUgTt HELD OVERI
1:50-4:20
1

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 7,1968

WANTED \
>i:*x*x-x-v.v.v.v;*:*x*x*x-x*x->>v.v.w > x'-.
Eng-sg needs a place to live for at
least rest of term. Desire a separate
room. Require a place to sleep. Leave
message at 372-3475. (C3t-32-p)
- -- -

M | w
I Dowafewa GdmvlUt |
V 2iV|i ji ||T;B STmni'lillililjliifi
y 111 iI | i^H
JM In his violent underworld
they judge a man
1 by the color of the money
he steals ... and McClain :jIL
I knows how to lead his f
aHpMBI gang to an easy half 1 |j[ 1 mI^L
I million. The hard part
I is staying alive BBsEr^-
' I enough
BBBBBe WjjMp Hk. m
m. Getaway Man CLINGER
Karate
DOUGHERTY: &j GOUGH: GLADYS: NEGLI:
The Killer
1 co slatring GENE HACKMAN JACK KLUGMAN I
\WSMWI3tkSt\ I A WARREN OATES JAMES WHITMORE jjggftxl f==|'
L 'Cl -.ERNESTBORGNINE ffSRSBIPfIk W J
ragSjjSW] Direct from its reserved reserved
reserved seat engagement.
.Cum
k> Winner of 3 Academy Awards!
IMRIS'REDGRAVE NERO-HEMMINGS JEFFRIS
\ O iirTTuttMif. inc'iTiiThrAu I***-* a,TMu>i- oPa4iinob,iUjai mt im* MttK** lot* |
% Sujgittt| fttr I l "AKUK JUoUJA LUUAN I Qtcectee b, MOSS HUT ftom THE QHCt WO FUTUWt KIW6 b> I H WHITE

WANTED §
&x*x-x*:-v.vx-x'xx*x*x-x.^v x!£x*x'>:
Co-ed roomate wanted for rest of
term or year private room A/C, free
washer and dryer $37.50 378-3291
or 376-3582. (C-33-st-p)

| WANTED \
Two people to ride to Boca Raton
area. Leaving Nov. 27, return Dec. 1.
$lO each round trip. Call 378*9664
evenings. (C-3t-34-p)



GAT O R CL ASS IF IE D S

HELP WANTED |
X v
VirGHLV QUALIFIED SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent job, excellent
'pay. Do not apply unless well
qualified. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)
Listeners wanted WiiJ' pay $1.50
for 1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
Univ. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-c)
LUMS RESTAURANT WAII RESS,
must be over 21 yrs. of age. Apply
1621 SW 13th Street. (E-2t-34-p)
Sports Department of the Alligator
needs experienced writers for
features and event coverage. Contact
Marc Dunn at the Alligator
Office.(E-tf-nc-34)
AUTOS
1960 Pontiac Ventura 4-door
hardtop automatic transmission. In
excellent condition, reliable,
inexpensive transportation. $325 Call
376-9034. (G-st-31-p)
1965 Alfa Romeo 1600 veloce race
car. scca prodified, limited slip
complete spare 512 rear street
equipment included. $2,000. 4030
Ortega Blvd., Jax, Fla. 904 388-3030.
(G-4t-31-p)
PERSONAL |
&w.^x; x^-x*x*:*s xix"x-x*:-v.vx"x*x*x£
ATTENTION GATORS! WDVH 980
on your dial, has a MISSION for you,
which is not IMPOSSIBLE. The
WDVH GOOD GUYS have hidden
the KEYS to a 1969 FORD
MUSTANG FASTBACK somewhere
in the Gainesville area. YOUR
MISSION, should you accept it, is to
find the KEYS and CLAIM the
MUSTANG valued at $3,004. CLUES
are given HOURLY on WDVH 980.
Good Luck. (J-3t-31-c)
Phi Taus: Congratulations on your
Homecoming sweep and intramural
showing. Love always. The Little
Sisters of the Laurel. (J-lt-34-p)
Delta Chi
Donates
Delta Chi Fraternity donated
money for a new roll of songs
for Century Tower two weeks
ago and still no bells.
What gives?
Were still waiting for the
parts and equipment to be
returned from the factory,
Willis Bondine, university
organist said.
The parts were sent away for
repair during the week of
registration in September he
said.
I talked to a company
representative last Thursday.
Wed hoped to have the chimes
working for Homecoming. But
we dont have the budget to call
the company every week to find
out whats happening, Bodine
said.
Were just as anxious at the
music department as anybody to
have them fixed, Bodine said.
But were at the mercy of the
company.
(VWw^.*/*%v.v.v.v.v.v.v/.:.v^
COMPLETE XEROX!;
and
; OFFSET FACILITIES jj
Specializing in :*
Thesis and Dissertations :
Reductions and
Enlargements %
Open Til 11 P.M- \
Highest Quality !;
We Guarantee it! {
I 7 days
| QUIK-SAVE
[ llnivarsity Ploza
[ 1620 W. University
| 378-1001 I

PERSONAL 1
, V
>x*x*x-:*:x%v.vx*x-x-x-xx-x.:.v.w.v->:*
Wendie, the secret of seat 61 is out!
Lee may be No. 80, but youre
always No. 1. Our friend at will speak
Thursday. Neal. (J-lt-33-p)
Would like to hear from
non-professionals who have
experienced encounter, marathon,
sensitivity or T groups, and who
would share their opinions positive
and/or negative. Call C.w. Duncan,
ext. 2370, 2003 or 2004. (J-st-29-p)
CHEVALIERS CHEVALIERS
Dinner Nov. 8. For information and
reservations Call Bill Slippy after six
at 376-2603. (J-lt-34-p)

CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS
NOVEMBER 8
BECHTEL
CORPORATION
A world leader in the design, construction and
the management of projects in many fields.
BECHTEL has openings for
CIVIL ENGINEERS SAN FRANCISCO
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS NEW YORK
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS IN WASHINGTON, D.C.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS HOUSTON
and
jobsites throughout the nation.
See your placement officu for details.
\Ndvh9Bo--
Sports Roof
clues given daily to
where the keys ore hidden
Mission A Impossible Contest
Tk* WDVH Good Guys have eMdcn the keys to e brand new 1969
Mustene Seorts Reef, V-B with redie, wkite sidewall* and ofkcr extras
$3 000 aatamnWlcsome -ere in tke Creator Gainesville Area.
Twa new clues era given ceilv an WDVH ta tke lecetien a# t*a
keysta tana in new and win!
LIST OF CLUES ALREADY GIVEN AT
FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:
LAW Cafeteria All Cotton
313 W. 111.. * **K^T£r
R4 Mm 238 W. Univ. Av-.
cm s
Here Are Two Clues To Start You
To the Hidden Keys
Tke cars are wfcixxlne pest I A* tke keys survey tke scene
acas I'm skoppn* merrily. they can see red, yetlow and
arr :n.

Thursday, November 7,1968. The Florida Alligator.

I PERSONAL |
WANTED AND NEEDED: 6
TICKETS FOR GEORGIA. ED
NASH, 372-6579. (J-2t-34-p)
To the Sig Ep saint in room 11.
Thanks for a deep HC weekend. I
knew youd say Are you .. Love
always, LBJ. (J-lt-34-p)
LOST & FOUND I
!% >
!vx*: xxx.v.%v.v.v.v.v;;*:*:.xx*:.:.v.v.v.v. fc
FOUND: Small mens ring, at
apartments behind University City
Bank. Call 376-6072, ask for Susan,
to identify. (L-3t-32-p)

Page 13

LOST A FOUND |
LOST: Black wallet after Fri. parade.
Ten dollars reward for return. Call
372-0035 or 51 Colonial Manor.
(L-3t-34-p)
Admiral Farragut class ring 1967
initials MAS lost campus vicinity this
weekend. My steady will kill me. Call
Sharon 372-9394. (L-lt-34-p)
LOST a ladys navy blue umbrella
in Anderson Hall. If found please
return to 406 SE Broward or call
392-9611. Reward. (L-2t-34-p)

PRIMROSE INN
Superb SiNki
Attractive Atmosphere
Frhrut# Pertiet
8 'WSilff Practical Price*
114 W. Uuirartify Ava. Pbewe 174-S47*
' ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines axe required-Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 r lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check*
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3.00 pjn. 2 days prior to staffing day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
> <* M o
I it 1| 1| | 5
____ ___ *!SI I| ? t I
|t| 8 t Itl S
. i;
_ z
1 " mmmmm (_J Q Q (_] 11 Q
>,
e m Um
'<<<<*< 3
ra u u u 2
- 3122 lo
_ *2 * f
u a t 1
ill i
__ ... 3 3 3
\ i
l o
_ | Q > 3 z
O 3§§!
>
P 1 r -o O
s >
__ z r
V
nHHH

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

SERVICES jj
Charcoal portrait sketches- 16x20 m
matted. SIO.OO. For appointment
call Connie 378*0659. (M-32-st-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGfNG.
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-lt-34-p)



Page 14

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 7,1968

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Only 19 per cent of UFs
Shands Teaching Hospital
operating costs are furnished by
the state.
Last year $93,000 for
crippled children and $172,000
for indigent patients had to be
absorbed by the hospital,
hospital Provost Samuel P.
Martin said.
A total of approximately
$314,000 in delinquent hospital
accounts was written off by the
Board of Regents in Fridays
meeting in Gainesville.
The Regents also serve as the
hospitals board of directors.
Questions were raised at the
meeting as to why these
accounts had to be written off.
The hospital handles indigent

WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN THE POET WHO MIGHT HAVE SAID I GIVE YOU MY
HEART AND REALLY MEANT IT: The poetry of William Carlos
Williams, the physician turned bard, will be discussed today in rooms
122 and 123 of the Reitz Union by Professor Butler Waugh.
Festivities begin at 4:30 p.m.
IN MORE UF POLLEMICS: The Association of Women Students
will gallup to the brink of Union rooms 361 and 362 at 7:30 tonight
to harrass each other with the results of the poll the organization took
on Freshman curfew.
IN THESIS: The SDS-SSOC sponsors a draft counseling seminar in
room 347 of the Union tonight at 8.
AND ANTITHESIS: The Arnold Air Society meets in the Military
Building tonight at 7:30, and the Semper Fidelis Society gathers in
room 363 of the Union at the same time.
IN PRODUCTIONS THAT MAKE MACBETH LOOK LIKE A
COMEDY: The Alachua County Alumni Club will provide those of us
with a masochistic bent an opportunity(?) to see the year of the Gator
get torn down by the Auburn Tigers.
The Club will screen the game films of the Auburn-Florida contest
tonight at 8 in the Union Auditorium.
AND SPEAKING OF TEARING DOWN: Those who plan to spend
some time building up things, namely, the Student Contractors and
Builders Association, will step into room 349 of the Union tonight at
7:30.
AND HERES SOME OTHER GROUPS INTERESTED IN
BUILDING THINGS UP: The members of the Presbyterian Student
Center will meet today in room 357 of the Union at 10 a.m.
The Christian Science Organization meets in room 357 of the
Union tonight at 7.
IN GREEK-LETTER GOINGS-ON: Gamma Beta Phi has an
executive meeting tonight at 7:30 in room 150 G of the Union.
Phi Chi Theta gathers in room 118 of the Union tonight at 7;
Alpha Kappa Psi assembles in rooms 355 and 356 of the Union
tonight at 7:30 p.m.
Say something anti-Semetic to Lewis Rothlein today while
coddling your beloved copy of Mein Kampf.

TONIGHT FREE BEER
IF YOU ARE 21
AND LIVE BAND th* I
White Rabbit Rabbitopen
open Rabbitopen tonight by popular demand
from 10:00 p.m. till 1:30 a.m.
Free Soft Drinks For All
You Must Be 18 To Be Admitted
809 W. Univ. Ph 372-9222-376-0011

Shands Hospital: A Budget Problem

Alligator
k.

or welfare patients from various
state and local agencies. These
agencies are able to pay only
three-quarters of each patients
hospital costs. The rest has to
come from somewhere else.
Since the state provides only
19 per cent of the hospitals
operating costs, the hospital
absorbs the cost of indigent
patient care.
This percentage is the lowest
for any state supported teaching
hospital in the nation, Martin
said.
For example, Martin said,
University of Georgia gets 80 per

ANALYSIS

cent, University of Kentucky, 84
per cent, University of Missouri,
71 per cent and University of
North Carolina and University of
Mississippi get 45 and 46 per
cent respectively.
Presently, a select legislative
committee is investigating the
hospitals problem, Martin said.
I think the legislature is
trying to resolve the problem if
the budget commission can be
convinced, Martin said.
The budget commission is
comprised of the governor and
the cabinet with a director
appointed by the governor.
There are apparently two
approaches within the Regents
to solving the problem.
The state shouldnt have to
give even 19 per cent because
the hospital is doing such a good
job, Regents Chairman Chester
Ferguson said.
Because the hospital has a
good reputation and is able to
attract research grants then the
state has no need to provide'
funds, Ferguson said.
We would hope the
legislature would provide other
state institutions with funds so
they dont have to send patients
to the hospital, he said, or if
they do they could pay for
them.
The other approach is to give
the hospital the funds it
apparently needs.
The legislature should give
the hospital a teaching budget to
provide for indigent patients,
Regents member Louis C.
Murray said, I hope its
corrected.
Private patients are being
assessed to pay for indigent
patients and this is not a
conducive atmosphere to attract
grants from the federal
government or private industry,
Murray said.
Additionally, regular patients
are paying double for care since
they pay both higher rates and
taxes which go for welfare,
Murray said.
There are reasons behind the
hospitals plea for more funds.
Probably the hospital was
able to cope with indigent
patients costs before the

Veterans Administration
hospital, across the street,
moved in, House of
Representatives speaker Ralph
Turlington said.
When the VA hospital started
operation labor costs went up
because of competition and, in
addition, teaching costs rose,
Turlington explained.
The select committee has
finished its investigation but has
not reported yet, Turlington
said.
The committee has
recommended that 30 per cent
of the hospitals operating costs

v/a iiv r v _____
dStbello
H H
97 Projects. No Waiting.
p
Ip ~ v \|:;YYY" p||l§| Y/Y YY ;Y 1 7 '* J YYY;Y Y*;'; YY -'YY || Y Y
: ** : Y J '" *; ''
for the Government. Under both civil
* and defense contracts.
Right now were in communications,
military command and control, air traffic control,
transportation, medical information, education,
urban planning. We have openings for systems
engineers, electronic engineers, systems
analysts, mathematicians.
INTERVIEWS WILL BE CONDUCTED \. Wif
ON CAMPUS, X>-y
SIGN UP NOW AT THE PLACEMENT OFFICE
NOV. 8 *
MITRE \
An Equal Opportunity Employer
rit c i ,ormallon Mr LJ. Glinos, College Relations Coordi-
Lnator, The MITRE Corporation, 4000 Middlesex Turnpike R~u Qf a. Mass.

be provided by the state,
Turlington said he believed.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell reportedly has the
report in his office but since the
committee hasnt released it yet,
OConnells administraive
assistant Mel Sharpe said no
statement could be made.
The hospital must be
provided with a greater sum to
accomplish its mission as a
teaching hospital and where
extraordinary cases can be
handled, OConnell said.
We must convince the
budget commission and the
legislature, he said.



qP eSt
-2/w homit buns jw Deteraent 1
V-10 8READ....2/49' RYE IRIAB 29 \Jfflfe. .* I
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOD THRU NOW. 9th \ V WT| J PURCMAI* EXCLUDING CIGARETTES M-f
GATORADE 39* &OO /
MAYONNAISE 39*
MARGARINE 5/sl.
THRIFTY MAID ~ ASTOR SALE
M ARROW \ UTSUP 4/sl. SOUPS 10/SI.
.J* AA % W W No. 103 Cm ASTOR FRUIT No. 303 Con THRIFTY MAID 9
T|\ .1 COCKTAIL.... S/sl. TOMATOES */sl.
WK l/6161Q6ni 1 TUNA FISH 4/sl. TOMATOES 5/st.
vMXII LIMIT 1 DETERGENT YOUR CHOICE WITH II.M OR MOM £ H IRAK lA/t 1 f 111 1 DCITC O /4h 1
PURCHASE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES I jAUVtoGGGOOG lU/f ! %U PbITSimO/jlg
Wmt / SPINACH 7/sl. MILK 7/sl.
Miff.. / POTATOES... 4/sl. GR. BEANS...6/SI.
S POTATOES 10/SI. WK. C0RN...6/SI.
BEANS 10/sl. GR. PEAS.... S/sl.
Beef Nosh.... 3/$l Coke Mix 3/$l IJ
Sausage. 5/$l Pancake Mix... 19 w
Butter Cups 49* Syrup 49* VVI IEC \
Powder 59* Towels Astor I Folger s 1
MORE Thrifty Maid ~ Astor Specials I I WM I
Grfruit Juice3/$l Bart. Pears...3/$l m£A{ f//
Fruit Drinks 4sl Peaches 4/$l NJBf Mm I M £
Tomato Jaice4/$1 Apple JuEce..,4/$l ^sawa zsssr- M
J TO.
Erot wmSSaA j Palmolive Soap v
"SL'iss" \wmfxg bath size
Twin POM O/QQC FAMILY SIZE SECRET FAMILY SIZE CREST
Spray Deodorant Toothpaste
! Fob o ent AQ, w sr 7*91
mm ts?'Si2~r? imm ; 87* Wf *. mint OO'
I 1 *- .'-T- Tr -~ "j 11 ir "Tt 11111 illl i H 1

Thursday, November 7,1968. The Florida Allivator.

Page 15



Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 7,1968

'6B: Good Year For Republicans

GOP Governorship
Control Is Increased
WASHINGTON (UPI) Republicans Wednesday upped the
number of state governorships they control to 31, highest total since
the Eisenhower administration.
Ironically, Richard M. Nixons victory in the presidential race,
which was at least partially responsible for the strong GOP showing at
the statehouse level, probably will cost Republicans one of those
governorships.
This is because Nixons running mate, Gov. Spiro T. Agnew of
Maryland, will have to be replaced under state law by a successor that
will be chosen by an election in the Democratic-controlled state
Legislature. Agnew has served half of his four-year term.
With only North Carolina undecided in the 21 gubernatorial races
in the nation this year, Republicans had won 13 states for their total
of 31 statehouses compared to seven Democratic victories and a total
of 18 statehouses. If a narrow Democratic lead in North Carolina
holds up, Democrats would wind up with governors in 19 states.
Going into the election, the Republicans held a 2624 margin.
Despite their overall gain of at least five governorships, two
incumbent Republican governors were beaten, including John H.
Chafee, chairman of the Republican Governors Conference. He was
upset in his try for an unprecendented fourth term in Rhode Island by
Democrat Frank Licht, who benefited from Hubert H. Humphreys
showing there, to become the states first Jewish chief executive.
In Montana, incumbent GOP Gov. Tim Babcock was defeated by
State Atty. Gen. Forrest H. Anderson.
Meanwhile, the Democrats lost two incumbent governors. Gov.
Samuel H. Shapiro, as expected, was defeated in Illinois by
Republican Richard B. Ogilive. And in Delaware, Republican Russel
W. Peterson upset Gov. Charles L. Terry. Republicans won in five
other states where there were no incumbent candidates.
Traditionally Republican Vermont and New Hampshire which
had elected Democratic governors in this decade switched back.
Republican Deane C. Davis won in Vermont and Walter R.
Peterson, Republican speaker of the legislature, was the victor in New
Hampshire.
Three veteran Democratic senators were ousted. Former
Republican Gov., Henry Bellmon of Oklahoma defeated Sen. A. S.
Mike Monroney, Sen. Wayne Morse, D-Ore., lost his seat to
Republican Robert W. Packwood, and Rep. Richard S. Schweiker beat
Sen. Joseph Clark, D-Pa.
Barry M. Goldwater, the GOPs ill-fated presidential nominee in
1964, was returned to the Senate from Arizona. Democratic Gov.
Harold E. Hughes of lowa bucked the Nixon tide in his state to win
the seat of retiring Republican Sen. Bourke B. Hickenlooper.
Illinois* swing to Nixon eliminated the possibility that neither
major party candidate would get an electoral majority and that
Wallace could use his 45 votes to break the deadlock.
In Montgomery, the former Alabama governor wished Nixon
every success and said his movement doubtless had a conservative
impact.

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... close

Florida Voters Back Streamlined Constitution

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI) Florida
voters, in a historic decision giving them a
greater voice in determining their own
future, gave solid backing Tuesday to a
new streamlined constitution, the first
major revision of the state basic law in 83
years.
The document, which goes into effect
the first of the year, provides a host of
changes which include gubernatorial
succession, annual sessions of the
legislature and vests in the electorate the
authority to initiate constitutional change.
What the people did was to restore

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GURNEY
... landslide

power to themselves to determine their
own future, said Sen. John Mathews of
Jacksonville, whose work in drafting the
charter and leadership in guiding it through
the legislature were major factors in its
gaining approval by some 55 per cent of
the voters.
This gives them a great power to
initiate change, said Mathews, who will be
formally named president of the Senate
when the legislature meets next week.
Voters approved the document by a
margin of 579,692 to 474, 318. with
almost 96 per cent of the votes counted.

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ELECTION NIGHT AT UF
... anti-war skits held at apolitical rally
Nixon-Agnew Victorious
In Record Voter Turnout

PAGE ONE jj
The nationwide voter turnout appeared to be a
record an estimated 72 million persons. This
bettered the 1964 record of 70.6 million.
After receiving congratulatory messages from
President Johnson and the Vice President, Nixon
told supporters at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New
York City that The great objective of this
administration at the outset will be to bring us
together.
He pledged an open administration welcoming
the ideas and support of both parties, Americans of
all races, the young and the old.
Nixon saluted Humphrey for hjs gallant and
courageous fight. Recalling a teleohone
conversation with Humphrey, he added: I know

Bad Day
For
Democrats

Meanwhile with Florida re-established as
friendly country for Republicans,
president-elect Richard M. Nixon headed
here Wednesday to relax in the warmth of
a nationwide victory.
Floridas other big Republican winner
and the states first modem GOP
senator-elect, Edward Gurney of Winter
Park, spent the day making thank you calls
and getting ready for a West Indies
vacation.
The loser to Gurney in the Senate race,
white-haired democratic former Gov.
Leoy Collins, went quietly back to work

HUMPHREY
... conceded

how it feels to lose a close one, having lost a close
one eight years ago.
Though his triumph this time was also close, it
must have been sweet for the man who lost to
Kennedy by a mere 118,574 popular votes and 84
electoral votes, and then sank to the depths of
political defeat in 1962 by losing a bid for Governor
of California.
Six years of patient planning and wooing support
of the GOP rank and file from coast to coast paid
off for Nixon Wednesday after one of the closest
elections in modem times.
Yet the President-elect will have to work with a
House and Senate still dominated by the Democrats.
It was the first time since 1892 that an incoming
president has failed to have his party control
Congress.

in his Tampa law office. He said he was
through with politics.
Gurneys margin over Collins topped
228,000. It was this race, more than the
presidential race, that showed that
Floridians were in a mood for
conservatism.
On the lower levels of the ballot,
however, many winners were Democrats.
In 10 congressional races on the ballot,
eight of the winners were Democrats and
two Republicans, leaving the delegation
lineup at 9-3 in favor of the Democrats.

-.jibEm mm
COLLINS
. . retiring



Reid 11, Gaddum Clash Today In Finals

Browns Bandits won the Law
League football championship
Tuesday as they eased by Team I
13-0.
The game was close most of
the first half as neither team
could manage to put anything
on the board. Bandit
quarterback Lou Stinson was
hobbled this week with a severe
charley horse and his
effectiveness was diminished.
With only a minute remaining
in the first half Mike Mann
threw a forty yard pass to Jim
mingo Teper which brought
the Bandits close to the goal
line Rich Perillo, JMBA Pres,
candidate, promptly thrilled the
voters with a short TD pass to
Sports Trivia
Sorry about the delay in
quizzes, but I was in Norman,
Oklahoma scouting the
thrice-beaten Sooners (we are
being eyed to oppose them in
the Pre-season Rankings
Bowl).
Todays Quiz:
1) Who currently leads the
nation in individual total offense
in major college football?
2) Match the following pro
football players with their
a) Bob Jeter SMU
b) Lance Rentzel Virginia
c) Sonny Randle lowa
d) Forrest Gregg Oklahoma
e) Homer Jones Texas Southern
3) Robin Roberts won
twenty games a season for how
many consecutive years?
4) Who holds the NBA
record for most consecutive
games played?
5) Which former boxing
champion founded the bolo
punch?
Answers to Wednesdays quiz
are:
1) Citation; 1948
2) George Yardley
3) Sal Maglie; 2-0
4) John Landy
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Jeff Berg. Perillo caught a TD
pass later in the game to give the
Bandits their final points.
Ander Crenshaw was cited for
his exciting play for Team 1.
Johell Brown, an ocelot
slaesman on the side, was cited
for outstanding defensive work
for the Bandits in a mainly
defensive game.
In Independent basketball,
the English Dept, behind the 14
point showing of Joe Meigs
Tennis Club
Hosts FSU
The Womens Intramural
Tennis Club will host the Florida
State University Womens Tennis
Team Friday, November Bth, at
1:00 p.m. The match will be
played on the Broward Courts.
Carolyn Webb will be
representing the University in
the number one position. There
will be twelve singles and six
doubles with players and their
positions determined from the
Club ladder just prior to the
match.
This is the first match for
the local club this year, and all
tennis enthusiasts are invited.
Golf Tourney
Slated Here
A faculty and staff golf
tournament, sponsored by the
Intramural Department in
cooperation with the University
Golf Course, will be staged on
Saturday, November 23.
Tee-off times will start at 8
a.m. and go until all foursomes
are started.
All faculty and staff members
are invited to enter free of
charge at the intramural office,
room 229 Fla. Gym or call
376-3261 EXT. 2912. Call
392-0581 after Saturday.
The deadline for entereing is
Monday, November 18 at 5 p.m.
Prizes will be given to flight
winners on the basis of 18 hole
medal play.

IN DORM FOOTBALL

defeated the Spudnuts 30-28 in
overtime despite a 23 point
output by Ted Gottfried for the
nuts. The Tallywhackers moved
into the finals against the
English Dept, with a 39-16
lashing of ACU.
Gaddum section of Hume
moved into the finals of dorm
football with a big 25-6 win over
Fletcher N. In the other
semi-final game, Reid II using
the flee flicker to great
advantage trounced Tolbert 111
42-12. Tolbert 111 had previously
not given up a point. The finals
are today at 4:30 behind Hume.
In other independent action,
Pugs Honeypott swallowed Sea
Gulls Pier for the area six
championship, 9-0.
Chi Phi, improving with each
sport, trampled Theta chi in
their first match, 44-12. Bruce
Weeks and Steve Kaufman were
instrumental in the big win.
The FIJIS socked it to Phi
Kappa Psi registering a big win
with a 57-18 soaking. TEKE
stormed over Delta Sigma Phi

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33-0.
In other league action,
defending champions AGR

Bullets Monroe
Has NBA Lead

NEW YORK (UPI) The
National Basketball
Associations individual scoring
race is shaping up so far this
season as a three-way battle
among Earl Monroe of the
Baltimore Bullets, Elgin Baylor
of the Los Angeles Lakers and
Dave Bing of the Detroit Pistons.
At the moment Monroe is
the nominal leader but he has
played three more games than
each of his chief rivals and trails
both in average number of
points per game. At the same
time, Monroes average
production per game is sufficient
to suggest that he will remain in
the fight for the lead.
The NBAs official figures
released today show --_thal_

Thursday, Novambar 7,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

stormed over Phi Tau 37-0 and
DU walloped the Peppers,
574).

Monroe has scored 300 points in
11 games for an average of 27.3
per game. Baylor has scored 249
points in eight games for a 31.1
average and Bing has tallied 247
in eight games for a 30.9
average.
Bob Rule of Seattle, Kevin
Loughery of Baltimore, Ozzie
Russell of New York and Gus
Johnson rank 4-5-6-7 in points.
Wilt Chamberlain of the
Lakers leads in field goal
percentage with .681.
RebouncUrs
MINNEAPOLIS (UPl)lra
Harge of Oakland picked off
32 rebounds against Pittsburgh
this year to set an American
Basketball Association single
game record.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 7,1968

IS||l Soul Means Black
By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor

Time out.
Lets shift scenes today and take a look at
another sport and another problem.
Recruiting is going on during the football season,
it is taking place in all sports.
After every game in the Gator locker room many
high school recruits can be seen nulling around.
Sometimes they get enough courage to talk to one
of the Gators, but usually it is the other way
around.
Something different has taken place this year;
there is a greater number of Negro boys being
recruited.
It had to come, and now UF is attempting to
keep pace with the nation. Im sure everyone
remembers that Ron Coleman was signed by track
coach Jimmy Carnes last spring and UF had its first
black athlete. Now there are two, Johnnie Brown is
a freshman on the Cross-Country team, doing
extremely well.
Carnes must have realized that the only way to
build a great track program is by recruiting black
athletes.
Last Saturday I met one of Carnes latest
prospects, a junior college track star from
California. George Carty is black, that is different
from being Negro, and runs the high hurdles just
two-tenths of a second off the world record. Carty
also runs a 9.4 100 yard dash.
UFs current high hurdle man is Steve Tannen
and his best time is almost a full second slower than
Carty.
Carty had some interesting observations:
Florida is a coming school, 1 told Carnes that he
has to have some soul' on his team if hes going to
move.
For the uninformed soul means blade.
Carty stayed with Coleman and Brown while he
was visiting campus. Strangely enough those two
live together in Yon Hall.

Interest Wanes In Atlanta Pros

ATLANTA (UPI) One gets
the feeling that a tinge of despair
is setting in among the many
sports promoters who figured on
making a fast buck in Atlanta.
They are finding out there
isnt as much spectator gold in
these hills as they had hoped.
Actually, it shouldnt be that
surprising that a city that had
NO professional teams three
years ago has shown waning
enthusiasm in the face of a
play-for-pay onslaught that
included baseball, football,
soccer and basketball.
Not only has there been an
unprecedented demand for the
Atlanta-area sports dollar; but
the entertainment hasnt lived up
to expectations either.
Lets look at em-one by one.
Football-The three year-old
Atlanta Falcons are playing to
10000-under-capadty crowds
but have won only one game this
season and looked bad in most
of the losses. When Atlanta
joined the NFL in 1966; season
tickets were at a premium.
Baseball-The Atlanta Braves
drew a little over 1.1 million in
1968-more than a quarter of a
million under 67.
Soccer-The Atlanta Chiefs
won the National Professional
Soccer League crown-and still
averaged only about 5,500 per
match.
Basketball-The Atlanta Bawks
came here this year and were
encamped in the Georgia Tech

Coliseum. There hasnt been a
threat of a sellout yet.
This is not to say that
professional sports wont hit it
big someday in Atlanta. Theres
little doubt that the Falcons will
pack them in if they ever reach
NFL standards or that the

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Carty repeated over and over again that UF was
catching on and if there was going to be a big step
toward solving the lack of black athletes competing
here he wanted to be in on the ground floor.
It gets a little heavy on your shoulders this
racial thing, you know. But I got strong shoulders
man, I mean, if it is worth it I can do it.
A guarantee Carty is not going to get. In fact, he
isnt even going to go to school here.
Why?
There are a number of reasons.
Carty has a white girl friend in Oakland. Now
dont be shocked those things happen all the time
in other regions of the country, out of the south.
Carty is also one of the most sought after
athletes in the country and you can bet Southern
California and San Jose State are not going to roll
over and play dead. They want him and one of them
will get him.
UF is not ready for George Carty.
This campus has not come to grips with the racial
problem yet. Last year when a bladk law school
professor was threatened and consequently left
town because he was black everyone made real nice
speeches and promised to help rectify this horrible
situation.
I dont see much change. Those people who had
black friends before have black friends now and
those who would threaten a man just because he
was black would still do the same thing.
Words arent going to solve any problems, they
never have. Action is what we need, not just
embracing a black man because he is black but for
two reasons:
The only route to a nationally prominent sports
program is by having black athletes competing
because they are speed on every team, because they
are soul on every team and because they are unity
on every team.
Also because a man is a man no matter what the
color of his skin.
Wake up Gators.

Braves will draw big the year
they are serious contenders for
the National League pennant.
Soccer and basketball maybe
something else again. The Braves
admitted it would < take a long,
educational process to get
Atlantans interested in soccer.

Sugar Bowl 'Looking 1

NEW ORLEANS (UPI) The
Sugar Bowl keeps looking at
the top 10 for its New Years
Day classic, but that is just
another way of saying the
selection has narrowed down to
Kansas 3, Penn State 4,
Tennessee 5 Georgia 10 and
possibly Missouri 8.
Dr. Fred Wolfe Jr., president
of the bowl, confirmed Monday
that the list had been narrowed
to those five.
Kansas, 7-0, is currently the
top jewel in the competition
between the Sugar and Orange
Bowls, but with Oklahoma,
Kansas State and Missouri still
waiting for the Jayhawks, the
situation could change.
The Kansas-Missouri game is
not until Nov. 23, five days after
the bowls are expected to name
their teams. The late battle
could turn into an

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embarrassment for the bowl
grabbing either team.
Georgia is also a gamble
because of its Nov. 30 match
with arch-rival Georgia Tech.
Tennessee will be heavily
favored over its last two rivals,
Kentucky and Vanderbilt. But
Penn State will have a tough
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more than two weeks after the
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Albert
Predicts

By Albert The Alligator'

Albert came out with his most fantastic week ever last week, and
with a clear head, this weeks going to be even better.
First, 1 d like to sav that I managed to miss only two games with
one tie. Anyonewhosawa better average than that is welcome to come
into my cage and tell me about it. Ill get rid of this opposition yet.
Upsets in the air? This week will be loaded with them. Miami will
beat Penn State, and Im as sober as Alligators come. Another one is
LSU Over Alabama.
Heard enough? Heres the rest:
Tennessee over Auburn by 10 Ill start with the politico joke of
the week. How do you brainwash a campus politico?
Southern Cal over California by 1- Give him an enema. I dedicate
that to all the officeholders who wore vests to gator Growl on the
pretense that it was cold.
Florida State over Mississippi State by 14 The drink of the week
is steaming Gatorade Cola laced with an inch of brandy. (Yes,
alligators have good tastes in liquor)
Kansas over Oklahoma by 12 Another Dr. Cade invention is the
Gator-mater, which will revolutionize dating habits at UF. (?)
Ohio State over Wisconsin by 24 The girl in the pink sweater is
back at my cage. If shes there tonight, shes got a big surprize coming.
Notre Dame over Pittsburg by 10 There are no state laws
forbidding alligators to do anything. I dont think the honor court
could do anything either.
Vandy over Kentucky by 6 Did you know there are politicos on
this campus who have been active here up to ten years? Aside from a
few Alligator staffers, that must set some kind of record for staying in
school.
Houston over Memphis State by 13 How can you tell a Georgia
alumnus?
Tampa over East Carolina by 6 By the hayseed in his hair. How
can you tell an engineer who graduated from Georgia?
Oregon State over UCLA by 18 By the red dirt under his
fingernails. OK, finally, how can you tell a Georgia coed alumnus?
Purdue over Minnesota by 20 Shes probably still wearing the
letter she got for football.
Texas over Baylor by 12 Those were pretty bad. The last one,
however, is pretty easy: How will you be able to tell a Georgia
alumnus on Saturday?
Easy, theyll be crying. That brings me to my prediction on this
weekends game, which says that Florida will get back into the victory
column by beating Georgia 27-20. Vince Dooley can look that up in
his Funk and Wagnalls.
See you at Access 5 Saturday night. Bring your own.

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Thursday, Novombar 7,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

>, Tho Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 7,1968

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