Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 32

Union Board Election Overthrown

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Staff Writer
For the second time in eight
months the Honor Court has
overthrown a Student
Government election.
The decision of the Honor
Courts Board of Masters released

Roger Brown
'Hasnt Won
By MARGOCOX
Alligator Staff Writer
We really havent won the
case, was Roger Browns
statement concerning the Honor
Court Board of Masters decision
declaring the student body
elections of the union board
S&
officers null and void.
We have only proven it is
unconstitutional to elect these
people. The Student Senate bill
attempting to make the union
board subject to their political
system was unconstitutional,
Brown said.
By this action, we have
given each individual
organization the right to say
something about how it
operates, the power to buck the
political system.
We think now we have the
chance to work out a good
system for running the board
that will be at the best interests
of the students and not that of
the political system, Brown
said.
As for Bob White,
personally, we think the concept
we were trying to establish will
not hurt him, Brown said.
White, who was elected
president of the Union Board in
the October voting, had no
comments on the decision which
declared his election null.
Gary Goodrich, vice-president
of the student body and
(SEE ROGER BROWN PAGE 2)

The Pill: A No Policy' Policy At UF

k £. JT^^Mk
9
BV" \. -~ ; ; -> V r '' v- < { ? .- fj I / '.' -, \, 4 *A I A *- -//_
.
BIRTH CONTROL PILLS (
.. .dispensed at UF
*. \ 1 ; '

--- The
Florida Alligator

Monday has declared the Oct. 17
Reitz Union Board presidential
election null and void.
The courts opinion written
by Honor Court Chancellor Pete
Zinober, overthrew the election
on the grounds that the Student
Senate exceeded its authority
under the Student Body
Constitution, in amending the
Union Board charter without
consent of the Board.
The charter of the Union
Board will read as it did before
the attempt by SG to amend the
charter, and Roger Brown will
remain as Union Board president
until the spring elections, with
the approval of the Union Board
of Managers.
Since the election.. .was
held pursuant to the terms of
the amendment to theeitz
Union Charter, without any

Gators 'Kick A Bulldoa

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
A giant bulldog in the Plaza
of the Americas is going to take
a beating this week.
Also this week, several
football players will write
testimonials about the game and
the UF in the Alligator.
According to head
cheerleader Roddy Grubbs,
students may come to the Plaza
any time starting Wednesday to
give the dog a healthy kick in the
rear.
UF students will be kicking
the crepe paper dog in the tail
starting Wednesday, symbolizing
the Gators' clash with the
University of Georgia Bulldogs
in Jacksonville this Saturday.
Then, Friday noon, there will
be a giant rear-kicking party at
the Plaza possibly including

University of Florida, Gainesville

BY HONOR COURT

Htk
PETE ZINOBER
.. .wrote opinion
subsequent official action on the
part of the Board of Managers,
said election is declared null and
void.. . said the Board of
Masters decision.
The major dispute between
Brown and Gary Goodrich, vice
president of the student body
and representative of Student

speeches by the co-captains and
Coach Ray Graves.
At Jacksonville's Gator Bowl,
orange and blue shakers will be
distributed before the game to
help boost the Gators in their
match against what Grubbs
called a special rival.
Films of last year's game, in
which UF topped Georgia 17-16,

F

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of a three part series on
birth control at the UF. This
installment reviews the
procedure followed by infirmary
physicians for prescribing birth
control pills to UF coeds. Staff
writer Sydney Frasca received a
prescription for the pill from an
infirmary physician while on a
special investigatory assignment
for the Alligator.)
r } f 4
By SYDNEY FRASCA-
Alligator Staff Writer
JJnder what infirmary
officials call a no policy
policy, UF coeds have been
issued prescriptions for birth
control pills from Student
Health Service physicians.

ROGER BROWN
.. .disputed senate power
Government, concerned the
power of the Senate to amend
the charter of the Board of
Managers of the Union. The
amendment was passed by the
Senate during the summer term
when Brown and other Union
Board members were not at the
University.

will be shown Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday from
7 p.m. 9 p.m., at the Reitz
Union collonade.
The game featured a 52-yard
run for a touchdown by Richard
Trapp and a field goal in the last
29 seconds of the game by
Wayne Barfield, which tipped
the score in favor of the
Gators.
' 0

! 1 U< >r*^B

DEPTH
REPORT

The practice has been termed
a professional decision by
health service officials but UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
asserts that the prescribing of
, birth control pills is not the
responsibiltiy of the university.
O'Connell said in a recent
interview he knew of no policy
on prescribing contraceptive
drugs and that the subject had

America's
Number I
Col toga
Daily

Tuesday, November 3, 1968


ISP :^H
i Wtrm
GARY GOODRICH
.. .supported amending right
Brown said the Senate had no
power under the Constitution to
change the Union Board charter;
Goodrich said the Senate did
have this power over any
organization created by Student
Government. This includes the
power to abolish an organization
such as the Union Board with
the consent of the president of
the university.
The Board of Masters opinion
sided with Brown because it was
felt organizations such as the
Union Board derived at least
part of their existence apart
fromSG.
Is it logical that the Senate
should have the power to
deprive these groups of more
than it has the power to bestow?
We think not,** the Boards
decision said.
The amendment of the
charter instituted by the Senate
is unconstitutional, according to
the court. The decision
emphasizes the importance of
strict adherence to the
Constitution, the supreme law of
the Student Body, and all other
laws enacted by students, or
even partially by students as in
this case, must conform or be
subserviant to the Constitution.
The courts decision was
concurred by a unanimous vote
of the five-man Board of
Masters.

never come up before.
Earlier this quarter, one
infirmary official reportedly told
a journalism student during an
interview that the UF infirmary
under no circumstances issues
birth control pills to unmarried
coeds for contraceptive purposes.
He subsequently denied
making the statement.
Two UF coeds, one under 21,
were sent to the infirmary by
the A.lligator to test this policy
and each received prescriptions
for the pills from two different
physicians.
Both girls were unmarried
and specified that the pills were
needed for contraceptive
purposes only.
the dpctors prescribing the
* (SEE 'NO POLICY' PAGE 2)



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, 1 uesday, November 5, 1968

Vietnamese School Needs Aid

UFs Angel Flight has
responded to a high ranking Air
Force officers plea for basic
supplies for an elementary
school house for Vietnamese
children.
Lt. Col. John Thomsen, a
former UF instructor, was
transfered to Nha Trang Air
Force Base last January. He soon
became active on the Air Force
Civic Action project.
He then penned a plea to all
UF students for school supplies
such as pencils, erasers, paper,
or anything to help suply and
educate these children.
Angel Flight plans to provide
the six-room school house,
which was built by the American

AT INFIRMARY

No Policy f On The Pill

KOM PMt ONE J
pills warned the girls against
venereal disease, and talked to
them about their individual
situations.
They were told how to use
the contraceptive, what to
expect in the way of side effects
and after effects, and were given
prescriptions refillable for one
year.
Neither girl was given a pelvic
examination. One told the
physician she would prefer not
to have an examination for
medical reasons and was placed
on her honor by the doctor to
return later for a physical.
The other coed told the
physician that she had been
examined in January.
Health Services Director
Wilmer J. Coggins, aware of the
fact that an Alligator reporter
had received a prescription
without the examination,
comment on the
importance of the pelvic
examination because his
comments would be subject to
misinterpretation by the
reader.
Coggins said the decision to
give a physical examination is
left up to the attending
' physician.
Physicians are bound by
good medical practice to make
decisions as for whom they
prescribe contraceptive
medication, Coggins said.
Coggins indicated that the
only guidelines followed at the
infirmary on prescribing
contraceptives were the
guidelines of good medical
practice and awareness of
complications.
Physicians are acutely aware
of moraf implications of oral

TM||J|/ What has Nixon dohe besides
ininlV picking Agnew
Humphrey has the answer.
Now give him the authority.
pd. pol. adv.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and U published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as_ JfCgPd class matter at the United states Popt Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver adver'
' adver' tlsements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Adverttsiy
ttsiy Adverttsiy Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not bo responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to ran several tiroes. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
4'

VIETNAMESE SCHOOLCHILDREN
.. .in need of supplies

Military Civil Engineers, with the
essentials under Operation
Angel School.
Many sororities and

All

DEPTH
REPORT

contraceptions and are involved
in counseling as well as
prescribing, he said.
One significant problem in
prescribing birth control pills
involves the coed under 21.
Physicans treating a minor in
any area where a question might
be raised, such as prescribing
birth control pills, should be
aware of the fact that parental
consent is necessary, Coggins
said.
y
When asked if unmarried
minors are prescribed
contraceptive medication
without the parents' consent,
Coggins said it depended on
individual circumstances.
It is a and
private affair between doctor
and patient, he said.
Other state universities have
official policies that differ from
procedure at UF.
At the University of South Florida,
the Health Service does not have
a written policy but does not
prescribe birth control pills
when they are to be used solely
for purposes of contraception,
according to Director Robert L.
Egolf.
Because our contact with
our students is limited. .and
because there are medical
problems . that are more
competently handled by a
specialist, and because we have
no gynecologist on our Health

fraternities have already
expressed concern in the project
to aid an estimate! 250
Vietnamese children.

Service staff, it has been our
practice here to refer our
students to a private
gynecologist or their family
physician, Egolf said.
Egolf called this a
legitimate reason for
the position and said he
did not consider those
(reasons) involved with parental
disapproval, marital status, and
others raising moral issues
legitimate reasons for not
prescribing birth control pills.
Lack of facilities was also
given as the reason Florida State
University Health Services do
not prescribe birth control pills.
In policy procedures written
m June. I l )07, it states that the
Student Health Service does
not tit nor provide prescription
lor contraceptive drugs unless
there is some definite medical
indication.
The gynecology staff is far
too small to provide the large
number of pelvic examinations
that would be required if we
offered contraceptive drugs,
the policy says.
Dr. C. R. Gentry, director
health services at FSU, pointed
out that even when the pill is
prescribed for reasons other than
contraception, the knowledge fl
and written consent of the I
patients parents is required. 1
Senate Meet I
Cancelled I
Because of English progs I
tonight, the Student Senate I
meeting has been canceled I I
until Thursday night at 7:20 I
p.m., Charlie Harris, majority 1
floor leader, said. 1
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Some are planning drives,
while others are contributing
money to help transport the
supplies to Vietnam once they
are collected.
Anyone interested in
contributing to the drive can do
so this week. Angel Flight has
set up an Angel School,
contributions box on the First
floor plaza of Reitz Union.
Roger Brown
'Hasnt Won
respondent in the case,
expressed disappointment over
the decision.
Were disappointed. We feel
that the case in essence has
finally taken the student body
and student government out of
the affairs of the union and has
given that power to the
administration.
William E. Rion, director of
the union was pleased with the
decision.
I feel that the authority of
the operation of the union
should be left to the governing
board (Board of Managers), he
said.

H Loans Up To S6OO
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Poll Rates
I
Humphrey
Over Nixon
NEW YORK (UPI) Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey
has moved three percentage
points ahead of Richard M.
Nixon in the Final pre-election
poll by Louis Harris &
Associates, it was reported
Monday.
The poll, conducted Sunday,
gave Humphrey 43 per cent of
the vote, Nixon 40 per cent and
third party candidate George C.
Wallace 13 per cent with the
remaining 4 per cent still
undecided.
It was the first time in the
campaign that Humphrey led the
Harris poll, which reported
Nixon leading by 3 per cent last
Friday. The Friday figures,
however, were based on polling
before President Johnson
announced the Vietnam
bombing halt Thursday night.
The Harris poll, based on
interviews with 1,206 voters,
was printed in late afternoon
editions of the New York Post.
Another nationwide poll, the
Sindlinger daily survey, reported
Sunday that among voters
interviewed Friday and Saturday,
Humphrey held a 0.6 lead over
Nixon. Sindlinger gave
Humphrey 34.4 per cent, Nixon
33.8 per cent and Wallace 14.1
per cent with 18.7 still in doubt.
The Sindlinger continued its
survey through Monday.
The final Gallup poll, also
released Sunday, gave Nixon a 2
per cent lead. It said Nixon
would receive 42 per cent of the
popular vote, Humphrey 40 per
cent and George C. Wallace 14
per cent with 4 per cent
undecided. The poll was based
on interviewing completed
Saturday.



New Constitution Has Urban, Rural Appeal

By BILL SADOWSKI
Alligator Special Writer
(Fourth in a Four Part Series)
The proposed tax article of
the Florida Constitution clarifies
one questionable area under the
1885 Constitution regarding the
taxation of agricultural
property.
The new section expressly
permits the classification and
assessment of agricultural land
and land used exclusively for
non-commercial recreational
purposes, for the purposes of
ad valorem (property) taxation,
solely on the basis of character
or use. Drafters of this
provision included it so the
affected property need not be
taxed as heavily as other
property in the state.
Thus, the part pertaining to
agricultural assessment is
regarded as being particularly
attractive to rural interests,
whereas the section referring to
land used exclusively for
non-commercial recreational
purposes is expected to be
particularly appealing to urban
interests.
The section continuing the
homestead exemption (up to
$5,000) includes a new portion
allowing the Legislature to
increase the exemption to
SIO,OOO for people 65 and over
and for the disabled. The
exemption is specifically
extended to include
condominiums and cooperatives.
The maximum exemption
which the Legislature may allow
to the head of a household for
personal property is increased to
SI,OOO from the present SSOO.
The existing SSOO exemption for
widows and the disabled is
extended to the blind.
The prohibition against
pledging the credit of the state is
continued in the proposed
constitution. However, it would
not operate to prevent the
investment of public funds
under certain conditions so the
money can be put to work
earning more money for the
state.
t
This section also allows the
Legislature to provide for the
issuance of revenue bonds by
counties, municipalities or
special districts to finance or
refinance local airports or port
facilities and the cost of capital
projects for industrial or
manufacturing plants.
Again, specific conditions
must be met before such action
is permitted.
Nor may such property be
exempted from property taxes,
to the extent it is privately
occupied or operated. Provisions
like these are intended to
encourage industry to come to
Florida and to facilitate the
construction of airport and port
facilities.
The portion of this section
dealing with revenue bonds was
inserted in direct response to a
Jacksonville case handed down
by the Florida Supreme Court
interpreting the 1885
Constitution to prohibit the
issuance of revenue bonds for
such purposes.

r Alligator

The prohibition against
levying a state personal income
tax is carried over from the
present constitution. The
question of whether a corporate
income tax may be levied under
this provision ultimately
depends on how the courts
interpret the phrase No tax ...
upon the income of residents or
citizens of the state shall be
levied ... i.e., whether a
corporation qualifies as a
resident or citizen.
The principal conflict in the
Legislature resulted from efforts
to impose constitutional limits
on the levying of property taxes
by local government. The
section of the tax article
providing for millage limits for
property taxes was the most
controversial to be considered
by the Legislature.
It provides a maximum of ten
mills may be levied for
municipal purposes, ten mills for
all county purposes and ten mills
for school purposes -a total of
30 mills for all purposes.
The effect of this provision,
standing alone, is to place a cap
on the amount of property taxes
which may be levied in this
state.
The inclusion of such limits
in the proposed constitution
(such comprehensive limits do
not exist in the 1885
Constitution) was forced by
Legislators who believed that
something had to be done to
prevent property taxes from
going any higher.
4
Many of these men were
elected from counties where
increased tax bills resulting from
a recent Florida Supreme Court
decision requiring property
assessment at 100 percent had

I ELECTRIC HEAT IS
CLEAN

"a
your vlll'/ GAINESVILLE UTILITIES

i 1 '" HWUli'iimnj ! ain ll il |!

ANALYSIS

just been sent out by tax
collectors. Opposition to this
particular provision, while
considerable, was not sufficient
to force deletion of the millage
limits.
The section in Article Xll
(Schedule), relating to millage
limits reads: Tax millages
authorized in counties,
municipalities and special
districts, on the date this
revision becomes effective, may
be continued until reduced by
law.

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PIZZA YOU WANT
$ 1.35 Per Person In The Pizza Hut
Smorgasbord Olympics INCLUDES 1 SOFT DRINK)

You there with the big
appetite. With a craving for
m-m-m marvelous mushroom
pizza; and perfect pepperoni
pizza; and simmering sausage
pizza; and cherishable cheese
pizza; and super-dooper
supreme pizza.

The effect of this provision
turns on the interpretation of
authorized.
Another tax-related area
which is not included in the tax
article, but rather in Article XII
(Schedule), is the second gas
tax.
The formula for distribution
to counties of revenues collected
under the second gas tax has
been changed to one-fourth area,
one-fourth population and
one-half on the basis of
collections.
The 1885 Constitution
provides for a formula of
one-third population, one-third
area and one-third according to a
county's contribution to the

... what are you waiting
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Smorgasboard Olympics.
Entitles you to eat all or
little as you want including
soft drink. Children up to
13, Just $.lO for each year of
age.
(Warning: One taste and

Tuesday, November 5,1968, The Florida Alligator,

cost of state road construction.
Thus, larger, more populous
counties regard the new
provision as advantageous to
their interest because the factor
based on area has been reduced
whereas the proportion based on
collections and population has
been increased.
dood Srvic Starts
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Come try. Win or lose out
Pizza Hut Smorgasbord
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Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida AHigator, Tuesday, November 5, 1968

Big as it is, the information processing
industry is just beginning to grow.
Recently, Fortune estimated that the value
of general purpose computers installed in
this country will more than double by 1972.
Other publications have other predictions,
and probably no source is totally precise. But
most agree that information processing is
one of Americas fastest growing major
industries.
Every day, it seems, computers go to work
in a new field or new application. IBM com computers
puters computers are working in such diverse fields as
business, law, medicine, oceanography,
traffic control, air pollution. Just about any
area you can name.
To somebody just starting out, this growth
means exceptionally good chances for
advancement. Last year, for example, we
appointed over 4,000 managerson
performance, not seniority. Here are four
ways you could grow with IBM:

Engineering and Science
The interdisciplinary
environment keeps
you technologically jf
Working in data process processing
ing processing today pretty much means
you work in a broad spectrum
of technologies, says Nick
Donofrio.
An Associate Engineer at IBM, Nick is a
1967 graduate in Electrical Engineering.
Hes using his technical background to de design
sign design circuits for computer memory systems.
Nick says, Your specialty at IBM can take
you into the front yard of half a dozen dif different
ferent different fields. In my job, for example, I work
with systems design engineers, chemists,
physicists, metallurgists, and programmers.
The diversity helps me keep up to date on
the latest technologies.
Career areas in engineering and science
at IBM include: Research, Design & Develop-

Other reasons to consider IBM
1. Small Team Concept. No matter how large
a project may be, we break it down into
units small enough to be handled by one
person.or a few people. Result: quick recog recognition
nition recognition for achievement.
2. Educational Support. IBM employees
spend over thirteen million hours a yda'r in
company-sponsored educational and training
programs. And plans like our Tuition

IBM invites you to join an infant industry.

ment, Manufacturing, Product Test, Space
and Defense Projects, and Field Engineering.
Youll need at least a B.S. in any technical field.
""
Working with
company presidents
is part of the job.
Andy Moran. I
consider that fairly good for an engineer
who graduated only two years ago.
Andy earned his B.S.E.E. in 1966.T0day,
hes a Marketing Representative with IBM,
involved in the planning, selling and installa installation
tion installation of data processing systems.
Andys customers include companies with
annual sales ranging from 20 million
to 120 million dollars. He often works
with executive vice-presidents and presi presidents.
dents. presidents. Andy says, At first I was a little
nervous about the idea of advising execu executives
tives executives at that level. But by the time I finished
training, I knew I was equipped to do the job.
Career areas in marketing at IBM include:
Data Processing Marketing and Systems
Engineering, Office Products Sales, and
Information Records Sales. Degree require requirement:
ment: requirement: B.S. or B.A. in any field.
Finance
Youre in an ideal
spot to move
ahead fast.
Ive always figured my
chances for advance advancement
ment advancement would be better
in a growth industry.
Thats why I picked
IBM, says Joe Takacs.
Joe's been working J M j
in general accounting

Refund Program could help you get your
Masters or Ph.D.
3- 300 Locations. We have almost 50 plant,
laboratory, or headquarters locations and
over 250 branch offices in key cities
throughout the United States.
4. Openings at All Degree Levels. We have
many appropriate starting jobs for people at
any degree level: Bachelors, Masters
or Ph.D.

since he got his 8.8.A. in June, 1968. Growth
wasnt the only reason he chose IBM. He
says, I learned that it's general practice at
IBM to promote from within and to promote
on merit alone. I like that.
Another growth factor is the job itself,
Joe says. During my first few years, Ill get r
experience in nearly every area of general
accounting lncome & Expense, Balance
Sheet, and so on. I'll be learning how the
company is structured and how it operates
on a broad scale. Thats exactly the kind of
knowledge Ill need to help me qualify for
a managers job.
Career areas in finance at IBM include:
Financial Planning and Control, Financial
Analysis, Accounting, Information Systems,
and Internal Auditing. Youll need at least a
Bachelors degree.
Programming
Its a mixture j|v
of science
Acomputer
is prac pracuseless
use- pracuseless
less until some somebody
body somebody writes a
program for it, £
says Earl Wilson. "|
Earl got a B.A. in Modern t
Languages in June,l967.
Hes now an IBM programmer working on a
teleprocessing system that will link the
computerized management information
systems of several IBM divisions.
Earl defines a program as a set of
instructions that enables a computer to do a
specific job. Programming involves
science, says Earl, because you have to
analyze problems logically and objectively.
But once youve made your analysis, you
have an infinite variety of ways to use a
computers basic abilities. Theres all the
room in the world for individual expression.
Career areas in programming at IBM include:
Systems Programming, Applications Pro Programming,
gramming, Programming, Programming Research, and
Internal Programming for IBMs own use.
Youll need atleasta.S. or B.A.

Visit your placement office
Sign up at your place placement
ment placement office for an inter- ON
view with IBM. Or send OAMDIIC
a letter or resume to wMMrUO
Charles Cammack, IBM, NOV.
Dept. C, 1447 Peachtree a 4Q a a
St., N.E., Roomlo,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
If 5 A 'y
An Equal Opportunity Employer
IBM



TO ELIMINATE DUPLICATION

Mautz:State Universities
Need Long-Range Plans

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
A comprehensive
development plan for the state
university system is essentia] for
making the most of educational
opportunities without
unnecessary duplication, State
University System Chancellor
Robert B. Mautz said Saturday.
Speaking at a Phi Alpha Delta
legal fraternity breakfast, Mautz
called for an analysis of
educational output in relation to
needs on a long-range basis.
Part of my goal is to build
an analysis of total cost for
programs, including space,
library requirements,
maintenance charges, and other
indirect but real charges," Mautz
said. V
An interesting aspect of cost
is that no one has ever included
space as a part of total cost," he
continued.
A university frequently
justifies its request for a new
program on the basis of the
faculty being already present.
An argument is made that
therefore the new program will
not cost any more, he said.
In fact, no major program
has ever been approved that was

Election Laws
To Be Studied

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Election laws are vague, ambiguous, and full of loopholes,
Secretary of the Interior Ric Katz said last week.
To study such inequities in Student Governments election
procedures, Bill Modlin Tuesday will introduce to the Student Senate
a bill calling for an Election Laws and Procedures Commission.
The commission would look into existing voting laws and methods,
with an eye toward suggesting new procedures and possible revisions
of statutes.
For example, the country voting machines which we use now are
too expensive, Modlin, a senator from Towers, said. They cost
S9OO. Wed like to find a less expensive way to vote.
He and Katz mentioned using IBM card packets for voting.
As to election laws, Modlin said the fact an Alligator reporter could
vote three times, proved that current laws are inadequate.
Another weakness, Modlin said, is the fact there is no definite
procedure for the Honor Court to follow in invalidating elections. The
commission could study possible solutions.
Also, too many election duties go to the secretary of the interior,
Modlin said. He suggested that the commission could study allocating
election responsibilities among members of an elections board.
You cant depend on just one person, he said.
The commission would be composed of the secretary of the
interior, two senators, two Honor Court representatives, an Alligator
editor, and two other interested students. Their appointments would
be subject to senate approval.
Modlin, who anticipates no opposition from the senate to the bill,
said plans are to get concrete proposals from the commission in time
for the spring elections.

Tuesday STEAK SPECIAL
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TOSSED
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v 9 c
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not immediately followed by a
request for a major building.
According to Mautz, it is
essential to direct and
coordinate educational programs
to prevent an educational
sprawl that would eventually be
as disastrous as the urban
sprawl.
There simply is not enough
money to create instant
universities throughout the state
nor to duplicate it at nine or
more places.
Mautz cautioned against
demands for greater
productivity in the universities
because it leads to
impersonalization of the
educational process and to
frustration of faculty and
student.
Greater productivity is
achieved only by crowding more
students into a class, asking each
faculty member to teach longer
hours, eliminating laboratory
experience for students, failing
to provide modern equipment,
requiring each student to wait
for a book until other students
are finished with it, increasing
the number of night classes, and
by eliminating the personal
contact which is a hallmark of

higher education, Mautz said.
Such activities are
appropriate to a factory and not
higher education. The inevitable
result of implementing this
concept of efficiency is a
second-rate education.
Mautz also talked of the
radical change" in today's
students which is not generally
recognized by those of us who
tend to think of present
situations in terms of our own
experience years ago.
Students today are
idealistic. They are concerned
about the world into which they
are thrust. They reject with all
the emotionalism of youth that
which we we accept but which
we have vague misgivings," he
said.

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Tuesday, November 5,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, November 5, 1968

Page 6

Prof Predicts
Big Surprise
In Election
By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writer
On the eve of the national
election, author, nationally
recognized political analyst, and
UF professor of political science
Dr. Ernest R. Bartley predicts an
upsurge of support for
Vice-President Hubert H.
Humphrey putting the election
up for grabs.
Bartley said a recent surge of
Humphrey strength indicated by
the Gallop and Harris polls and
the trailing off of the George C.
Wallace campaign are responsible
for the closeness of the
presidential race.
Humphreys strength will be
a big surprise Bartley said, but
he declined to make a definite
prediction on the outcome of
the race.
Bartley said the states to
watch in the East will be New
York, Pennsylvania, and
Connecticut. A 10 per cent
popular vote for Wallace in any
of the northern states will not
only be a big surprise but will
also increase his chances.
The mid-West, including the
critical state of Illinois, will have
a big effect on the election,
Bartley said.
Florida will be important to a
Richard M. Nixon victory.
Bartley said Florida will
probably go for Nixon but
Wallace strength is high and a
Wallace victory in Florida would
seriously hamper Nixons
chances.
Bartley, although he is a
Democrat, said he hopes the
election does not go to the
House of Representatives. In the
event Humphrey makes a strong
showing nation-wide and Wallace
takes all the South, Nixon may
not get a majority of the
electorial college.
In the event Nixon does not
get the 270 required votes, the
election would go to the House
and a President would be elected
there. The Senate would elect
the Vice-President. In the event
the House became deadlocked,
the Vice-President elected by the
Senate would become the
temporary President.
Bartley said his optimism
over ex-Gov. Leoy Collins
chance of defeating Republican
Edward Gurney for the U.S.
Senate seat vacated by George
Smathers has increased in the
last week. Bartley said Gurney
would carry about 50 of
Floridas 67 counties but would
lose in populous Dade,
Hillsborough, and Duval
counties.
Army ROTC
Booth Erected.
An information booth
manned by senior Army ROTC
Cadets will be open Wednesday
and Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2
pm
The booth, located between
Little Hall and Walker
Auditorium, will furnish
information to freshmen and
sophomores interested in Army
ROTC.
Freshmen not presently
enrolled in the Army ROTC
program may apply next quarter
and still complete the two years
of basic ROTC needed for the
advanced program.

DROPOUTS

FOR felM-PRSPComTcASTfePSrateE i
I*6l by linked fee've Sy*d*o*. W.

Apolitical Rally
In Plaza Tonight

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF chapter of Students
for a Democratic
Society-Southern Student
Organizing Committee
(SDS-SSOC) plans an apolitical
rally tonight for people who are
not interested in the outcome of
the national election.
At the Plaza of the Americas,
SDS-SSOC will present
anti-war, anti-establishment,
and anti-military skits. The
skits including one pantomine,
will be repeated throughout the
evening.
Also performing at the rally
will be several bands, some
playing conventional music.
James Dama, chairman of the
rally, said last week the rallys
purpose is to show disapproval
of the election system and to
give students something to do
besides watching the election
returns on T.V.
The rally will begin when the
vote count starts.
Dama urged all who attend
the rally to bring candles so, to
climax the rally, the group can
circle Tigert Hall holding hands
and displaying lighted candles.
He emphasized the rally
would be non-violent. It will
follow an informal schedule,
with bands and skits, and the
participants will do generally
five till nine
dining room only
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1506 N.W. 13th Street 378-24811

whatever they pleaseTne said.
SDS-SSOC, which has been
an off-campus organization sj nce
1965, is currently seeking
official recognition, from the UF
administration. There has been
no word from the Committee on
Student Organizations and
Social Affairs, whose members
are appointed by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, on
whether the charter request will
be granted.

do your
contact lenses lead
acleanlife?

Malones Annex
SALE on discontinued j
jackets, tee-shirts
and sweatshirts,
assorted styles and colors
Used and new paper back books.
Also reference books.
1714 University Ave.

Contact lenses can be
heaven ... or hell. They
may be a wonder of
modern science but just
the slightest bit of dirt
under the lens can make
them unbearable. In
order to keep your con contact
tact contact lenses as comforta comfortable
ble comfortable and convenient as
they were designed to be,
you have to take care of
them.
Until now you needed
two or more separate
solutions to properly pre prepare
pare prepare and maintain your
contacts. You would
think that caring for con contacts
tacts contacts should be as con convenient
venient convenient as wearing them.
It can be with Lensine.
Lensine is the one lens
solution for complete
contact lens care. Just a
drop or two, before you
insert your lens>coats and
lubricates it allowing the
lens to float more freely
in the eye's fluids. That's

BY HOWARD POST

because Lensine is an
''isotonic'' solution,
which means that it
blends with the natural
fluids of the eye.
Cleaning your contacts
with Lensine retards the
-buildup of foreign de deposits
posits deposits on the lenses. And
soaking your contacts in
Lensine between wear wearing
ing wearing periods assures you
of proper lens hygiene.
You get a free soaking
case on the bottom of
every bottle of Lensine.
It has been demonstrated
that improper storage be between
tween between wearings may
result in the growth of
bacteria on the lenses.
This is a sure cause of
eye irritation and in some
cases can endanger your
vision. Bacteria cannot
grow in Lensine which is
sterile, self-sanitizing,
and antiseptic.
Let your contacts be the
convenience they were
meant to be. Get some
Lensine, from the Murine
Company, Inc.
1
a |
I p



Saigon Stalemate Sticks,
Thieu Rejects Paris Bid

SAIGON (UPI) President
Nguyen Van Thieu Monday
reiterated his refusal to send a
South Vietnamese negotiating
team to the expanded Paris talks
with the Viet Cong. Nobody
can force us to do that, he said.
As Thieu addressed the
nation, his aides predicted that
6,000 persons would attend a

WHATS
HAPPENING

IN JUDGMENT DAY, 1968: Today some of the American people
will decide whether they want Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon or
whats-his-name to lead or mislead the U.S. for the next four years.
Despite the gigantic bombardment of charge and countercharge
heard during this campaign, one question still remains to be answered:
Will Spiro Agnew become a household word?
AND SPEAKING OF POLITICS: The Student Senate meets in the
Reitz Union Auditorium tonight at 6:30. Come and watch if you like.
AND SPEAKING OF WATCHING THE BIRDIES: The Badminton
Club gathers in Norman gym tonight at 7.
IN ENCORES: The University Symphony Orchestra presents a
Childrens Concert in the University Auditorium today at 10 a.m.
Another Childrens Concert was given last Wednesday.
IN OH, JACK, YOU ALWAYS WERE A CARD: Bridge Lessons
will be taught tonight in room 150 C of the Union at 7.
AND HERES ANOTHER ACE OF A CLUB: The French Club
congregates in room 150 Bof the Union today at 2 p.m.
IN GREEK-LETTER GOINGS-ON: Gamma Sigma Delta meets in
room 150 Aof the Union today at 7 a.m. for a breakfast; Alpha Delta
Sigma meets in room 118 of the Union at 7 tonight; Delta Sigma Pi
meets in rooms 347 and 355 of the Union tonight at 7.
Despite the pretensions of current pretenders, the practice of giving
a homely admonition to do such-and-such today is well-founded in
historical precedent. The practice dates back to the historic case of
Tigert vs. Hall, in which the Florida Klan was assured the right to do
their linen in public laundromats as long as they didnt stoke the
machines with Confederate money.
As he was leaving the courtroom, Grit N. Grime, attorney for
the prosecution who won his fame settling estates, was asked by a
reporter from the liberal yankee press if he had any words for the
aspiring young country lawyers in the audience.
Ever the advocate of forthright, determined, decisive action, Grime
threw up his head and rang out with these immortal words: Practice
law with a will today!
And so it is with no unfounded fear of plagerism that I say:
Investigate Lewis Rothleins past today.
Listen To
\Ndv h 980"~
R p d a t h d
clues given doily to
where the keys ore hidden
Mission Impossible Contest
Tfce WDVN G*U Cays have ettMkw Mm kvya tv e trend new 1969
Mestene Seerts See#, V-t wttt redie, wklfv aideweNs end after extras
a $3,000 aatewetlls samewtara in tke Greeter GehusviWe Area.
Two new dees are given caMy an WOVM fa the lecetlen at the
keya- aa sane in new and win!
LIST OF CLUES ALREADY GIVEN AT
FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:
LOW Cafeteria AN Caftan
113 W. Univ. Avt. Min-A-Mert Skew 0 Keefer
Stares Ferd Tawn
Sad Sam 23S W. Univ. Ave.
Acmes tram C.H4. Marian Finance
222 W. Univ. Ave.
Here Are Two Clues To Start You
To the Hidden Keys
Tke cert am lrftliflni past Aa tke keys sarvey the scene
sea aa I'm skeppag merrily. tkey can sea rad, yaSaw and
gwan.

government-sponsored rally at
Saigon City Hall Tuesday
morning to stress South
Vietnamese self determination
in political affairs.
U.S. officials increased
security forces at the American
Embassy and erected wooden
barricades outside the building.
Military commanders ordered

By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer

American troops to stay out of
downtown Saigon unless on
officials business.
Thieus 18-minute broadcast
address Monday night was his
first offical statement since
Saturday when he told a meeting
of the National Assembly in
Saigon he void boycott the Paris
talks scheduled to open
Wednesday if the Viet Cong
were seated delegation
separate from the North
Vietnamese.
Thieu said it was his
understanding that the National
Liberaiion Front NLF political
arm of the Viet Cong, would
appear at the Paris conference
table as a separate delegation.
Dont listen to the
Communist propaganda saying
we agreed to talk with the NFL,
and that the war is going to end
and that you should throw down
your arms and join them, Thieu
said in a remark directed at
South Vietnamese troops.

Our Lioa) Is A/jxio us
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y -.ZrefCy (ytFTSj
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Open 10-9
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oar Ta&ty/ wTOfn!
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| JACKSONVIUE COUSEUM |
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THE W
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Tuaaday, Novambar 5,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I. The Florida Alligator. Tuesday, November 5.1968

The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
* the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
PoatoJm Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez James Cook
fl
/if /It
Achilles Heel
77te Endorsement
The Florida Alligator
Published fay students of the University of F lor ids under the
eu vices of the Boerd of Student Publications.
EdHorid, Burin aae. Advertising offices In Room 3SI Reitz Union. Phone
sett. 2832
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are thorn of the editors or of
the nriter of the article nd not those of the University of Florida.**

EDITORIALS

Elect Leadership

A microcosm of America clashes at the
polls today in Floridas senatorial race.
The choice is between ultra-conservative
Republican Ed .Gurney and moderate liberal
Democrat Leroy Collins.
And the philosophical lines between the
candidates are about that clearly drawn.
In our judgement, Gurney cannot be
seriously considered by intelligent voters.
Yesterday, the Alligator endorsed Hubert
Humphrey for the presidency on the premise
that in political outlook, he is the most
qualified of the three candidates to deal
meaningfully with the sicknesses of America.
We urge the election of Leroy Collins to
the U.S. Senate for the same reason.
When all the verbalities are set aside, the
most critical issue to America in 1968 is
reversing the river of hate which threatens to
flood her.
Neither ignoring the sentiments of a large
portion of the American people, both white
and black, nor trying to solve them with
methods which may have worked in 1768
but will not in 1968 are adequate cures for
Americas ills.
In fact, the solutions to Americas
problems offered by Ed Gurney would be
more likely to escalate disenchantment
among a large portion of American people.

'Scratch Fad

These ARE The Days

Smile, for the best years of
your life are here!
So what if it doesnt seem
like it? What difference does it
make if you are perplexed,
disoriented, drifting in a solitary
vacuum, physically tired and
intellectually drained?
Five, ten, 20 years from now
you will look back to these good
ole days and smile. The
memories of these carefree,
anxiety-free years will return to
your mind and make you
chuckle.
The long, sleepless nights of
tossing and dark despair will
then be forgotten.
The endless hours when walls
and ceilings caved in, trapping
you in a murky whirlpool of
emotions, will be brushed aside
by a mind that prefers to recall
and cherish those fleeting
instants when a dream seemed
about to become a reality.
In a few years, these times
will be but part of a
carefully-polished, well-edited
remembrance of colorful
football games, noisy parties,
bright afternoons and pleasant
experiences.
The young creature that now
wanders aimlessly amid
moss-infected trees and
expressionless faces will be
transformed into a strong
warrior that successfully
conquered golden castles.
The concealed, silent tears of
disenchantment, frustration and
desperation now shed will be
tossed out of your mind along
with the memories of crushed

dreams, fruitless hopes and
unattainable goals.
And you will return to this
land-where you triumphed and
suffered, climbed and crawled,
lived and died-to remember
only the victories, the successful
ascending, the good life.
Gone will be the nights of
vigil, the somber rainy mornings,
the hot afternoons of endless
waiting for a miracle to occur,
for a dream to materialize, for a
messiah to appear.
And you will be just another
homecomer returning to the

Alligator Inquizitor
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Happy Tuesday. I bring you the good news that Friday is the
big Inquizitor contest. A day of toughies and jollies and
whoever gets the most correct answers will be amply rewarded. 1
warn you, this will be only for the seasoned Trivia-head. So
todays questions will be easy to make you other folks feel
better. Why, even Dave Chafin may get one right today.
Sock me with some answers:
1 Who writes the alligator column,WHATS HAPPENING?
2. Who was, in standard fairy tales a) the poor lass trapped
in a tower with beautiful long hair, so long that a prince climbed
up it. b) the little man with the ability to weave gold out of
hay ( he had a funny name).
3. What was the name of Merv Griffins TV quiz show?
4. What character in a Shakespeare play said, Some are
bom great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness
thrust upon them? And from which play?
5. What was Gary Lewis and the Playboys first big hit?
6. Is it true that a Dane wouldnt but a Norwegian wood?
Friday s answers (there was a limitation of space yesterday):
1. archy (from archy and mehitabel) 2. The American
Mercury 3. Fels Naptha Soap, Fiske Tires, Packard, Lucky
Strikes 4. Texas Guinan, Clara Bow 5. Mah-jongg
Write your mother today.

America needs the leadership of men such
as Leroy Collins. We urge you to elect that
leadership.
Why?
I a
The Honor Court Board of Masters
announced Monday its decision to overturn
the recent elections for Union Board posts
on the grounds that the Student Senate
exceeded its powers in calling for the
election.
The court ruled that the Senate does not
have the authority under the Student Body
Constitution to set elections for
organizations chartered by Student
Government without first seeking the
approval of the group involved.
We have now but one question: why
didnt anyone ask for a constitutional
interpretation of the Senates law before the
election was held at a cost of a couple
thousand dollars, paid for by the students?
Why was the issue raised only a few days
before the election?
There may be more to this than meets the
eye.

By Raul Ramirez:

alma mater where you spent
some of the happier years of
your life.
And you will proudly show
your friends and family the tree
under which you studied,
Century Tower and the buildings
erected since I left.
And walk by the warm spot
in the sun where you once swore
to conquer the stars.
And failed.
So smile, for these are the gay
years, the bright times, the
beginning of the end.



: J^^iBBSWitM^B!IHMBI^HBHBB^Mitf4-#^*i^WMSSr r i6>. i
mNo, theyre not pictures from
San Francisco or
Haight Ashbury or the village in
New York These are the signs of
the times in a small central
Florida town that has frequentlv
been criticized for being rural,
and whose natives have been
called rednecks and crackers
But the university has always
betMi the major cause of change
in Gainesville and it is still
causing alterations.
Students have always had a
lot to say about how Gainesville
looks and they are beginning to
give the city a real face lifting
The signs seem to say that
Gainesville is starting to groove
Because the signs, they are a
changin'

WAVAV.W.VW..V.WS%VW///.V.V.V.V/JWZmWWVWSW9WWWOOCOOOOMf
A Poem
MR. EDITOR: jj
$
Babe, bom of mother, seeks to satisfy
An appetite, stomach desire, the need to be dry
Howling in irritating noise |
His mother his best of toys j>
Still his passion is easy to satisfy >
The child of men seeks status among friends
v;
Does willing help as means to obtain ends |:
Disregards his homey succor jj:
To be a boyhood friended lucker
for food, clothes and peers he !;
freely fends
Yesteryears status greatly magnified
As adolescence fire is slowly set aside
Free agencys adult world ij
Before the terranaut is unfurled ;!
With doors wide open and the strings untied
Many grow mature intellectually bright jj
Others grow adults-only-six-feet-in-height ;j
With brains, little sense
Want dollars, not cents
But saturation of every possible appetite
Thus, surely sex is completely "adult
You worship it privately, or join free loves cult
Hold it Tight, tell it about
Whisper crass stories, join in a shout
Then in the fleshpots yourself basely exult
Maturity greater than sex, status, selfish demand
Or doing, proclaiming all thats in your command
Is tendered restraint
For mankinds complaint
Not blowing your horn in any old band
The toys of big boys is sex, and new ways
To deify some virtues but others allay
Seeing not the needs
To sort out the seeds
Which destroyed nations who lived other days
No greater feeling for energy spent
No need for dismay nor cause for repent
THAN FACULTIES UNFOLDED
TRUE MANHOOD WELL MOLDED- .<
Then, go forth in strength tfll injustices are rent :j
JOHN HAL JOHNSON |
DEPARIim|ITOFjroODSCII^C^_J

Of The Times

No Alligator -- No Smile

MR. EDITOR:
Many students, especially the
new ones and the ones interested
in the field of Journalism,
probably wonder what makes
your publication Americas
Number 1 College Daily. I have
been wondering myself ever
since I enrolled at this
university. Everyday I look for
the newspaper like everyone
else. I enjoy reading it and I
believe it has a great quality.
Even though I am not an

Can Thought Be Potentially Evil?

MR. EDITOR:
I am told by Mr. Sherman
and Mr. Primack that
individualism holds a great
potential for evil. Surely such
a serious charge demands
evidence to support it? At the
risk of being called a Satanist, I
would like to point out that
simply saying an idea is
intellectually and morally
bankrupt or that it shows an
abysmal lack of information and
reflection without saying why
is asking the reader to suspend
his critical faculties and accept
the authority of the best
thinkers (whoever they are) on
faith.
Why does individualism hold
a great potential for evil? Is it
potentially evil to think that
men are born free? That the
rights to life, liberty, and the


s /
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expert in the field, I believe that
our newspaper has one of the
best writing staffs. What Id like
to point out though, is the fact
that students by their support
and loyalty to the Florida
Alligator contribute a great deal
to make this daily great.
I noticed today that the
newspaper was not published the
emptiness felt by many students
as they went by the usual places
of distribution and could not
find it. 1 saw the expression on

pursuit of happiness are based in
mans nature, and are not gold
stars granted by the State for
obedience? That it is the
function of a government to
protect these rights, not to
collect them?
Is it potentially evil to think
that rights do not multiply?
That 100 men do not have more
rights than one man? That credit
for the false dichotomy**
between ,an individual and a
group of individuals should* be
given to collectives which says
that 100 men acquire a mystical
sanction for whatever they wish
to do that supercedes the rights
of the individual they wish to do
it to?
Is it potentially evil to think
that you should live with other
men, but not for them? That
freedom is the first conditioit for

Tuesday, November 5, 1968, Tht Florida AHigator.

their faces. It was as if
something was missing. A great
disappointment. When you have
a reaction like this, I think that
you can safely infer that you
have a great newspaper.
To me, your newspaper has
become part of my daily life. I
look forward to reading the
newspaper every morning from
Monday to Friday. My question
has been answered. I know now
why The Florida Alligator is
number 1.
P.E. CACERES, 2UC

brotherhood, because without it
you are both societys slave and
your brothers keeper? Is it
potentially evil to think that the
only obligation you owe other
men is respect for their
individual rights?
What, precisely, is it
potentially evil to think?
CAROL PFRLEY
i
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 5, 1968

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

WHITE HOUSE FELLOW
APPLICATIONS must be
received in Washington, D.C., by
Jan. 3, 1969. Young faculty
members are urged to apply to
the Commission on White House
Fellows, The White House, for
more detailed information. The
program selects 15 to 20 young
men and women to serve for a
year as special assistants to
cabinet officers, the vice
president and members of the
White House staff. The White
House Fellow's year begins
around the first of September
and extends through August of
the following year.
PRE-MEDICAL & PRE-DENTAL
STUDENTS: Dr. Gaorga T. Laws
from tha Univanity of Miami School
of Madicine will ba on tha UF
campus to intsrviaw applicants and
interested students beginning
Tuesday, Nov. 12, through Friday,
Nov. 16. Students should make an
appointment with tha
Pre-Professional Office in Room 3
Anderson Hall to talk with Dr. Lewis.
PROGRESS TESTS: All students
in the respective courses are required
to take the following tests. Students
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and
will ba required to use their Social
Security Number.
CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Nov. 6,7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B)
report to Peabody 1, 2,4, 5, 7,10, or
11; (C) to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little
113, 121, or 125; (F) to Little 201,
203, 205, or 207; (G) to Peabody
101, 102, 112, or 114; (H) to
Peabody 201, 202, 205, or 208; (l-J)
to Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
202, 211, or 213; (L) to Little 213,
215, 217, or 219; 223. 225, 227, 233, 235. 237, or
239; (N-O) to Anderson 104,112, or
115; (P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; (R)
to Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101 or
109; (W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 143 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Nov. 6, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Matherly 2,3,
4, 5. 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,13,14, or
16; (M-Z) to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119.
CEH 131 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Nov. 5, at 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to

Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance ---*
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement ~ ~
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours : 800 cun. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday IBr

Peabody 1, 2. 4, 6. 7, 10, or 11; (C>
to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121, or 125; (F) to Little 201. 203,
205, or 207; (G) to Peabody 101,
102, 112, or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205, or 208; (l-J) to Flint
110 or 112; (K) to Walker 202,211,
or 213; (L) to Little 213, 215, 217,
or 219; (M) to Little 221, 223. 225.
227, 233, 235, 237, or 239; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 112, or 115; (P-Q) to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) to Floyd 108;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.

Sign-up sheets are potted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
NOV. 5: ERNST & ERNST,
CPA, Acctg, law. SHELL
COMPANIES ~ Engr. & science
BELL SYSTEM Group
meeting, 5 p.m. SAV-A-STOP,
INC. ~ Acctg. SOUTHWIRE SOUTHWIRE-ME,
-ME, SOUTHWIRE-ME, IE, EE. INTERNATIONAL
T&T CORP. EE, IE, ChE,
Chem. PROCTER & GAMBLE
CO.- PhD, Post Doc. research in
chem.
NOV. 5-6: BELL SYSTEM
Eng. Math, Physics, Bus. Ad.
UNION CAMP All engr. Acct,
Forestry.
NOV. 6: NAVAL SHIPS
RESEARCH & DEVELOP DEVELOPMENT
MENT DEVELOPMENT CENTER Eng. EE, ME,
CE, ASE, Phy, Math,
Oceanographers, Naval
architects. REPUBLIC STEEL
CORP. EE, ME, ChE, MetE.

H Excited?

A

BLUB BULLETIN

Placement Interviews

MS 204 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Nov. 7,7 p.m., in
Walker Auditorium.
CEH 132 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Nov. 5, at 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5,6,7,8,
9, 10, 11, 12,13,14, or 16; (M-Z) to
Matherly 102, 106, 108, 112, 113,
114,115,116,117,118, or 119.

PRATT & WHITNEY
AIRCRAFT AE, ChE, CE,
Eng. Sci, ME, MetE, Chem, Phy,
Math, IE. THE FIRST
NATIONAL BANK OF TAMPA
- Bus. Ad. RETAIL CREDIT
CO. Bus. Ad.
NOV. 6,7 & 8: UNION
CARBIDE CORP. Chem. Phys.
Math & Stat. ChE, EE, ME,
MetE, NuE&Eng. Mech.
NOV.7: GENERAL MILLS,
INC. Bus. Ad. Mkt. FLORIDA
STATE ROAD DEPT. CE
SAUTER LABORATORIES,
INC. Bus. Ad. WORTHING WORTHINGTON
TON WORTHINGTON CORP. ME. IE, ChE.
BETHLEHEIM STEEL CORP.
All Eng, Lib Arts.
CONTINENTAL OIL CO.
ChE. EASTMEN KODAK CO.
ChE, ME, IE, EE, Chem,
Physics, Bus. Ad. AMERICAN
OIL CO. AMCO CHEMICAL
ME, CE, ChE. FORD MOTOR
CO. ME, Eng. Mech. MBA
with tech, undergraduate degree
in ME, EE, IE, ChE, MetE,
Chem. TENNESSEE EASTMAN
CO. IE, ME, ChE, EE, Math.
Stat, Acct. Chem.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, November 5,1968
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Music Dept., Children's Concert with
Symphony Orchestra, University
Aud., 10:00 a.m.
La Cerde Francais, (French Club),
Informal Coffee Hour, 150 B
Union, 2:00 p.m.
Program Office, Children's Ballet,
Tap 8i Modem Dance Lessons, C-4
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Florida Cicerones Cabinet Meeting,
123 Union, 4:30 p.m.
Program Office, Bridge Lessons, 150
C, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi. 347,355 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Supper Club Meeting, Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 pjn.
Program Office, Beginning Oil, C-4
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Program Office, Charm Classss, 363
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, November 6
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Unitarian Student Forum Lunch, 150
C Union, 11:30 a.m.
English Dept., Annual Tea for
Graduate Students, E. Gallery,
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Program Office, Children's Tap,
Ballet & Modem Dance Lessons,
C-4 Union, 4:00 p.m.
Phi Delta Kappa Open Forum:
"Participatory Democracy",
Speaker: Caroline S. Griffis, NRN
Aud., 4:15 p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Fla. Gym, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society, Union
347, 7:00 p.m.
Program Office, Motion Picture
Technique, C-4 Union, 7:00 p.m.
International Circle K, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Benton Engineering Council Business
Meeting, 355 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium Lecture,
Colloquium room. College
Library, 8:00 p.m.
Council Honor Society Meeting, 150
F & G Union, 8:00 p.m.
SGP: "MANTOVANI", Florida Gym,
8:15 n.m.

Thursday, November 7
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Presbyterian Univ. Student Center
Meeting, 357 Union, 10:00 a.m.
Program Office, Spanish
Conversation, 150 B Union, 12:00
noon.
Poetry Reading, Works of Major
British & American Poets, 122
Union, 4:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organization, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Business Meeting, 118
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Arnold Air Society, Military Bldg.,
7:30 p.m.
Semper Fidel is Meeting. 363 Union,
7:30 pm
Program Office, Water Colors, C-4
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Executive Meeting,
150 G, 7:30 p.m.
Football Film, Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
SDS-SSOC. 347 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Friday, November 8
Seminole Portrait Photography, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Football Film, 150 C & D. 12:00
noon.
Union Movie, "Darling". Union Aud.,
5:00,7:00 8.9:15 p.m.
Chess Club, 118 Union, 6:30 p.m.
Chess Tournament, 118 Union, 6:30
p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Fla. Gym, 7:00 p.m.
Santa Fe Junior College Vest Pocket
Players. 3-act comedy, "Marriage
Wheel" SFJC Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing, 214 Fla. Gym,
8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the SGP:
"MANTOVANI", $2.50, $1.50
and SI.OO, the Florida Cinema
Society, $1.50 per person, and the
Fine Arts Production,
"OTHELLO", $2.00, $1.50 and
SI.OO. Tickets are also on sale for
the Florida Players Production,
"SGT. MUSGRAVE'S DANCE",
$1.50, $.75 and $.25, and for the
SFJC Presentation, "MARRIAGE
WHEEL", students $.50, all others
SI.OO.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
V V
Yamaha 1967 60cc. One owner,
excellent condition. Helmet & tools
included. Low mileage. SIBO. Call
K arl at 378-7661. (A-st-28-p)
Ex-Yamaha mechanic must sell own
1968 Yamaha 350. Kept in perfect
condition. Only 4300 miles. Call
372-0009 after 5:30. (A-st-28-p)
Rest your feet, Vespa 125 cc, best
buy for money, starts easy, 55 to 60
mph. Excellent running shape, call
Russ at 378-9710 after 3:00 p.m.
SIOO. (A-st-28-p)
Are you a woman who wants to
increase your bustline or firm up and
support your heavy bosom?
SYMBRAETTE custom fitted
lingerie is now being introduced to
Gainesville. Call 378-7811, 376-7387.
(A-st-28-p)
1962 Austin Healy 3000 MK2
Excellent condition. Complete
overhaul with removable hardtop.
SIIOO.OO or offer. Call Glenn at
481-2769 after 5 p.m. (A-3t-31-p)
1968 Bultaco racing motorcycle,
125 cc Sherpa. & 3-bike trailer. Buy
both for only $550. Call 372-3947.
Also 1966 Honda 50. $125.
(A-3t-31-p)
Camera, pacemaker 4x5 Speed
Graphic. Film holders, pack adapters,
hangers & trays. 2 flash & 1 slave.
Solenoid release. $250. 378-0159 or
378-7124. (A-st-31-p)
FOR SALE: 1966 Honda S-90. New
brakes! Just rewired the electrical
system! Inspected! Call 378-8893
after 4:30 p.m. (A-3t-31-p)
HONDA 50 4000 miles electric
starter Excellent shape S9O or best
offer. Also extra tough visored
helmet sl2. Call Mickey 378-5744 or
372-9479. (A-st-32-p)
3 bdrm, 2 bath, dng 7 utility rms,
screened porch, air-c. unit, tool shed,
washer, refrig, carpeted, %113 a mo,
SISOO down, 1611 NE 19th Lane,
372-2 722, near elem & jr-hi.
fA-10t-32-p)
Trailer Bx4o. Perfect for young
couple. Completely carpeted, new
appliances, AC, 10x20 cabana.
Completely furnished. Asking SI4OO.
Call 376-7637 after 4:30 p.m.
(A-3t-31-p)
:..\v;x*x.x.;.;^.H.VSSSSSXXvX*X*x*x*x-v.v.*.
FOR RENT
v v
: ; :X'X*x>x*x-x*xax.s%v.sx;*x\'*x-x*x*x*x CAMELOT APARTMENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
<6-25-20t-p)
House trailer 1 bdr., furnished. $55
mo. Will move to any park. Call R.
Schmidt, 376-9914 or 376-0285 or
write Box 356 JHM Health Ctr.
(B-4t-30-p)
Furn Downstairs Apt. 2 br. Air Cond.
h, 3 '' after 5:30 378-7845.
vd-32-TF-c)
Modern 2 bedroom, carpet, Air
conditioned, furnished apt. Couple or
2 graduate students only. Call
376-5828. (B-st-23-p)
WANTED
Will pay sl4 f or two gen> admission
tickets to Georgia game. Call Cheryl,
378-1502, room 1301. (C-st-30-p)
WANTED: One set of 1968 Dodge or
Plymouth mag wheels. Call Tom
376-3424. (C-3t-30-p)
Need 1 male roommate. Share 1 or.
summit House Apt. Call Managers
Office anytime before 6 p.m. at
376-9668. (C-st-31-p)
Eng-sg needs a place to live for at
east rest of term. Desire a separate
mom. Require a place to sleep. Leave
message at 372-3475. (C3t-32-p)

There are a limited
number of 1968
Seminoles for Sale.
Just $5. Come by Rm. 330
_ Reitz Student Union

HELP WANTED I
f L '?n s want ed Wii; pay si. so
P o n r n if t hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson
Umv. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-c)
qual,f, ed SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
Is£'nt 9 a i an o ther secrotaria skills
o Per T anent i b excellent
r£ 0t app,y un, ess well
378 ?n e 376 9950 Clays or
3/8-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)
Engineering student; maintenance
work, apply Ramada Inn, will fix
hours to fit class schedule, ask for
Col. Krause before 4 p.m. (E-3t-30-p)
Women Girls: Telephone & survey
work part time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue
upstairs. Offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
SECRETARY to work 12-5 p.m. and
6-9 p.m. Five days a week pays $1.50
hr. Non student preferred. Apply
Student Publications, Reitz Union
before 12:00. (E-2t-32-c)
AUTOS
v y,
!*>X*XX*X*X*NS*X X*X*X£viX*SNXX*X X*I*XXV
1965 Alfa Romeo Sedan. 5-speed,
Pirellis radio, reclining seats, heater,
disc brakes. SBOO or best offer.
372-8818. (G-st-29-p)
Plymouth Wagon 1959. Power brakes
and steering, inspected. S3OO. Phone
372-9860 after 5:90 p.m. or
weekend. (G-st-18-p)
MGB 64 A Superb driving machine.
Clean & in good shape. R&H. Must
sell. $1175. Way below market.
Come by and test drive. 378-6917.
(G-st-29-p)
1960 Pontiac Ventura 4-door
hardtop automatic transmission. In
excellent condition, reliable,
inexpensive transportation. $325 Call
376-9034. (G-st-31-p)
1957 Chevy six, 4-door, new muffler,
oil change, R&H, smells nice, S2OO.
1216 S.W. 2nd Ave. Apt. 1.
372-7111. (G-2t-31-p)
XKE 1967, excellent Ondioon. All
accessories, except air. Best offer
over $4450. Terms available. Call
378-6654 weekdays after 6 p.m.; Sat.
and Sun. after 12. (G-st-28-p)
1965 Alfa Romeo 1600 veloce race
car. scca prodified, limited slip
complete spare 512 rear street
equipment included. $2,000. 4030
Ortega Blvd., Jax, Fla. 904 388-3030.
(G-4t-31-p)
1967 MG Midget, radio, heater, wire
wheels, luggage rack. Excellent cond.
$1650 or best offer. 378-1219 after 6
p.m. (G-st-28-p)
v.*"Nv. xvx*x x X"X*x x*x*x-r-x-x-x-x.v..-... >
PERSONAL
.s.v.vxy:-x*x*x-x.vx x x*x*x*x.vx x-x*x<-!
Dear Rachel Baby, I am sorry I
missed you last night but you know
how busy Anthonys is. Please,
another chance and at lunch. Love
Marvin. (J-st-28-p)
Sweet Lovable Bob, please forgive
me. You should have told me that
those cute little escargots they serve
at Anthonys were snails. Liz.
(J-st-28-p)
Need an ant eatef? Baby ocelot?
Penguin? How about snakes, owls, or
a Ceratophrys calcarata? Call the
Underground Zoo, 378-8810.
(J-st-2 8-p)
Would like to hear from
non- p r o fessionals who have
experienced encounter, marathon,
sensitivity or T groups, and who
would share their opinions positive
and/or negative. Call C.W. Duncan,
ext. 2370, 2003 or 2004. (J-st-29-p)

Tuesday, November 5. 1968, The Florida Alligator,
.......

I PERSONAL I
:-:->:*;-x-x.x.:.ss-xv.x*xx*x-x.x.x^v.Nvx*.w>:-
Sheila Happy Ist anniversary with
more to come. Love and kisses
always Allen. (J-lt-32-p)
ATTENTION GATORS! WDVH 980
on your dial, has a MISSION for you,
which is not IMPOSSIBLE. The
WDVH GOOD GUYS have hidden
the KEYS to a 1969 FORD
MUSTANG FASTBACK somewhere
in the Gainesville area. YOUR
MISSION, should you accept it, is to
find the KEYS and CLAIM the
MUSTANG valued at $3,004. CLUES
are given HOURLY on WDVH 980.
Good Luck. (J-3t-31-c)
~ : *x*:*x-xav.vv.v.v;*x, x y:-:*;*x-x, x -x*x.v.v.:.;
I LOST & FOUND I
A
w.vv.sy.y^.y.y.v.v..vv.'.v.v.vWl'KvXM
LOST: black wallet near new library.
Ten dollars reward for return to
Anthony Martinich. Address:
Georgetown Apts., no. 74.
(L-3t-29-p)
LOST: black prescription sunglasses
in flowered case. Needed badly. Call
378-9035 Reward. (L-3t-31-p)
Lost: red miniature dachshund pup
last seen outside Williamsburg Apt.
56. Desperate, dog not mine.
REWARD. Call 378-5534.
(L-3t-30-p)
FOUND: Small mens ring, at
apartments behind University City
Bank. Call 376-6072, ask for Susan,
to identify. (L-3t-32-p)
FOUND: Girls w.ch. Grove parking
lot, Wed. morning. Call 378-5809.
(L-3t-30-nc)
Red Wallet lost at Med Center
library. Keep money. Please return to
Jennings Hall Desk. (L-4t-30-p)
SERVICES
j ..v.v.v.v.sv.v.y &
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-tf-c'

1
m 378-243^^1lllll|^^^B
w "|i v JB.
f |l
|||| ,& "a I /ili RH -g- J|
esxS£&. M f 1 k k I ] 1
I TONY CURTIS HENRY FONDA GEORGE KENNEDY I
jj .oV****lC |j
I Mike Kellin Murray Hamilton Robert Fryer Richard Fleischer Edward Anhalt Geroid Frank
Panavision Color by OeLuxe Suggested for Mature Audiences
I mf.'i.miUtiiMKr-'m i a 111113 smnsl
MO- 4:15- 6:50-9:20 >#

Page 11

i *x*x-x.v.v.v.v;vx x*xx*xx*v.vs*x*;*x*x.j.
I SERVICES 1
A s
i; x:*>x*xx.v.v.*; x*x*x*xxv. ;*x x x*Mo>v
Charcoal portrait sketches- 16x20,
matted. SIO.OO. For appointment
call Connie 378=0659. (M-32-st-p)
Buy, Sell, or trade used articles.
Confidential loans our specialty. A to
Z Pawn Shop 378-5575. 1326 E.
University Ave- (M-st-28-p)
Need kerosine or fuel oil? Good
credit means no payment till
December. Call United Fuel Oil,
378-5333. (M-30-st-c)
G General Audiences
M Mature Audiences
(Parent's Discretion)
R Restricted (under 16 must be
accompanied by adult guardian or
parent)
X Under 16 not admitted.
H A f nrfVtr unosrflllfTMlif H
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Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, TuasJay, November 5, 1968

Coaching Changes
Stir UF Practice

Ray Graves put the Auburn
defeat behind him Monday, and
began a climb back into the
victory column this weekend.
The newest effort has
brought changes in the coaching
staff yesterday found Gene
Ellenson coaching the offensive
squad, and Ed Kensler, the
defense.
The turnabout of positions
was described by Graves as only
a challenge to the staff.
These are only changes
which I am looking over,
commented Graves. They are
internal, and only that. The
coaches still coach, the players
still play, and I still make the big
decisions.
On the Gator practice field,
two players returned who had not
been present for a full week.
Larry Smith and Jim Hadley,
both appeared at full speed in
the unusually heavy Monday
practice.
However, big tight end JJim
Yarbrough, badly bruised in the
Auburn game, limped as he went
through a less strenuous
practice.
Both legs feel like theyre
going to fall off," was
Yarbroughs commentary before
the game last week, and his feelings
would seem no less anguished on
the first day of practice
yesterday.
"Yarbrough is the most
seriously injured of the team,
explained Graves, but he will
be in shape for play this
weekend. I dont have to say
how badly we will need him.
A big relief was in the
physicians report on Jackie
Eckdahl. The junior quarterback
went out of the game Saturday
on a toe fracture.
Eckdahl was given a clean bill
of health. The toe fracture
turned out to be very minor, and
as a result, Eckdahl will be in the

Teps Win Volleyball,
Beta, Chi Phi In Lead

Tau Epsilon Phi, overcame its customary early game jitters and proceeded to
storm over defending champion and heavily favored Sigma Nu to win
the Orange League volleyball title 15-12,15-9 last week.
The TEPs, playing their finest game of the campaign, were
extremely effective in setting up spikers Rick Perillo and Craig Savage.
At times, it appeared that Sigma Nu all-campus spiker Jim Strickland
and set-up man Chuck Schaeffer were pitted alone against the TEPs as
the rest of the Sigma Nu team continually made mistakes.
The first game was close as the teams rarely got more than two
points apart. Foreign student Tim Culbertson got the Nus rolling
early with some fine spiking.
The TEPs set-up men Shelly Finman, Danny Melker. and Stu
Goodman never allowed the Nus to draw too far ahead.
The nucleus of the TEP team came from last years team that
managed to win only one game. The addition of Finman and 64
Barry Goldwater gave them the additional solidarity and height they
needed to win. Not one TEP spike went into the net.
In the Blue League championship, Chi Phi won and became the
league leader as they overcame a strong Phi Tau team to win 3-15,
15-13,15-12.
Steve Kaufman and Bruce Weeks provided the spark to take the Chi
Phis to victory. Andy Mintz and Ken Fowle were outstanding for the
Phi Taus.

ORANGE LEAGUE STANDING
BTP 260 PKP 120
TEP 205 PKA 120
PDT 192 KS 105
ATO 190 IM 103
SN 180 KA 100
SX 163
AEP 145
SPE 140
PUP 140
DTD 133
SAE 125
. ( iI { ; t )*t > £
< 1 1 n ; i l ;i 1

number one slot this weekend.
Perhaps the biggest asset the
team will have this week is
morale. Graves counts this big in
his arsenal, and expects it to be a
major influence on Saturdays
game.
Im not worrying about
morale this week, said Graves.
The team is taking care of that
for me. Theyve been getting
ready for this game all year.
If there is a morale dimmer, it
is a flurry of constant rumors
over either a pending resignation
by Graves, or his dismissal by
President Stephen C. OConnell.
This is something Ive been
hearing for a month, and I want
to get it off my chest, said
Graves.
I have a coaching contract
here which is good until 1970,
or until I decide to renege on it. I
dont intend to resign.
When I came here eight
years ago, 1 promised this school
a lot to be happy about, but also
a lot to cry about. Now, people
see we aren't winning, and
theyre looking for a reason. I
seem to be that reason.
Graves was not the only vocal
objector to the spreading
rumors. O'Coi nell also issued a
statement on his support for
Graves decisions.
There is no basis, in my
judgement, for attacking either
Graves or his team. Both are the
hardest fighters I have ever
seen, said OConnell.
Both have my fullest
encouragement. I would, and I
intend to, disregard any cry
from any source which is
intended to demean Coach
Graves.
This is a poor time, before
the end of the season, to talk of
abandoning the ship. Such talk
can only serve to hurt the
team.

BLUE LEAGUE STANDING
XP 275
PGD 220
TX 202
PKT 189
DX 188 ,
DSP 157
TKE 146
DU 140
AGR 138
PKPsi 109
PEP 100
, ... pV
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